(navigation image)
Home American Libraries | Canadian Libraries | Universal Library | Community Texts | Project Gutenberg | Children's Library | Biodiversity Heritage Library | Additional Collections
Search: Advanced Search
Anonymous User (login or join us)
Upload
See other formats

Full text of "Kansas State collegian"



Exp. M» oam 

•Kansas St -te Historical Saietv 
Newspaper Section 



.^v^. 




tinsns kS'livlc 



V^OLLEGIAN 



ALTERNATIVES 
FOR SINGLES 




Weekend boles 
atalemativ« 
places to find 
dates and 
wtiy pickup 
Inesdanlwak. 

17 




UNWERSTTY / MMIHArnUli MRUS 



Ua-UM Admrtlting - Sai-SUO 




.ColleQian 

TsUng a IttW p^repcctiva cm rodeoSi Brian Oultmcler, Mnlor In construction utoncs and manajiomant, takas a wtid backward steer 
ride during the intramural rodeo Ttiuraday evening In Weber Arena. 

5 events teBlured in 1 st intramural radeo 



It was a human stampede, with 
2 1 contestants chasing after, nine 
steers. 

The first Intramural Rodeo was 
sponsored by the K-Staie Rodeo 
team Thursday night in Weber 
Arena. 

Chris Larson, freshman in ani- 
mal science and industry, and 
Chad Yost, sophoinore in animal 
scierKC and industry, won the first 
division of the Intramural Rodeo: 
team roping. 

Larson and Yost chased a steer 



Exceptional 
adults watch 
rodeo team 
rope Y ride 



on fool and were the first team to 
successfully rope the animal's 
head and two back legs. 

"It sounded like a lot of fun," 
Yost said. "We got a team togeth- 
er to see what we could do." 

Twelve teams competed in the 
five rodeo events. Teams consist- 
ed of four men and two women. 
No horses or equipment were 
needed to compete, so anyone was 
able to enter. 

"Hopefully, this will be the 
first annual Intramural Rodeo," 
said Dan Suderman, senior in ani- 
mal science and industry and prcs- 

ITAClYtUOlW 

CdUcfiin 

Weber Arena was filled with 
bright eyes and big smiles 
Thursday evening as a crowd of 
more than 100 people watched the 
K-State rodeo team. 

Members of the K-Slale rodeo 
team participated in an 
Exceptional Rodeo as the resi- 
dents of Big Lakes Development 
Center Inc. and the Kansas 
Neurological Institute watched on 
the sidelines. 

About 60 physically and men- 
tally handicapped adults fn^m Big 



idem of the Rodeo Club. 

Jimmy White, senior in animal 
science and industry and vice 
president of the Rodeo Club, sug- 
gested the idea of the rodeo. 

"I transferred here from Fort 
Hays State University, and we did 
it there. It was very popular," he 
said. 

While said he thought the 
rodeo would make the Rodeo 
Club more visible on campus. 

"When I transferred, I noticed 
not a lot of the college knows we 
are here. We are literally unheard 
of." he said. "I thought it would be 

Lakes and about 35 from the 
Kansas Neurological Institute 
attended the rodeo. 

The program has been going on 
for more than five years, said Dan 
Suderman, Rodeo Club president 
and senior in animal sciences and 
industries. 

Patty Roark, Big Lakes com- 
munity living adviser, said the res- 
idents enjoy the interaction with 
rodeo-team members and watch- 
ing the events. 

"They were really looking for- 
ward to it. They've been talking 
about it all week," she said. 



a good way to get the rest of the 
college involved and let them 
have a good lime with us." 

The five events were calf tying, 
team roping, goat tying, barrel 
racing and steer riding. 

Each team paid a SIO entry fee 
plus St per event, Suderman said. 

Pissed Off Cowboys was the 
winning team and received a $60 
Jackpot. 

Team members were Karen 
Moorman, junior in animal sci- 
ence and industry, Becky Molzen, 

■ See STUDENTS Page 10 

The reception from the team 
members was wonderful, Roark 
said. 

"They met us at the vans and 
walked us to the arena. They have 
been great," she said. "They make 
them feel real special." she said. 

Amy Kinney, Kansas Neur- 
ological Institute activities therapy 
technician, said some of the resi- 
dents know what is going on and 
Just enjoy watching the rodeo. For 
others, she said, all the visual 
sights and sounds are wonderful 

■ See MUSCULAR Page 10 



► STUDENT SENATE 



UFM salaries allocation passes 



utt 



Colkfian 

Student Senate finished semester 
allocations to campus organizations 
Thursday nighl by giving UFM half 
the money it had requested 

However, the K -State administra- 
tion has agreed to contribute the por- 
tion of the money thai Senate cut 
from its allocation to UFM this year. 

Patrick Camey, arts and sciences 
senator, introduced an amendment 
Feb. 7 dial would have cut $10,350 in 
Senate funding for UFM salaries. 
Senate voted Thursday to allocate 
UFM $4,350 for salari^, 

Camey received a commitment 
from the administration to pay more 
than half of UFM salaries next year, 
and the bill was again brought before 
Senate. 

Phil Anderson, faculty representa- 
tive to Senate, said UFM was an 
impoftani part of this campus, and it 
should receive its full amount for 
salaries fram Senate. 

Carrie Bdelman, agriculture sena- 



tor, expressed concern thai additional 
funding for UFM would only be 
available next year. 

Senate sets precedents when fund- 
ing groups, and it would be more dif- 
ficult to add to next year's UFM bud- 
get. Edelman said. 

Trent LeDoux, agriculture senator, 
said Senate should save money this 
year by accepting the administration's 
offer and funding UFM completely 
when it comes up for allocations 
again. 

UFM had requested $13,000, and 
the Allocations Committee had rec- 
ommended $ 1 1.700. 

Senate's final allocation to UFM 
was $5,700, which included funding 
for salaries, postage, printing and hon- 
orariums. 

While UFM was of interest to 
many senators, the bulk of the 
evening was spent on allocations to 
International Coordinating Council. 

Nine student organizations in the 
ICC received funding. The groups 

■ See STUDENT Page 10 



m&a 




thtottgh comimiiiity service 



FINANCIAL 
AID DEADLINE 

"nie pnor% deadline lyfnancial 
assislancelsMarcM. 
Appllcatjons are 
available in 
FairchiW 104, 




FRIDAY- 

HIOH LOW 

58 37 

sunny 

WEATHER — PAQE 3 



MA 



WmMHW/HUMBEBIOT 

Flnt copy Itm. AddHiwul tutim tn 38 ctnti. 



6 will remain after 
Tuesday's primary 



C^ul legion 

Thii U ike tecoad story In a tkrtt'part itriti about Ihi 
candidalnfot city commUsion, 

Eight Manhattan citizens want to be on the 
city commission. 

With only three open spots, the field will have 
to be narrowed. 

The primary election will be Tuesday, when 
voters will be asked to chcx>se their top three 
choices. 

The winning six candidales will try for the 
three available positions in the general election 
April 4. 

mVEHALL 

The public has the final vote, Steve Hall said. 

"I support economic development for our 
community. However, before any money is spent 




ISeeCANDIDATESPagelO 



Technology, motivation 
debated in USD 383 race 



KMSTIN MUOKTON 



College in 

This ii th* ttcend story in a ikrtt'part strits about 
Iht candidat§t for laanhatttut-Ogdiit USD 3»3 School 
Board. 

Matters of motivation, parental involvement 
and lechnologicai issues arc topics of discus- 
sion for candidates for the Manhattan-Ogden 
USD 383 School Board. 

jOLnNHai 

Jiilt'en Hill, an incumbent finishing her sec- 
ond term, is a pasi board president and vice 
president and a KStale graduate. 

She has three grown children who all attend- 
ed Manhattan schools. 




ISeeBOARDPagelO 



News Digest 



►STATE UNIVERSITIES MAY LOSE MILLIONS 



TOPEKA (AP) — Decreas-tng 

enrollments and increasing costs 
at slate universities prompted a 
committee Thursday to remove 
$6 million in proposed spending 
tor the Kansas Board of Regents 
system. 

The htouse Appropriations 
Committee endorsed a proposal 
to cut 0,8 percen! from Gov Bit! 
Graves' recommended general- 
use budgets (or all six regents 
institutions for the fiscal year 
1996, which begins July 1, 

Rep, Kenny Wilk, R-Lansing, 
sakj the cuts sent a message to 
universities to ease spending. 

The committee had originalfy 
endorsed a $5.7-mJllion reduction 
based on each school's tuition 
shortfalls. Under that proposal, 



the UnwefSity o( Kansas woukJ 
have faced $3 4 million in cuts, 
and K-State woukt have suffered 
the second-largest cut, $1 million. 

Under the new proposal, KU'S 
cuts are $1 .5 million, while K- 
State and Wichita State 
Unrverstty face larger aits. 

One of the most important 
budget decisions legislators make 
each year is how much money to 
Spend on state universities. 

fleg-ents inslitu lions account 
Ibrl3.7 percent of all tax dollars 
spent. 

Conservatives want to remove 
$100 miltbn from Graves' budget 
proposals to permit large tax cuts. 
To meet their goals, they wouW 
have had to remove $137 mitlioo 
from tl>a regents budget. 



AWHIHAZ LTT ^_____^ 

Coikfiln 

As a college student in 1966, Anne Butler, interim 
director of women's studies, read a book that 
changed her life. 

"'Coming of Age in Mississippi* was written by 
Anne Moody, a woman who was active in the civil- 
rights movement in the rural South," Butler said. 

"Reading about her life changed my life because I 
realized everyone can do something for change no 
matter where they arc." 

Butler was a student at Eastern Kentucky 
University during the late l%Os. She said she would 
describe her involvement in the social change of this 
lime period as grassroots participation. 

"There had been several racial incidents at Eastern 
the year before 1 came to school," Butler said. "As a 
student, I became involved in community -service 
activities as a way to forge ties between the universi- 
ty aiMl the community, which was predominantly 
white." 

■ SeeFACULTYPa«elO 




■HANI KCYMIVCoUeOiltr^ 

Anne Butler, Inlarim dlr«clor of wom«rt't studies, was In school after the passing 
of civll-rfghts legislation. She tried to help (org* ties between Eastern Kentucky 
University and the surrounding community. 



vC- 



Friday^ February 24, 19M 



KANSAS STOI COLLEGIAN 




News briefs 



^ TRIO PROGRAMS HELP DtSADVAHTAQED STUDENTS PREPARE FOR FUTURE 



students who coma from low* 
lf»oofF» backgrounds and h«v» par* 
•fits wittKHil a cottage education are 
excelling in high schoola and gradu- 
ating Irom untversities nationMrtde. 

Because ot the federal ly funded 
Trio programs, which were eatab- 
Itohtd by Congress in 1965, dlead- 
vwnlaged students are now prepar- 
ing themselves for the future. 

Kathy Greene, diraclor of 
Educational Support San/lces, said 
1 ,750 programs have been set up 
across the nation, and 700,000 stu- 
dents are involved each year. 

'Histortcatly, the Trio programs 
provide educational opportunities,* 
said Lora Boyer, assistant director 
and coordinator ot Upwaid Bound 

The idea is that it you increase 
the educational level, you increase 
the chance to get out ol the pover- 
ty,' Boyer said. 

The programs, which Include 
Upward Bound, Student Support 
Services and Talent Search, were 
started al K State In 1974. 



Upward Bound is a program 
designed to help high-school stu- 
dents to stay and suex»ed in schooi. 

Boyer said die program advises 
72 high-school students in the 
Manhattan, Riley, Rock Creek and 
Junction City area. 

'Over 90 percent of the partici- 
pants who graduate choose to 
alterxJ school," Boyer said. 

"I reel very positive about the 
program. It helps a great deal,' she 
satd. 

Boyer said Upward Bound helps 
students Ntl out college applications 
and provides a tutoring program. 

To appty (or the Trio programs, 
students must meet federal tow- 
income guidelines, have learning or 
physical disabilities or be the first 
generation in their (amity to go to 
college. 

Educational Support Services, 
the other existing program at K- 
Stale, works to advise undergradu- 
ates while they are attending the 
University. 



Greene said the Trio programs 
are valuable to the American educa- 
tion system. 

"Without these types of support 
programs, students at these levels 
would rtever be able to gel a college 
degree,' Greene said. 

To celebrate the creation of the 
Trio programs, a National Trio Day 
was declared on Feb. 25. 

Univarstties across the country 
are organizir>g open tiouses, assign- 
ing guest speakers and setting up 
information tattles, Greene said. 

This year. Educational Support 
Services has invited students who 
are involved in thte Trio programs at 
K -Stale to a reception, which will be 
at 10 a.m. today at Hoiton Hall. 

^a want to celebrale it to high- 
light our success record,* Greene 
sakl. 

'We've bean around tor a long 
time, and we want people to know 
about us," she said. 



►CASINO NIGHT, BALLROOM BLITZ WILL ROUND OUT 
CIRCLE K DISTRICT CONVENTION THIS WEEKEND 



K-Slate's Circle K International 
chapter will be host to the Kansas 
District Convontkin this weekend 

Snehai Bhakta. president ot 
Circle K International at K-State, 
said he sKpecis 50 people from dif- 
tereni colleges in Kansas to attend 
the convention. 

'it's a chance for other clubs in 
Kansas to come to one central k)ca- 
tion and exchange ideas and have 
fun," he said 

The organisation will have a 
number of events throughout the 
weekend. Bhakta said. 

Opening ceremonies lor the con- 
vention will begin at 6 tonight in the 
K-Slate Union Ballroom and will be 
(ol lowed by a casino night 

Free Circle K international 
tnorMy will be given out to those who 
bring a can of food or a coloring 
book, and there will be dillerent 
tables to gamble at, Bhakta said. 

The canned foods will be donat- 
ed to the Rint Hills Breadbasket, and 
the cok)hr»g books will be donated to 



Manhattan Headstart Program, he 
said. 

Workshops, a luncheon, gover- 
nor's banquet and a ballroom blitz 
dance will bo SalunJay in the Union 

A farewell lurKheon will conclude 
the convention in ihe landon Room 
at Ramada Inn 

Bhakta said the organization is 
the largest worldwide service organi- 
zation across college campuses. 

"it's a real good opportunity to 
buitd in service, character artd lead- 
ership,' he said. 

New members are always wel- 
come to join the organization or 
attend a maetlng, which are at 9 
p.m. Tuesdays in Union 204, Bhakta 
said. 

'Here at K-Stsie, the twst way to 
learn about Circle K may not be to 
come to the convention but come to 
our meetings,' he said. 

"But i don't want to discourage 
anyone interested m not coming to 
the convention,* Bhakta said 



41 



FOR 
OOLLAAI 

KSU Fbunlaion'i TeMnt fno^ms 
wilbecofKlucMnigNlyunll 
Tuesd^, TTi0 phonis WW cparaM 
Thunday njj^ fay thjdanli from ttw 
OoiO0e of Engineflmg. Colsgas 
mate Ms duly every two to flvet 



Nighl ol Teietund 
Evening total; 
Grand total: 



17 

$36,120 
$732,626 






Sourae: Oeaiww Wolkar 




You*ve Shot your friends, co-workers, families and 
significant others for the Royal Purple yearbook. 

jhat are you goii 
do about it no 

Come to the K-State Union from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. 
Feb. 28 and look at the Shoot Younetf proofs set up 
on a table outside the Stateroom cafeteria. At this 
time, you'll be able to order copies of your prooft 
($7 for a Sx7 and $10 for an 8x10). You will also 
have the opportunity to purchase a I99S Royal 
Purple yearbook for only $21, so grab your 
checkbook and reserve your yearbook now. 



lili 

bnsautate university 





t 



TU D 10 
ROYAL 



<^ Police REPORTS ^Bulletin board 



>ii « i 



■I n a *ifcls. wt <s iwllit wt w i n fa, 



ANNOUNCBMKHTS 



K-$™iPOua 



The KSU Bldodmobflc «i]S ccHUiniic lodiy fram I0;30 i.m. to 3^30 p.m 
H the Uiiiun S biKruom 

Appttcatlew ror AH* and Sckaca Afih^—dan «c «viilibk i« the! 
dcuh\ olTice. Apptkniona are due at 5 p m MJurch tA. 



THUMOAY, raBRUARY la 



At t:}3 p.111.. Jun« Sttfihucy of 
13 IirdiM r*part*d Ibe llicfl of i 

RILEV COUNTY POLICE 



BULLITIMS 



IS17S 



WIOHUDAY, FEBRUARY 22 



At S p m . Divkl Bciclwr of 2M0 
WaKtKMtt. Apt. II, riled ■ lepofl of 
tOHicty A bkH nJlM with S200 ind 



THURSDAY, PBBRUARY 23 



miKcltineayt tD( iMt cardt vtn 



■ Tbtn will ht an ttt^drap 
COMIC I fot hiflt-tctiool ttudenti 
friHii I \ i.m. to 3 p.m. tttdiy in Ihv 
t>urluid Hill Atrium. 

■ lalcrVinlly Cbrttltaa 
Frilamllip will meet u 730 lonight 
in Thnjckmnnon 1014 

■ HnHli PrafMioai AdTWat 
Office will havt a urrjp-up fcvicw 
utiiiin fi)f iht DAT, MCAT and 
OAT tmm 9 am. to noon 5anifd*y 
in Ei«nho*er«H 



■ Cslkflal* 4-H will maei at 
6:30 p.m Sunday in Ihe Union 
bowling alley. 

■ K'SUIt Atkldo will oteer 
(tom 7:30 lo 9 p in. Suaday in room 
30lo[llieIhiKeSliidio. '. 

■ ClMpaa Girt ScoHll «it^ 
meet frwn 4 lo 3:30 p.m Sunday in 
Union 201 

■ tBlherw Cmvm Mlalau?: 
will meet al 7:LS p-ffl- Sunday it^ 
Danfonh Oupel 



At l:tt a.n., Kara Ltvety ot 
1010 tUarnty St leponed a Clanoa 
AM-FM lUreo tilicn. Loai waa S230. 
Thefe was no damafc to the vefucle. 

At 1:36 am.. Tooatvili T Ululy 
of 100) BliMxwM Ave.. Apt 1 1, wu 
aft*ttcd in Afficville on chaffei of 
cfimiaal damajt to propeny. baiury 
to a law enrorccmeoi officer and 
reiiitini arreit. iond w*t Ml al 
11,300. 

At 2:30 a.m , Anjaneitt Nwltirk 
of 2143 Bui±iii|banw Apt. S. RJtd a 



repoti of theft in A||ie*ill« at ■ 
brown putt* wiih eonunu Lou wu 
»«. 

At 1:33 ajn., lenniFer Herpich o( 
261« Kimball A«e. nitd a report of 
theft in AuieviUe of a btack leaiVi 
jacket and a cream-eotored purte 
ljuofM13 

Al 2:4S a.Ri., George A Ricbardi 
of 910 N Manhaiiaa Ave wai 
chaffed with Dili. BawJ wh let ai 
tl.OOO 



ELECTRONIC COUEGIAN 

The Kansas Stats Cotegian haft gone 
«(ectronic. Updated (Mff, you tMn Dhd th* 
Electionk; Cotogian on Itw WofM Wkte W«tt O 

http://Wwvif.»pyl).l 



■n* Kansas Slats Collegian 
(USPS291020l,astijdwil 
rwwspaper at Kansas Stale 
UnivBrsity, ts fKjWished by 
Siudont Publications Inc., 
Kedzje HaH 103. Mattfiattan, 
Kan.,66S0e.TtwCo»e9i»)is 
pubfehed ww talii yB (luring ttw 
school yaif and onoe a we«k 
[through Ihe stjmmer. Second- 



class postage is paxj at 
Manhattan, Kan., 66502. 
POSTMASTER: Send 
addrm dMngit to Kifwai 
SWi Colealin, afCuWion 
des>(, Kedzie 103, Manhattan, 
Kan. 66506-7167. 



CKintatSltieCelegiin, \m 



LEHERS TO THE EDITOR 

We accapt letters to trw edlttf tly •fnal Out 
addraw Is Jatters Q a(xA.lisu.fidu. Wa naad ycKu 
nanm addiaaa, pDOfw ni^ttm anl eMtanl 
IDfHjmbw. 



DID WE MAKE A 



■ If we fnake a mistake or are not quite clear 
on something, please call and ted us. We are 
only human. Our number is 5^-6556. 



Weather 



YESTERDAY'S HKWS AND LOWS 




RUBseu 

8I/3S 



mmmm 
mm 

. ^ . 

SAUNA tOPEa 

t\im 59/36 



WKHTTA* 

«/« 



COFFEYVILLE 

88/44 • 



State Outlook 

Mostly sunriy. Br«ezy and warmer 
in the north csntraJ and western 
regions, l-tiglts in the SOs in ttie east. 
(rom 60 to 65 in central regions and 
65 to 70 out west. 

•^•i^^ Manhattan Outlook 

UIT 

TODAY ■MHBBBIHH 

Sunny. High in the mkt- 
to upper 50$. Wif>d out 
ol the southwest from 
10 to ISnnph. 





• DENVER 

60/30 



• TULSA 
51/45 



•OMAHA 
51 /2t 



• ST LOUIS 
61/42 



TOMORROW 

Windy, much warmer 
and nnostly sunny 
High from 70 to 75. 




vo 



OUR LOSS IS YOUR GAIN! 

TEXTBOOK 
SALE 

Feb. 24 -March 12, 1995 

We have cleaned out our storerooms 
and have HUNDREDS of selected new 
and used textbooks to sell at great prices! 

$2.00 Hardbacks 
$1.00 Paperbacks 

^Various fields of study* 
*Some previously used at K-State* 




IN AGGIEVILLE 



€i 



We Give You Our Best" 



; 



9 a.m. - 9 p.m. 
Men. - Sat. 



Noon - 5 p.m. 
Sunday 



KANSAS STME COLLEGIAN 



Friday, Fcbfuafy 24, 1 998 f^ 



► RIMODILINQ 



Marlatt B wing 
to feature suites, 
remodeled rooms 



MNICIMUU 



Cullegiu 

Marian Hall will reopen tb B wing 
the fml of June for lEsi dents, but the 
rooms will have a new look. 

'Tlw rooms will look like you're 
walking into the Hilton Hotel," Gene 
Wiley, director of maintenance, said. 

Many of the special or expanded 
rooms are complete with ceiling fans, 
wall-to-wall carpet, mini-blinds, 
dropped ceilings, cabinets and book- 
shelves, along with a personal bath- 
room, he said. 

The rooms, which are on the first 
three Hoots, will have private bath- 
rooms in each room, and each floor 
will have a laundry mom that will be 
used only by the residents of that 
floor, Wiley said. 

Lawson Harris, freshman in aichi- 
lecture and design, said he thinks the 
new rooins will increase the number 
of people who want to live in (he resi- 
dence halls, 

"1 think the suites would keep a lot 
more people in the balls, especially by 
having a pnvate bathroom," he said. 

Sybil Freeman, sophonxire in ele- 
mentary education, agrees with the 
importance of having privacy. 

"I like having people around, but 
you need to have your own space. I 
grew up having my own room," she 
said. 

The expanded rooms will allow 
more studenLs to have that sfoce. 

The new rooms come in a variety 
of styles. Two of the styles involve 
convening three rooms into two sepa- 
rate living quarters. 

Other designs are an L-shaped 
room or a rectangular-shaped room 
with a larger bathroom. The bathroom 
for the rectangular room contains 
more shelving and space. These are 
called expanded or sp«;ial rooms. 

The final design is to make the 
three rooms into a single living area 
for three people. One room becomes 
a sleeping area, the middle can be a 
living area and the third is two bath- 
rooms. The.se are known as suites. 
Burgess said. 

West and Haymaker halls have 



some Elites and expanded rooms. The 
Haymaker rooms are full, and the 
demand is high for those rooms, 
Mateo Rernsburg, assistant hall direc- 
tor for Haymaker, said. 

Tim J. Hanzlik. junior in arehitec- 
tural engineering, said he would like 
to move into the new expanded 
rooms at Marian. 

The room would cost him $85 a 
semester more than his current dou- 
ble-as-a-single room is costing him, 
he said. After looking at the rooms, 
Hanzlik said he decided the extra cost 
would be woith it. 

For a student on the 20-rncals-pe- 
wcek plan paying with installments, 
an average residence-hall room will 
cost $1,710 next year, while the 
expanded rooms under the same sce- 
nario will be $2,020, said Bob 
Burgess, assistant director of housing 
for business operations. 

Because the competition for the 
nooms is high, the residents for those 
rooms will be chosen on several crite- 
ria, Yoder said. 

The first coasideraiion is the num- 
ber of semesters that the residents 
have lived in Marlatt. The date the 
$25 housing application fee was paid 
is next on the list. The earher appli- 
cants get the fee paid, the more likely 
they arc to get one of the rooms. 

The leadership positions the per- 
son has taken place in either the hall 
or on their floor is another criteria, 
which is at the discretion of the halt 
director. Voder said. 

"Those criteria by and large, have 
solved the problem." he said. 

The work at Marlatt has met all 
safety codes and regulations and has 
been approved by both state and 
University officials F.ach of the three 
floors has a handicapped-accessible 
room as well. All of the work in reno- 
vating has been done in-house, and 
nothing was contracted. Wiley said. 

By doing the work in-house. 
Wiley estimated the costs have been 
cut by one-third to one-half. This 
allowed the flexibility to make 
changes in plans as it became neces- 
sary. 



► HINT 



Residence-hall rent to increase in fall 



JANICI MILIA 



Collcf Ian 

The cost of living in the resi- 
dence halls will increase again 
next year. 

The 4.7-perecnt increase will 
be used for a number of purpos- 
es, said Chuck Werring. director 
of Housing and Dining Services, 

This is the first year that 
money will be put into the 
Facilities 2000 fund, which is a 
program for the residence halls 
to support capital improvements. 

The money will be used for 
behind-the-watl improvements 
like plumbing, elevators and 
electrical repairs. Werring said. 

The increase will also be 
used for salary, food and utility- 
cost increases and inflationary 
expenses, he said. 

The housing department does 
not receive any funds from the 
state in the form of lax money 
for operating, salaries, repairs or 
maintenance. All of the money 
the department uses must come 
from the money students pay to 
live in the residence halls. Gene 
Wiley, director of maintenance, 
said. 

In addition, when the state 
mandates salary increases or 
compliance with the Americans 



with Disabilities Act, they do 
not provide any funds to help 
meet those requirements. 
Werring said. 

"We try to project what will 
happen so we can cover the bot- 
tom line." te said. 

Wiley said the cost of run- 
ning the residence halls has 
increased. 

"We are not raising funds to 
do things. It's just expensive," 
Wiley said. 

Ryan Haraughty, junior in 
wildhfe biology, said residence 
halls just don't hold the appeal 
of luxury apartments. 

"Dorms are getting to be less 
and less competitive," he said. 

Haraughty said he would like 
to live somewhere other than the 
residence halls, but his class 
load does not allow him the time 
for cooking and cleaning. 

Residence halls are trying to 
encourage students to return to 
the halls despite the price 
increase. 

Haymaker Hall is having a 
poster campaign this week to 
remind residents to sign up for 
preferential rcmms. The cartoon 
posters went up in the Haymaker 
lobby on Monday. 

The posters, which resemble 



NEW RESIDENCE-HALL FEES 

TTiea»lfQf a room in the residence halsw* (tie SO^neal plan wilinc^ / 
by $75 next year. 



IVpeolRooffl 

Regular with a roomritate 
Double as a single 



CotlthisyHT 

$1,6ta'semestef 
J2,000/semesler 



CottfttHyesr 

$1 .ess/semester 
t2,075/semes(er 




"The Far Side" cartoons, were 
designed to attraict the attention 
of the residents so they would 
remember to sign a contract for 
next year, Mateo Remsburg, 
assistant hall director of 
Haymaker, said. 

"We hope they will be more 
likely to come down and sign a 
contract," he said. 

Returning residents will 
receive a personal note of recog- 
nition from Remsburg, their 
floor staff and Kim Winkler. 
Haymaker hall director. 

"1 feel we are very commit- 
ted. Hopefully, it shows by the 
number of returns we have," he 
said. 

Brian Story, freshman in 
business, said living in the resi- 
dence halls has been a good 



TRISHA BENNINOA/Collegia/i 

experience as a freshman. 

'They do a very good job," 
he said. 

Story plans on moving out 
next year, but he said the price 
was not a factor in his decision. 

Through his apartment hunt- 
ing. Story said he found that it 
seems to cost around $200 to 
$215 a month, but you have to 
cook your own food and buy 
whatever else you might need, 
he said. 

Michael Garcia, freshman 
undecided, said the residence- 
hall prices are economical, but 
there are other improvements 
that could be made, 

"I think they're fairly reasiin- 
able since they include dinners, 
but I think the dinners could 

■ See MAINTENANCE Page 8 



> RECREATION 



HGB to sponsor free Mardi Gras dance in Boyd Hall 



J<MKLIIOO«1Y 

The genuine Mardi Gras celebration may be 
in New Orleans, but the residents of Boyd Hall 
plan to have a little party of their own 
Saturday night. 

Jenny Graff, Hall Governing Board social 
chair and sophomore in agricultural econom- 
ics, said the second annual Mardi Gras dance 
will be in a decorated Boyd Hall ba.sement. 

The free dance is being sponsored by HGB 
and will take place from 8 p.m, to midnight, 

Graff said the dance will be different in a 
couple of aspects this year. 

She said some men from Marlatt Hall vol- 
unteered to DJ the dance, in contrast lo last 
year's jazz ensemble music, 

"We wanted more of a dance atmosphere, 
and we didn't want it to be the same." she said, 

Michelle Coitcse. sophomore in animal sci- 



ence, said the DJs will be playing requests and 
general popular music, 

"A lot of people didn't dance last year to 
the jazz ensemble. ' Concsc said, "1 think the 
variety of the music will be suited to every- 
one." 

Graff said HGB had a number of things in 
mind when it decided to sponsor the dance, 

"We needed to have an activity where peo- 
ple could get together and jusi meet people, 
have a good time and relieve some stress." she 
said. 

Graff also said this year's dance will be 
open to anyone living in any of the residence 
halls, La.st year's Mardi Gras dance was only 
open to residents of Strong Complex. 

Jennifer Higerd, HGB treasurer and sopho- 
more in political science, said the festive 
atmosphere should provide students with a 
good time. 



"This year, we're hoping a lot more people 
come over from other residence halls," Higerd 
said, 

Graff also said Mardi Gras may be replaced 
with something new if there is not a good 
turnout, 

"We hope that we get a major response, 
because sometimes you don't get people to 
respond," she said. "People just don't come," 

She also said Boyd Hall residents are excit- 
ed about the opportunity to be the site of such 
a big event. 

"It's a big deal for us lo have so many peo- 
ple invited." Graff said. "We feel big pressure 
for the response, siiKe this is our first time to 
undertake something so big." 

Graff said she hopes for about 200 people 
lo attend the event. 

"It will he a great time." she said. "The 
more people we have, the more fun it will be ' 



^■lt ' l\nlt^ »»»'mi'>»»»^vttw»ttmimini'm'm'mm««<»tt'm'mnv^nvtT\\^Tr 



We specialize in bridal, 
special occasion fabric & accessories 
& tuxedos. ^^Htb k^ 

3t4 Poyntz 




|M|k Kansas State Union 
SBii and 

"••^ Trotter Hall 



Now 



Man. - Sat. 9 ajox- 10^50 pjn. •Sim. Noon - 10^30 pum. 

Gome Join us when Lhe dorm cafeteiiss are closed 1 




Enjov The Benefits And ^ The Savings! 
. Join The 2fl '20 Club" • 

fn The .Widfoipn Pima 

S2.1S. 17th Street 
Manhattan, KS €6302 

New & Used Instruineni Sdles & Rep^ii 
Videos, Books. & Accessories 



Doug fonen. Proprietor 



913 SS9l9sa 





>^VVVVVVVVVVVVVVVVVVVVVVVVVVV^J 



i 

I 



CLEARANCE 

Selected Shirts $15 and $7.50 

WRANGLER'H BAR C« ROPER'PANHANDLE SUM 

LUCCHBSE BLUE 8 BLACK lEANS 

$20 



A Selected Winter 
Coats 

Award Design 

Bee Wild 

Utiper 

ALL $35 



> Comfy 

& 

David James PRCA 

Jacket 



A WRANGLUi UMW'/. l\ /\T COiORit) fiANS $15 



DIAMOm J LADIES ROPERS SLASBED TO $45 
MEN'S SELECTED STYLE BOOTS SLASHED MORE ^i 

$8M98 ^ 

J1ltnil*ABILBNE*0LJITaE>I.AIIK OF WOODS 

PLUS OTHER ITEMS WITH .^rTPl** ft 

BIG-BIG CLEARANCE! ^ nCVTCflN l||j^ ^ 

RODEO DAYS t^^ ±A • "clo*. 

CLEARANCE \f^^ 4mM# T^ 

FEB. 24 & 25 ONLY ! AAflift I 

8426 E. Hwy. 24 • 776-6715* Manhattan iM^W^W i 

Mon.-Fri. 9 a.m.-7 p.m. -Sat. 9 a.m.-5:30 p.m. — H_lElif^'*— JJ 



wwvvvvvvvwwv. 



■^;< 




PINION 



G Kansas State ^ 
3LLEGIAN 

BNTOR • . . . N. Siewul Andemm 

lUIMIM IMTOR Cristini Janney 

,. t ..... . Ri}hm Kickh^ftT 

Mark Utfingwdl 

OMIWi UKTOR Christy LittJe 

Dnm IBfTINI Steptunic Foqua 

l-eOillOlM IWTM ...... Mike Bunch 



SenL'hnfc 

All/PUTUMt lOtTM. . . Amy Zktkt 
»Vm IMTM ......... Pliiil Spikei 

aiumct lOITON Triifaa Braninga 

eOPT C¥m Dive OlMo 

cm-aov. nMTim Mike Mvku 

AMT. IMWrt BMnil Jmm^ Oiibne 

VKi PMAGTI BfTOR . ■ . , 



ilB lUIUOm RyndeU Uok 

AMt MUUn JiU DuBw 

umwiuaiR Airan Gr^kim 

TIMSKIITI MOII . . , . Nauoyo Kemt 
imn ABVmi ...... Rod Johnson 

AO Umm Glorii Fteelind 



minmfy%HM 



In Our Opinion 



by the Collegian Editorial Board 

mmmmmmm 



More insurance plans easier on students 



Th« StiKtont 
HmHIi Advisory 
Council wanfs 
•tudonto to bo 
ablo to choooo 
from thro* 
plans wHh dif- 
f orsnt dogroos 

of COVBFSOO. 



K-State students could be getting 
more health-care optioDs. 

The Univffrsity only offers one 
student health plan. The addition of more 
choices could be very beneFicial to stu- 
dents. 

Hie biggest downfall of the current 
student insurance is that it has only one 
plan. 

If a K-State students cannot afford 
the plan, then they have to either go with- 
out or get insured by an outside company. 

The Student Health Advisory 
Council wants students to be able to 
choose from three plans with different 
degrees of coverage. 



Most importantly, it has three dif- 
ferent price ranges. 

One good characteristic that would 
be carried over from the current system is 
that insurance still would not be a prereq- 
uisite for enrollment. 

Unlike the system at the University 
of Kansas, if students do not want insur- 
ance at K-State, they are not forced to 
cany it. 

It would be beneficial to K-State if 
more students could afford health insur- 
ance. 

An effective way of allowing 
affordability would be to have several 
plans to fit different budgets. 



Disadvantaged students get a chance 

F 



eb. 25. It will be a sig- 
nificant day for those 
of us who are Tk-io 
alumnae. 



Thirty ycais ago. Congress established 
and funded Trio programs. This would 
mean "first-generation low- income young 
Americans would have an opportunity to 
aspire for a college education and fulfill 
their dreams of making a difference in 
life." 

FoT those of you who grew up in an 
environment in which a college education 
was an ultimate destiny. Trio Day may not 
seem that important. But 1 encourage you 
to think about the 1986 Congressional 
Resolution on National Trio Day. 

Trio Day focuses the nation's attention 
on the needs of disadvantaged young peo- 
ple and adults aspiring to improve their 
lives, to the necessary investment if they 
are to become contributing citizens of the 
country, which would be wasted if that 
investment is not made. 

When 1 was growing up in a housing 
project, i never thought about college. It 
was an environment that could only 
encourage "maybe getting a high-school 
education" but defmitely getting a job to 
cover the bills. 

In high school, I can remember my 
classmates making plans to attend college. 
They had aspirations of being doctors, 
lawyers, counselors and teachers. There 
were no college plans or career aspirations 
for me. All 1 knew wa.s I had a low ACT 
score, and college didn'i seem feasible. 
My goal was to get a job to pay the bills 
and survive. 

1 was fortunate that I was able to save 
some money from part-time jobs and take 
one class in creative writing, which was 
my area of interest. By taking that one 
class, 1 came in contact with people who 
supported my decision to continue with 
pursuing a college education. 

I also came in contact with my first 
Trio program that supported my college 
development. That Trio program was 
Educational Supportive Services. 

Because of the cultural, economic and 
gender biases within my primary and sec- 
ondary schools, I was not proficient in 
mathematics. Through Educational 
Supportive Services, 1 was able to obtain 
peer tutoring, which assisted me in under- 
standing the approaches and strategies in 
doing mathematics. 

I was able to do better, participate in 




my class and receive a passing grade so 1 
could achieve my degree. 

During my junior year, 1 also had the 
opportunity to be involved with the Trio 
program in another capacity. As a student 
teacher for Upward Bound's Summer 
Bridge program. 1 was able to work with 
first-generation college students who were 
making the transition to college. 

The program provided academic and 
study- skills development along with help- 
ing students build their cultural identities. 
In addition, the program focused on build- 
ing math and sci- 
ence competency. I 
also teamed stu- 
dents with commu- 
nity and faculty 
mentors, which is 
another important 
component of the 
Trio program. 

Since I was a 
first-generation 
college student, I 
know it is crucial 

for the first -generation college student to 
have riKntors and role models. 

Even though it is exciting being the 
first to aspire toward college in the family, 
it is also very scary and unpredictable. 
Often the student may be from an environ- 
ment that prescribes to the philosophy of 
everyday food and shelter survival, so col- 
lege may not be etKouragcd or supported. 
There is also no history or example within 
the family or even within some of the 
community living areas of college success 
to admire and aspire to. 

One of my first college teachers gave 
me an exemplary example of Trio role 
modeling. He was a well-known play- 
wright, and I never thought he would take 
a black giri from the housing pitiject seri- 
ously with an amateur play. But he did. He 
spent many hours of one-on-one individu- 
alized teaching with me. I knew he cared, 
and I knew he had faith in my talent and 
abilities That's one of the reasons why 
Vm a Trio alumna today. 

Now as an Academic Counselor 
Services Coordinator at K-State, it has 
been very rewarding for me to see how 
Trio programs have developed. Not only is 
peer tutoring offered, but there are classes 
on critical thinking and leadership. It has 
been very plca.sing for me to sec my Trio 
students in class processing their critical- 
thinking skills and applying their thoughts 
on leadership, which is essential to a criti- 
cal thinker. This will benefit communities 
in the future. 



pro- 

atso 

the 

E. 

Post 



Since I viras a 
first -generation 
college student, 
I know It l« cru- 
cial for the 
first-generation 
college student 
to have men- 
tors and role 
models. 



Trio 

grams 
include 
Ronald 
McNair 
Baccalaureate 
Achievement 
Program and 
Talent Search. 
The McNair 
program encour- 
ages minority 
and/or first -gen- 
eration college 
students to pur 
sue doctoral 
degrees in math and science. Talent Search 
assists middle- and high-schoi)l students 
with explonng their educational and caiccr 
options. 

For those who might believe Trio pro- 
grams give wasted support and opportuni- 
ties to people who arc not college material, 
ask yourself what prospects life would 
hold for you if you hadn't gotten the 
opporiunity to go to college and punue the 
career you have a passion for. 

If you have a talent for computers, 
music, writing, art or whatever, ask your- 
self where that talent would be if someone 
— a teacher, a friend, a counselor, a parent 
or whoever — hadn't believed in your tal- 
ent If your family has a business and you 
are looking forward to being a part of that 
business once you graduate, ask yourself 
where your career aspirations would be 
without that business. 

If you answered these questions honest- 
ly and sincerely, then you will have an 
indication how important Trio programs 
arc to these students. 

On Feb. 24. Educational Supportive 
Services at K- State will have an anniver- 
sary commemoration in support of 
National Trio Day on Feb. 25. 

I encourage everyone to visit Hollon 
201 at 10 a.m. to get to know more about 
the program and how it successfully 
affects students' academic progress. 

There's an African proverb that says it 
takes a village to raise a child. I also 
believe it takes a village to groom and 
mentor a student. 

Trio programs give a deep meaning to 
this thought, because if a village docs 
groom and mentor a student, that village 
gets a self-empowered individual and 
community leader back. 

Barbara Baker 

Academic Services Coordinator and 

counselor for Educational Services 



Tolerance doesn't 
mean being spineless 



During this school 
year, there has been 
an ongoing contro- 
versy over how to 
define the concept of toler- 
ance and especially how it is 
deHned in the Christian faith. 

The latest eruption in the debate 
stemmed from a columnist on this page 
defining tolerance in today's context as 
"spineless" 

This was apt to bring about some 
reply from the campus community, but 
the most surprising source of it came 
from people who claim to be Christians. 

It was confusing to me why people 
who claim the same set of beliefs could 
have their real beliefs so diametrically 
opposed. 

While I realize that not everyone on 
campus claims to be Christian, I wanted 
to discover why those who do were in 
disagreement. 

So I look it upon myself to discover 
the meaning of these concepts from the 
source of Christianity — the Bible. 

I do not intend to present my own def- 
inition of tolerance, love or any other 
word that is in a current state of redefini- 
tion because I do not believe my defini- 
tion is any better than anyone else's. 
Because we 
live in a coun- 
try where 
freedom of 
thought is still 
protected, I do 
not intend to 
tell anyone 
how to think. 

However, 
since 
Christianity is 
o b j e c t i v c I y 
defined and 
presented in 
the Bible, and 
any deviation 
from this source simply creates another 
subjective religion, there is no way to 
define these concepts for the Christian 
other than according to the Bible because 
it is the source of Christianity. 

In addition, I challenge those who 
intend to participate in this debate to 
include scriptural reference with ihcir 
argument as evidence so that there is no 
confusion over their basis for a certain 
point. 

Let me be very clear what I intend to 
do; ! am not forcing my beliefs on any- 
one, nor do I believe that my beliefs are 
any better than anyone else's. 

I am simply questioning the basis of 
those who claim to be Christian and dis- 
pute what Jesus Christ said and did in 
regard to love and tolerance. 

At the crux of the debate is how 
Christ defined tolerance. 

It appears that many believe that since 
Christ "preached love to the masses" and 
his greatest commandment was "Love 
your neighbor as yourself that 
Christians should tolerate any and all 
behavior because of love. 

If one believed that this was the case. 
why should murder be wrong to the 
Christian? 

Although this is an extreme case, 
what difference is there between murder 
and lying, since both are sins according 
to the Bible? 

If one is to create a new set of morali- 
ty for each action, then one has just cre- 
ated a new religion and must then 



I am simply 
questioning the 
basis of those 
who claim to be 
Christian and 
dispute what 
Jesus Christ 
said and did in 
regard to love 
and tolerance. 




embark on the 
"My religion is 
better than yours" 
crusade, a diffi- 
cult task in an era 
of cynicism and 
agnosticism. 

Using this 
extreme case, are 
Christians called 
to let murder slide 
because of the 
"don't judge" 
clause and just 
love the murderer 
for who he is and 
look past what he 
did? Surely not. for Christ himself was 
crucified alongside two murderers, and 
he only forgave the one who asked for 
repentance. 

The one thing Christ never did while 
on earth was give anyone license to con- 
tinue to sin on the basis of tolerance. 
T>iis also necessitates a definition ot sin. 
which the Bible docs. 

For those who claim to be Christian, it 
is your responsibility to know what sin 
is. "For ! have hidden your word in my 
heart that 1 might not sin against you," 
(Psalm 119:11) 

While some may believe that we 
should look past other's shortcomings 
because we are mature and educated. 
Christ never taught this 

Hc^ireached love to the masses, but 
not an earthly love between people that 
sought to approve all behavior, but rather 
a love for Christ. "Anyone who loves his 
father or mother more than me is not 
worthy of me." (Matthew 10; 37) 

It was not Christ's intent to make 
everyone live in harmony and peace with 
lots of love and the current concept of 
tolerance. In Luke 12;SI he said. "I did 
not come to bring peace, but division." 

Many argue that when Christ said 
"Judge not, lest ye be judged" this gives 
license for everyone to set their own 
morality. 

However, Christ applied this teaching 
in a different manner. 

When Christ was faced with dealing 
with the Pharisees who were about to 
stone an adulterer in John 8:7, he told 
them "Let him who is without sin throw 
the first stone." 

But more importantly, he didn't stop 
there. He then told the woman, in John 
8; 1 1 . "1 also do not condemn you. but go 
and sin no more." 

The commandment to "Love your 
neighbor as yourself has been used to 
validate certain kinds of behavior as 
well. 

However, this command has nothing 
to do with the behavior of others but 
one's own. 

It originated in the Law of Moses 
(Leviticus 1 9; 1 8) and commands "Do not 
seek revenge or bear a grudge against 
one of your people, but love your neigh- 
bor as yourself." and appears in the New 
Testament with the parable of the Good 
Samaritan, neither of which deal with 
actions by others, but rather, to use a 
contemporary term, "Get-Even- With- 
'Em-ism." 

So although Christ preached love, he 
did not validate tolerance of sinful 
behavior in the name of love because 
love denotes discipline and mercy 
(Proverbs 13:24), not a "spineless" toler- 
ance, 

Jeremy Stephens Is a sophomore tn 
business. 



Readers V^rite 



^ DMNKmO 



Drop lBtt*r« off at Kadit* 116 or Mnd ttwm (o t-«tt*rs to Itw EdHor, cto Chrtaly UWii, 
Stat* Collagian, K*dzl« lid, Manlwttan, KS 66506. W* accApl l«tt«r« by B-mall alao. Our 
■<ldr««« !• I«tt»r«e«pub.kau.*du. L«tt*t'i ahould tM addrasacd to ItM sdltor and inctuda a 
nama, addrau and phone numtMr. A photo IdantKlcatlon will b« n«c«asary for hand-dallV' 



sible points, and I would like to express 
my condolences to them about their 
friends and people they have known who 
have died of alcohol-related poisoning. 
However, I don* I agree with their observa- 
tions about the events of Kent Hamilton's 
2 1 St birthday. 

I am confused about Lyle's statements 
that this type of journalism is not responsi- 
ble, I have personally seen several other 
half- brained individuals participating in 
this sort of event, which apparemly Mr. 
Lyie doesn't think occurs at KU. In my 
opinion, the Collegian wasn't promoting, 
but rather reporting. Even Delehanty noted 
the story in the Manhattan Mercury about 
alcohol-related reporting. Although she 
must not have very good friends, because 1 



Night of bowling doesn^t cut it 

Dear editor. 

I am a faithful reader of the Collegian, 
like many students, and I would like to 
respond to the letters titled "Story was 
irresponsible" and "Alcohol could lead to 
death." I know that when the article 
"Finally 21, Finally Legal" was published, 
it would surely spark some responses, but 
gee wiz, both John LyIe and Rene 
Delehanty appear as if they had 16 shots 
and seven been before writing their let- 
ters, 

I underatand that both of them had fca- 



don't know any 
friends that 
would care that 
little about your 
well-being in 
that similar sit- 
uation to leave 
you with a trash 
can and call it 
good enough. 
Yes, 1 was up 
with Kent for 
most of the 
time that he 
was passed out, 
except to go to 
my classes the next day. but someone was 
always in the room with him until I got 
back. Delehanty said she thought that the 
article should have been written about cel- 
ebrating your 2 1 St birthday at K-Statc's 
bowling alley. Maybe it's just that 1 don't 
bowl regularly, but do you get carded 
when you bowl? t thought I heard some- 
where about not striking out at the check- 
out desk. Seriously, we all know what 



"I am confused 
about Lyle*s 
statements that 
this type of 
journalism is 
not rosponsi- 



Ben Towner 
lunlor In pte-law 



turning 2 1 enables you to do that legally 
couldn't get done, and I'm not trying lo go 
bowling. 

In conclusion, I am glad that both of 
these people are concerned with alcohol 
poisoning, but to Mr. Lyle and Ms. 
Delehanty, 1 don't care what the people at 
KU think Maybe it wouldn't be a good 
idea to go to the bars on March 4 if you 
don't want lo see u "half-brain" in a night 
of drunken debauchery. 

Ben Towner 
Junior in pre-law 

► PARKIWO 

Let students vote on proposal 

Dear editor, 

I am a student here at K-State I pay 
tuition, and I pay to park. Therefore, I 
believe that I should voice my opinion on 
this parking garage issue. Here it is point- 
blank. I do not want to pay for this garage. 
I don't think that 1 should be forced to pay 



for this garage, 
cither. As oth- 
ers have stated, 
there is room to 
park behind 
Weber, and 
there is room to 
park in the 
parking area 
across from 
Memorial 
Stadium, 

Already, I 
have spoken to 
several people 
who do not 
want to pay for this garage, and 1 sincerely 
believe that this campus-wide vote for the 
garage is a great idea. It is our money that 
SGA is spending, and we should have a 
voice in how it is spent, t^fs do a vote. 
Let's show the SGA how we feel about its 
garage. 

Christian McMaiunuw 
h^eshman, business admlnlstratloa 



"It Is our money 
that SQA ia 
spending, and 
we should have 
a voice In how 
It Is spent. Let% 
do a voto." 

Christian McManaman 

freshman In businesa 
admin«traUon 



KANSAS SIATE COLLEGIAN 



■OP-ED 



Friday, February 24, Igag ft 



Readers Write 



Drop Mlara off at KwizI* 1 1t or Mnd llwm to UMft to dM bIKor. c/o 
Chrttty LKtl*, Kanui SUta Collaglan, Kadila f 16, ManhatUn, KS MSOe. 
Wa accapt Mtara by a-mall alao. Our addraaa la MtaraSapub.ksu.adu. 
Lattara ahould ba addraasad to tha aditor and Includ* a nam*, addraas artd 
phona numbar. A photo Idantlflcatlon will ba nacaaaary for hand-dallvar«d 



► REVIEW 

Parents need theater 

Dear editor, 

t am writing in regard to 
Russell Fortmeyer's column on 
Feb. 17. There are parents going 

"Sure, I also 
thought 
Aladdin's pro- 
ductlon waa 
roalty bad, but 
my daughter 
aaamod to 
enjoy tt." 

IVONEE ZaLDUMBIE 

senior in advertising 



school 
who are 
paying 
as 

much 
money 
as you 
are, 
there- 
fore 
they 
would 
also be 
consid- 
ered 
"students." 

These parents can hardly ever 
attend events such as plays, 
music concerts and other serious 
events that go on in McCain, 
because it is either hard to find a 
babysitter or just hard to Irusi 
one. That's enough of a good rea- 
son to bring siufr that will enter- 
tain the children of students That 
way, we can have family time 
doing something besides watch- 
ing television, going to the 
movies and playing at the park. 

Sure, I also thought Aladdin's 
production was really bad, but 
my daughter seemed to enjoy it. I 
believe McCain is using "my 
money" too, to entertain "my" 
children. 

You probably didn't have a 
childhood and will never make 
your children happy with such an 
attitude. Whoever said that twen- 



ty-something students do not 
enjoy stuff made for children, 
probably not Aladdin's produc- 
tion, but I'm sure many of them 
would enjoy other children pro- 
ductions. 

If you don't like McCain pro- 
ductions, you can always go 
somewhere else and pay for it 
anyway. It is not like we get to go 
in for free. And if you don't like 
reviewing for bad productions, 
you'd better get another Job, 
because you won't always get to 
review what you like. 

I agree that McCain needs to 
improve the quality of its produc- 
tions, but 1 support their produc- 
tions targeted to children. After 
all, they are also using some of 
"my money." 

Ivonne Zaidumblde 
senior in advertising 

► PARKINQ 

Garage would be useful 

Dear editor. 

This is not just another letter 
about the parking situation. There 
has been a lot of discussion lately 
about the proposal to build a 
parking garage. Many of the 
views are from the student per- 
spective and assume that students 
will have to shoulder the bill for 
the facility. But this is an issue 
that affects faculty and staff as 
well as students and, as far as I 
know, the proposal did not speci- 
fy the method of payment. 

As a staff person at K-State as 
well as a student, I believe 1 can 
offer a different perspective. 

There is a lack of parking near 



many of (he buildings on the 
south side of campus. I don't feel 
that people who are employed by 
K-Staie should have (o park on 
the north side of campus and 
walk 15 minutes to their office. 
In the winter, it is often dark by 
the time an employee leaves 
work. Most staff people cannot 
afford r»erved parking stalls on 
their salaries. Currently, 1 walk to 
campus, but if I remained 
employed at K-State until retire- 
ment. I do not know if I would 
continue to be able to do so. 

If an employee's schedule dif- 
fers from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m., it is 
virtually impossible to find a 
place to park in faculty-staff or 
general lots. Parking off-campus 
is not a solution because it is dis- 
courteous to the residents, and 
many neighborhoods have taken 
action to prevent parking on the 
streets bordering K-State. If an 
employ 
ee hasa 
doctor 
appoint- 
ment, 
wants to 
attend a 
child's 
school 
pro- 
gram, 
wants to 
meet a 
fneiul at 
lunch or 
run 

errands 

at lunch, it is impossible to return 
to campus and find a parking 
place. Since 1 walk, 1 have not 
purchased a parking permit. 
There are limes, however, when 
circumstances require me to 
drive. Then I must find a place in 
the metered lot. This is not easy, 
especially when half of the lot is 
blocked for an event in the 
Union. 

Since the new an museum will 
soon attract more people to the 
south side of campus, and other 
plans for the future include 



increasing the conventitm capabili- 
ties of the Union, it is imperative 
that steps be taken to provide ade- 
quate parking facilities, it is past 
time for a parking garage at K- 
State. Perhaps those who feel that 
people are just lazy will be willing 
to continue to walk from the north 
lots so I can park my car a little bit 
closer to my office. 

Uurle Kirer 
senior In Journalism and 
I communications 



where lifestyles, faiths and views 
on arithmelic are diverse. 

In fact, I have no problem giv- 
ing these people the highly respect- 
ed banking positions they have 
been denied for too long. Denying 
people a job because they believe 
differently than the institution they 
work for is both ludicrous and 
highly unfair. 

In fact, letting a wider array of 
people with different arithmetical 
beliefs 



-Wm not rtght, 
and no amount 
of pratly pack- 
aging la going 
to changa my 
mind." 



Craic Dotx:E 

frashman undoctded 



"Aa a ataff par- 
aon at K-Stata 

as wall aa a 

atudant, I 

ballava I can 

offar a diffar* 

ant parapac- 

thra." 

Lai/meKifek 

senior in journalism artd 
mass communicaltOOB 



► TOLERANCE 

Tolerance only go^ so far 

Dear editor. 

Two plus two is four. I believe 
this is a fact. Of course, I have 
leained to accept and tolerate those 
who believe two plus two equals 
five. Far be it from me to force my 
beliefs and convictions upon any- 
one else. Who am I to say that the 
answer is four and not five? Yes, it 
is fine for me to believe in four, but 
at the same time, what business do 
I have forcing my conclusion on 
others? 

Accepting the answer of those 
who believe the answer to be five 
of six will help us all get along bet- 
ter in this quickly changing world 



into the 
bank will 
allow 
more 
people to 
seethe 
transcen- 
dent 
dcccp- 
tance that 
the said 
bank pro- 
fesses to 
believe 
in. 

True, the absolute right and 
wrong will be abolished, and the 
financial institution will be falling 
apart because it is contradicting 
itself, but it will be tolerant. 

The problem with absolute tol- 
erance is it flies in the face of rea- 
son. 

We have to come to grips with 



"TtM problem 
with absolute 
tolerance la K. 
fllas In the 
tace of rea- 
son.** 



Craig Dotx^E 

Iroshman undecided 



the idea 
that there 
are 

absolutes, 
there is a 
right and 
wrong, 
and not 
every 
idea is a 
good 
idea. 
Although 
it may be 
old-fash- 
ioned, I 

believe that the basis of right and 
wrong is the Bible, and not a 
morally ambiguous social majority. 

I believe in following the exam- 
ple of Jesus Christ, loving the sin- 
ner and offering a way of escape 
from sin. 

To me, calling lying, homosexu- 
ality, sex outside of marriage and 
murder anything but wrong is the 
equivalent of accepting my bank 
statement with the banker believing 
two plus two as five. 

It's not right, and no amount of 
pretty packaging can make me be 
tolerant of it. 

Craig Dodge 

freshman undecided 




Lair Gauche 

12th & Moro 

(Aggieville) 

Manhattan 

77&-3302 



'Computers (new b used) 
••Safes • Service • Upgrades 
••High Quality Components 

'Music (1,000s to pick from) 
••CD's (none over $8) 
•'Cassettes (all are $2) 

•Movies (lOO's to select) 
••VHS (none over $8) 
"We have Video Laserdisc 

'Software (over 650 titles) 
••For IBM & Mac 
••Far below normal retail 



Mark Rick 

& 

Friends 

9 p.m. • 1 ■.m. 

Folk & Blues 

No Cover 

Friday. Feh 24 

Brett King 
Musical Comedy 

9 p.111. - ? 

No Cover 



BLEACHERS 

awnui * tai * uib 



17tli A Ft. Rllty BItd. 



S3T-I4g4 



SfHIh AnnonQiiaiD 




M(Ddl©(D) 



February 24, 25, 26, 1995 
'Iz/C Weber Hall Arena .jf^' 

m^ (KSU Campus) j^^f^^p 

"^JS Manhattan, Kansas •vr-, j^sV 

Tonight 7:30 p.m ^...PERFORMANCE '< 

Foliowing rodeo.. Rodeo DANCE at KICKERS 

Saturday.....! & 7:30 p.m....PERFORMANCES 

I p.m KJDS DAY AT THE Rodeo 

7 p.m. MISS Rodeo K-STATE Coronation 

Followliig rodeo • Rodeo DANCE at KICKERS 

Sunday 1 p.m JCSV Rodeo FINALS 

10 a.nL .FELLOWSHIP OF CHRISTIAN 

COWBOYS Church Service 



TICKETS mAEDVANCE 
Adult- $5 tCidsl2& under- $3 

AT TEE BOOM 
Adult - $6 Kids 12 & under - $3.50 



TICKET OUTLETS 

' S Bar J Western Clothiers, Lee's Westem Wear or Weber 

Hall (Room 134) - Manhattan 

> Vanderbill's • Wamego 

• Roy Frey Western or Vandcrbilt's - Topeka 

• Roberts Westem Outfitters - Junction City 

• Riltel's Westem Wear - Abilene 
•Any KSU Rodeo Club Member 



ATTENTmNAllL MDS 12 <fi UNBEM 

* February 25, 1 p.m. performance, 

first 500 kids receive a trick rope, FREE! 

Sponsored by Farm Oedit Services of Northeast Kansas. 

• Birthday in February? 

If so, register at Hardees or B104.7 radio 

for Kids Birthday Party. 



For more information, contact Randy Raub S32'1240 
or Stevt Frazitr 539-8585, 



City Farmers 
Surplus Flea Market 

Open; 
l^ies. - Fri. 10 a.m. - 6 p.m. 
Sat. & Sun. 10 a.m. - S p.m. 

Appliances, ^roiturc, household iienu, 
jewelry and clothing, sporting goods, 
toots, medical supplies, lawn equipn\ent, 
antiques, home maintenance items, 
knick knacks and A LOT MORE (A 
little bit of cvetythirtg new and used at 
affotdable prices.) 

We Buy Used 501 Levis 

201 S. 4th St., 
Manliattan, Kansas 

(the old Sears building) 

\^ 539-8579 



PI 


nTv^T ^fl^H 


^^J'C'^^ 


'^1 


"W 


^5 %S^M^m^MWMM/a^\_ff. fltM, f #r|jlf4H 


Fond raiser: 
Little Apple Softball 


Jim C^^^? 



Becjauise iStuff^happerLiS. 

*Hcy this ifi Corporate America. We have to keep it clean. 



VISA 







It's every^^^l^^^^ ^ 
you AA'artt to be." 



<D ViiMi USA Inc. 19flS 



6 




PORTS 



CO-REC TOP 9 INTRAMURAL BASKETBAU TEAMS 



1. Fast Babes 


(3-0( 


2. Nads 


(3^) 


3. Fast Babes Farm Team 


m 


4. Da 8oy; & Da Girts 


(M) 


5. Pifik Tacos 


(4-0) 




m 



FURIMIir24.!M8 



KANSAS mn com 



K'Stato wing 
KJersten Larson 

applies pressura to ■ 
Mlsaourl player dur- 
ing K-Statfl's 70-60 
loaa to tha Tigers In 
Columbia on Jan. 29. 
CAmrcoNonii 

Coltegjan 




Pats to square off against MU, CU 



J OAHummmNz 

1^ he K-State women *s 
basketball team will 
play its final games of 
. the regular season this 
weekend in a homestand that 
may decide their postseason fate. 

The Cats will be host to Missouri 
tonight at 7 and then play Colorado 
Sunday afternoon at 2. 

Both teams won their home games 
against K- Slate by lU points. 

The Buffaloes pulled out a 76-66 win 
Jan. 27, and the Cats dropped to Missouri 
70-60 two days later. 

Post defense will be crucial in Friday's 



game against the Tigers. 

"Missouri has two really good players, 
Nikki Smith and Erika Martin, in ttie 
post," K-Staie coach Brian Agler said. 

"They both had close to 20 points 
against us over there. We'll have to do a 
better Job of putting pressure on the ball 
and playing post defense." 

TTie more formidable of the two oppo- 
nents comes in Sunday. The third-ranked 
Colorado Buffaloes will be bringing in a 
balanced scoring attack and high opti- 
mism. 

"It wouldn't surprise me if Colorado 
wins it all, " Agler said. 

"They're definitely a Final Four team." 

"They've just got everything you need. 
They've got good perimeter players, and 
they've got really strong post play." 

The Cats played Colorado tight in 



Boulder, lying the score with 11:44 
remaining. 

But three consecutive three-point shots 
by Amy Palmer put the game away. 

"We don't really do anything different 
than with anyone else," Agler said. 

"We've always, for some reason, 
played them well, and I wouldn't be sur- 
prised if we see the same thing Sunday. 
We'll have to do a good job controlling 
the tempo, but if we can do that. 1 feel we 
can be right with them." 

This weekend's games could have a 
great effect on K-Suie's seed in the Big 
Eight Tournament. 

By winning both games, the Cats could 
finish as high as third in the conference. 

Losing both games could drop the 
team as low as sixth. 

Both games could be imporiant in the 



race for an NCAA Tournament berih as 
well. 

"We've got to win Friday, because to 
get to postseason play, you've got to have 
a .SOO record or better on your confer- 
erKe." Agler said. 

"If we could beat Colorado, not only 
would that be a win in the conference, but 
we'd beat a team that's really powerful. 
That would greatly enhance our chances." 

Even though a win against Colorado 
would be nice. Agler said the Cats can't 
look beyond Missouri. 

"We are not looking by Missouri in 
any kind of fashion, because they 
whipped us over there," he said. 

"Our ladies know that for us to have 
any shot at all, they have to finish .500 or 
better in the conference, so we have to 
take care of business Friday." 



► TSNNI8 



Cats to face Lobos 



MUMTMOMM 



The K-State tennis team 
is looking to get back on 
track after » two- week lay- 
off. 

After a disappointing 0-2 
trip to Utah, K-State coach 
Steve Bietau said his 
Wildcats hope to turn tfalngj 
around on ttieir own playing 
stirface. 

The team clatnwd victofy 
in only one nuitch on the 
road trip, tn No, t doubles, 
Kahna Kuregian and 
Marline Sbfub^tole captured 
a 6- .3, 1-6, 6-4 win over 
Aogie Olson and Linda 
Qigblom of Utah. 

"We really struggled out 
there a* a team," Bietau said. 

"1 think we have to lesm 
how to be lougber, play 
smarter and Ix a lot more 
competitive. When we <lo 
thostr things, we will be a lot 
more siiccessful." 

Coming into town 
Saturday is the Cats' next 
opprmeni. tlie New Mexico 
Lotios, 

New Mexico, a metnlwr 
of the Western Athletic 
Conference, is nuked Titub 
in the f entral region rank- 
ings, three spot.i IkIow K- 
Statc. 

Leading the way for the 
Lobos is Angela Skrbic, the 
No 30ih-rai;ked player is 
Ihengion. 

K-Staie bas a Ug^ 



weapon, though, in 
Kuregian Despite « three- 
match losing streak in sin- 
gles, Btet:iu said he looks for 
improvements from his all - 
American. 

^'Wbeak comes b) 
Kuina, we're not in a panic 
staK yet" Btciau said 

"She lost to two very 
good players and played one 
very poor match We hove to 
keep things in perspective, 
though. Any time a player 
iin't playing well, you have 
to do the things that work 
out any [voblenu. She l»s 
been working a kM on her 
stroke. We need her to (eel 
Ixttcr about the way she's 
playing." 

The mnicb against New 
Mexico is K-Siate*s final 
borne nuich until the Big 
Sghl Conference seaaoi 
begins. 

Bieuu said thai the next 
month of play is important 
for his team. 

•TThe matches coming up 
for ut mean a lot to thu 
team," Bietau said. 

"We r>eed to Start getting 
things together before the 
conference seaaon starts. 
Our nc*i major oMicem is 
Big Eight play. Anything we 
do before wc start the con- 
ference in April can nuke a 
big difference for ns." 

Saturday's action is 
tcheduled for noon at the 
Cottonwood Club. 




K*State pitcher Iric 
Yini tries to beat a 
Missouri Western ptayer 
to first base during K- 
State'a sweep ol the 
Griffona Wedrwsday il 
Frank Myers Field. 



CoHsgtsn 



K-State to play in Louisiana during weekend 



Mcoupoau. 



CalitfUn 

The K-State baseball team got 
its first taste of victory 
Wednesday night after sweeping 
a doubleheader from Missouri 
Western. 

Now Coach Mike Clark just 
hopes his Wildcats keep that win- 
ning appetite. 

"I hope the guys have a nice 
taste in their mouths after 
Wednesday night, because I want 
them to get hungiy for this week- 
end," Clark said. "1 want them to 
stay hungry for it and continue to 
do the things we need to do like 
we did Wednesday night." 



What K-State did Wednesday 
night was put together solid per- 
formances both on the mound 
and at the plate, resulting in 6-4 
and 10-3 victories against the 
Griffons. 

Newcomer Steve Pcarce gave 
the Cats four solid innings from 
the mound, as he allowed just 
four hits and two runs while strik- 
ing out two. But picking up the 
win for K-State was Adam 
Novak. 

The second game of the 
evening saw K-State record a 
more convincing win as the Cats 
scored 10 runs on IS hits. 

But despite the Cats' impres- 



sive performance Wednesday. 
Clark said his team will have to 
be prepared for this weekend's 
Lake Area Classic in Lake 
Charles, La. 

"We've got to come out and 
have a good weekend this next 
weekend." he said. "Both 
Creighlon and McNeese State are 
excellent. It's a good test for us. 
It's the type of competition that's 
going to prepare us for the Big 
Eight Conference. 

"They'll either show us this 
weekend what we need to contin- 
ue to work on, or they'll show us. 
hey, if we compete with these 
guys, wc can beat these guys." 




► COLUMN 

Track can be 
an enjoyable 
experience 

Sports fans have a golden opportu- 
nity to watch some of the best athletes 
in the nation perform this weekend, but 
some might miss it. 

For the first 
and possibly the 
last time, the Big 
Eight Indoor 
Track and Field 
Championships 
will be in Abeam 
Field House 
Today and 
Saturday. 

K-Sutc's 
Gwen Wen 1 1 and, 
the best female 
high jumper in 
the Uniteid 
Slates, and Petar 
Malcsev, the best 
collegiate male 
high jumper, will be on displ-jy along 
with dozens of other NCAA qualifiers. 

Sports fans generally only pay 
attention to track and field in Olympic 
years or when something negative in 
the sport occurs, such as athletes fail- 
ing (bug tests. 

However, if given a chance, fans 
can enjoy the sport and possibly estab- 
lish an admiration for one of the few 
spoits in the world where a referee 
can't decide the outcome. 

OK. I hear the usual excuses like 
'Track is boring," or "it takes too • 
long." 

The blame for this can be split 
between the sports fans and the sport 
itself. 

Fans just don't expose themselves 
to track-and-field news. 

Additionally, fans who are addicted 
to contact sports like football and bas- 
ketball gel bored when there's no vio- 
lence involved. 

The people who conduct track 
m^ts are to blame t>ecause track meets 
just aren't fan-friendly. 

'Track is the only sport in the worid 
where fans honestly don't know what 
the score is," Nebraska track coach 
Gary Pepin said. "I think wc need to do 
a better job of letting the fans know 
what is going on." 

Track meets appear to be a three- 
ring circus. The heights and distaiu:es 
of the field events are usually clearly 
displayed on signs, but the problem 
with those is that fans have three signs 
flashing results at them at the same 
time, and it becomes overwhelming. 

Team scores are also a problem. 
Most fans don't have any idea of what 
the team standings are unless they have 
been diligently keeping track of results 
on their own. 

Fans who actually understand how 
to score a meet are a rarity as well, 
even though it is simple. 

(The top eight finishers in each 
event will t>e awarded points in this 
order: 10, 8, 6, 5, 4, 3, 2 and 1 point for 
eighth place.) 

Ever started watching basketball in 
the middle of the game on television 
and get frustrated because the station 
won't show the score? That's what 
fans are up against at most track meets. 

Becoming fan- friendly creates a 
double-edged sword for the sport, 
though. If officials only run one event 
at a time, then the meet drags on for 
hours, and boredom sets in. 

This is where the job of the public- 
address announcer is vital. 

While such events as the high jump 
may take mwe than an hour to com- 
plete, the event is usually won or lost 
on the last few jumps. 

Therefore, the announcer needs to 
draw attention lo events that are near 
completion. 

Organizers need to schedule events 
so they don't all end at the same time. 

My advice to fans who plan to 
attend the Big Eight Indoor 
Championships this weekend is to 
think ahead. 

The meet runs from 9 a.m. to 
approximately 8 p.m. today, and 9 a.m. 
through 3 p.m. on Saturday. That 
might be too much lo ask of anybody. 

Try to find out sonx information on 
the individuals or events you would 
like to see and when they take place. 

Better yet, try to find a time when 
several events you may be interested in 
take place in a row. 

If you aren't planning to attend, you 
should seriously reconsider calling 
yourself a spoits fan, because you will 
miss some of the greatest athletes in 
college athletics. 







Today's blue-light special: 
authentic Mark IWain 
Memorial Bridge pieces 



■"Hsoi 



to good home: historic bridge. 
Some assembly required. 



The Missouri Highwiy and 
Traospoftation Depaitment is looking for a 
new owner for the Mark Twain Memorial 
Bridge in Hannibal, Mo, 

The bridge is ^heduled to be replaced 
after 60 years of carrying highway traffic 
over the Mississippi River in Samuel 
Clemens' hometown. 

It's a good deaJ ftM* the right person, said 
RatMlall Dawdy, the department's historic 
bridge coordinator. 

The department will even take the 
bridge apan and teavc it in a nice, neat pile 
for the new owner. 

But it will be up to tte new owner to 
move it and rebuild it 

The 2,637-foot bridge was built in 1934 
by the Moutit Vernon and Union Bridge 
Construction companies at a cost of about 
$600,000. 

It will continue to carry two lanes of 
U.S. 36 traflic over the river until a bigger, 
four-lane replacement can be completed 
sometime in 1 998 or 1999, 

I've got itf Let's get this bridge, move it 
to K-State and put it up in front of 
Memorial Stadium to hide the parking 
garage inside. 

We could then turn the n>ad surface of 
the bridge into a grass playing field, effec- 
tively doubling the existing green space. 

The Parking Task Force has said this 
may be a possibility, but the feasibility 
study will not be done until sometime in 
2009. 

Air Force no longer able 
to fly the friendly skies 
of West Virginia county 

The Air Force has surrendered to a 
small Appalachian county that voted 
to close its airspace in pn>test over an 
tmpaid bill. 

The federal government will reimburse 
Morgan County, W.Va., $10,900 for 
responding to the crash of sn Air National 
Guard C- 1 30 in October L99Z. Rep, Bob 
Wiae said Wednesday. 

The County Commisston had voted to 
close its airspace to all federal aircraft until 
it received the money. 

"If all goes as planned, perhaps the skies 
over Morgan County can be opened once 
i^ain very soon," Wise joked in making the 
anrtounccment. 

"It proves to us that the American sys- 
tem truly does work," saiit County 
Commissioner Phil Maggio. "I'm siue our 
taxpayers will be pleased." 

Maybe it's about time to close the air- 
space above the K- State campus to state 
government aircraft until they stop taking 
more tuition money from us each year. 

Everybody cut footloose; 
Sunday dancing is back 

Dancing fools will no longer have to 
waltz out of town every Sunday to 
get their thrills. 

The Hereford, Texas, City Commission 
voied 6-1 Monday to repeal a 1956 ban oa 
Sunday dancing in this Texas Panhandle 
town of 14,623, 

Rumaldo Garcia, a dance-hall operator 
who led the repeal effort, said many people 
had been taking their Sunday two-steps to 
nearby communities. 

"I don't see why these surrounding 
towns should get the money," be told the 
commisston. 

Others weren't exactly kicking up their 
heels. 

"I'm just concerned about the family 
values in this time," said Commissioner 
Dennis Hicks, who cast the lone "nay" 

VOlB. 

"If people want to dance, let them go to 
a place that allows that," Hicks said. 

It reminds me of that eighth-grade Tilm 
classic "Footloose." 

As hipster-rebel Ren MacCormack 
(Kevin Bacon) said, 'This is our time to 
d»nce." 

layaMaMAwir 




7 



KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN 



Friday, February 24, IMS 



TIRED OF THE MEAT 

MARKET? 

Alternatives to traditional singles' scene do exist 



STORY BY NIKOLA ZYTKOW 



L 



iKiking into a crystal ball or 
calling the psychic hot line 
won't bring you any closer 
to the date of your dreams. 



But joining volunteer groups, hanging out at 
weddings and even going to church might. 

"A good place to meet women is at wed- 
dings," Norm Sedillo, senior in pre-mcdicine. 
said. "At weddings everyone is in the mood for 
love. They're smitten." 

Sedillo said amidst all the kissing and bouquet 
tossing, the women often start to think about 
their future and wonder if they'll ever get mar- 
ried. 

"That's when I show up and say, 'Hey babe,'" 
Sedillo said. 

Jimmy Dean, sophomore in psychology, said 
he likes to meet women at church, in between 
praising the Lord, of course. 

"You can really tell a church girl from a club 
hoppin' giri. They talk differently and carry 
themselves differently," he said. 

Colleen Walton, senior in English literature, 
is one of those women who said she enjoys 
going to church singles groups, as well as the 
coffee shops and restaurants. 

"You meet the nght kind of people there — 
the creative thinkers, ' Walton said. 

Walton said she likes to stay away from the 
bars and club scenes because of the raunchy 
atmosphere and come-on lines generated at some 
of the places. 

"They're usually stupid or corny," she said of 
the pickup lines some guys use, "They usually 
come from people that are desperate and defi- 
nitely not creative — the kinds of people you 
wouldn't want to hang around, I usually just tell 
them I'm dating someone. 1 lie, laugh or Just 
ignore them." 

But responses to these lines vary. 

"It really depends on the person. If they are 
cute, they can get away with it," Jennifer 
Hubener, senior in human resource management, 
said. 

Scott Smith, soi^omore in horticulture, said it 
makes him sick that some guys actually 
approach women in that fashion. 

"If 1 were a female, and a guy approached me 
like that, I'd feel cheap, dcgmitd. I'd slap them 
or throw a drink in their face." Smith said. 

"Men like that are very, very uneducated. 
They've got lo live in the sticks to use that. 
They've gotta have some leeih missing, and their 
mom and dad have to be brother and sister," he 
added, half- laughing. 

But bad pickup lines are not confined to men 
only, said Vrenda Pritchard, a faculty member in 
veterinary medicine. 

Pritchard. who likes to go to the Chester E. 
Peters Recreation Complex, said she sees women 




PICKUP LINES NOT TO U^E 

■ "Bond, James Bond.' 
• *Sex is a killer - wani to die happy'* 

■ ■Whatwoiiidyouc(oiflkissedyoungMnow?" _ 

■ 1 have had a reaiV badday, ardit always makes me leel better to see a~prelty 
girl smte. So, woiW yw smite for me?" 

■ Tardon me. btJt what pickup Itne wctks best wWi you?* 

■ Do your tegs hurt from running Itirough my dreams aU night?" 

■ t)o you t)eieve ir bve al first sight or should I walk by again?* 

■ "Caniftrtwithyou?* 

■ Iftaur daddy must ftave been a baker, 'cause yo/ve got a nice set of buns.* 

■ Is It hoi In here, or te It just your 

■ "Can t hivi dtoctumT* To whereT To your heart.' 

■ *AI thon txfm, and me with no brakes." 

■ 1 miss my faddy bear. Wsdd you sleep «^ mer 

■ 'So-htwamldobigT' 

■ "Can I bOTow a ()uartor? I wffitf to calt my mem and til her t jusi met the giri of 
mydraBms,* 



ART BY JUSTIN STAHLMAN 



up there with thong body suits and G-strings and 
said she thinks they sometimes try to look helj>- 
less to pick up men. 

"They play all helpless, like they don't know 
how anything works," she said. 

Although she does admit that the Rec is a 
good place to meet people. Simply asking some- 
one to spot you or asking the mechanics of a cer- 
tain machine can be a good icebreaker, she said. 

"You could say, for example, 'Would you 
watch my form?' while performing a certain 
exercise or lifUng weights." 

Pritchard said she's had people pick up on her 
tt>ere, and she even dated sotne of them. 

Whether you're at a bar or a wedding, 
approaching the person of your dreams is always 
tough. 

"Pickup lines nowadays come after a little bit 
of observation," Keith Collier, K-State graduate, 
said. Ke said this observation can vary from a 
couple of minutes to an hour, however long it 
takes to think of something original to say. 

"If you see they're already interested in you 
— a certain glance or blatant stare — that's 
when you can go for the lines." he said. 

"Compliment something about her, something 
original. If she looks like she spent a lot of time 
getting her nails done with jewelry in it and 
everything, tell her they look good Basically 
complinrteni anything that looks like it took some 
extra preparation. Women love when a man pays 
attention to details." 

Collier said he recently had an opportunity to 
use this line. When he saw the woman was 
receptive of his advances, he said to her, "Oh, 
and 1 don't see any rings on those fingers." 

'This lets her know your intentions as well as 
shows her respect by making sure she's not with 
anyone else." Collier said. 

Collier can testify to the success rate of (his 
technique even out of the club scene. Recently, 
he has become involved in some volunteer worfe. 

"You've got to gel involved with a volunteer 
group. It's a chance to meei eligible, single peo- 
ple that are doing something positive. Oh, and 
believe me — there's a lot of good-looking 
women out there," he said. 

Collier volunteers his time teaching elemen- 
tary students the importance of staying in school. 
Meanwhile, he said he gets to know the coun- 
selors and teachers. 

"I just met three women this way. One of 
them is a first-grade teacher," he said. 

Smith, on the other hand, said he likes the 
outdoor atmosphere when meeting people. 

"The park, definitely the park. You usually go 
with friends," Smith said. "If there's someone 
there that I'd want to draw attention to running 
or something, I'd start jogging over to them and 
ask if they want to play Frisbee with us." 

Sounds innocent enough — as does the 
library, a place where Amy Braun, freshman 
undecided in arts and sciences, said she likes to 

■ See PICKING Page 8 



► ASTROLOGY FORECAST 





I For ihoM or you who skipped elm Ui*t day, lait Fridijr'l 
[Migrunc wu, reilly, ictlly cool. 



PIICII (Feb. 20-March 

20) Happy Birthday. Expect 
this week to be kind of a 
cool-down. You've been 
working hard and doing lots 
of studying. Enjoy the relax- 
aliun Hang out with lots of 
t'nend.s and give that one spe- 
cial someone a bit of a chase. 
For the weekend; Follow 
your inner voice. 

Uat (March 21-April 20) 
You may feel dense and out- 
of-whack, so hang around 
with people who will lift 
your spirits. This is a great 
time to be optimistic and 
open your mind. Finances 
look great, but watch out for 
a con artist who is looking to 
spend your money. For the 
weekend: Go out on a secret 
rendezvous. 

TAURUS (April 2 1 -May 

21) Spontaneous and adven- 
turous are the key words for 



you. Be social and let go of 
that down-to-earth, mellow 
attitude you Taurus people 
are so known for. You'll be 
longing for status this week, 
so don't let your snobby side 
take over. For the weekend: 
Stick around the home front 
and let adventure fmd you. 

OmiM {May 22- June 21) 
Romance is highlighted this 
week, so make sure you're in 
the right place at the right 
time. Play hard-io-get when 
that former flame comes 
knocking at your door. 
Education should be at the 
top of your "to-do" list. For 
the weekend: Hang out with 
neglected friends and family. 

MMCn (June 22-July 23) 
You will be using alt your 
intelligence this week to get 
yourself out of trouble. Be 
extra-sensitive around some- 
one you like, and they will 



respond beautifully. Finances 
still seem negative, so try 
seeking professional help. 
For the weekend: Be on your 
best behavior. 

LIO (July 24-Aug. 23) 
Everyone seems to be work- 
ing your nerves this week, so 
relax and chill out. Romance 
is more positive than ever, so 
put your best foot forward. 
Co-workers are in your cor- 
ner, so be in theirs. For the 
weekend: Spend time with 
the one you love. 

WrMO (Aug. 24-Sept. 23) 
Time to return to your old, 
sweet self again. Last week 
everyone was your worst 
enemy, but now you arc 
more relaxed. Organization is 
sharp, and your instincts are 
on target. Romance is look- 
ing good — just give your 
partner the confidence to 
express feeling to you. For 



the weekend: Be loving. 

LIBRA (Sept. 24-Ocl. 23 
An excellent opportunity for 
love has finally arrived. Let 
yourself be carried away in 
the excitement. Now is a 
good time to be responsible 
and grounded, which might 
be hard for airy Libra. Work 
has you feeling exhausted. 
For the weekend: Remain 
calm and focused. 

ICOflPlO (Oct. 24-Nov. 
22) All the hard work you 
put into your career will 
finally earn you that recogni- 
tion you've been waiting for. 
Someone may try to sink 
your ship, but just smile and 
keep on moving. For the 
weekend: Surprise your 
sweetheart. 

lAQITTARlUt (Nov. 23- 
December 21) The love inter- 
est you've been trying to 
develop is finally going to 



come through. Keep your 
head and don't gel carried 
away. For the weekend: 
Avoid authority figures, or 
your rebellious nature will 
gel you in trouble, 

CAmCORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 
20) Communications seem 
excellent, and they are. 
Mercury moved into your 
house of communication. 
Finances are wonderful, so 
go ahead and buy that new 
stereo. For the weekend: 
Give that romantic partner 
you've been neglecting a 
night of total bliss. 

AQUARlUt (Jan. 21 -Feb. 
19) Venus is moving into 
your sign, so get ready for 
lots of attention from the 
opposite sex. Finances may 
not seem loo good, but you'll 
make do with what you have. 
For the weekend: Be 
assertive and call the shots. 



O Friday, February 24, I98S 



KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN 



► CAMPUS 



Legacy lecturer stresses flexibility 



wmitim. 

Csllcfiin 

Being flexible is the key to 
finding a job in today's market. 

Flexibility was one of the 
point;; Mclanic Fannin, president 
of Southwestern Bell Kansas, 
stressed when she delivered the 
third Legacy Lecture Thursday in 
the K-Statc Union Little Theatre. 

Fannin said there is no such 
thing as lifetime employment, and 
flexibility is the key to survival. 

"Be flexible and be willing to 
embrace change. " she said. 

Fannin said having balance was 
a key to success a( work and at 
home. 

"There is more pressure to 
spend more time at work than at 
home." she said. 

Following into that trap could 
destroy your work life as well as 
your home life, Fannin said. 

"No company wants a burned - 
out mess." she said. 

Fannin said she had always 
dreamed of being a lawyer, but 



her faculty adviser told her a pre- 
law degree would be a mistake. 

"He said there was a good 
chance 1 wouldn't be accepted 
into law school, so I should get a 
degree like education." she said. 

Fannin did receive a degree in 
education but went on to graduate 
from the University of Texas Law 
School with a law degree. 

Fannin accepted a corporate 
attorney job with Southwestern 
Bell in 1977 and worked her way 
up the ladder to become chief 
legal counsel for Southwestern 
Bell Telephone's state operations 
in Oklahoma in 1992. 

"I had climbed as high as an 
attorney can climb on the corpo- 
rate ladder." she said. 

Fannin said attorneys were told 
they could not expand into other 
areas in the business. That's why 
she was so shocked when she was 
offered the job of president in 
1994. 

"No one was as surprised as I 
was," she said. 



As president, Fannin said she 
quickly learned how fast the 
telecommunication industry was 
advancing, and competition was 
fierce. 

"Everyone wants in on the 
action," she said. 

Fannin said firms are paying 
large amounts of money for the 
licenses of the new technology. 

"The bidding price for a new 
cellular service called Personal 
Communication Service is at $6 
billion for the license," she said. 

Fannin said the international 
market is also growing quickly. 

"Mexico has great growth 
potential. We iastall 100 new phone 
lines every hour of every day." 

As the president of 
Southwestern Bell in Kansas, 
Fannin has observed various 
changes in the business world. 

"These changes are over- 
whelming to us that have been in 
the busine.>;s world," she said. 

Employers used to want people 
who would take orders, Fannin 



said, but now they want people 
who are creative and have speak- 
ing and computing skills. She said 
interpersonal skills are also very 
important. 

Fannin said even with these 
changes, one thing has remained 
the sanrve. 

"Employers are still interested 
in grades," she said. 

Jenny Mccray, freshman in pre- 
law, said she enjoyed learning 
about the future of big business. 

"The lecture was insightful on 
the international front and how it 
will affect my future," she said. 

Jeff Schwab, .senior in fmance, 
said he knows what he has to 
work on. 

"I need to focus more on the 
communications between individ- 
uals, both orally and written," he 
said. 

Fannin ended her lecture with 
some words of advice. 

"Choose a job you love, and 
you'll never work another day in 
your life," she said. 



Students compete in rodeo 



CONTINUED FROM PAGE I 

freshman in pre-professional ele- 
mentary education, Skeet Johnson, 
junior in general agriculture, and 
Sudcrman. 

Individually, Johnson placed first 
in the .steer-riding competition by 
holding on the longest while riding 
on a steer backward with his two 
hands holding on to the steer's Hank 
and his legs wrapped around its 
neck. 

Roger Miller, junior in feed-sci- 
ence management, and Sara 
Berkowitz, junior in animal science 
and industry, won the barrel -racing 
competition. 



Miller carried Berkowitz on his 
back while running around three 
bairels. 

Tonya Pauly, freshman in sociol- 
ogy, was the fastest to tie a ribbon 
around a goat's tail. 

Jim Schmidt, sophomore in agri- 
cultural engineering, won the calf- 
tying competition with a time of 
19.27 seconds. He flanked the calf 
and lied three of its legs. 

Each divisional winner received a 
cash award. 

"I think it went over pretty well," 
White said. "I think everyone liked 
it, and rl can only gel better if we do 
ii again." 



Muscular Dystrophy 
Association to receive money 



CONTINUED FROM PAGE 1 

Suderman said the residents really 
get a kick out of seeing the cow- 
boys, especially the clowns. 

"Working with them really 
makes you appreciate what the 
Lord has given you. Working with 
them helps us as people, or at lea.st 
it helps me," he said. 

"It is a lot of fun, and it also 
serves as kind of a run-through for 
the team for the upcoming rodeo." 



Suderman said. "It gives us a 
chance to sec where our hiccups 
are, and what we need to work on." 

In addition to this event, con- 
ducted in conjunction with the col- 
legiate rodeo, the club also donates 
money to the Muscular Dystrophy 
Association, Suderman said. 

"Rodeo Club is a fun time, and 
the reward is in your work. There is 
always something going on," he 
said. 



Cf+RISTWM 
D/4riC€ 



flWilCllM- 

mi 




PftlDKY. f eo. 24 
9P-fV 



MTU41WIV. ttfi. 2C 
lOP-lJl 



IF YOU WAIVT TO MAKE nr 

DV THE REAL WORLD, 

SPEND A SEMESTER 

EVOURS. 



Wall Disney World Co rfprcscniativcs will tic on campus to 
present an informsition session for UndcrRraduaic Students on 
the WALT DISNEV WORLD Summer/Fall 95 College ProBram, 



WHIKi;: .Sn Dl.M IMON, KOOM 212 



AttetidaHce al this pn^xetUatUm h required to 
iniert'infjttr the SummerFaU '95 CrtUege Program. 

(niervicws will be helJ Thursday. .Vlareli 2 

11k- following ntajors arc encuuraiicil to iitcndi 

Business, Cdtnmuntcuiion. Hrcrcation/Uisiirr 

Siudics, Hospitalin/Rcstaurani .VlanaRrmeni. 

Travel A Tourism. Tbcatrr/Drama. Ilortitultiirt. 

and Aurictiltiinr 

lifcttiunk are niftk-it in work aj oiir many 

WaicT Pari» and Rcsons Siuifcnts wiih 

.\S\ m.ijur ire cli[yhlf to ap()l> ^oii 

nicd II) lk)ld li(cKi4an.t itrlilitalMin t>R be 

3 MnmB s-wimmc r and wt II pmvtdc tlw 

f nining nrcik-il Inr an r\c'i(inj{ 

cxpchcntc Ihis sntinnir or IjII' 

For more inlbmuttloii contact: 

DcAiuia FuUer 

Phone: MM6ai 

World Co. 







fviufvfitr fbr rrtt t^ fhtir Hi H 



Picking up people doesn't 
have to include bars 



CONTINUED FROM PAGE 1 

"Libraries are a good way to meet 
men. If a guy is there, you know he's 
studious," Braun said. "A good way 
to break the ice would be to lek them 
to help you find something," 

"But you don't go to the library 
that much," a friend of Braun 's said. 

Both women laughed, and Braun 
admitted to going to bars occasionally. 

"I go to bars to have fun, but not 
for a romance." she said. 

Mary Fields, sophomore in anthro- 
pology, said she agrees and said the 
atmosphere at greek functions is 
much better than the ban anyway 

"People seem more sincere al the 
functions. You don* I feel like some- 
one's not going to remember your 
name in the morning." she said. 

Fields said the best way to appr- 
oach her is to start up conversation, 
and be honest and suaightforward. 

Makaela Nikodym, freshman 
undecided in arts and sciences, said 
the approach that works for her is to 



be shy or ignore the men. Her room- 
mate. Amy Kennedy, freshman in 
pre-professional elementary educa- 
tion, said she disagreed. Kennedy said 
she likes to meet men in the mall. 

"First you have to make eye con- 
tact," Kennedy said. 'Then you walk 
away and leave the store." 

Kennedy said she checks to sec if 
the man will follow her If he docs, 
she might approach him Sometimes 
it even leads to dating. 

Fven though it might sound 
unlikely that a serious relationship 
would emerge out of meeting at a 
video store or on the highway, it can 
happen. 

Hubener said she met her husband 
on Kansas Highway 75. 

"We pulled into a Hardee's park- 
ing lot. 1 was introduced lo him by a 
friend. Actually, he wasn't my type. 
He had long hair, and he was in a 
band. I did tell him he had pretty 
eyes." 

Four years later they were married. 



DR. PAUL E. BULLOCK 

OPTOMETRIST 




$io 



OFF 
COMPLETE EYE EXAM 



Bw ht-Offict Contact Lent Consuhation 



NEW LOCATION 
1441 ANDERSON AVE. ANPERSON VILLAGE 

MAN H ATTA N '776-94A1 
TOU FREE 1-800- 4J2-OOM 

IXP. MARCH i/2V95 




"\ isualK 
sliiiiitinii!" 



^^> 



" \ I'liSIIIK- 

|o\-iiilc.' 



/" ^\ 



\V r I ' '. -i t 1 ( 



p \ '.I k > ^ 1 \ i t M 



S T A R c; A T E 



Friday. February 24 7:00 A 9:30 pm 

Safurday. Fobruary 35 7:00pnn 
IK SuteUnion FORUM HALL 



*Watch for Th« Catchw In tha Wheat Film Contest* 



Dave's 






Thursday fc-i'nuvu/ii u, ii" uixmux Saturday 

7&9;30piii irtSSlLUVaUU 9:30|>iB 

fcalurini: 

•Tht Kpic «r Gllgantih: Swift ■■d $ava|« 
*DBrkB*ii Ltk* DirkB««i 

*Tkt Wa; Tbla|i G« 



Forum Hall 



•10» Yt*r* at MiralsaaaBliliH 
«D4alk sf SuIIbIjb 

•MbbIt G«w*i m 



Maintenance, future 
renovation cause rates 
to rise in residence tialls 



CONTINUED FROM PAGE 3 

taste better considering what we 
pay for them," he said, 

Remsburg said the increase plan 
was a good one. It is belter to raise 
the prices minimally over the years 
rather than all at once, he said. 

The history of the residence 
halls has been to try to space 
expenses out over the years so that 
any one group does not carry the 
burden ilself. Werring said. 

"The one added attribute is the 
commitment the students have 
made to Facilities 2(XX)," he said. 

Many of the buildings are 30 
years old, and the systems are 
beginning to decay. 

Maintenance is important to 
maintain things like hot water and 
air conditioning students expect 



every day. Otherwise, extensive 
renovations will be needed some- 
day, Werring said. 

"It seems kind of unnecessary, 
but everything is going up." Sybil 
Freeman, sophomore in elementary 
education, said. 

General maintenance, along with 
routine bills, is expensive, Wiley 
said. 

For example, the utility bill for 
housing alone averages around 
$100,000 every month. But that 
covers the 3,000 residents in the 
halls, the dining centers, the hous- 
ing offices and all other housing 
facilities, Wiley said. 

"We do things here that other 
schools don't. Money we save 
makes it better for our studenU," 
Wiley said. 





75 

Old Milwauki 
Bottfes \ 

^ \ YotJf Aggieville Altef native 

9 oz. Top Sirloin $6 8oz. KC Strip $6.50 

12 oz. T-Bone $7.25 16 oz. Top Sirloin $7. 75 

Friday, Feb. 24 

Come join BoWii^te's and Old Milwaukee for food, fun and prizes ! 
776-1022 3043 Anderson 



Justin Kastner for City Commission 



ASTNER 



Citv Commission 



Co-Chairpersons: Terry Glasscock 
Karen Rogers 



Treasurer: 



For more inlormatlon. call the UPC Enteflnirtinfiil Linp .ii 532-6570 



Larrv Becrafl 



Kerry S. & Sherry K. Carlson 

Don Wis sm an 

Harry Marsh 

Ron & Karolyn Tacha 

Dennis & Rhondu MulUn 

Kim Winkler 

Diiie Roberts 

Terry & Mary Guglc 

John & Sally Helin 

Don & Suzy Ericson 

Tom & Suzanne Arthur 

Becki Johnson 

Bill & April Bockus 

Donald & Doloris O'Connor 

Larry &. Anne Becrafl 

Henry & Lillian Brown 

Marti Marsh 

Bob Krause &, Marty Vanier 

Hinnie G. Smith 

Jerry Peiile 

Cam Fe liner 

John & Mary Lee Graham 

Jack & Jan Riley 

Dan & Sandy Messeli 

Lane & Elizabeth Mills 

Sue Peterson &. Charlie Thomas 

John & Mary Beth Reese 

Cherie & David Kodgion 

Bruce McMillan 

Barbara Finnegan 

Margaret Strain 

Mel & Donna Dee Chasiain 

Karen Rogers 

Naomi Scheldt 

Sally Lanidowne 

Tim & Linda Trubey 

Bob & Jacque Melsner 

Nancy Wilson 

Mark Esfeld 

Jodi Bryant 

Mario Brown 

Helen Hayes 

Pat A Teresa Alexander 



Sally Anderson 

Kent & Kick Glasscock 

Jerry A Robin Feeley 

Sue Colley 

Joe & Leola Smith 

Phil Brokcnicky 

Scon A Wilson 

Jack Com 

Bryan & Holly Hixson 

Roy & Carl a Jones 

Dick Hayier 

R.W. Krekel 

Brin^ Beverly Cobb 

Da*«$. Rogen 

Bajb'ftPotly Altland 

WIDlimMafsh 

Ri^ Howell 

SeoitWiiunan 

RJdurd & Jane Thieuen 

Ann Stevens 
- Pete A Hcten Cooper 
. ^-< Dave A Claudetie Laurie 
'•i. Jim & Maiy Undquist 

Bob Krah 

Karen Thuniiii] 

Wayne & Cindy Sloan 

Charlie & Pat Hughes 

Joe A Melisa Hancock 

Bill A Francis Glasscock 

Ron A Pam Say 

T^ny A Marlene Glasscock 

Lucky Houghton 

Richard Coleman 

Harvard A Dana Towntend 

Gary Pierson 

Donna A Terry Davis 

Mitchell Patterson 

Karen & Lewis Martin 

Bobi Hoover 

Barbara Wilson 

Irene Harlan 

Rick Mann 



**' 




Political adv. paid for by Justin Kaitner for City CommisaJon. 




IVERSIONS 



9 



MNIMSTAnOOUIQUUI 



RBRUARVHIMe 



► CROSSWORD 



ACROSS 

1 Sch. grp. 
4Tak>n 
8 Somber 

12 Umbrella 
part 

13 High- 
calorie 

14 Stromboli 
spillover 

15 BrurKh 
entree 

17 Chalce- 
dony 
variety 

18 Break off 

19 Additionally 



37 Top o( the 
line 

39 "So that's 
it, eh?- 

40 Brat 

41 Doorway 
45 Top 

48 Breai^ast 
order 

50 Sunday 
paper 
section 

51 Gossip 

52 Piscine 
flapper 

53 Contempt- 
ible 



21 Yon werKh 54 They might 



22 He would 

crack at 

any 

moment 
26 "MLiss" 

author 

29 Shoot in a 
stream 

30 Fabf>cat)on 

31 Erstwhile 
ovum 

32 Golf goal 

33 Pop choice 

34 Trapeiist's 
insurance 

35 Once- 
divided 
land: abbr. 

36 Less 



be high 
55 Wear down 
DOWN 

1 Urge on 

2IMews- 



week's 
competitor 

3 Help a 
hood 

4 Nativity 
scene 
setup 

5 Limber 

6 Don't iusl 
sil there 

7 If 

SPostal non- 
deterrent? 

9 Took off 

10 Wall 
climber 

11 Nth degree, 
jocularly 

16 Finlsfies 

the 

marathon 
20 Fomnerly 

chic 



Solution tlmo: 28 mina. 



7 


rs 


T 





1 


c 


L A 

C R 


M 

A 

V 


1 


C A 


W 


c;o|M 

HUE 

e;x!t 


^■a 


R 
Y 

U 




1 

S 
E 


A N D 
Ri_A[s 


^H 







Mb 


T 


YHM'IA 


R 

1 



w 


1 N 
S E 


MjE 
ill 

,x|y 


B 

d 


R 


G 
R 


H 

I 




P 
A 


1 p 

RE 


s 


T 


V 
O 
N 


X 




V 


E X 

1! 


mtJ 


I 

--t 
1 


4i 

AH 


P 
E 


■ 

E 


w 


A n 

f ( 


1 

c 
s 


1 


B 


A 


T T 


L 

1 


c 


C 


R Y 


E 
L 


D 

A 


1 E 

M'P 


H iInI 


H 


± 


H oIpIeI 



Eugene SHEHEit 

23 Tactic 

24 Bathroom 
wall piece 

25 Calendar 
quota 

26 Drape 
loosely 

27 State with 
certainty 

28 Actress 
Moreno 

29 Discor- 
dartce 

32 Veggie in 
Chinese 
food 

33 Sampling 
of drudgery 

35 Prized 
possession 

36 Summer- 
time garb 

38 Mason's 
partner 

39 Met 
otterir»g 

42 Roosevelt's 
successor 

43 Largest of 
the seven 

44 Sharp- 
sighted cat 

45 Branch 

46 Macabre 
writer 

47 Greek H 
49 X'est la 



outgoing 


Yosttrday'i 


> ana WW 


2-24 


- 


-1- 




1 


2 


3 


i 


4 


5 


6 


7 


1 


B 


9 


to 


n 


^i 






13 








t4 








1^ 
















1? 








IS 












1 


18 


20 




ta^^^^H^^ 






^ 




S^ 


i* 


a 




W 


2a 




w 




^■30 






3t 






r 




V 








i* 




W 




_■" 










» 






34 








3ft 




^^^1 








41 






4i 


4^ 


44 




44 


4? 




1 


48 
















to 








St 








1 


ta 






S3 









64 








»s 







Cf I IUDCR9 ^'^' answers to today's crossword, call 
Wl VlfflrEVi 1 -»XM54-e873 ! 99e per minute, louch- 
tooe/ rotary phorws. (16* only) A King Faaluros sefvice. NYC. 



CRYPTOQUIP 

MX TSEFLIZWZUQ, HJATH 

SLZEF-ZU LFWITKLTUIW 

QFl XJK IJ AKLM 

XJKL TOOFIZIF. 

Yesterday's Cryptoqulp: WHEAT FARMER, WAN- 
DERING IN HIS FEELDS LAST WEEK, CAME ACROSS 
A STALKER. 

Today's Cryptoquip clue: X equals Y 



► CALVIH AND HOBBES 



Biu Wattoson 



W^kJltWt IT Bt CTOL 
tf toy SHttttO »N0 

rttfit wiiANiv-i f(ton> 




■*U COM BREAK 
(T ori NOUR CMCl. 
UK) HMl K 3 

35^ui.rTORt or 




► NON SEQUITBR 



Wtt« 










■VtgK 



► FOXTROT 



Bni Amend 



PAi«, in'S TRY A «UN- 
THBou^H of CLfBfWniA'S 
IKATM UtMt. 

OK. 




HIRES 
VJK 
5KAKE 



SrMcfl^^UVMKT 
KTbMoLO A 

5NWCE?.' AAAA.' 
eCT IT Htm 

FBDMME 





I SAlOCLEo-^^ MtCOULO 
PfcTRA'S OtATH, HA« UdD 
NOTTHE ME THt 

P»W» tar*, THIM6 WAS 

RUHtit 




► UNKNOWN 



Brandon PEac/CouiOAN 







Penis performance perplexes reader 



Dear Casste, 

1 don't mean to sound like a 
nympho, but I haven't had sex in a 
long time. I have a very dedicated, 
wonderfully caring boy Trie nd, but no 
matter what we do, he doesn't "rise to 
the occasion." Any suggestions? 
Signed, Just not Satisfied 

Dear Just Not Satisfled, 

1( couid be that your boyfriend is 



just nervous and feels like he has loo 
much pressure to perform. 

My suggestion is that you take the 
pressure off him. Don't place so much 
emphasis on having sex, but more on 
being together. Talk, cuddle and take 
long walks. If you learn how to be ful- 
filled by just being together without 
sex, the rest will happen later natural- 
ly. 

Casste 



No Coupon" Specials 



(NO coupon iifi'd'^H. 
NONE .icccplfci) 



Everyday 
Two-fers 

2 - PIZZAS with 
2 -TOPPINGS each 
2 - COKES with ice 



Everyday 
Three-fers 

3 - PIZZAS with 

1 - TOPPING each 

4 - COKES with ice 



$8.45 



Prlcai do not 

include sbIm u;(M. 



^10.34 



Pizza Shuttle 776-5577 




Opens Friday 

Sunday-Friday 4-6 p.m. 

Saturday 11 a.m.-Noon 

Full line of camping, canoeing, and '^ 

other outdoor equipment available." 





To submit poetry, cal the Collegian 
3t 532-6556 or 6-mail alzSltsu. 
ksu. edu. Poems must be typed 
vritl the auttWs name, maipf and 
vMrat the lap and must be 
bebMen 200 and 450 WftJs. 



Paper Doll House 



t call in sick 

but I'm calling home 

and my home is yet to be 

my mental residency 

i trespass on my father's wooden floors 

the key will take me halfway 

but Ihe welcome mat is battered 

there' s no on there to gre^ me 

gavel branded on my forehead 

so my Judgment is recorded 

on the defective part of gods creation 

that is 

if there is a god 

all according to father 

and fadier knows best 

no faiipiay, mental foieplay 
prc-rage festivities 
swept under expectation 
fcHccast calls for 
omrru&sive passive aggressive 
game of father kitows best 
and ring around the rosary 
the losaiy is father's pride 
ihe ring is his children 
choking and spitting 
in die vcnorrwus >^ll 
uf holy water 
of childhood 

and i crave the solace of a stranger's affection 
to suifocate the anguish of anger's infection 
to be my pillow while my soul's in storage 
mothballs and rejection. chilc&Kxxl in a closet 
reality is a hanger far above passive ag^essive leach 
my mother was ihe seam^icss 

my brother, insulation 
my sister was the preacher 
as my father painted windows 
and taught us silence well 
my mother counts the stitches 
after each public appearance 
and mends her daughters 
when paper dolls are torn 

but we rip the seam of spirit before we sell the paper 
dollhoase 

icallinlaie 

i had an af^Kuntment with a cMkI 

with an appetite for the miracle of solace in a 
stranger 

she cried in my affection and became my winter coal 

her mother was a mothball, her father was a gavel 

her brother was the bailiff, her sister was the narrator 

until the rosary deflated and the closet door cracked 
open 

the reunion was belated when unspoken wotds were 
spoken 

and Ihe ring of fathers rosary scattered shortly after 

and i am ihc historian, moved home id paper ashes 

\aok my soul out of storage 

to break the painted windows 

i'm not supposed to talk about it, or remember a ring 
of witnesses 

though i live in his paper reality though i even call it 
home 

i'll never be a modibdl and i'U never learn to sew. 

Paf^ Otz 1$ a (Wshman in pre-JoumaUsm and mas 

communications 



Hardeer 

Delivers 

9 a.m.-l a.m. Daily 

537-2526 

Inside Manhattan 
City Limits Only 



PEOPLE'S GimfM 

Community-cwned 

Open CO everyone 

Largest selection 

ofbulk herbs 

and spices in Manhattan. 

539-4811 

811 COLORADO 

Located diree btocks south 
of Poyniz, Manhattan 



V t ■ t St" 



■^ lor I >i.i, 



S3 ' (.'),SI ) 




K-STATE UNION 

10:30 a.m. to 5:30 p.m. 

Tuesday, Feb. 21 to Friday, Feb. 24 

in the "S" Room. 



ATA 



i$15 CASHy 

to Ev..yta»y»do„.t. plasm.. ^ 

I • Quick, safe, easy V^"^ ■ 

" Study while you donate "^ 



% 



Watch movies while you donate 
Donating plasma saves lives! 




I 

I Manhattan Biomedical Center i 

I 
I 
I 
I 




I 1130 Gardenway (across from Westloop) 
I ifsJ^^on,-Fri. 9 a,m.-6:30 p.m.. Sat. 9 a.m.-l p.m. 

I ^^ ffiffii BioMbdicalCenteb €^^ 



Special Guests 




DAVID BALL & THE TRACTORS 
SAT., MARCH 25 * 8PM 
BRAMLAGE COLISEUM 



4 IfflOMtTU bHitoM wMwi Uftvpt [tmUMWH <• T^fii. 

■^rSty^. <»i3>532-7'606 

FKODUCtO BY f O H T t M F O It A tt Y 



Gttfttt §a*tf. Gtt-at /Vli*»/t- 



4Q Friday. February 24, 1888 



KANSAS STAH COLLEGIAN 



► STUDENT HEALTH 



Council seeks cheaper insurance 



Health policies 
examined in order 
to lower costs 



UMILUOTT 



Cnllegian 

The Student Health Advisory 
Council is looking into making 
student insurance less expensive, 

"We're hoping to be able to 
offer a cheaper plan by Jiggling 
around the benefits," John Bell, 
SHAC chairman, said. 

Bell and his committee are 
looking into making the coverage 
as comprehensive as possible 
while keeping it within the price 
range of the average student, he 
said. 

Dehra Duncan, graduate student 
in family life education and SHAC 
member said she signed up for the 
health plan at the beginning of her 
Tirst year at K-Staie. but she had to 
drop it because it was too expen- 
sive. 

"1 couldn't make it month to 
month," she said. 

Bell said group policies offer 
advantages to people who prefer 
lower rates. 

"A group policy works best 
because there is more money com- 
ing in. so the insurance company 
can offer lower rates," Bell said. 

Under the current policy, chil- 
dren and spou.ses of students can 
be covered on the same policy for 
a little extra money, The policy is 
not an age-rated policy, so the 
basic premium is the same for all 
students despite their ages, he said. 

"There is a range of options in 
it,'* he said. 

SHAC recominends a company 



to the University, and a card pro- 
moting the health-insurance plan 
goes out in official mailings to all 
students. Students interested in the 
policy can send the card back aiKJ 
receive the coverage, or they can 
ignore the card. Bell said. 

Unlike other universities, K- 
Siaie doesn't require students to 
purcha.<ie the insurance policy. The 
University of Kansas requires all 
students to purchase their insur- 
ance policy or provide proof that 
they Me covered by an insurance 
policy, he said. 

Lafene Health Center is the 
gatekeeper for the policy. Unless a 
student on the insurance policy 
needs emergency medical treat- 
ment, the student must go to 
Lafene before going to another 
medical facility. 

"It would be wrong of the com- 
mittee to take business away from 
a health center paid for by the stu- 
dents," Bell said. 

About 650 students have poli- 
cies with K-Statc's carrier, Bell 
said. The plan is only recommend- 
ed, not University-controlled, he 
said. 

The cunent policy contains a 
S25O,OO0 lifetime maximum. The 
deductible is St 00 per student per 
year. The policy also has a stop- 
loss at 11.100 on each policy per 
year, he said. 

The stop-loss means students 
have a maximum amount they 
have to pay. On $1,000 bill, a stu- 
dent pays $300 including the 
deductible. Bell said. 

Two things the committee said 
were important to look for in a pol- 
icy is the' quality of the coverage 
over the price and the ability to 



control the maximum debt a stu- 
dent can incur, he said. 

"What people would itally like 
is more coverage for less money," 
he said. 

Insurance companies don't 
work that way, he said. The cheap- 
er the policy is, the less coverage 
the policy holder receives. 

"We want to buy a good poli- 
cy," Bell said. 

SHAC has been carefully 
weighing the benefits of coverage 
against the premium and the 
deductible on each policy, he said 

Bell said the committee is look- 
ing for the happy medium between 
having a policy with strong cover- 
age and expen.se. 

"You need to look at the eco- 
nomics and look at the pros and 
cons," Duncan said. 

!f premiums and coverage are 
dropped to the floorboards, then 
it's not worth having the coverage 
because the deductibles are so 
high. Bell said. 

"We're trying to find the point 
where extra coverage makes ii a 
good bet to have health insurance," 
he said 

The committee is looking into 
creating three tiers of coverage for 
students with different price 
ranges. The first tier would be 
basic coverage. The second tier 
would have more benefits, and the 
third tier would have even more 
benefits, Bell said 

The majority of students don't 
need the comprehensive coverage. 
Duncan said. A minority of stu- 
dents are going to be sick enough 
to need complete coverage, but 
those students are more likely to 
have their own health plans else- 



where, she said. 

Bell said the cost of the policy 
forces some students to gamble on 
their health. Duncan said. 

"I'm a gambler, so I'm taking 
the risk," she said. "I wish I was- 
n't, if we had the middle-range 
plan now, I surely wouldn't be." 

Duncan, an international Stu- 
dent, said she thought it was difO- 
cult for students like her to get and 
afford coverage because they don't 
know where to go or what to look 
for. Her main interest is in provid- 
ing an affordable kind of health 
plan for those students, she said. 

SHAC saw the proposal from 
the current carrier on Feb 17. 
Duncan said she thought SHAC 
would decide today if they would 
be searching for a different carrier 
or going with the same one. 

"We've told them what we'd 
like to see changed in their rough 
draft." Bell said. 

SHAC has been approached by 
several companies throughout the 
year, but the current carrier gets 
priority over other companies for 
next year's contract, he said. 

"We're real interested in getting 
some sort of prescription care," 
Bell said. 

Currently, only in-patient and 
out-patient drugs are covered. 
SHAC would like to gel a policy 
that would allow students to get 
pharmacy cLwcrage on regular pre- 
scriptions, like the allergy medica- 
tion Seldane, for an extra fee of a 
few dollars. 

Bell said a lot of thought is 
going into the selection process 
because the committee wants to 
find a plan it feels confident in rec- 
ommending to friends. 



► FINANCIAL AID 



Students sliipping class risk losing federal financial aid 



RBBICCA SCHULZ 



Not going to class can also 
mean losing TinanciaJ aid. 

"The government has a philoso- 
phy th'df <tu'dents should go to 
class," UaiVy Moeder. director of 
student financial assistance, said. 

The Department of Education 
in Washington has a federal regu- 
lation that requires students who 
receive financial aid to attend 
class. Institutions that do not com- 
ply with this directive can lose all 
student financial aid. Currently, 
the department has no method to 



fully enforce the regulation. 

"It seems reasonable that the 
government should expect students 
to go to class if ihey are receiving 
aid," Michael Ossar, professor in 
German, said. 

K-State's policy requires the 
faculty to inform the financial aid 
office on the status of students* 
attendance, leaving it up to the dis- 
cretion of the teacher according to 
what they require for attendance. 

"It shouldn't matter as long as 
you're making the grade," Lance 
GuLsch. junior in civil engineering, 
said. 



Moeder said letters are sent to 
professors with the 20-day roster 
and a form to fill out and send to 
financial aid. 

"We want to wait until students 
have really settled into their 
course." he said, "The method we 
have here is probably the most 
intrusive It really leaves it up to 
the instructors." 

While enforcement of the feder- 
al directive is left up to faculty, it 
doesn't require them to take atten- 
dance. 

"I think it's a good ittea, but 1 
don't tike to be the policeman." 



Michael Oldfaiher, associate pro- 
fessor of economics, said. 

Shayleen Wederski, senior in 
biochemistry, said she receives 
financial aid but was not aware of 
the federal regulation. She said 
steps should be taken to better 
inform students. 

Financial aid has received a 
good response from the faculty, 
and in most cases, students haven't 
gone through the correct drop/add 
procedure. 

"Right now, it is officially help- 
ing us to inform students to 
drop/add." Moeder said. 



► REVIEW 



Performance recreates 
spirit of West Africa 



AMVZMOLU 



A West African village complete 
with straw huts, colorful woven 
blankets, dancers, drummers and 
storytellers appeared on stage 
Thursday night. 

The Le Ballet national du 
Senegal, a company of 35 perform- 
ers, treated the audience to a night 
of cultural entertainment Thursday 
night at McCain Auditorium. 

Although the performance began 
a half-hour late, the performance 
was worth the wait. 

From the minute the performers 
swirled out to the final dance steps, 
the energy level was phenomenal. 

The performers, who are natives 
of Senegal, had a natural movement 
that shined through in each step. 

The artistic director, Bouly 
Sonko, travels throughout Senegal 
searching for members for the com- 
pany and ideas to involve in the 
choreography 

Because the dancers, drummers 
and acrobats come straight from 
Africa, the performance was 
authentic and inspiring. 

The first program introduced the 
audience to an African vigil in 
Senegal. 

A storyteller came out on stage 
and spoke in his native language 
while a red outline of Africa shone 
in the background. 

The rest of the company, dressed 
in colorful African clothing, then 
joined him to recreate the spirit of 
West Africa 

Later on in the evening, the 
dancers told the story of sacred 
spirits frightening a young girl. The 
dancers wore elaborate white m^ks 
to represent the spirits. 

During this scene, a dancer. 



dressed in a yellow straw costume, 
shook back and forth as if he were a 
giant broom, and a clown on stilts 
bounced around the stage. 

The next scene demonstrated the 
precise choreography of the pro- 
duction. 

Women, dressed in beautiful, 
ethnic clothing, took the straw bas- 
kets off their heads, set Ihem down 
on the ground and beat them in per- 
fect unison while the drums were 
rolling behind them. 

The costumes were an important 
element of the production, but so 
was the nudity during the 
"Khaware" section of the perfor- 
mance, 

Bare -breasted women sat down 
on the ground as the men tried to 
seduce them by dancing to the beat 
of the magical talking drum. 

While it may have been a sur- 
prise or even a shock to some peo- 
ple, I thought it added to the' 
authenticity of the production. 

Another aspect of the ballet that ' 
was impressive was the use of 
native musical instruments. 

In between the dance routines, 
musicians played a Kora, a 21- 
string melodic harp made from a 
gourd, and the Balafon, which is 
similar to a marimba. 

From the dancers to the musi- 
cians, the production was definitely 
one of the highlights of the McCain 
season. 

The acrobatics and breathtaking 
costumes created the atmosphere of 
a West African village. 

Overall, it was an excellent way 
to celebrate Black History Month 
and educate the K-State and 
Manhattan community about the 
African culture through stories, 
music and motion. 



Student Senate wraps up final allocations 



CONTINUED FROM PAGE 1 

included African Student Union. 
Bangladesh Student Association, 
India Student Association and 
International Club. 

Allocation for Multicultural 
Student Council was postponed The 
group requested $ 1 .65t) (o pay tor two 
speakers, but group members and 
senators were unsure of who would 
be speaking and when. 

Senate approved fees for the K- 
State Union and KSDB FM-91.9 
Both fees will remain the same and 
will be reviewed in two yetrs. 

With the allocations process fin- 
ished. Senate has S25.000 in its fund 
to loan out to other student groups. 
They cut almost $18,000 from the 
original allocations proposal. 

John Riedel, Parking and Campus 



Safety Committee chair, talked fur- 
ther about the raising of metered- 
parking rates from 25 to 75 cents. 

"You may see a bill before Smdent 
Senate next week that would raise the 
price to 50 cents," Riedel said. 

Michele Meier, business senator, 
said parking council is also consider- 
ing doubling the number of meters at 
Chester E. Peters Recreation 
Complex. 

Parking will be discussed at two 
student forums early next month. The 
first forum will be at noon March 8 in 
the KStatc Union courtyard. 

The second fomm will be at 5 p.m. 
March 9 at Lucky BrewGrille. 

Students can also get involved 
with parking issues by coming to the 
next Parking Council meeting at 3 
p.m. March 16 in Union 205. 




LASSIFIEDS 



KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN 



OUR BASIC RATE 

To OMi 2D urnnlt or Im* for ocw day 

It tS. For Mch word ovM 20 *dd 20t 
p»f word. Call SU-(i5SS lor coriMCUtlv* 
d«yrala». 



DEADLINES 

CltttltM Mlt mutt bt ti»c»6 trt 
noon ttM Iter txton lti« data ltt« ti 
run*. Claurad cKtpIvy wli muat Im 
tiiactd by 4 pjn. two NoiMng diyt 
Mtom tM im Iht ad njna. 



HOW TO PAY 

All cUaaMtod* frutt Iw paid \f) 
adiranca unlaaa you fiivi in 
attaUlitMd atcouni wtth Student 
Publkatlont. Catti, check, MaitafCard 
orVtuirticcapltd. 



Call 532-6555 
to place your classified. 





Tight on 

Cash? 




MANHATTAN 

BIOMF.niCAL CENTER 

I ISO CjarJenwav 

776-9177 

M«i~'Frl. * • m, '*;*■!> p.rrt.^ 
tflt V *.in.-i fi m 



ADVAI^CED FLIGHT Tram 
ir>g plus ground school 
for pflvate. instrument 
and multi-angina tsl- 
ingt. K Stata Flying 
Club approved inatruc- 
lor. Huoh Irvirt. 

COME FLY with ui. K-State 
Flying Club has five air- 
planes For best prices 
cell Troy Brockwiy. 
776-«735 after 5:30pm. 

LOIII AOAM formally at A 
Cut Above <( now at 
Joyce't Hair Tamara. 
She wBtcome* all form- 
er and new clienti. 
S39-TAME <S3a3). 

0«| 



tort lid Pouiwl 

Found ade can be 
Iplaoetf fra* tor thraa 



We require e form of 
pictura ID tKSU, drlv- 
ar'a licenaa or otharl 
when ptaelns a per- 
eonal. 



BRANDON P. 
Birthday. 



Happy 



BRONSON AKA 'Caaey* 

tiope you had a greet 
Birthday. admirera 
from a dittance. KAT. 



OMl 



Partl*s-n -Mora 



ADO A eplaah to your rtext 
bath. Greet mid -term, 
perllea begin with Wet. 
N-Wild Mobile Hot Tub 
rentals. S37-1 826. 

ADO AN extra touch of 
class to your next par- 
ty. Cell Wayne't Weler 
Party to rent a porteble 
hot tub S37-7587, 
S30-T561 

COLDEST BEEfl on Weat 

sidel Great selection of 
spirits. Poison liquor 
across from Food 4 
Lass. 3108 Anderson. 
&37-<1096. 



IQD 



HOUSING/ 
REAL ESTATE 



For Ront- 
*pt«. Fiimltlwd 

AVAILABLE NOW. Bate- 
mant one-bedroom 
very rtear cempue. 

Waeher/ dryer. S:7S. 
Day $32.4)64, evening 
SX-3\3A. 

NICE FURNISHED apart- 
ment In lake home. ID 
m Inula* from cam put. 
SJTW month Including 



utilities. Availefola 
Mar - July, 539-3078. 

NOW LEASING for June T 
occupancy. Furnithed 
or unfurnished. Self- 
contained, one-bed- 
room quality apert- 
ments. Veers laato. Cell 
537-9188 

QUIET SURROUNDINGS 
lor study. Cempua one 
mite, one-bedroom, 
end studio some utili- 
ties peid. Short term 
laaaa, no pet*. 
S37-83». 

TWO, THREE, lourbed. 
room, eweiiable Aug. 1. 
Clote to camput. No 
pets, S39-2S&1 

t10| 

ForRont* 

Apt. 

Untumlshod 



AVAILABLE FEB. IS, two 
bedroom at 806 Atliaon 
S42a New carpet, dish 
wather Laundry faciti 
ties. Water/ iraah peid. 
776-3804, 

AVAILABLE IN February, 
one-bedroom 731 N. 
Sixth, S330 Small, 
quiet complex. Water/ 
treah paid. No pels. 
776^SM 

AUGUSTLEiMli 

• Fremont Apto. 
e$andMDneApt3. 
•OolegeHsighlsApts. 

• Cambodge Sq. Apts. 



LulBtBadimmltaitt 
B37MM 

i9am-430(im 
lt0am.-3(UTi 



AVAILABLE NOW. two- 
t>edroom near cainpus. 
1500 McCain Lane 
1450. Laundry lacltltles. 
Water/ trash paid. No 
pal*. 776-3804 

AVAILABLE NOW, one. 
bedroom three blockt 
west of campus. t0!6 
Sunset. S360. Remo- 
deled unit. Water/ trash 
peid. No patt. 
7T6-3804. 

AVAILABLE NOW, Ihree- 
bedroom, two blocks 
eett of KSU S600 plus 
utilitiei. S37-I940. 

AVAILABLE NOW. two- 
bedroom apartmanta 
near City Park I0!S 
Osage $450. Waler/ 
treats paid. Laundry 
facdilies Within walk- 
ing distance to KSU. No 
pats. 77S-3S04 

FOR AUGUST. Next (o 
KSU, deluxe two-bed 
room apartment, S490. 
539-2482 after 4p.m 

FOR JUNE, large two-bad- 
room apartment. Wa. 
t»i! trath/ gas two 
thirde paid. S430/ 
month. Also one-bed- 
room S310 tor Aug. 
539-2482. After 4p.m. 

FOUR-BEDROOM AT 

Royal Towers. 1700 N. 
Manila lie n $860 Avail- 
able now. Water/ trath 
peid. Laundry facilitiea, 
Sundeck, hoi tubs. No 
pete T7e-:»04 

GET A JUMP ON NEXT 
VEARI Chase Manhsf. 
ten Apart mania le now 
leetlng two, three end 
four-tiedroorni for Au- 
gust. Our waiting lltt is 
long, drop by before 
they're gonal College 
and Claflin, 776-3M3. 




STOP! 

so ROT URT 

AlAFABTHUn 

nmiTou 

C0N8IDEB THI8I 

•Brand nf »' sparkling 

swimming pool 
• Spacious deda^tkx 
•Avail. June 5 Aug 6 
•Kitchen Appliances 

include micmwave 

and ceiling fan 
•Economical gas heal 

/ frt iAuumPflQKED Mtt 



tit^ BW BOOKED S5I* 



i hrdm o m wS ti ui t S64 2 



1 bedmom w/Study S804 

Office: 

2400 Kimball Ave. 

at College Ave. 

( Across from Bramlage) 

Call Roy 

at 537-7007 

for an appointment 




PARKING 

SOUTH OF THE 
UNION 



OFFICE HOURS: MONDAY-FRIDAY 8 a.m.-5 p.m. (Bxespt hoUdayt) 



M Vrnt COUJQIAN CLASSiniDS, K-Stitt MleflM, K«^ IM 101, 




MAKE ANDERSON PLACE YOUR 
HOME AWAY FROM HOME! 

Nc* leasing for 1995-96 
•3 bedrooms 
*'A block from campus 
*Furn)shed and unfurnished 
Showings eveiy 
Monday through Friday 
3-5 p.m. 



1852 Anderson Place #4 
776-1 148 



LARGE TWO eEDROOM. 
one half block west oF 
campus. Tri'let^ei apart- 
menr 1825 College 
Heights, SSSO. Water/ 
tresh paid. Two bath, 
walk-in ctosatt No 
pete. TTO-3804. 

ONE-BEDROOM ALL utlll- 
tlat peid. Neer Ag- 
gievlMa 1220 Laramie. 
I37S. Avetlable Feb. S. 
776-3604, 



ONE. BEDROOM APART 
MENT. available Feb 
IS. 924 Fremont. $300 
Walerf trash paid. ParK. 
ing available. Close to 
Aggieville. 776-3004 



QUALITY TWO BEOHOOM 
duplex, quiet neighbor- 
hood, water and traah 
peid, air conditioner, 
S37St/ month Available 
March 1 Call 539-7 IBS 



ONE eeoROOf^ apart- 
ment available now at 
Waraham Hotel. 416 
Poynli, S3T5 water/ 
trath paid. Laundry 
facilltlet. No peta. 
770-3804. 

TWO BEDROOM AVAIL- 

ABLE now on Stagg 
i-)ill 803- a05 Allison. 
S36S Water/ trash paid 
Laundry facilities, DJth- 
wesher 776-3804. 



TWO BEOnOOM AVAIL- 
ABLE now. Aggieville 
Penihoute Apertrrtente 
617 N. 1«h $660. We- 
tar/ trash paid. OJth- 
washer, microwave. No 
pets. 776-3804. 



ftoems 
AvaiiaU* 



male ROOMMATE want- 
ed: Will have own 
room. Availabis now 
until July 31 $160/ 
month plus one. fourth 
ulililiae. 639-6676 



120| 

For R*nt- 
Hout*s 



NEXT TO catfipya two." 

three, four, five-bed' 
room houses lomer 
with fireplace end ga-^ 
rage and apartmentt-' 
Washer/ dryer, central 
sir, perking. Pest con- 
trol/ tresh paid No pel* 
available, now or Aug, 
(460- $1200. £37-6643 



KANSAS SIAH COLLEGIAN 



Friday, FalHiwry 24, 19g8 4 ^ 



Collegian Classifieds 




im tha daadllw for 

CKANSA.S STATE 
OLLEGIAN 
Classiffieds 

103 Ksdzia I a Ji. - B $m. 



i«l 



Room mat* 
Wanted 



A NON-SMOKER, ihara 

tiouss. ullhllai with 
thraa raipoiidbl* 
malai Larg* atlic 
room, privita phona, 
laundrv. parking, SItO. 
«»-24ea Kay 

FEMALE. NON SMOKING, 
roommale, thres-bsd 
room apartmanl, $195/ 
month plot ulilillai. 
Call Julia or Hailhar, 
S37-4878 

FOR NON SMOKER/ drink- 
nr. Roommata noadad, 
walk to clau S39-1554. 

HELP SHARE housa south 
of csrnpus and close to 
parlc. All bills paid Call 
539-6096 (or mora infor 
mation. 

MALE ROOMMATE warvt- 
kd two'liadfoam baia- 
mant apartmanl, Closa 
to Atiaarn Fisid Housa 
Call&37-9t88 

ROOMMATE NEEDED. 
Avatlabia Mar. 1. Tltraa- 

badroom housa, ona- 
third utitJtia* S150/ 
month. 776-7S02 



2m 



SERVICE 
DIRECTORY 



2t«| 

Rouiino/ 



A PERFECT rasuma and all 
ynuf othar word pro- 
cessino naads. Laaar 
printing. Call Brvnda 
776-3390. 

00 VOLI fiead a lattar par- 
feet resume, paper, or 
anyihmo Rise typed t>y 
en enperienced typist? 
Call Janni at 539^0361. 

NEED SOMETHING typed? 
I'll type it lar Si/ per 
page. Call 637-S4S0 
after S:30p.m.. but 
please, no calls after 
IDp.m. Ackfor JacUa. 



You'll never 
know unless you 
try-advertismg. 

OLLEGIAN 

KfdfW 1IU U2-M9! 



ROOMMATES NEEDED 
now. Two rooms evail- 
abla. Britlnay Ridga 
complex. Call 587-6611 
ask for anyone who 
lives theia. S negoli- 
able. 687-6611 

ROOMMATES NEEDED to 
share house. Own bed 
room, washer/ dryar. 
SI 65/ month plus one 
fourtlt utillti«t. Call 
776-2397. 

THREE ROOMMATES look- 
ing for fourth Non- 
smoking female to 
Share bi level apart- 
ment for next year. 
Across tha street from 
campus $186/ montli, 
587-8702. 



VEflV nice oriebedroontv 
apartment- Available 
Mar 1 to Aug 1. Fur- 
nished, close to cam- 
pus and Aggiewitle, 
quiet and nice neigti- 
bort. Can renew lease 
in Aug Call 539-7500 
arMi leave message. 



F0UR-8EDR00M, TWO 
bath- Close to campus. 
Call 776 3445. $600/ 
monlti. 

MID-MAY TO Aug May 

paid, $165/ month. 
Royal Towers Own 
room. Walk to campus 
Call Joel 587-4629. 



SUBLEASE AVAILABLE in 
May. Two-badroom, 
Closa to campus and 
Aggiaville- Furnished. 
Air conditioned, park- 
ing, $486/ month, call 
Sarah or J at 587-8074. 

SUBLEASE AVAILABLE: 

tttrae-badroom at 
Woodwav, across from 
Bramlage. with pool, 
tsundrvlscililies, S200/ 
month plus ulilitiea. 
Celt 395 3865 



SUMMER SUBLEASE avail 

able May- Aug. May 
paid for. rwo-tMdroom. 
Iltti and 8luemont. 
567-8706. 



Dosktop 
PuMlotilng 



TYPED PAPERS, graphics, 
charts and graphs. 900 
fonts ar)d nine years ex- 
perience to make your 
paper look great Fenn 
Graphics 537-0448. 
fenn@ksu.kiu.adu 

asol 

Automothro 

NISSAN- DATSUN Repair 
Service. 22 years ex- 
penence- Maidss. Hon- 
das and Toyotas also 
Auto Craft, 2612 Dipper 
Lane, Manhattan, Kan- 
sas. 537-5049. Ba.m.- 
5p.m. Mon.- Fri. 




Othor 



CASH FOR college 
900.000 granii avail- 
able. No repayments 
ever- Qualify imma- 
diately (8001243-2435 



CUfltnt—U mJCfUt 



5t 



IO.F- 
SOVE 

COPIES 



FREE FINANCIAL Aldl 
Over 16 billion in pri- 
vate sector grants and 
scholarships il now 
available. All itudante 
are eligible regardlaea 
of grades, income, or 
pa rant's incoma. Let ua 
help Call Studam Fi- 
nancial Services: 
18001263-6495 exi 
F57g82 

PROMPT CONTRACEPTIVE 
and abortion teivicas. 
Dale L. Clinton, M.D., 
Lawrence, 
(9131841-5716. 



K-' 



RESUME PREPARATION. 
TAX PREPARATION, 
word proceiaing. UPS. 
shipping, copies and 
morei The Mail Center 
acroas from Alco. 3110 
Anderson, 776-6345. 

WE DO light construction/ 
roofing, psiniino/ paper 
hanging, finish work. 
Call Dusne at 53»-1569 
or Jay at 539-8786. 



Resumes 

CM todayt 779-377i 



Nutritional 
Wolght Low 



*WE*OME OIETI lose 
40 pounds in only one 
month. Proven success 
ful and medically safe. 
No drugs or expensive 
food. For entire plan 
send S7, check/ money 
order to K.T A , P O 
Box 1379, Wichita, KS 
67201. 

WANTED 100 students: 
Lose 8- 100 pounds 
New nwtabolism break 
through. I lost 15 
pounds in three weeks 
hN aisistad. Guar- 
anteed results $35 
1800)579-1634. 

3010 



EMPLOYMENT/ 

CAREERS 



siol 



Molp W«wt>tf 

The Collegian cannot 
verify tha linancial po- 
tential of advarllse- 
mante Iri tha Cmploy- 
mentyCereer clasalflca- 
tlvn. Raadara era md- 
vle«d to approach any 

■ uch amploviTienl op- 
liortunltv with raaaon- 
alila caution. Tha Coi- 
laf Ian urgas our raad- 
ara to contact tha Bat* 
tar iualnaee Bureau, 

■ 01 St Jefferson. To- 
peka, KS «eB07-11»0. 
I»1 3)332-0464. 

ACCEPTfNG APPLICA 
TIONS/ Resumes for 
Bwirfiifiing pool manag 
er. Must bo WSI com 
fied Call [913)457 3361 
City of Westmoreland 

AG BACKGROUND hetptui 
to eern commission to 
15/ hour marketing 
unique agriculture pro 
ducts (8001765 0033. 

ALASITA SUMMEH EM- 
PLOYMENT- Fishing 
Industry Earn up to 
S3000- SeOOO plus per 
month room and 
bosrdi Transportation' 
Male/ female No ex- 
perience necessaryl 
(206)546^155 
aiit.A57ea4. 

CAMP WEKEELA Can- 
ton, Main*, is hiring 
experienced dynamos 
to instruct arts, sthtet 
ics. campcrafi. drama, 
guitar, horseback, ten- 
nis and waterfront. 
Alto positions in Dining 
Services, office staff 
and mainienanca. 
2B07 C Oalmar Or. 
Columbua, OH 

«U09 
tB00WB9-3177. 

CRUISE SHIP JOBS I Atten 
lion: Students. Earn 
S2000 plua monthly. 
Part-lime/ full-time. 
World travel. Carib- 
tiean. Hawaii. All posi- 
tions available. No ex 
perience. CALL: 

16021453-4661. 

CHUISe SHIPS NOW 

HIRINQ- Earn up to 
$2000 plus/ month 
working on Cruise 
Ships or Land-Tour 
companies. World trav' 
el IHawaii. Mexico, the 
Caribbean, etcl- Sea 
aonal and full time em- 
ployment available No 
experience necessary. 
For more information 
call (206)634-0468 
ext.C57684 

CUSTOM HARVESTER. 
Need ambitious Individ 
uala for wheat and row 
crop harvest. Truck driv- 
en anrt combine opera 
tors needed. For infor- 
mation phone 
(9131525-6326 or 6330 
Naagale Combine Inc. 

DELIVERY PERSON alter 
4p.m. Apply in person- 
Hunam Restaurant, 
1304 Westloop 

EMPLOYEES NEEDED to 
assist in family oriented 
custom harvesting op- 
eration. Salary negoti- 
able and retleciive ol 
employees compatibili- 



Make music 

Want to learn to play the 
guitar? Check the Collegian 
classifieds to find someone to 
give you lessons. Only $5 for 
up to 20 words. Youil make 
music in no time. 



c 



KANSAS STATE 

OLLEGIAN 




Kedzie 103 (east of the Union) 532-6555 



ly with employars fami- 
ly, customer a and other 
employees For mora 
Infomation reply la 
Gary SI I316)22&^79 
after Sp.m. 

FAST FUNORAISER- raise 

tSOO tn five days- 
greeks, groups, clubs, 
motivated individuela. 
Fast, easy no financial 
otiligstion 
(80oTt75-MS1 EXT 33 

FRUSTRATED WITH $4.26/ 
hour? Part-time/ full- 
time openings. Excel- 
lenl pay VVJII train. 
Flexible hours Call EZ- 
HINI for iniarviaw. 537- 
0782. 

GRAND OPENING new 
Manhattan office now 
has openings for part- 
time and lull time. We 
need help in all areas. 
Full training, must heva 
positiva attitude. Travel 
Options, 637-0805. 

HARVEST HELP rteadad. 
JD9600 and truck driv- 
ers wanted- Must Ob- 
tain a CDL and will help 
Obtain. Call for vary 
good salary options. 
May to Nov Clydesdale 
Harvesting and Truck- 
ing. Call Randy 
5S-S132. 

KAW VALLEY Graenhous- 
es IS a quality company 
looting for quality peo- 
ple. Part time and full- 
time needed. Call this 
Wed., Thurs, and Fri. 
between 4:30- 6:30p.m. 
only. 776-8585 

KSU STUDENT help need- 
ed MWF morning 8- 
noon Work in Dean's 
Qltice of Vet Med Gen 
ere) office dutiss $4 25/ 
hour. Call 632-4006 to 
inquire. 

LIVE-IN NANNV needed 
tor eest coest couple. 
Two children: good 
pay, benefits. Must pro- 
vide references. Cell 
537-9745, after 5pm 

NATIONAL PARKS HIR- 
ING- Seasonal and full- 
time smployrrtant avail- 
able at Nallonal Parks, 
Forests and Wildlife 
Preserves. Benefits plus 
bonuse&l Apply now 
for best positions Call: 
(2061545-4804 exl. 
NS76e3. 

NEEDED TRUCK drivers 
for wheat harvest from 
Texas to North Dakota. 
May through Aug. Da- 
lane Relmar 
14051267-3367 



Not enough 

[time on your 

hands to get 

I everything 

done? 

Check the 

CIdssifieds 

service directory, 

OLLEGIAN 

KtdiidOJ 532-«55$ 



NEEDED: 38 people to loee 
weight now. all natural, 
guaranteed, doctor rec- 
ommended, works es- 
pecially wall for wom- 
en. Call 539-1692. 

NEW ENGLAND Brother 
Sister Camps Mas 
sachusetts. Mah-Kee 
Nee for Boys/ Danbee 
for Girls Counselor po 
silions lor program 
Specialists: All Team 
Sports, especially Baae- 
ball, 8askett)atl, Golf, 
Field Hockey. Roller 
Hockey, Soccer, Vollay- 
ball, 30 Tennis open 
mgs, also Archery, Ri- 
flery. Pioneering/ Civer- 
night Camping, 

Weights/ Fitness and 
Cycling; other openings 
include Performing 
Arts. Fine Arts. Pottery, 
Figure Skating. Gym 
nasties. Newspaper 
Photography, Year- 
book, Radio Station, 
Rocketry, Ropes and 
Rock Climbing: All Wa- 
terfront Activllies 
iSwimming. Skiing, 
Sailing. Windsurfing. 
Canoeing/ Kayaking). 
Great salary, room, 
board and travel. June 
18' Aug. 18. Inquire: 
Ml^ KuJUc leoysl 
190 Linden Avenue. 
Glen Ridge, NJ 07028. 
CalH800|763-9l18QlD: 



bSLlQirlsl 17 Waetmln- 
ster Drive, Monlville, 
NJ 07046 Call 

(800)392-3762, 

PART-TIME RESIDENTIAL 
construction expari- 
anca necessary, will 
work around clata 
tcheduiae. 776-4864. 

SPORTS MINDED. If you 
have a compatillve 
edge but ere a team 
player we need you 
now. Full trainino' trav- 
el options. FulTtime/ 
part-time 45K income 
potential. 637-0802 

SUCCESS MINDED indi 

viduats needed for 
sales arvd management 
potltlons In enplosive 
growth company full- 
time preferred, part 
time alao. Sorioua Inqui- 
ries only. Call Patrick 
587*8700 ai(t.S24. 

SUMMER HARVEST help 
needed- Run John 
Deere 9600's and 9600 
and drive truck. CDL 
preferred. Parker Har 
vesting. Call 

1913)363-2527. 

SUMMER HARVEST help 
and run 2188 Caste I H 
combines and three au- 
tomatic trucks. Wanted 
experience. CDL for 
truck drivers and com 
bine oparatots. Payroll 
$1500/ month for ax- 
perience. Will also work 
with other to gat CDL. 
Prefer nonimokert, 
non-drinkers and non 
drug users Call 
(913Wa9-46eO. 



4(^ 



OPEN 
MARKET 



41l>| 



ttMiM tdr lal* 



Computw 



MACINTOSH Computer. 
Complete system In- 
cluding printer only 
$599. Call Chris at 
1800)289-5685. 




INFORMATIONAL MEET- 
INGS. Beach Art Mu- 
seum. Tour Guide Pro- 
gram Mar. 2, 
9:30- 11a m.. 6:30- 
Bp.m Room 148 KSU 
Foundation Building. 
Call Katharine Walker. 
532-7220. 

3M| 

■usInsM 
Opjwrtuiilttoi 

Tha Collegian cannot 
varlfv the financial po- 
tential of advartlao- 
manle In tha Employ- 
mant/Carear claeaifice- 
tion. Readere are ad- 
vlaad to approach any 
such bualnese oppor- 
tunity with raaeonabia 
caution. Tha Collegian 
urgae our roadara la 
contact tha Battar Bwel- 
naas Bureau, 801 BE 
Jaftaraon, Topaka, KS 
6M07 119O. 
(St3)232-04M. 



S1750 WEEKLY poasibls 
malting our circulars. 
No experience re- 
quired Begin now For 
infor call (202I29S-S933 



GOOD USED Zarox e45S 
Memorywriter word- 
processor, will take 
best offer. Call 
(BI3I292>42S0 week- 
days. 

WEDDING DRESS and vail, 
aiie 8. White full tangth, 
lag of mutton sleeves. 
Sweetheart neckline. 
Gown and cathedral 
length train trimmed in 
sequins and pearls 
776-3712 



FiimlturB to 
■uy/S«ll 

BARSTOOLS- CHROME/ 
black/ swivel, $40/ pair, 
Twin headboard with 
bookshelf $40 Rayfaan 
Wayfarer sunglasses. 
S20- 532-9073 leave 
message 



Airtlqiws 



TIME MACHINE Antique 
Maul and Geeb Empori- 
um. 6000 square teet, 
antiques, collectibles, 
estate jewelry, furni- 
ture, 4910 Skyway Dr. 
four blocks east of Man- 
hattan Airport. Open 
Tues- Sat. 12- 6p.m. 
539^4684 



GET 
THE 
WORD 
OUT 




20 meg 
3.5 floppy, sound 



TANDY 1000TX, 
HO, 

card, DMP printer, 
stand. 1200bd ex mo- 
dem, joy slick, soft- 
ware $250 537 0720 
after 6p.m. 



Music 
Instnifnwnts 



WELCOME TO THE MUSIC 
CO In Iha Midtown Pla- 
la, 523 S 17th Street 
New and used instru- 
ment sales and sejvice,' 
accessories for ttt« mu- 
sician. 539- 1958. 



Suppll— 



GOATS FOR sale: Four 
goats need a home 
efier the KSU Rodeo. If 
interested contact 
Stave Frailer at 
539-8586 

HEV REPTILE Loveral 
Check out these prices I 
Emperor Scorpions 
$7,951 Rose Tarantulas 
S7.96I Iguanas $14.95 
with cage purchasel 
Egyplian Uromastyx 
S89.99I Rey Eye Tree 
Frogs $49,991 Boss 
$1001 Tokays $S 991 
House Geckos $3 991 
Skunk Geckos $19 991 
Golden Skinks $11 991 
Only at your source for 
reptiles- Animal House 
Pets, 210 N 4th 537- 
B111 



long dialanca. Aaking 
$1200, 77S-7S17. 

1985 CHEVROLET Calabrl- 
iv. Sedan, four-door, 
Ve, 116» New battery, 
muffler. Excel lent condi- 
tion SI 600, rwgatlabla. 
53»^3a68. 

19BS MUSTANG, four ey- 
llndar. four-speed, air, 
power steering, locks, 
upholstery, 63.000 
mllaa. Asking S2460. Ex- 
cellent condition 
(913)466-2841. 

1986 HONDA CRX five- 
speed Looks and runs 
great. $2900 or t>««l off- 
er. 637-1479. 

1987 VW GTI, five-spaed, 
AM/FM caaeatte, runs 
strong, new tires and 
■hocks, security sys- 
tem, sharp. Call 
537-1446, S6000 or b«« 
Offer. 



6CRD 



TRAVEL/ 
TRIPS 



•io| 

Tour 

P»ek«flOS 



Remington's 

NOW HIRING 

Country Western EnlertainmenI Canter 

(Opening iate March, early April) 

This 33,500 sq. ft. Countrv Western Entertainment 

Cflftter will feature 3,350 sq. tt. of (fance floor 

(3 dance lloors) and 14 bars (4 mini bars) 

plus special food service operation. 

100 flmploysM ntsded: 

3 cashiers 

4 cooks 

25 waitresses 
25 bartenders 
10 security/patrol 
10 doormen/escorts 

8 barbacks 

8 busboys 

2 coat check clerks 

2 shoeshlne girls 
misc. backup positions 

Experience preferred. References requested. 
Lfnitorms required. Apply at the job site, 

Feb 21-fVlar 4. Tues thru Sat, 2-5pm 
1155 Wanamaker Road, Topeka, Kansas 



PERFECT DORM room 
pets Two adult Boa's 
about Rye feel. One Cei 
men, about two feet 
$50. cages available. 
Call .>elt, 776-3501. 
Leave matsasa. 

TIckotste 
Buy/Soil 

WANTED: MEN'S beskal 
ball Tourney tickets. 
Call <91 3)364-6944 or 
IBO0I3S7-SS44. 

son 



TRANS- 
PORTATION 



9t0| 



Automobiloo 



1976 OATSUN truck, rune 
good, 1971 Dodge truck 
runs good. 1982 Audi, 
rveads work. 639-66^. 

1984 NISSAN Santrs (SW). 
Excellent condition, 
new battery, boots, 
muffler and catalytic 
converter. Good for 




[Ski C olorado 

Kay«tor>* • Brvckaiuldgt 
• A-Saaln 

Adult t» Chltdtie 

Copper Mountain 

fWuH$33 SludwrtS2ft 
Cf«Ud$l7 

Winter Park 

Adult $32 Child $16 
(under 13) 

Limited suppty in 
stock. Order in 

advance to Insure 

availability. For 

Spring Break, 

please order by 

March 3. 

Classic 
Travel & Tours 

tail More AggtevBs 537-7646 



M.[HJ!IJI.I:UUH?r 



MNA.MA tITVflEflCM 



iT.m'h'r.i-i,wa 



When you're 

readi/ to 

advertise, tune 

in with the 

Classifieds. 



LfO: 



IWNWfTilTt 

iLLEGlAN 



iKcdxJtlU SU-4 




Meet your match 



Want to meet that cute guy in 
your anatomy class? 
Advertise in the Collegian 
personals. Only $5 for up to 
20 words. You'll meet your 
match in no time. 

C KANSAS STATE 
OLLEGIAN 

Kedzie 103 (east of the Union) 




532-6555 



Classified Directory 




BULLETIN 
BOARD 



010 Anrw u ncefn e n h 

0») LostaftdFound 
OM Ptftonalt 
040 MeeUnga/Eventt 
OW Pattes-fHMort 




HOUSING' 
REAL ESTATE 



108 FotReni- 
Apl. FumiihMt 

lie Fornwil- 
ApLUAinWwd 



118 Rooms Avaitriilt 

ISO FwRem — Hotjsn 

Its Foe Sa)«- Houses 

180 For Rsfil - 
Mobile Hoine8 

111 ForSals- 



140 For Rent — Garage 
148 RoonvnataWttited 
180 SuUmm 
188 SiaUe/Pasture 
180 Office Spin 
188 LMidlDfSale 




Tutor 



110 Re3uni«/TVpi(ig 

ai8 Oeektop Publishing 

aao Sewmiy/UtefBtiofit 

ass Pregnancy Tasting 

330 Lawn Can 

S38 CWCam 

MO Mtsidvn/DJs 

SU Pat Services 

SBO Automolh* Repair 

888 OttwSerrioes 




EMPLOYMENT 
CAREERS 



810 He^WinlQd 

8M Vokmieert Needed 

SN BusinM6 
Oppoitunilies 




OPEN 
MARKET 



408 WtoMtoBuy 

410 IbmilorSite 
418 FumKinloBuy/Sel 
480 QsraoaOfMSiles 
4S8 Aucfcn 
480 AriquM 
488 Compulefv 
440 FoodSpactalt 
448 Music ftabUDinte 
480 PMiandSupiilM 
48k SportngEqulpmert 
480 SIsno Equipnwni 
488 1U«tstoB«fy/Sil 



^^ 


■ 


CATEGORIES 


rr\_ i1H 


To help you And what you are 


WWVI 


looking tor. Die classified ads Kave 






been arranged by category and 






TRANS- 




sub-category All categories are 


PORTATION 




marked by one ol itie large 




images, and sub-categories are 


810 AitomUes 


preceded by a number 




designation. 


8S0 Sicydes 




880 MolorcydM 


TIPS FOR 


840 CwPool 


WRITING A 




CLASSIFIED AD 


^f^ 




ANvays put wtiai Item or service 


^H^ 




you are acNertlsIng Hrsl. TTilt helps 


AA^i 




potential buyere find what they are 


6Qd 




looking lor. 


V%Jv 




Don't use atibreviations. Many 


TRAVEL' 




buyers are confused by 
abbreviations. 


TRIPS 




Consider Induding the price 
This tells txjyers if they are looWrfg 
at sometTiloQ In their price range. 


810 Tour Pick 


■9* 


«S0 AftptaneTkitiii 


WE DO NOT USE PHONE 


880 TmnUcMs 


NUMBERS Oil LAST NAMES IN 




PERSONALS. 


•40 eusTioM 


I 





4 y Friday, Febniafy 24, IMS 



KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN 



Board hopefuls worry about future 



CONTINUED FROM PAGE 1 

After seeing the evolution of many 
district issuer, Skhe said she still 
believes the Isey to improving the dis- 
trict is Tor parents to become pan of 
the education team. 

"We are all in this together," she 
said. 

Like everyone facing the possibili- 
ty of having to decide how to handle 
the district's budget. Hill said cuts 
may need to be made. 

"Some services we want and 
expect arc going to suffer." she said. 

Hill said she is enthu-siasttc about 
Quality Performance Accreditation 
because the state will accredit districts 
on what they are actually doing. 

QPA is a state program to assess 
schools on the basis of snjdeni perfor- 
mances on asses-sment tests instead of 
through quantitative measurements 
like counting the number of books in 
the libraiy. 

She said QPA is an evolving 
process. Like any new system, it nnay 
have some Haws, but none which can- 
not be remedied, she said. 

The tesLs are varied assessments of 
basic skills, she said. 

"I can't believe anybody could be 
opptised," she said. 




PMLMOMUH 

Expectations and motivation are 
great concerns of Phil Morgan as 
well. 

Morgan, a 
former K-12 
instniciof and a 
parent of four, 
runs a baseball 
school with 
children from 
ditTerent socioe- 
conomic and 
cultural back- 
grourxls. 

He said he 
has a strong 
interest in pay- 
ing the commu- 
nity back for all it has done for his 
family and motivating students. 

"I have a strong interest in helping 
kids," he said. 

In the real world, he said, people 
facing high expectations arc those 
who work hard and get jobs. 

Morgan wants kids to be in a posi- 
tion that they have the skills to do 
what they want in life. 

Morgan said Outcome-Based 
Education is only a new name for an 
old concept. 



Morgan 



"It has taken place since education 
has taken place," he said. 

He said teachers have always prac- 
ticed mastery learning in their class- 
rooms. If not, no one would have got- 
ten past their math facts, he said. 

It is only when the name was 
applied to OBE that people began to 
worry, he said. 

MAIffMCHOLI 

Mary Nichols, storytelling iastiuctor. 
doctoral student, parent of two and an 
mcumbent of two terms, said she is 
worried about students lacking com- 
puter literacy. 

"Some don't 
even have the 
abilities lo work 
i n 

McDonald's," 
Niched said 

She would 
like to see stu- 
dents learn 
more computer 
basics to pre- 
pare them for 
thcfiituie. 

"The year 
2000 is going to 
be different for the job market,' 




Kichols 



Nichols said. 

One big probtem with technologi- 
cal education is some students have 
more ability than others because they 
have learned at home, Nick>ls said 

Other children, Nichols said, have 
parents who are not computer literate 
or cannot afford to keep up with 
changing techiwlogy. 

Budget issues are another big con- 
cern for Nichols. 

"Budget cutting is not a pleasant 
occupation." she said. 

She said governmental relations 
are going to be important for any 
board member The Kansas Legis- 
lature is in a tax-cutting mood, and 
cuts are not jast being aimed at K-12 
education, but universities as well, 
Nichols said 

"It costs money to educate chil- 
dren," she said. 

Nichols said she believes a better 
word for QPA is results. 

"That part no one complains 
about," she said. 

Nichols said on the state level 
there has been a tot of confusion 
about what was needed with die QPA 
program. 

"You don't start massive programs 
on lop of confusion," Nichols said. 



Faculty member voices 
civil-rights concerns 



CONTINUED FROM PAGE 1 

Butler said one of the most impor- 
tant activities in which she was 
involved was the organization of 
breakfast programs in local schools. 

"Eastern is located essentially in 
the foothills of Appalachia where the 
level of poverty is very high We were 
able to make a real diOcrencc." 

In addition to creating a breakfast 
program for local school children. 
Butler said she was also involved in 
organizing tutoring classes. 

"Through these activities. I was 
able to have a positive impact on the 
community." she said. "But what 1 
have taken away from these times is 
the cITFect grassroots participation can 
have in bringing change " 

Through her involvement in liKal 
community service. Butler said she 
also learned about the imptjrtancc of 
forming coalitions with other W4>men 

"My younger yean had been filled 
with sbnng women, so I had grown up 
with a sense of women's resiliency 
But when I became involved with 
other women in the movement on cam- 
pus, I realized women were always 
behind the efforts for stx'ial change," 



As a student during the civil-rights 
movement, Butler said she was heavi- 
ly influenced by the philosophies of a 
woman named Ella Baker. 

"As a civil-rights activist, her phi- 
losophy was 'strong people do not 
need strong leaders,'" she said. 

Butler said the efforts of people 
like Baker are often forgotten. 

"Baker was involved in many 
aspects of social change, from orga- 
nizing unions fur black women in 
New York City to collecting data in 
the Soudi for the NAACP," she said, 

Butler said she is concerned that 
today there are extremists working to 
dismantle the change achieved during 
the civil-rights period. 

"There is a cyclical movement to 
change. The pendulum swings one 
way and then swings back the other 
way But each time it is harder to get it 
moving back in the right direction," 

Butler said she is also concerned 
that there is a sense of lost energy on 
ctillege campases today, 

"I worry that students have been 
lulled into a sense of complacency. 
Students arc aware of what they don't 
like with a lack of awareness " 



Candidates discuss town's economic base 



CONTINUED FROM PAGE 1 

on a new business park, the project 
must be approved by a public vote," 
he said, "Public programs will only 
work with public support and 
approval." 

Hall said he shares the same atti- 
tude about a juvenile detention center. 

'There is a need for a juvenile 
detention center and jail, which must 
be addres!«:d by both the county and 
the city. As with a business parte, this 
issue must also be placed before the 
taxpayers to be voted on, as they wilt 
be asked to fsiy for tfiis improvement" 

The Manhattan citizens should also 
have a say in how the half-cent sales 
tax is spent, he said, 

"With the half-cent sales lax that 
passed in November, the city will 
have an additional S2 million each 
year to spend," Hall said. "We must 
demand that the city be accountable 
for our taxes. We must ask: What are 
we doing? Why arc wc doing it? Who 
are wc doing it forT* 

Hall s^d the same care should be 
taken when planning for future 
growth. 



"I favor responsible growth. With 
the downsizing of Fort Riley and the 
peaking of enrollments at K-State, our 
growth will not be as it has in the 
past." he said. "Our planning must fol- 
low reason, must be prudent and must 
follow facts, not wishful expecta- 
tions." 

EDfWAAOIKMS 

The future might not be so bri^t, 
unless the Manhattan community can 
pull together and work toward a com- 
mon goal, Edward Home said. 

'The community need for an eco- 
nomic base is very important, espe- 
cially with the downsizing of Fort 
Riley." Home said. "Wc should be 
trying to pull the community together 
to support that goal." 

Manhattan is headed in the right 
direction, however. Home said. 






Dilly'si 




I Buy one saiuiwich, | 

j get secoiui at | 

I halt price | 

I with this coupon I 



I AggievilIe>sy7Slt) J 



^smmm 



WHATS RIGHT FOR VOU 

50% OFF 

1st Monttis Rent 

w/coupon 

Starting @$7.99 

per^w^ek 

We Have: 
19" TV's 
Dinettes 
Microwaves 
VCR's 
Slielf Stereos 
Dorm Refrigerators 

1235 Washington, 

Junction City 

762-7602 




great research.. 

Kaplan spends over $3 million annually developing 
products and researching the tests. We've proved 
that we know the tests inside out. 



tSAT 




mCAt 




In 1992, Kaplan predicted the elimination 
'^ of an LSAT question type and changed our 
course in anticipation of the change. 



In 1993, the ETS was forced to 
'^ withdraw a GRE question type because 
Kaplan "broke the code." 



In 1994, Kaplan research brought to light 
,^ security flaws in itie computer based GRE 
tests. As a result, the ETS temporarily 
pulled the test. 

great results. 

Kaplan's expertise translates 
Into higher scores and greater 
confidence for our students. 
Put our research to work for 
you on test day. 



*l-800-KAP-TEST 
gat a higher score 

KAPLAN 



"I'll be hon 
est 1 don't have 
a specific magi- 
cal plan, but 1 
know that the 
whole commu- 
nity docs need 
to be encour- 
aged to focus," 
he said. "Busin- 
esses should be 
encouraged to 
re-invesi in the 
community. 
The jobs will be needed because ihete 




Home 



could be 4,500 fewer petfple here alter 
Fort Riley's dowasi/.ing is ctmiplcted. 
Home said. 

'it will definitely affect our ecom> 
my. It is certainly a Ngh-priority item." 

Home has served as chairman of 
the Library Board. 

"I'm in very big support of the 
Manhattan Public Library expansion 
project. There is u proposed expan- 
sion, and the project has wide support. 
I think it would be very worthwhile 
for the whole community." 

LIXPIMION 

Lex Pearson has lived in 



Manhattan all of his life and said he 
knows the benefits K-Stalc and Fort 
Riley can bring. 

"I love K- 
State being a 
part of the city." 
he said. "The 
school gets 
money back 
It's beneficial to 
the students at 
large." 

Pearson said 
everyone in 
Manhattan will 
feel the effect if 




Pearson 



Fi>rt Riley is closed. 

"It'll hurt if the fort keeps getting 
smaller It's like a trickle-down effect. 
I'm a painter, and if there's no con- 
.struction happening anywhere, that 
trickles down to me," Pearson said. 
'■['II do what I can. I'm for the fort." 

Pearson said another industrial 
park could help with Manhattan's 
economic development. 

"We need an industrial park. Wc 
have one out by McCall's. and there's 
interest there." he said. "I think an 
area by the airport would be a good 
place to have another one. That way it 
could help the airport also." 



We are the only 

genuine dealer 

of Harley Davidson 

motorcycles, 

service, & accessories 

within 60 miles. 



fs^^fm 



lil^mj;^ 



■^^F 



Over 2,500 
sq. feet of 
accessories 

and parts. 



1309 N. Washington 

Junction aty, KS 

(913)238-34 11 



Deb NUSS for ScHooI Board 

A strong voice for education 



• Quality Education at AU Grade Levels 

• Responsible Financial Management 
•Z Parent & Community Involvement 

• Proven track record of success ar\6^ \.1* 

Political adv. paid fur hy Nuss for School Board. Janice Schroeder, Treasurer; Clyde Jones, t'halrman. 





First 



'4r- 

Bap^ Ost Church 



Sunday Worship 11 a.m. 
Church School 9:45 a.ni. 

For free transportalion within city limits, 

call the church . 

Pastors Karen & Alan Selig 

2121 8lue Hills Rd. 539-0691 

An American Baptist Congregalion 



Grace Baptist Church 

(2901 Dickens - 2 blks. E. of Selh Child) 

♦ Sunday ♦ 
Two Unique Worship Opportunities 

8:15 ♦ 10:45 a.m. 

Bible Classes For All Ages - 9:30 a.m. 

Body Life or Care Cells 6 p.m. 

776-0424 



Manhattan Mennonite 
Church 

Sunday School 9;30 a in , Wmsfup 10.45 am. 

David Jones, Interim Pastor 

lOttfindFramont S3M079 

ChikJ Caie Available 



-* 4^ vmwv coNNiwrn 
Welcome Back, Students 

Morning Worstiip 8:30 & 10:45 a.m. 

Sunday Scfiool 9:45 am. 
Sunday Evening Worship 6 p.m. 

1st, 3rd & 5th Sundays 

CARE CELLS (Small Groups) 

6 p.m. 2nd & 4th Sundays 

3001 Ft Riley Blvd. 537-7173 



St Isidore's 
Catholic Student Center 

Masses Sat S p m 

Sun 9 30. Ham ispm 

ConlessMns Sal 3:30 p m 

71t DtntMO $3»-T4W 

Chipltin: FiltMr Ktlth W*b*r 



Unitarian-Universalist 
Fellowship 

Sm*I OfW iMud (HW) 17T), km Ml 

«i iHKdMt Nd (Miy iiv «wi leeui 1 -.1 mm. 

'M DUcAufCfl mttt a IttrtI vrt OEWi mmml t'mKWP ' 

Sunday School ind S«(vlc«i 

FOR INFORMATIOM CAU. M»-»X9 oi UT.H16. 



SEVEN DOLORS 
CATHOLIC CHURCH 

•SUNDAY MASSES* 

7:30 a.m.-9 a.m.-10:30 a.m,-Moon 

SATURDAY MASS 6 p.m. 

"HOLY DAr MASSES 

7:15a.m.-5:15p.m. or7p.m. 

•SATURDAY CONFESSIONS* 

4:30 p.m. -5:30 p.m. 

CORNER OF JULIETTE S PIERRE 

731 Pterre 77M115 




St. Francis 
Canterbury 
Episcopal 
Campus Ministry 

Eucharist & Guitar 

in Danforth Chapel 

Every Sunday at S p,m. 

Rev. Cathy Chittenden-Battom 

532-9099 



Joint Fellowship Tune 

in between worship 
services 




Lutheran 

Campus 

Ministry 

New Wonhip Ttmt 

Sunday 7:15 p.m. 

Danforth Chapel 

"Nofw t(>t ftOMt and Celebration" 

College Litur^ St 

Holy Comm union 

Potior Jayne Thompson 

539-4451 

— Open to All — 



First Lutheran 

10th & PoynU 537-8532 

Worship al 8:30 and 11 a.m. 
Sunday School tor all ages at 9:40 a.m. 



FIRST UNITED 
METHODIST CHURCH 

8:30 & It a,m. Worship 
9:45 a.m. Church School 

Nursery provided tor all services 
Omer G. Tittle, Pastor 

612 Poyntz 776-8821 

DIAL-A-PRAYER 776-9569 



ST LUKE'S 
LUTHERAN CHURCH 

(LCMS) 
Campus Pastor James Gau 

Sun, 8 and 10:45 a.m. 

Sat, Worship 6 p,m. 

Bible Class Sunday 9:30 a.m. 

330N.Sur>setAve 539-2604 




? 



FIRST CHRISTIAN CHURCH 

OtSCIPLES Of CHRIST 

Worship & Praise 8:30 a.m 

Traditional Worship 10:55 a.m 

Chnslian Education 

Weetily College Piograms 

Live Broadcast tt:30a.m 953FM 

Wed Eve Bit)le Study & Vrxjttt Piograms 

PASTOR DR DONALD E BREZAVAfi 

COLLEGE MIMSTER REV KARL J BUNJES 

5th t Humlwldt 77M7W 



First Congregational Church 

700 Poyntz (Poynlz and Jjlietle) 537-7006 

Sunday School 9:30 a.m. 

Worsttip 10:45 a.m. 

Sermon: 

X:tose Encounters of the 
Divine Kind' 
1/ Sunday, Feb, 26 

Rev. Donald Longbottom 





AMERICAN BAPTIST 

CAMPUS MINISTRY 

1601 Anderson Avenue 



ALTERNATIVE WORSHIP 
Stories, Songs, and Prayer 

7pm Tuesday 

Danforth Chapel 

(on caiDpus n«ar McCain Auditorium) 

Eneryofw AluBy^ Wekorrm ChMcav 

available Call Kathy OcmJey, Campiis 

Mmisim, torirom mfomialion, 53S-3051 




532-6560 



CRESTVIEW 

CHRISTIAN 

CHURCH 

English Worship 10:30 a.m. & 6:30 p.m. 

Sunday Schod 9:15 a.m. 

Chinese Worship 1 p.m. 

4761 Tuttle Creek Blvd. 

(3 miles noriti o( Kimtall Ave | 

776-3798 




Exp. Bite 00/« 
Kansas State Historical Society 
NeMspaper Section 
120 M 10th 



OLLEGIAN 



^CKHUG TO 



Ule looks at vegetarian students 
and what led Dm to a meal-free 
diet. 




MOiS 



TRACK 
CHAMPIONSHIPS 

TTie women's track team finished 
second al tie Big BgN Indoor Track 
arxl Rek] Champioriships this 
weekend. The men's learn lintshed 
sixth. 



MOEt 




MONDAY 

HIGH COW 

49 32 




WEATHER — PAGE 2 



JtBRUARY27, 1015 



timimnmmm 



Nnn - S32-«se Uvwtltins - SaMIM 



108 



FM copf fTM. IMItlonal eeplM m 25 c«ni*. 






10,000 people 
attend rodeo 
at K-State 

jILL TIOTMBIIR ^__^_ 

Tolfcgtan 

Ten thousand rodeo Tans 
turned out to sec K-Siate's 
annual rodeo this weekend. 

The K-Slale Rodeo Glut) 
organized and helped sponsor 
the annual KSU Rodeo lasl 
week in Weber Arena. 

The winning team for the 
men's competition was 
Panhandle State University 
from Goodwell, Okia, For the 
women's events, it was 
Southeast Oklahoma Slate 



University Trom Durant, Okla. 

Although the K-State 
Rodeo Team didn't have 
much of a showing In the 
finals on Sunday, it did put in 
a lot of hard work, said Dave 
Katzer. K-State Rodeo Team 
captain. 

"Between the Facilities we 
use and the worlc from the 
team members, I think most 
people agree we put on the 
best rodeo in the region," he 
said. 

Katzer said he not only 
competed in the saddle bronc 
event but also did everything 
from sweep bleachers to pre- 
sent a plaque to the Coorsi tteer 
distributors for their support. 



"It's lots of manual labor 
— lots of cleaning up every 
night and wiring things 
together to get ready for the 
next show," he said. 

Dan Suderman, K-State 
Rodeo Club president, said the 
rodeo was something special 
for him. 

"I don't deserve a bit of 
credit," he said. "Everybody 
worked real hard and had fun 
while they did it. There was 
no big chief silting back and 
telling everyone what to do." 

When team members were 
not setting up or cleaning up, 
they were competing. 

■ SeeBULLPage12 



Sophomore wins rodeo crown 



Ktlly Haiwl, rreshmao In pre-toumalism and mm» communications, rtdes around a banral Sunday afternoon during 
the finals of the KSU Rodeo In Weber Hall. Kanel made It In 12.72 seconds. This nearly tied the time of her sister, 
Kasey, senior \n elementary education, who rode In 12.79 seconds. Tha two compata<l In the barrel-race finals and 
were K-State's only participants In the finals Sunday afternoon. 



Colt^ui 

The Miss Rodeo K-Sute crown was passed 
on Saturday night in Weber Arena. 

Lena Rati iff, sophomore in animal science 
and industry, was given the title by last year's 
Miss Rodeo K-State. Libby Schnoebclen, 
senior in microbiology and animal science and 
industry. 

Kara Beth Lowe, sophomore in agricultural 
journalism, was first runner-up. and JtxJi 
Christiansen, junior in business management, 
was second runner-up. 

Christiansen was also awarded the Miss 
Congeniality title, which was voted on by the 
other two contestants. 

The judging was divided into three different 
categories and was done days before the 
crowning. 

The first category of judging was nKxleling 
at TW Longhom's, Rati iff said. 

"We had the opportunity to pick out cloth- 
ing to wear from S Bar J Western Clothiers and 
from Lee's Western Wear and were then able 
to model to the song of our choice," she said. 

The contestants were also required to 
answer an impromptu question at the modeling 
competition. Christiansen was awarded the 
modeling award. 



The second Judging category was the horse- 
manship contest. Within the horsemanship cat- 
egory, there were four different areas of com- 
petition. 

The first area was performing horsemanship 
patterns. 

"We each drew for two different horses that 
we had never ridden before and were then 
asked to perform two different patterns on 
them." Ratliff said 

The contestants were each given two min- 
utes to get used to the horse they had drawn. 

During the pattems, they were judged on 
horsemanship skills, a mount and a dismount. 
Ratliff wan the horsemanship-perfomiancc 
compeiitiun. 

The next part of the horsemanship category 
was a written test, 

"The test covered information about K-State 
and about the National Intercollegiate Rodeo 
Association," Christiansen said. 

The third part of th? horsemanship category 
was a IS- to 20-minute interview. Contestants 
were asked everything from current events to 
life at K-State to the rodeo. 

For the last pan of the horsemanship catego- 
ry, contestants gave a speech at Giorgio's 

■ See MISS Page 7 



Forums over; elections next for school-board candidates 



KNWnN BRIOHTOH 

Collesiu) 

The issues are on the table. 
Now it is decision time. 

The field of 10 candidates for 
the Manhattan-Ogdcn USD 383 
School Board will be narrowed 
down to only eight after Tuesday's 
primary. 

Running for the board are Rick 
Crow. Peter Garretson, Colleen 
Hampton, Joleen Hill, Phil 
Morgan, Mary Nichols, Deb Nuss, 
Michael Pearson. Kimberiy Wells 
and Larry Weaver. 



The candidates are coming off 
of two forums late last week. 

Thursday, the Northview 
Arca/Dix Neighborhood Assoc- 
iation sponsored a small forum at 
Northview Elementary School, and 
Friday, the city's PTO/PTA groups 
sponsored a well-attended forum at 
Amanda Arnold Elementary. 

All the candidates attended the 
Northview forum except for Crow, 
who didn't attend any of the 
forums. This was the community's 
only opportunity to hear Wells, for 
she was unal>le to attend the 



Amanda Arnold forum because of 
an injury. 

The candidates were questioned 
on new issues, including over- 
crowding guidelines in reference 
to the opening of the new Frank 
Bergman Elementary School and 
how the community can benefit 
from school facilities. 

Nichols, a two-term incumbent, 
said one reason she ran for the 
board initially was because of the 
district's battle with overcrowding. 

She told the story of a kinder- 
gartner who one day told her 



mother she didn't know if she 
liked her class because her teacher 
had been so busy she didn't have 
time to say hello to her. 

Nichols said she wants to keep 
class sizes small so teachers can 
spend quality time with their 
pupils. 

Garretson said with the down- 
sizing of Fon Riley and the uncer- 
tainty about how many students 
will be leaving the district, he 
hopes the district has enough stu- 
dents to warrant all the schools. 

"We might have to close a 



school," Garretson said. 

This would be a decision, he 
said, that would help the budget 
but would anger a neighborhood. 

Hampton, a parent of three chil- 
dren in the district, said she does 
not think her children have ever 
felt the effect."! of overcrowding. 

"I don't think they have been in 
a crowded classroom," she said. 

She also said, however, that if 
the fort's down.sizing does dramat- 
ically lower attendance levels, it 
could be nice to have extra space. 

When discussing community 



usage of schools after hours, the 
responses were mixed, considering 
the budget strain the disuict is fac- 
ing. 

The state has not raised the 
amount ol money it gives the dis- 
trict per student for three years. 
Combining this flat budget with 
the potential of losing students 
leads all the candidates to believe 
tough decisions concerning differ- 
ent programs may have to be 
made. 

■ SeeF0RUMrage12 



► CITY COMMISSION RACE 



Candidate wants to cut taxes 



Colkgiu 

rWt is Ihf third of a thm-part striti 
spattighting lh< right candidatrs runHtng 
/or tk* €ity roflMtiuHift. 

Eight candidates have put 
them.se Ives in the limelight after 
dedicating their time to running 
for city commissioner. 

Voters will be asked to choose 
their top three choices Tuesday in 
primary election. 

rANUVCmWDIR 

Cutting taxes is the plan for 
Stanley Crowdcr, 

"Taxes are too high in this 
area," Crowder said. "They're 
money-crazy. I'm going to cut 
taxes," 

Crowder, who has run in the 
city-commission race five previ- 
ous times, wants to stop action on 
the half-cent sales tax that was 
passed last year. 

"That tax was passed because 
Cessna was coming in. They're 



not coming here, so I want to push 
to get that stopped," he said. "We 
can take the money already col- 
lected and give it to the sewer and 
water company and have them 
give people a reduction We need 
to return that money to the taxpay- 
ers." 

Crowder 
said he did 
not support 
plans for con- 
structing a 
new air termi- 
nal at the 
Manhattan 
Municipal 
Airpon and a 
fou r- 1 ane 
highway on 
Seth Child 
sRoad, 

"Manhattan doesn't need any of 
that. This town is gradually 
dying," he said, "Only two lanes 
are used on Seth Chi Ids anyway. 
Why pay all this money? People 
take the Road Runner to Kansas 




Crowder 



City's airport." 

One way to help businesses in 
Manhattan is to close the 
Manhattan Town Center, Crowder 
said. 

"We need to foreclose on the 
mall. Let Manhattan have the busi- 
nesses," he said, "If you look at 
the old maps, pan of the maJl is in 
Pottawatomie County, so part of 
that money isn't even going to 
Manhattan or Riley County," 

Manhattan will also be losing 
money if Fort Riley closes. 

"Manhattan is going to be hurt- 
ing. 1 think Fon Riley is going to 
close," Crowder said. "There's a 
lot of discrimination against the 
CIs, but when college is out, the 
businesses welcome them. 
Manhattan will shrivel up without 
them," 

Crowder also said K-State 
should not be a part of the city, 

"Manhattan should leave them 
alone. They think it says 

■ SeeEC0N0MICPaget2 



► SCHOOL-BOARD RACi 



Candidates concerned about Fort Riley 
puUout, budgeting for quality education 



JOMTni iMOHTON 

TkU iM tk* third in m thrtt-part 
t^Hti Uatlitt •< cmndldatts far 
Hmnhailaa-Ogdtu VSD MS School 



Concern for the changing size 
of Manhattan-Ogden USD 383 
classrooms and changes in the 
way students are educated have 
caught the interest of citizens 
hoping to be on the USD 383 
School Board 

Ten candidates are vying for 
four available spots on the 
btmtL Two will be eliminated 
; the primary Tuesday. 



PITIII (MWTIOII 

Peter Garretson, who previ- 
ously served on a iichool board 
in Highland Part. III., is a retired 
nuiitvy attorney, His son, Alex, 



graduated fmni Manhattan High 
School in 1993, 

After his retirement, 
Garretjion 
rc-enlisted. 
this lime at 
K-State. He 
is pursuing 
a degree in 
secondary 
education, 

Garret- 
son said his 
pcalest 
concerns 
deal with 
the district's 
budget. 

'The state's contribution to the 
distria is $3,600 per student This 
amount has not been ^aagti fcx 
three years, even though district 
expense have risen. 

Combine these flat budgets 




Gamtoofl 



with the uncertain pullout of 
Fort Riley students t>ecause of 
downsizing, and it becomes evi- 
dent the district could have some 
hard budgeting decisioos to 
make, Ganetson said. 

Garretson said these cut> 
backs could mean the district 
might have to make cuts in areas 
such as uniforms, activities ot 
personnel. 

'The challenge is to provide 
our children not with more edu- 
cation but with better educa- 
tion.*' be said. 

Me said he hopes the commu- 
nity will be able to counterbaJ- 
ance the effects of military 
downsizing. 

"Hopefully. Manhattan will 
be a growing community." he 
Mid. 

■ See CANDIDATES Paga 12 , 



A Monday, February 27, 1098 



KANSAS SUTE COLLEGIAN 



#News briefs 



► FOUNDER OF LOCAL COSTUME STORE DIES AT AOE 6«j SERVICE TODAY 



Maria C Lawli. 09, of 814 
Wildcat Ridgo. diad Thursday 
•vaning. Sha was the foundar of 
Maria's Costumes sl^. whlcd tws 
t>eeo in Manhanan sinoa 1977. 

Lewis Mas bofn on Nov 4, 1925, 
in Wood Rivar. Neb. She was the 
daughter ot Walter Sylvester and 
Cecilia Bonhart Schlick. 

Lewis had resided in Grand 
Island, Nsb , before moving to 
Manhattan *n 1969 

Lewis graduated from Wood 
River Hl^h School ir) 1943 She l»en 
taught school lor one year before 
worlung (or a munitiorts plant durrng 
Worid War II 

In 1969. sha moved to 
Manhattan, where she opened 
Mane's Costumas in 1977. 

Lewis owned and operated the 
shop until her retlremeni in 1992, 



when her daughter Pam Miller 

bought it tram her. 

*She started collectirvg costumes 
and things other people made,' 
Miller said "She Just collected 
things' 

The things she collected ware 
first sold as costumes tor children. 
When she realized she had so many 
costumes, she started a business. 
Milter said. 

Lewis sold costumes to K-State's 
dance and theater programs. 

Lewis was a mamtter of many 
Manhattan organizations, including 
the Seven Dolors Catholic Church, 
the VFW and the American Legion 
AuKiiiartes 

In 1947, she married Weldon 
Roger Beier m Evanston, Wyo. 

He preceded her in death. On 
Sept 25. 1976, she was married to 



Arthur Eari Lewis in Manhattan He 
preceded her in death. 

Lawris Is survived by six daugh- 
ters, Including Pamela Miller, 
Manhattan; five sons, including 
Michael and Steven Beier. 
Manhattan: orw brother and one sis- 
ter 1 1 grandchildren and five great- 
grandchildren. 

Lewis was preceded in death t>y 
three sisters and her parents. 

Friends may contribute to a 
memorial for Homecare and 
Hoaplce Inc Contributions may be 
left in care of the Edwards- 
Yorgenaen-Meloan Funeral Home, 
1616 Poyntz Ave. 

The service will be at 10 am 
today at Seven Dolors Catholic 
Church. 



►63-YEAR-OLD K-STATE STUDENT DIES; SERVICE SCHEDULED FOR TODAY 



Yvonne G. Price, 63, of 
Wamego, died Thursday at her 
t>ome 

She was bom Juna 4, 1931, in 

Nam-Dinh, Vietnam. In 1953, she 
moved to the United States to live at 
Fort Euslis, Va. 



She married Richard Price on 
July IS, 1964, m Westmorelarid. 

She and her husband moved to 
Wamego in 1971 

She had attended K-State for tlw 
past two years, taking classes in 
language development. 



St>e is survived by her husband. 
two daughters and 1 grandchildren 

The service will be at 10 am 
today at R.J. Evans Mortuary in 

Wamego. 



►FORMER FORT RILEY MAINTENANCE OFFICER CONVICTED OF 2 MURDERS 



A former maintenance officer at 
Fort Riley was convicted ol two mur- 
dara Friday 

Pfc Eddie Patterson, 22, was 
found guilty of the July 9 shooting 
deaths of Pv2 Anthony Thornton, 
22, and Spec Silky Boatwnght, 23. 

Thornton was a member of 
Company 8, 70lsi Support 
Battalion, and Boatwnght was a 
member ol Company C, 701st 



Support Battalion 

Patterson was louivj guilty of the 
premeditated murder ol Boatwright 
and the felony murder of Thomton, 

Patterson was also convicted of 
communication ot a threat and viola- 
tion Of the weapons regulation in 
connection with the shooting deaths 

An eight-member military jury, 
which included officers and enlisted 
soldiers, sentenced Patterson to life 



in prison, reduction to the rank ot 
pitvats E-l, forfeiture ol all pay and 
atlowanoes and a dishonorable dis- 
cftarge. 

Patterson, formerly of the 5&6ih 
Maintenance Company, 541st 
Maintenance Battalton at Fort Riley, 
will be serving his sentence at Fort 
Leavenworth. 

LMAauJOtT 



►U.S. AND CHINA AVOID TRADE WAR, SIGN COMPREHENSIVE AGREEMENT 



BEIJING (AP> - China and the 
United States averted a major trade 
war Sunday by signing a compre- 
hensive agreement putting teeth into 
Chinese laws protecting copyright, 
trademarks and patents. 

The agreement capped 20 
months ot "often very dillicuH negoti- 
ations, " said Deputy US. Trade 
Representative Charlene 



flarshefsky 

"This IS a strong agreement for 
American companies and American 
workers," President Clinton said in a 
statement issued by the White 
House. 

The agreement spells out mea- 
sures that would enforce laws China 
wrote alter similarly tense talks 1t>at 
went down to the wire in 1992. In 



those negotiations, the United 
States demanded stricter legal pro- 
tection lor its copyrights, patents 
and Iradamarto, 

Tbe steps include estat)llshing a 
nationwide task force to raid busi- 
nesses engaged in piracy, review 
business records, destroy goods 
and equipment, and order closure 
artd cnminal prosecution 




You've Shot your friends, co-workers, families and 
significant others for the Royal Purple yearbook. 

jhat are you goi 
do about it no 

Come to the K-$tate Union from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. 
Feb. 28 and look at the Shoot Yourself proofs set up 
on a table outside the Stateroom cafeteria. At this 
time, you'll be able to order copies of your proofs 
($7 for a Sx7 and $10 for an 8x10). You will also 
have the opportunity to purchase a I99S Royal 
Purple yearbook for only $21, so grab your 
checkbook and reserve your yearbook now. 



.J.A 



bnsas Stale yfiiversity 





4^ 



TU D lO 
ROYAL 



<^ Police REPORTS ^Bulletin board 



«• tifeM dndtr frM Ibf MIy ligt si Dm K-Kils M< Mtf ( 

■mwm Iff tp«e< camtnlnti, «• de Ml MwlMtlseks, 



K-STATE POUa 



SATURDAY, nBRUAIIY 3S 



AMNOUNCIMINTS ■■■■■■■■■■■■■i 

KpfUtMiiaua tor Aril ■nd Sdmcct AnbMMaori m avtiilaMe in ili^ 
dcin'iiirrice App(icitimii«KdiKiii 5pm March 16 

AiiItt McAltlMw will b* dtftadlni tier doctanl dla*TUtlw lilted 
"Hhe MuikiCHl Legacy of DorcMhy l^vc Cu«(n; African American F<m4l< 
Ompcl Singer wilh ImplicMKni for EdocMioA ind TheMcr Educutoi" M tiXI 
p m today in BluemoiU 36S 



Ai 12:0] a.m., «n itteit mn 
nude ibr dhvinK under the intlucni^e 
MichNel Ayala was ti^ippeil for j irat- 
r^ vMation and leiled tor possible 
high alcohol level The ie^ih con 
Tinned he waa driving nver ilie kgjl 
limii. Ayala wa« arreted jnd Ijhrn lit 
Hilcy Cutnly Jail 



AI 117 am, an amtl wai made 
r<>r driving under ilH inrluenct Hugh 
Shalknberjer wsf napped for t traf- 
fic viqlaimn and Ic^ed for poitible 
high alciilwl level ■ Teat CdntirmRt 
he wa% driving (ivei the legil limil 
Shiillciiberger wu armted and taken 
ui Ritry CfHiiuy fail 



BULLBTINS 



■ Chlmti will mct( it B JO 
ii>Aifht in Union 2U. 

■ 4pofltoltc CftRipui MLnkto 



will rtic«l it I toAifN iti Uriion20b ^ 
■ Beta Alplu M will med at 7 
EtHnight in ihc Union Big 8 Room 



RILEY COUNTY POLICE 



FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 24 



At l:OJ pjTt, a vehicle accident 
with tnjuriei wat repiirled jl 100 
Nunh 14th St Meliiv,! I,icuhten 
5)2J Turkey Fool Road, and Bnilgci 
O'Brale, 44M Tutlle Crecli Road, 
were the pariiei involved itoth 
refused u««tinent for ncdi and haci, 
pain. 

At 2:40 p.m . a vchicte aixideni 
with injurica wai reponrd at N 
Manhallan Avenue and Beiirand 
Stieel Benjamin I Mafi\peal(L-r. I2.M 
Vatticr St., and Stephanie A Huqua. 
1531} McCiun Ljnt. were ilie partio 
irivulvcd fu^i complained nl pntu- 



Ilk kntt injurtei A nujor-dtmate. 
minor injury report waa filed. 

At M 07 p m . Jefriry L Kucli, 
I42tj Pilliitiury t>rive. wai arrtiled tor 
dnving under the influence ai>j pin 
%e%uiin of povMble drug pviptiemalia 
at 7011 Yuma St Bond wai ut at 

A I 1 1 35 p.m.. a report wat 
received of an unlawful uw of an ID 
ji Uomben. 1 1 :n Muni St Ruuin R 
Lf4thcrv, 1013 Deni^uri Ave., wai 
iv\ued a ntmce lu appear for untawfttl 
uie ota Kan4a driver' t licenw 



DIALING FOR DOLLAR$ 

KSU FbuniMorfi TeMnl piogrentt Mi be cofvdu^ 
iiJgNly tirfl TiMtday. Th« f^nn warn operated Suratey 
fiigh by studwils frixT) ttw ooa«on of Efigiraefing and 
AnihlKtuPB and Oatjgn. Colegtt rotate this dtity ev^ 
K) Itne ni^tt. 



Night of Tetefund: 


16 




Evening total: 


$58,938 




Graf>d totaJ; 


1791,719 



A 



jourct: Oearma Walker 



SATURDAY, FIBRUARV 28 



At 2:tJ «.ni.K Jun t. (j^nimi). 
1221 Piem St,, wu wr«^n} tat dn 
vtnf under the mniwncc al ^4111 ^nd 
Yufna htrerlK Bond wj\ \ti ^\ 
lUOOO 

At 3:07 a m . A rcfHirl wa^i 
received of unlawful ule ol hquur Al 



Chiirlie s Ncighborh^KH) Bat, IttOO 
ruOin Rood Stephen B CvUon, 
l^^6 CtfiYipiiii RoaJ, 4nd iauin L 
Hlj£i. R^dbtfd Ektai«i. were i»oed 
nutiit^h ti) appeir for »rvin£ ikohol 
jU«r htMjn 



The Kansas State CoKegiao 


dass postage is paid at 


(USPS 291 020). a student 


Manhattan. Kan , E6502. 


newspaper at Kansas Slate 


POSTMASTER: Send 


University, is pubtehed tiy 
StutJem Put)lica(ions Irvc.. 


address changes to Kansas 


Stale Coiiegian, cirojlabon 


Kedzie Hall 103, Manhattan, 


ttesit, Kedzie 103. Mantiattan, 


Kan.. 66506 The Collegian is 


Kan 66506-7167, 


pubKsned we6l«i53ys dunng the 




school year and once a week 




thfough the sunimef Second- 


Kansai State Cdiequn. 1 99$ 



Weather 



YESTERDAY'S HIGHS AND LOWS 



^GOOOUND 
17/31 



/GAfiDBtCfTY 
57/37 



RUSSEU. 

S7/43 



MANHXrTAN 
M/S4 



SAUfU 
65/M 

WICHTTA* 
66/S2 



lOKKA 

55/52 



KAMSAS 

cm 

^S5/51 



COFFEVmf 
S8/50 • 



• DENVER 
64/34 



• TULSA 
66/53 



• OMAHA 
34/32 



• ST. LOUIS 

71/56 



State Outlook 

Mostly chxjdy rtorth and east Partly 
cloudY southwest. Cixiler most 
aroas. t-lighis in the 50s noittieast to 
the upper 60$ southwest. 

Manhatian Outlook 

TODAY H^HHHMIHl 

Fog and drizzle in the 
morning. Mostly doudy. 
High of 49. 

TOMORROW ^a^^^m 

Colder and a ttigh of 
38. A 30 percent 
chance of snow or 
drizzle. 





OUR LOSS IS YOUR GAIN! 

TEXTBOOK 
SALE 

Feb. 24 -March 12, 1995 

We have cleaned out our storerooms 
and have HUNDREDS of selected new 
and used textbooks to sell at great prices! 

$2.00 Hardbacks 
$1.00 Paperbacks 

^Various fields of study* 
*Some previously used at K-State* 




BOOK STORE 
IN AGGIEVILLE 



a 



We Give You Our Best" 



9 a.m. - 9 p.m. 
Mon. - Sat. 



Noon - 5 p.m. 
Sunday 



KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN 



Monday, Fabruary 27, 1 g98 ^ 




► TECHNOLOGY 



Suit protects workers 
from chemical waste 



MIKE WELCHNAN&Colle^uin 

Manhattan firefighter John Shearer walks on a treadmlli in an environmen- 
tal simulation chamber Friday afternoon during a lest being conducted by the 
Institute of Environmental Research at Seaton Hall. Stiearer was testing an inter* 
cooling unit to work witti hazardous material cleanup suits. 



NNtOLA ZVTKOW 

Cnllegiiin 

A new suit may soon be 
available for nuclear plant 
maintenance workers, fire- 
lighters and people who 
clean up hazardous; waste. 

The Institute for Envir- 
nnmemal Research in Seaion 
Hall ha.s been given a gtant 
from OceanecrJng Space 
Systems to evaluate a new 
suit called the advanced 
worker protection system, 
sard Elizabeth McCullough, 
co-director of the institute 
and professor of (entiles. 

The new suit is an 
advanced version of the old 
suit, which has been worn by 
workers for a long time now, 
McCullough said. 

Both the old and new 
suits ate impermeable to pro- 
lecl the worker from chemi- 
cals. But while the old suit 
does have a self-contained 
breathing apparatus, it laclcs 
a cooling system. Mc- 
CulkHigh said. 

Since sweat does not 
evaporate, in (he okl suit the 
person is susceptible to heat 
.stroke, uJong with discomfort 
from sweat dripping all the 
way inio the boots. Because 
of this, the worker can only 
wear Ihem for short periotfa 
of time between rests, she 
said. 

"This causes a tremen- 
dous loss of productivity on 
the job," McCullough said. 

The new suit provides an 
internal cooling system that 



operate by using cold water 
tubes to cool the body The 
system is tied to the air sup- 
ply system. 

The testing is taking place 
in an experimental chamber 
at temperatures such as 100 
degrees and 80 degrees. It 
will go on for more than a 
week, and the participants 
are Manhattan firefighters, 
McCullough said. 

"We arc trying to mea- 
sure the tolerance time in the 
new suit versus the old one," 
she said. 

Jim Taylor, a local fire- 
fighter, said the four fire- 
fighters involved in the test- 
ing are getting paid. 

"We walk a treadmill as 
kmg as we can hold out" he 
said. 

Taylor said firefighters 
can walk about an hour to an 
hour and a half in the new 
suit, compared to 20 to 30 
minutes in the old suit. 

"They have thermo resis- 
tors on us that detect the skin 
temperatures and an EKG 
that detects heart rate and 
bbod pressure," Taylor said. 

At this point, the conclu- 
sion is that the new suit is 
two-to-three times more 
effective than the old one in 
the amount of work that can 
be achieved in it bcfnte the 
worker has to take a break. 
McCullough said. 

If the new suit proves 
successful, it will be avail- 
able for use within a year, 
she said. 



P' CAMPUS 



Regents approve 
research center 
for food animals 



► CAMPUS 



Blood drive numbers are down 



JANIT OILULAHD 

The numbers for the lust week's 
blood drive were disappointing. 

"There were a total of .5,^.1 dona- 
tions and 43 dcfei>i, and these numbers 
are down considerably." Dodie 
Paul cone r, head nurse of the blood 
drive, said. 



lei I Sneed. ivjiutnal tuordmiitiir tor 
bliKxi siTvict'> ut tin* American Red 
Cross, sail! ihe jamil was SO di»iK)rv for 
Derby I-immI tV'nti."r and 16^ donors 
pet day Ittr iIk* lesi ol ilic v\«.'k. 

Tht' blixKl dnvc was (.itmlucied at 
[>rb> on l-ch. 20 and in lite K- Stale 
Union Tuesdav lluniijih lrtd;i>. TJic 
school llial dun;!!!.'-- thi' n>iivt blood 



receives the traveling trophy and gets 
to keep it until the next blood drive. 

K-State has won the four previous 
semesters The results of this Kcmesier 
arc not in yet because KU is not 
scheduled to have its blood drive for 
several weeks. Paukoner said. 

Sneed said there has been a 
decrease in donor pariicipation. Last 
semester's decrease was probably 
because the bkxxl drive was during 
the K State vs. KU ffXMball game. The 



cause for this decrease is unknown 

Kody Krien, junior in pre-phamia- 
cy, said it is important to have a bkxxl 
drive because it is necessary for hospi- 
tals and for surgery. 

Sponsors of die blood mobile are 
Delta Tau Delta, American Red Cross, 
Lafene Health Center. Alphi Phi 
Omega, Golden Key National Honra- 
Society, the Association of Residence 
Halls and Manhattan Christian 
College. 



ANOIl STUMP 

Research and post-graduatc edu- 
cation will be the focus of the new 
Food Animal Health and 
Management Center at K-State. 

The Kansas Board of Regents 
approved the new research group in 
the College of Veterinary Medicine 
on Feb. 1 6. 

'•We're elated," said Dr. Ron 
Marler, dean of veterinary medi- 
cine. "This is a major step forward 
in the cooperative relationship 
between the agricultural base in 
Kansas and Kansas State 
University." 

The College of Veterinary 
Medicine made the decision to re- 
allocate funds to form the center 
last spring. 

"This was a major effort in refo- 
cusing our priorities around our 
strengths in food animal health and 
management." Marler said. 

In November, the college named 
Dr. Jerry Gillespie as director of the 
Food Animal Health and 
Management Center. He left his 
position as head of the Department 
of Clinical Sciences to assume the 
leadership in the new center. 

"My job ul I he center will be to 
act as department leader of the fac- 
ulty and staff in ihe development of 
the center and to make sure we stay 
with Ihe mission," he said. 'I'll be 
also working to raise funds for Ihe 
center." 

Approval by the regents was the 
last step in the proposal for the new 
center. It had to be approved by the 
college and then by the University 
before the regents could lake 
action. 

Gillespie said the center's mis- 
sion is applied animal-health 
research and managemenl and post- 
graduate education. 

"Our goal is to be one of, if not 
the leading food animal health 
research cenier in the world," he 
said. "1 want it to be a place where 
the very best faculty want to be and 



where the very best graduate stu> 
dents want to come to study." 

The center has four faculty 
members, a postdoctoral trainee 
and two staff members 

Gillespie said he is in the 
process of hiring a new swine spe- 
cialist and hopes to add two more 
by the end of the year, 

"tn five years, we hope to have 
twice the staff we have now," he 
said. "The number of graduate stu- 
dents we will have depends on how 
well we raise money." 

The specific aims for the center, 
as published in the proposal, are "to 
provide an environment for food 
animal health and managemenl 
research and to provide a center of 
excellence in post-DVM and post- 
doctoral education in food animal 
health and management." 

"Now, we have the means to 
provide focused research in post- 
graduate education for the food ani- 
mal industry." said Dr. John 
Galland, assistant professor of clin- 
ical sciences and a faculty member 
with the center, 

Gillespie said current research 
includes pre-harvest food safety, 
work in trying to improve the 
reproductive performance of beef 
cattle, and developing a computer 
program to help producers manage 
health practices on their farms. 

"Up until recently, the focus for 
control of food safety has been a 
matter at the processor and beyond. 
We are doing research to develop 
management salety," he said. 

T*he cenier is lcx:ated in the east 
wing of the veterinary teaching 
hospital 

"We were working hard before 
the center was approved, and we 
will continue to do so," Gillespie 
said. "The regents approving the 
cenier helped us define our rela- 
tionship with the rest of the college 
and campus, 

"We're excited, and we think the 

■ See CANCER Page 7 



Your rwiwEsx 

CLIIMQUE GIFT 



FRESH SUCCESSES 

%OllRS WITH \K\ $13 OR 
MORK PURCHASE 




Treat yoiirsi:i.i to $15 of ai^jythinc Cliimque ai^d look what you get, at i^o extra charge! 

A \ ERSAi ht: c:adi>y/orgai\izer filled with Cliwique favorites: 



iti (.ohlrii l!i;in(l\. .i -nil s|iiiki-ri f;iltU>»l jM'tH'h li|t ntlinir wild a rich, i^himnitTy niii?<li. 

* CXmiiiiim; |jmo\ 2 

In I lijii .i\uiv -fifiii -iHliMc (•»•(((•. iiiuki- skill tnrir<> n'rr|(iivc' to irioisturc 

* lti:ti>\ii lli.i«iiii-;H 

ill llmii'^ Itari'. oilTri'i'. uii^nlii'n' ritlnr for cluTk^, lips. c>ps 

* Alton viicis l'>i\iH Pi-Hi'i >ii: Spkay 

riiiii([iit\ inMiiiMiii»riiii-i IrajiiaiKi' iliiii >|i(>uks to tin" indivtdiiulist In rvrry woman. 

* DflAnVIK VI.IA Ull I i:HIAI MOINTI HIXIIX; UniO\ th.- "drink" kins love 

So CHECK YOIR llWi-MORl — C OSMETICS, SKil\ CARE — AND HURRY 11^. 




CLINIQUE 

Ai.i.Ki«;% 1>:.*tTi:i». 

Uttt% l-iu<;ii%^(i: liiii;. 

(^ ith Ike etrrptio* of \ruMatir<i ViMr 



^"*^ ^^^^ (n it* Ike etrrptlo* of \ruMatir<i l-.IUir prM»rt 

Dilland's 



for Your ("fnivRritfttiff* Wi> Accept Viio, MasterCord, Amertcon Expresj, Discover, Corte Blanche, Diner's Club Ot Your Di(lo(d'i CKofge 
INTEGRITY. , .QUALITY. . .VAIUE. . .DISCOVIR THI DIFPERENCEI Shop Today 10 A.M. • 9 P.M. 




PINION 



IDITQfllALBIIilllD. 

TTw opinions expressed in Coto^n sditorlaia under the 
ttOe "In Our Opinion' are the opinions o( a majoriiy ct 
Editorial Board member. These views do not necessarty 

CQUIMMISTS ^ ^ 



rapment (he v4swi ci Kanua State UntversHy, Sudani 
PlMealtona Inc. oriha A.Q. M«ar School of Joumatem and 
Mass Cofntnunlcationa. 



Cotumrw are the opinlonB of onty th« Mtumnisl. Thay <h 
not ratlact Iha views of the Kansas State Colegiwi, but 



iMlMd olfer a dt(l»f1ng viewpoint, 



r 



UKUMiirar.iMs 



In Our Opinion 



by th€ Collegian Editorial Board 



K-State voters could make a difference 



H th« BtudMts 
of K-9t«to 
votMl «• a unl- 
flad bmly^ w* 
could vote Just 
about anything 
Into oflact* 



It is time once again for the tradi- 
tional "go-vote", editorial from the 
Collegian. 

We could have used an editorial 
from our archives saying how important it 
is to vote. 

That might measure up to the same 
level of apathy that runs rampant through 
the K-State student body when it comes to 
voting. 

This year's elections of city com- 
missioners and USD 383 Board of 
Education members should be even more 
important to students because campus is 
now part of the city, and campus is affect- 
ed by the sales taxes. 

If the students of K-State voted as 



a unified body, we could vote just about 
anything into effect. That shouldn't be our 
goal. Our goal should be getting our voic- 
es heard and our votes counted on campus 
and city issues. 

This election should spark student 
interest because a K-State student is run- 
ning for city commissioner. Justin Kastner 
wants a say for K-State in city decisions. 

Vote and make the city commis- 
sion listen to us. as students and voters. 

But let's face it, K-State students 
don't vote. Only about 18 percent voted in 
the last smdent election. 

Large numbers of students won't 
vote in the city elections. 

Just try and prove us wrong. 




Environment doesn't cause homosexuality 




h being gay a 
mental illness? 

Those of you 
wfwreadmy 
column last week 
know thai many 
homosexuals, 
including myseir, 
didji' I choose to 
be attracted to 
members of the 
same gender. 

But if it isn't 
a choice, then 
what causes it? 
Was I burn this 
way? [s it the 
result of my upbringing? Am I in 
some way mentally ill? 

The evidence seems to suggest no. 
Now, I don't claim to be a mental- 
health expen. I'm not a psychiatrist or 
a psychologist or an expert on early 
childhood development. I'm just an 
interested lay individual who is giving 
you his subjective insight on the topic. 
And from my perspective. I don't 
think homosexuality is an illness. Nor 
do I think my sexual orientation can 
he changed with any kind of therapy. 

And the mental -health profession 
generally seems to agree with me 
here. 

There has long been a school of 
individuals who have viewed homo- 
sexuality as a developntental disorder 
or an illness. 

In the early decades of this century, 
homosexual males were castrated, 
injected with hormones, subjected to 
electroshock and aversion tJierapies, 
encouraged to "bond" with masculine, 
father-figure role models, or were 
even lobotomized in an effort to find a 
"cure" for what was then considered 
to be "sick" behavior. 

These "treatments" did nothing to 
stop homosexual tendencies in the 



subjects. Eventually, the "treatments" 
were discontinued, being called inhu- 
mane efforts to fix something that 
wasn't broken. 

In 1973, the American Psychiatric 
Association finally concluded that 
homosexuality, while possibly result- 
ing from environmental factors, was 
immutable once set — you could 
change it. They removed homosexual- 
ity from their lists of illnesses, citing 
the fact that most homosexuals lived 
healthy, constructive lives free from 
any other menial illness, and therefore 
homosexuality probably was just a 
normal variation on the human sexu- 
ality theme. 

The evidence just didn't support it 
being an illness. 

Tlie emphasis in the mental-health 
field ever since has l>cen on helping 
homosexuals adjust to living healthy, 
happy lives, accepting the way they 
are 

Mind you, there ARE still those in 
the mental-health field who still 
believe a homosexual orientation to be 
dysfunction and who attempt to 
change their patients' sexual orienta- 
tion. 

These practitioners are in a decided 
minority, and there is growing evi- 
dence that the kind of "reparative" 
therapy they provide often does more 
harm than good to the patient's mental 
state. 

Sigmund Freud, the father of mod- 
em psychiatry, had a lot of influence 
on modem attitudes about the "pathol- 
ogy" of homosexuality. Freud is 
famous for suggesting that homosexu- 
ality develops in early childhood as a 
result of a strong mother and a weak 
ur absent father. (Incidentally, Freud 
believed that once set, a person's sex- 
ual orientation could not be changed 
— it was set for life.) 

Freud's reasoning in this matter has 



Readers Write 



Drop lattort <sH at Kodzli 1 16 or ••nd thMn to L»n«r» to th* Editor, c/o Christy 
Littt*. Kanut Stata CoHeglan, Ksdzia 11Q, Manhattan, KS 66506. W« accspl let- 
tara by s-mall also. Our addresa !• lattaradapub.kau.adu. Latter* ahould t>« 
addraaaad to itie ad It or and Includ* a nam*, addrasa and pttona numbw. A 
ptioto tdantnicallon will b« nacaaaary for tiartd-dallvarad lattara. 



p, PARKINQ 



Cooperation could help 

Dear editor. 

Speaking of parking, I have been 
faculty representative on the 
University Parking Council for 
almost three years now. We've spent 
many pleasant hours listening and 
learning about the campus "parking 
problems." I would like to make a 
couple of observations about the 
parking discussion and share with 
you a few of my dreams. 

My first observation is that we 
continue to use a language of rights 
and needs to talk about an issue of 
privileges and wants. There arc cer- 
tain rights that we have that are guar- 
anteed by the Constitution. Driving a 
car is not one of them, and finding an 
empty parking space near the build- 
ing of our choice is also not one of 
them. As an old landlord of mine 
used to say: "You have two rights: to 
breathe and to pay rent" (and he was- 
n't too sure about the breathing part). 

A few of us need a parking space, 
a sure thing, next to a building. 
Those of us who have a physical dis- 



ability that makes walking difficult 
or impossible probably n^d a park- 
ing space. A parent who has a 7:30 
class and the day -care center doesn't 
open until 7:15 might need a handy 
parking space Women (or men) who 
are required to wear pantyhose and 
pumps to work every day may need a 
parking space close to their office to 
avoid ankle injuries. Most of us, 
however, don't need a parking space. 
We want a parking space, and we 
want it right now. 

A second observation is that dis- 
cussions about pailcing and people's 
behavior about paricing are irrational. 
We know (because we've counted) 
that at the busiest times of day on 
campus, there are from 300 to 500 
empty parking spaces available. 
Most of these are likely to be in the 
outer lots, for instance behind Call 
Hall. Still, people pull into the lot 
behind Duriand FtaJI at 1 1 a.m. for 
an 1 1:30 class and sit and wait for a 
parking space to open up a little after 
1 1:20. A person could drive to Call 
Hall at 1 1 a.m., park the car and 
walk to Duriand Hall in 10 minutes 
and have time to relax and have a 
Coke before the 1 1;30 a.m. class. 



Many of you 
grow up in 
•nYironments 
Just like mine 
— and gniw up 
toba 
Katorasaxual. 



been largely 
discounted 
by a modem 
mental- 
healih pro- 
fession that 
sees homo- 
sexuality as 
a normal 
deviance in 
human sex- 
uality. But 
there are 
still people 
who believe that Freud was correct 
about the causality of homosexuality. 

Personally, I find Freud's idea par- 
ticularly fascinating because I come 
from the very background that Freud 
was describing — my parents were 
divorced, and I was raised by my sin- 
gle mother, whom I consider to be 
VERY strong. (If being able to work 
full-time AND singlehandedly raise 
healthy, well-adjusted kids isn't a 
gtxKJ definition of strong, then I don't 
know what is,) 

Now, you might say this is evi- 
dence that Freud was right. But wait! 

1 have a brother less than two years 
different from me in age, raised in the 
exact same environment with that 
same absent father and strong mother. 
And he is most defmitely heterosexu- 
al. 

If it's the environment that does it, 
then why isn't he gay, too? 

Many of you reading this right now 
know about the kind of home situation 
I am talking about — we are a genera- 
tion that understands divorce and 
growing up in single-parent house- 
holds. Many of you were raised in sit- 
uations similar to mine, by single, 
strong mothers, without fathers pre- 
sent to help in the day-to-day tasks of 
raising kids. 

Many of you grew up in environ- 



ments just like mine — and grew up to 
be heterosexual. 

That leads me to believe that envi- 
ronment isn't the whole story. Oh, it 
certainly may play a part. I won't deny 
that. 

But maybe there is something else 
going on here other than just the fami- 
ly situation I grew up in. 

Which leads me to my topic for 
next week: is it biology that caused 
my homosexuality? 

UPDATE ON HETEROSEXIST & 
RACIST T-SHIRTS: 
Two weeks ago, I reported to you that 
Hot Line Gifts in the Manhattan Town 
Center was selling hcteroscxist and 
racist shirts. 

I am pleased to be able to tell you 
that the manager of Hot Line Gifts 
called me this week and inforrned me 
that the shirts are iw longer being sold 
there — the owner has pulled them 
from the shelves. 

I applaud Hot Line gifts for taking 
this very reasonable step. It shows 
great courage and fortitude on the 
owner's part, and I wish to publicly 
thank the manager for the great job 
she has done in handling this difficult 
situation. 

Hot Line Gifts has done the right 
thing, 

NAMING THE NAMES 

Notable Homosexual for the week: 
Alexander the Great (356-323 B.C.) 
Soldier. Alexander conquered most of 
the known world before his 30th birth- 
day, and is considered to be one of the 
greatest military geniuses of all time. 
Ironic, considering he would not be 
allowed to serve today in the U.S. mil- 
itary. 

Kevyn Jacobs b a freshman in art 



Does this sound like a rational idea, 
one that would save fuel, help the 
environment, contribute to health of 
the walker/driver and reduce stress? 
Of course. 

Would most people who drive 
their cars to campus think it was a 
nifty idea? Probably not. I rest my 
case. 

Now. for my dreams. In waking 
reality, almost no one in the history 
of Parking Council has come to one 
of our meetings to tell us what a 
great Job we are doing, that they arc 
really impressed with how fast we 
removed the snow or how much ihey 
appreciated the new and improved 
lighting in the parking lots. 
However, in my sleeping dreams, I 
have been haunted by fantasies of a 
series of letters that have come 
through campus mail from people 
who are concemed about the parking 
problem. I'll share just a few 
excerpts. 

A student: "... and I realize that 
some students drive a long distance 
to school and have to get up early 
enough without having to hassle 
about a parking space once they get 
to campus. I decided to walk the six 
blocks from home to free up a space 
for someone who might need it more 
than I do." 

A secrcUry: "You were right! I 
started parking by the vet school and 
walking to my office in the Union. I 
feel so much better Thanks!" 

One of the suits in Anderson 



"My first obsar- 
vation Is ttiat 
wa contlnua to 
usa a language 
of rights and 
naads to talk 
about an Issua 
of pHvtIaflas 
and wants." 

Cw Vejischelden 
sodaJ work, faculty 



Hall: 

"I've been 
thinking. 
Walking 
for 10 
minutes a 
day is just 
what the 
doctor 
ordered. I 
don't need 
my 

reserved 
parking 
stall any- 
more. 
Maybe a 
student could use it." 

Another student: " I drove on 
campus to hear a speaker in the 
Union last night. I realized that there 
might be people in the community 
who might be less able to walk a 
long distance than I am. So I parked 
over in West Stadium so that maybe 
a space would be available closer to 
the Union for someone else." 

Maintenance worker: "What 
could 1 do to help? I get here early so 
I never have a problem finding a 
space, but I would be willing to park 
in a different place if it would rnake 
the whole system work better," 

I know, I need to wake up and 
smell the asphalt. 

Cia Verschelden 
social worfc, faculty 




Christianity and 
compassion must 
go together 

Whenever my close friends come 
over to hang out, we usually end up 
talking about God. 

I am somehow sucked into talk- 
ing about my theology. 
Unfortunately, I am very unsure of 
certain aspects of my belief. 

I have done a lot of observation 
in seeking my answers about God. 

I am now certain about four 
things: God is, I am, I am not God, 
and compassion is beautiful. 

While I am sure these things are 
probably no revelation to most of 
the world, I found them to be quite 
surprising. 

There are two things that never 
cease to amaze me. 

One is the fact that most Christians are so 1 00- percent 
certain of their beliefs. 

I am also shocked by how inconsistent some Christians 
are. 

Having read a large portion of the Bible, 1 would like 
to know how so many forget compassion. 

Compassion is probably the most important lesson the 
Bible has to offer. 

Compassion can play a very significant role in our 
lives. 

It is important to offer it to others, lest they fail to offer 
it to us. 

How many times do we need someone else to be a lit- 
tle more patient or understanding? 

Compassion occurs on several levels. It can be an 
understanding for a physical ailment or a mental and emo- 
tional understanding of what level people are functioning 
on. 

Once in a while, 1 would like friends and family to 
realize that no one has the same experience and not every- 
thing I do has a hidden meaning. 

Modem liietoric has thrown compassion out the win- 
dow and has replaced it with tolerance. For some, these 
two ideas may be identical, but they are not. 

Tolerance implies you are having to suppori an undue 
burden from the people around vou. 

Having compassion is navmg the ability to look past 
all of that and see God in another individual. 

I sometimes wonder if the only people in whom we see 
God is ourselves. 

Tile next time the opportunity arises, see the goodness 
in other pmplc. 

Look at other people for the praisewoithy things they 
do and the differences they make, instead of focusing on 
annoying habits, mistakes and differences of opinion. 

Standing for the value of other people is important, A 
society should be gauged by its empathy toward others. 

Everyone should live by the old proverb,, there but for 
the grace of God go I. It could have just as easily have 
been one of us heading down a dark twisted road. 

One of the most rousing sermons I've heard was given 
by my pastor about forgiveness. The main idea of the ser- 
mon was a comparison of forgiving others and asking for 
forgiveness from God. 

If we would go before God and ask for forgiveness, 
shouldn't we be willing to forgive those who have 
wronged us? 

A little compassion goes a long way to build bridges 
and form friendships. 

Isn't it time we reached our hands out to other travelers 
down the road of life? 

Try smiling at someone or asking about their day and 
really meaning it. 

Stop pretending to care, and start taking interest in 
other people's lives. 

Although the proverb "Forgive and forget" might seem 
old and outdated, the bridges it can build may surprise 
you. 

Don't let the opportunity pass you by. 
Be kind to someone who needs a little forgiveness or a 
little empathy. 

Don't condemn the answers others give for questions 
you have not been asked. 

Kathleen Mastio b a nresbman In pre<veterlitary 
ntedklne. 




MPII3 . 




GOT ANY IDEAS? 



If you know of any interesting stories about faculty, 
staff or campus life in general, give us a call and 
tell us about it at 532-6556. We can not promise 
a story, but we do appreciate any story ideas you 
can give us. 



IIBRUAIir27,1iW 



KAMASSTATICOUIQUII 



Being a 



Vesfetana 

Vix^ ot on oILhoi 




at an all-beef 

Being surrounded by so much beef at K-State , 
how can students ehminate meat from their 
diets? 




E 



ven in the land wKere the bufTaloes roam, 
some people have made the decision to 
eliminate items such as beer and chicken 
from their diets. 



For Mime, vcgetariani^im is a way of life. 
Mike Muih, Manhattan resident, said he believes 
geography doest play a large role in a person's diet. 

"t guess if you live along the ocean, you eat seafood," 
Muih said. "If you live in Kansas, you eat meat." 

Muth said he grew up in California where seafood was 
abundant. Three years ago, he said he made the decision to 
become a vegetarian mainly for health reasons. 

In his diet, Muth said he eats no chicken or red meat, but 
continues to eat a large amount of fish. 

Muth said hi>^ eating habits are not meant to offend 
anyone. It's just his preference. 

"I don't think eating beef is wrong. It's a money source 
for a lot uf people and that's fine," he said. 

But Muth said he does have concerns about what is done 
to red meat and chicken. 

"I think they use steroids and chemicals that you don't 
know about," Muth said. "I don't want those chemicals in 
tny system." 

Muth said the sight of red meat and chicken does not 
bother him. 

"It's the smell that's repulsive," he said. 
Unlike Muth, Gretchen Morgan, senior in theater, said she 
did not become a vegetarian for health reasons. 

Morgan said it's the idea of eating an animal bothers her. 
but she does eat dairy products 

"For me that's different 

because I'm not actually 

eating the muscle of an 

animal," Morgan said. 

"It just doesn't have the 

same effect." 

Morgan said she became a 
vegetarian five years ago, but it 
was a slow process. 
"Well. I never really liked meat 
anyway, then I started thinking about 
what I put in my body, and it disgusted 
me," she said. 
Morgan said she believes it is more 
difficult to be a vegetarian in a state like 
Kansas. 

"It's nice to go to bigger cities — or states even — where 
they do have restaurants just for vegetarians," Morgan said. 

Morgan said she does not believe in today's society, with 
the wide range of food choices available, that it is difficult to 
get protein from sources other than from meals. 

Misty Schultz, sophomore undecided, said she is a 
vegetarian because she believes it is wrong to cat animals, 
but also because of the health aspects 

Schultz said it docs not bother her when others eat meal, 
"I don't try to push my opinions on others," Schult; said. 
"It's not my place to tell people how to eat or live their 
lives," 

Schultz said her father owns farm land and raises cattle, 
but was still accepting of her decision to become a 
vegetarian ber freshman year in high schot>l. 

"At the beginning they just thought it was a fad, and I was 
just trying to be different," she said. 

Schultz said she thinks that she eats less fat than a non- 
vegetarian, but she still eats some unhealthy items too. 



Lofw-fetfofrwn-tet, 

mXk, yoguil, fres^ 

cheese 

and/or Mied ' 

alternatives. 

Twlotluee servings. 

Eal moderalety. 



VuQc'IdDfBS. 

Three to five 



servings 

Eat 

9enerousty. 



Story by Klmberly 
Hefling 

Design by 

Mike 

Welchhans 




"I'm pretty positive I eat 
less fat than a normal 
person, but sometimes I still 
eat onion rings and French 
fries," she said. 

"Occasionally. I even have 
to cat ice cream." 

Barbara Scheule, 

administrative dietitian for 
housing and dining, said It 
is complicated to plan meals 
in each of the dining centers 
on campus because students 
have a wide range of eating 
habits. 

Some students are used 
to eating targe portions of 
meat at each meal. Others, 
she said, are vegetarians. 

About two years ago, 
Scheule said the dining 
centers started offering 
vegetarian entrees, but even 
among vegetarians there are 
differences in the types of 
food requested. 

"We have some items 
that some vegetarians are 
very pleased and satisfied 
with as an entree, but others 
will say. "This really isn't 
an entree to me,'" she said. 
"Then we have some items 
that some vegetarians are 
pleased with and others will i^^^— ^^^— ^^^^— ^— 
say, 'I'm not going to eat this." 

Because some vegetarians do not eat items such as dairy 
products but others do, Scheule said that it is difficult to 
determine what exactly vegetarians will eat 

Scheule said a common misconception about vegetarians 
Is that they do not get enough protein. 

"From a nutritional standpoint, a traditional diet, or 
perhaps a traditional 
midwest diet, has a 
lot more meat in it 
than physically 

people need," 

Scheule said. 

Scheule said a 
person's daily 

requirement of 

protein could be 
received by eating a 
3-ounce hamburger, a 
I -ounce piece of 
cheese and one egg. 

Scheule said she 
has concerns that 
vegetarians who do 
not eat dairy products 
are not receiving 
enough calcium. 

"There can be 
calcium in something, 
but If it's in the Form 
that your body can't 
readily use, then it's 
more difficult." she 



THE VEGETARIAN PYRAMID 



Fate, oils an{) sweets. 
Eatsparetgly. 




Beans, nuts, seeds and 
meatalterr^tlves. 
Two to ttiree servings 
Eattnoderalely. 



Fnjtts. 

T*o to four servings. 

Eat generously. 



I Whole grair^, sucti 
I as breads, cereals. 

lice and pasta. 

Sixfoil servings. 

Eat liberally. 



t-f 

Itliiiiitniyplaceto 
tell people how to 
eitoplivetlieir 
lives. 



I') 



Misty Schuitz 

Sophomore 
undecided 



miSHA BENNINCA/Collegiar) 

said. 

Scheule said calcium In milk can be readily used, but in 
most other forms It is difficult. 

Like non-vegetarians, Scheule said vegetarians need to be 
careful about the amount of tat they eat. 

Scheule said a vegetarian, for example, who drinks a large 
amount of whole milk and eats a lot of cheddar cheese would 
have a high-fat diet. 

"Some vegetarians need to be careful about that," she said. 
"Docs that mean you .shouldn't eat that kind of stuff'.' No, but 
you need to eat things in moderation." 

There are some health advantages associated with a 
vegetarian diet, according to the November IW.l Journal of 
the American Dietetic Association. 

"Studies of vegetarians Indicate that they otten have lower 
mortality rates from several chronic degenerative diseases than 
do non-vegetarians," the report said. 

The effects could be attributed to a vegetarian diet, but also 
to lifestyle characteristics such as maintaining desirable 
weight, regular physical activity and abstinence from smoking. 
alcohol and illicit drugs, the same report said. 

The report also said that a typical vegetarian diet, which is 
usually lower In protein than a non-vegetarian's diet, can have 
positive side effects 

"This lower protein Intake may be associated with better 
calcium retention in vegetarians and improved kidney function 
in individuals with prior kidney damage. Further, lower 
protein Intakes may result in a lower fat intake with its 
inherent advantages, because foods high in protein are 
frequently high In fat also," the report said. 



i>( 




DR. PAUL E. BULLOCK 

OPTOMETRIST 




$10 



OFF 
COMPLETE EYE EXAM 



Aw tm-Offiee Cvnkut Lem Comitkatim 



NEW LOCATION 

1441 ANPIRSON AVf . 'ANPERSON VILLACE 

MAH HATTAN-776-94«1 

TOLl FRU f-BOO- 4J1-OOM 

IXP. MARCH ViS/'95 



Endangered! 



The Earth loses up to 100 species every day! Many 
disappear before we learn anything about them. This 
thought- provoking video provides a clear introduction to 
how human activities are endangering thousands of 
species, why protecting biodiversity is critical to us all, and 
how the Endangered Species Act works to help us do that. 
After the video, learn more about what you can do to help 
save the Endangered Species Act in Congress! 

Tuesday. Feb. 28, 1995 
7 p.m.* K-State Union 212 

Sponsored by Students for Sustalnabillty 



PORTS 



e-fOOT-AND4mD&R TOP 6 MrRAMURAL BASKETBALL 



1. Go Chicken Go 


m 


ZEndoSmoke 


m 


3. Total Package 


(w) 


4. Hunners N' Gunners 


m 


S.SAEInd 


m 



fwmmntitm 




MlttAS STATE COLLIttM 



p BIG EIGHT TRACK AND FIELD CHAMPIONSHIPS 

K-State can't overcome 
Nebraska, takes second 



WISS HUDUMN ^___^_ 

CoWegym 

Coach ClirrRovelto 
said he had a good 
idea of how the Big 
Right Indoor Thick 
and Field Championships 

would end. 

Before the meet Friday and 
Saturday. Rovelto said, he knew 
Nebraslca's domination in the 20- 
pound weight throw and the shot put 
would be tough to deal with. 

"Basically, those two events were 
iix) tnuch to overcome," Rovelto said. 
"In terms of points, we came in about 
where I thought." 

The Cornhuskers racked up 184 
points en route to their 16th consecu- 
tive Big Eight Indoor title. The 
Wildcats finished second with 131. 

Nebraska made its move early on 
Saturday by taking first, third and fifth 
in the 20-pound weight throw and first. 
third and fourth in the shot put. 

K-State was scoreless in both 
events. 

"I looked at the throws and knew 
there wasn't a whole lot we could do 
about it." Rovelto said. 

However, the women dominated 
some events as well. 

Jill Montgomery and Gwen 
Wemland captured the top two spots in 
the pcntuihlim Friday. 



Montgomery scored a career- best 
4,093 points in the events to beat 
Wenttand with 3,998. 

"I couldn't have done it without 
Gwen," Montgomery said. "She really 
pushes me while we compete. It helps 
my mental psyche a lot." 

Montgomery and Wentland tacked 
on three more events after they com- 
pleted the pentathlon on Friday. 

Montgomery fmished eighth in the 
high jump, seventh in the S5-meter 
hurdles and fourth in the long Jump 
with a distance of 1 8 feet 9 inches. 

Wentland took third in the triple 
jump, eighth in the long jump and first 
in her marquee event, the high Jump. 
withaleapof6'l-l/4". 

"1 fell a little pressure at the end 
because 1 knew 1 had to make that 
Jump to seal up the championship," 
Wentland said. "The crowd here obvi- 
ously helps out. but 1 think what helped 
the most was I finally got my approach 
down." 

Wentland beat teammate Wanita 
Dykstra. who finished second with a 
leap of 6*. Missouri's Hanne 
Skeilovstakken also cleared 6' but fin- 
ished third. 

K-State sprinter Karissa Owens 
turned in two outstanding perfor- 
mances and two wins in the 55- meter 
dash and the 200 

Owens blistered the field out of the 
blocks in the 53 and raced to a lime of 
6.85 The time auiomaiically qualifies 



her for the NCAA Indoor 
Championships in Indianapolis, ind., 
March 10-1 1. 

Nebraska's Annette Halt finished 
second in the race with a time of 6.93, 

"I've been working on my start a 
lot." Owens said. "I felt a lot of pres- 
sure coming in with the top time, but I 
just tried to go as hard as I could and 
just see what happened." 

Owens took home her second gold 
of the day with a late charge in the last 
50 meters of the 200. She won the 
event with a time of 24.26. 

Teammate Belinda Hope took third 
in the race with a time of 24.57. 

Earlier in the day. Hope solidified 
herself as the top runner in the confer- 
ence in the 400. Hope won the race 
easily with a time of 54.32. 
Oklahoma's Tami Freeman finished 
second with a time of 56. 15. 

"I tried to gel out hard and make up 
the stagger early in the race," Hope 
said. "I was a little scared before the 
race, but 1 think it helped me." 

Nebraska Coach Gary Pepin said he 
was relieved after the meet was over 
and the title was in hand. 

"I don't know of any other program 
at any level, junior high, high school or 
college, who has won this many titles 
in a row in their conference," Pepin 
said. 

"It adds a lot of pressure, though, 
because no one wants to be on the team 
that finally loses one." 




TOOO raiSACKColleOian 

K*State trackster Kritten Schuitz mak«s a throw attempt during th« 8lg Eight Indoor 
Track and Field Championships. 




Broxterman places 1st; Cats finish 6th 



SHANi KIVMItColtogian 

K-State high jumper Ed Broxtennan leaps over the bar during the Big 
Eight Indoor Track and Field Championships at Ahesrn Field House Saturday. 
Broxterman placed first In the high Jump with a leap of 7 feet 4-1/2 inches. 
The Jump qualified him for qualities him for the Indoor NCAA Championships. 



WM» HWWLtOW ■ _, 

The K-State men battled 
injuries and staggered to a sixth- 
place finish in the Big Eight 
Indoor Championships, bul may 
have made history in the meet. 

K-State finished sixth with 
72-1/2 points, but they were 
only 26 points from finishing 
fourth. 

Friday night, three K-Staie 
high Jumpers cleared 7 feet I 
inch in the high Jump and placed 
first, third and fifth in the event. 

Junior Ed Bronierman took 
home his first Big Eight title 
with a leap of 7'4-l/2". 
Teammates liai Margalit and 
Percell Gaskins finished third 
and fifth respectively. 

"I was just having a good 
time," Broxterman said. "Last 
year, I was so worried about my 
technique that 1 didn't think 
enough about jumping high. 

"This year I decided just to 
get back to the basics." 



3roxterman said his mind 
wi&n't on the event the night 
before or during the afternoon 
leading up to Friday night's 
competition. It proved to be 
good strategy. 

"1 stayed up pretty late study- 
ing for a test last night," 
Broxterman said. "It was the 
hardest test I've ever taken. 

"1 never started thinking 
about it until the test was over, 
about 1 : 30 in the afternoon. " 

Broxlerman's clearance of 
7'4-l/2" automatically qualifies 
him for the indoor NCAA 
championships. 

"I Just felt light all day." 
Broxterman said. "The sun and 
the air and everything Just fell 
different today." 

The team's hopes for success 
took a serious blow when all- 
America triple jumper Dante 
McGrew was unable to compete 
due to an ankle sprain. 

Margalit also had to sit out of 
the triple Jump. Both scored in 



the event at last year's meet. 

Additionally, Junior-college 
all -American Steve Duren was 
not up to par because of nagging 
hamsU'ing injury. 

"We're still short 1-1/2 
scholarships on the men's side 
because of probation, plus we 
had two of our top athletes, 
Dante McGrew and Steve 
Duren, limited because of 
injuries," Coach Cliff Rovelto 
said. 

"That's Just too much for us 
to overcome. We have to have 
everybody ready to be one of 
the top three teams in the con- 
ference. 

"But I'll tell you this," 
Rovelto said, "we'll be a much 
better team outdoors." 

Bill Fields continued to 
improve by placing third in the 
400-meter dash and the 200 
with limes of 48.7 seconds and 
21.77 respectively. 

It was the first time Fields 
ran the 400 this season. 



"He competed very well." 
Rovelto said. '"He never even 
ran the 400 this year. He went in 
with no tirne. 

"I knew he could score in the 
event, but I didn't think third." 

Marlone Davis entered the 
finals of the 64)0-yard run with 
the top time but placed second 
with a lime of 1:11.58 behind 
Oklahoma's Ryan Kite. 

Travis Livingston also 
entered the finals with the top 
time in the 55-meter hurdles. 
After hitting the last two hur- 
dles, he dropped back to third in 
the race with a lime of 7.37. 

Three-hundredths of a second 
separated the top three runners 
in the event. 

"I was trying to get an auto- 
matic qualifying time in the pre- 
lims so I wouldn't have to worry 
about the finals," Livingston 
said. 

"I was just trying too hard at 
the end of the race, and 1 hit the 
last couple hurdles." 



► TENNIS 



Netters continue slide, 
lose to New Mexico 



TOOD wawjurT 

CulleiJan 

After Saturday's 6-3 
loss to New Mexico, K- 
Slate women's tennis 
coach Steve Bietau was 
not happy with his team's 
play. 

"1 didn't think we 
competed very well." he 
said "1 expected we'd 
play harder." 

New Mexico put K- 
Slate away in singles 
play. The Cats went 1-5 
in singles competition. 

The lone victory came 
in No. I singles by junior 
Kurina Kuregian, 5-7, 6- 
3, fi-3, over New 
Mexico's Alicia Meraz, 

Bieiau credited 

Kuregian's the victory 
that snapped her three- 
match singles losing 
streak to Kuregian's tal- 
ent, 

"Karina won yester- 
day because she's a better 
player." Bietau said. 

I he only other victo- 
ries i»(i I he day for the 
Cats came in straight set 
victories in No. I and No. 
3 doubles. 



Kuregian and senior 
Marline Shrubsole won 
in No. 1 doubles, and 
freshman Chris Schulte 
and sophomore Nicole 
Lagcrstrom were victori- 
ous in No. 3 doubles. 

Even with the pair of 
doubles victories, Bietau 
focused on his team's 
poor play. 

"We just got out- 
played," he said. 

"New Mexico 

deserves credit. They 
came out ready to play." 

Up next for the team is 
a pair of weekend match- 
es in Oes Moines, Iowa, 
against Drake and 
Northern Illinois. 

Even though his team 
has not won in almost a 
month, Bieiau said he is 
positive about the future 
and said anything can 
happen from here on out. 

"I think a team in any 
sport has to go onto the 
court ready to battle," 
Bieiau said. 

"If ihcy don't, then 
you can just throw every- 
thing else out the win- 
dow." 



► WOMEN'S BASKETBALL 



Cats lose a close one to 3rd-ranked Buffaloes 



K-Staie had the shot it 
wanted, ft jmt didn't fall. 

With the Wildcat!! trailing 
by Just three points against No. 
3 Colorado. Route's Shanele 
Stircs had an opportunity to 
send Sunday's game into over- 
tiine. 

However, with the clock 
running out, her shot hit the 
back side of the rim, went into 
the cylinder and bounced back 
aimlessly. 

With the missed shot, the 
Cats dropped their second- 
straight Big Eight Confercoce 
game by a score of 77-74 to 
the Buffaloes in Bramlsge 



Coliseum. 

"I got a good look at it, let 
it go," Stircs said. 

"1 thought thai it was in — 
in aiKl out. 

"It was kind of a quick 
release. I thuik that t let it go a 
tittle quicker than I wanted to." 

Stires' shot was a set. play 
that K-Suue coach Brian Agler 
called a time-out to set up after 
Colorado extended its lead to 
three points with nine seconds 
left in the game. 

"We wanted to get the ball 
to Shanele,** Agler said. 

"I just thought that she 
could make it. She's bit some 
befoft, and I just thought that 
she could make it. 



"It would have counted if it 
went down." 

With the win. the Buffs fin- 
ished a perfect 14-0 in tbe Big 
Eight 

"I'm happy." Colorado 
coach Ceal Berry said. 

"I feel like we'll have a big 
target on our back at the Big 
Eight Tournament." 

Colorado guard Shelly 
Shectz said the 14-0 record in 
the Big Eight is an impressive 
feat 

"We're only the second 
team in the Big Eight to go 
through 14-0," Sheetz said. 

"It was a really big win." 

In the first half, the Buffs 
jumped out to an early 12- 



point bulge with a 13 -point tun 
at the tO-minute mark. 

However. K-State chipped 
away at the Colorado lead and 
narrowed it to three points. But 
Colorado then jumped back 
out to a 10- point lead at half- 
time. 

The Cats came out of tbe 
break on fire and scored six 
straight points. 

"I told them at halftime that 
we can beat this team," Agler 
said. 

Agter's advice .seemed to 
work as K-Siaie continued to 
narrow the Colorado lead for 
the rest of the second half. 

In fact, at tbe lO-minute 
mark, the Cats trailed by just 



one point, and they missed an 
opportunity to take the lead 
when a Stiies shot crawled off 
the rim. 

However, in the end, 
Colorado just made the plays 
when they had to, Agler said. 

"We did a tot of good 
things," Agler said. 

"It was a war out there. 
They did what they had to win. 
My opinion of them isn't any- 
thing different. I think that 
they are a Final Pour team. 
They're as good as they want 
to be." 

The loss put K-State in fifth 
place in the regular season 
with a 14-12 record and a 6-41 
record in the Big Eight 



Missouri sweeps Big Eight season series against K-State 



DAM umnuwiiz 



Missouri completed a set* 
son sweep of the Wildcats 
Friday with a 66-39 victory in 
Bramlage Coliseum. 

The Wildcats scored first 
against Missouri, with fresh- 
men Amanda Chamberlain and 
Brit /acobson teaming up for a 
steal and layup. 

But Mltsoiui came back. 



scoring the next 10 points and 
holding off the Cats for the 
Femaindcr of the half. 

"1 don't think we did a very 
good Job of competing in the 
first half." K-Staie coach Brian 
Agler said. "I don't think we 
ran very good offense, and I 
think we broke down defen- 
sively." \ 

K- State regained the lead 
early in the second half on a 



pair of free throws by senior 
Shanele Stircs, But K-State 
didn't hit a field goal for the 
first 6:50 in the second period, 
allowing the Tigers back in the 
game, 

"We had a lot of shots go in 
and out," Jacobson said. "We 
got the shots. We Just didn't 
knock them down when we 
needed to," 

A turnaround Jumper by 



Missouri's Nikki Smith gave 
the Tigers a lead they would 
never surrender. Missouri 
stretched the lead to 13 on a 
lumaround by freshman Alison 
Lucy with just 4:03 remaining. 
Though three-pointers by 
S tires and sophomore Missy 
I>ecker would cut the lead to 
four in the final minute. 
Missouri hit its free throws 
down the stretch to seal the 



victory. 

"We just got beat tonight," 
Agler said. "They beat us the 
way we've been beating peo- 
ple all year. They cune down 
and stuck us defensively, then 
ran their offense right down 
our throats." 

Stires led all scorers with 
21 points, while Jacobson and 
sofrfiomnre Andria lones each 
contributed 13. 



*' 



KANSAS STCTE COLLEGIAN 



Monday, February 27, t995 "f 



► CITY 



Brothers and Sisters to bowl for goal 



LMAILUOrr 

Buwiing can make a difference. 

Manhattan Big Brothers and 
Big Sisters is sponsoring (he Big 
Brothers and Big Sisters Bowling 
Classic March 5-11 at Manhattan 
bowling alleys. 

The Bowling Classic is the 
main fundraiser for Big Brothers 
and Big Sisters, Carol Babcock, 
assistant director of the program, 
said. 

This year's goal is S40,000. 

■'Wc have the capacity for 200 
bowlers," she said. 

Money is raised by getting peo- 
ple to sponsor the bowlers for a 
flat rate or for a certain amount of 
money per pin. Babcock said. 

"[ know that my Little Sister's 
mother has her pledge sheet full 
already." Keri Konold, junior in 
history, said. 

Konold will bowl Saturday, but 
she's not a very good bowler, she 
said. 

Konold said this will be her 
first Bowling Classic because she 
has only been a Big Sister for a 
year. 

"We'll sec how 1 do," she said. 

Babcock said they arc still sign- 
ing up teams. Teams are usually 



made up of five members, but if a 
team has fewer members, that's 
OK, 100, she said. 

Each bowler should have at 
least a couple of sponsors in order 
to bowl, Babcock said. 

"The minimum is five dollars," 
Konold said. 

One thing Konold said she likes 
about the setup of the Bowling 
Clasiiic is that the bowlers don't 
have to go back out and collect the 
money themselves. 

"1 hate going around and col- 
lecting money," she said. 

Konold said she had not started 
signing pledges yet, but she didn't 
think it would be difficult to get 
people to sign up. 

Participants with IS sponsors 
will receive a T-shin, and partici- 
pants with 25 sponsors will get a 
sweatshirt. 

During bowling days, partici- 
pants can win door prizes, and the 
lop earners will receive prize 
money after the event. 

The Bowling Classic kickoff is 
March 5 at Memory Lanes. 
Members of the community can 
come in and bowt for Big Brothers 
and Big Sisters. 

"1 think it's good because we 
get to be with our Little's family," 



Konold said. 

She said she was looking for- 
ward to meeting her Little Sister's 
brother's Big Brother. Her Little 
Sister's brother was matched 
about 10 months after Konold was 
matched with her Little Sister. The 
Bowling Classic will be Konotd's 
first chance to meet the Big 
Brother. 

"My Little's family is really 
open," she said. 

Her Little Sister's family 
includes Konold in things they do, 
and they always let her know 
what's going on. 

Konold said having a Little 
Sister is like an extension of her 
family. The Big makes a commit- 
ment to be there for the Little. 
They children know their partner's 
are there for them, she said. 

"They need people like us to do 
this kind of thing," she said. 

The money raised in the 
Bowling Classic will go toward 
paying for the expenses the ser- 
vice incurs during screening and 
matching and the salaries of the 
full-time staff members, Babcock 
said. 

Big Brothers and Big Sisters is 
a social -service organization that 
matches children from single par- 



ent homes with an adult screened 
and supervised by the program, 
Babcock said. 

Although 120 pairs arc 
matched currently, there are about 
50 kids on the waiting list, she 
said. 

Volunteers have to be at least 
IS years old, have access to a car 
and be willing to malce a year-long 
commitment, Babcock said. 

Big Brothers and Big Sisters 
conduct three reference checks, a 
criminal-history check and two 
interviews with the volunteer. The 
volunteer must also take a person- 
ality test, she said. 

The entire process takes one to 
two months, Babcock said. Then, 
the volunteer is matched with a 
child on the waiting list. 

"The screening process is 
lengthy," she said. 

Screening and matching take 
up a lot of their time. Big 
BroihcrVBig Sisters has only four 
employees, counting the enecutive 
and assistant directors. Babcock 
said. 

During the screening process, 
the staff tries to get to know the 
children as well as they can so 
successful matches can be made, 
she said 



Animal research 
center could receive 
federal grant money 



CONTINUED FROM MGE 3 

center will be very important to the 
college and to our constituents," he 
said. 

Galland said be assisted in writ- 
ing a computer program for feed 
yard veterinary practitioners to help 
them provide new professional ser- 
vices to the feed yard. 

"One of the missions of the cen- 
ter is to provide tools for graduates 
to earn a living," he said. "The 
practice of veterinary medicine is 
changing because of the changing 
economy and the change in the 
consumption of food animal prod- 
ucts." 

The center is also working to 
study antibiotic -resistant bacteria. 

"We have sought funds to study 
the entergence and spread of antibi- 



otic-resistant bacteria and for 
developing Hazard Analysis 
Critical Control Points to help 
assure the wholesomencss of food 
animal prodiKts," he said. 

Dr. Neil Anderson, professor of 
clinical sciences and small-rumi- 
nant specialist, is also one of the 
center's faculty members, 

"We face a big challenge in 
obtaining funding in the current 
competition climate, but that is 
what wc arc doing every day," 
Anderson said. 

Faculty members of the center 
said they hope it will be funded by 
state allocations, government 
grants and contracts, industry 
gifts, grants and contracts, and 
revenue from consultation and 
contracts. 



Miss Rodeo K-State says rider safety her goal 



CONTINUED FROM PAGE 1 

Italian Restaurant. 

"We were given the topic of 
what rodeo and K-State have done 
for us," Christiansen said. 

Lowe won the speech competi- 
tion. 

The third and fmal judging cate- 
gory was a queen's run. where the 
contestants were judged on riding 
their horses while welcoming the 
crowd to the rodeo. 

As the 1995-96 Miss Rodeo K- 
Statc, Ratliff will receive a $200 
scholarship and various odier prizes 



from sponsors around town. 

"It is a good experience for any- 
one because it helps you lo become 
a better people-person and lets you 
know what kind of sport rodeo is," 
Schnoebelcn said. 

Schnoebelen said her most mem- 
orable event was the Kaw Valley 
Rodeo where she was paired up 



with a child and went through the 
children's rodeo with that child. 

Ratliff became interested in 
rodeo by coming from a farm back- 
ground and by her mother showing 
horses. 

This helped her to start barrel 
racing as a little girl in 4-H. 

Ratliff said she is sitting out 



DRAWS 



IWt 



Bl<; DAW^S 






jl S| I'.iik.i;:! 



• RESPONSIVE 

Planning Board Leader 
for 3-112 years 

• RESOURCEFUL 

KSU Energy 
Extemion SpeciaUst 

• READY TO 
REPRESENT YOU! 

Resident for 19 years 
Experienced, Independent 




^'"Citv Commission 



Poliilcal Adv. Md for l>y Bnice SocmJ Ax City c:oinmluk>D; Mut K mcte nd og cl. TVcuuier 



from the rodeo team this semester 
because she is training a new horse, 
but she plans to go back on the 
team next fall. 

"My goals as Miss Rodeo K- 
Staie include promoting horse and 
rider safety for kids and adults in 
the community because there is a 
way to prevent accidents," she said. 



Hardeer 

Delivers 

9 a.m.-l a.m. Daily 

537-2526 

Insirio Maiihnttan 
City Limits Only 



In the Stateroom 
F^bmary 27- March 3 
10:30a- 1:30|> 




ORlENt 
£yp«£SS 



Teriyaki Chicken Strips. .$1.99 
(boneless and skinless) 
w/rtoe or tried pasta 

Sweet & Sour Pork $1 .99 

w/ rice or tried pasta 

Vegetable Egg Roll $1.55 

w/ rice or fried pasta 

While Rice $0.75 

Fried Pasta $0.75 

Stir Fried Vegetables $0.99 



Meal Deal $3.69 

YOURCHGKXOF 

Chickan TeriyalQ 

or Sweet & Sou Pork 

wiisicfeofRicdorPasIa 

AW 

EggRoB 

SlirFryVeget^)le 

and Fortune Cook» 



U 



K-State Union 

Food Service 



JUSTIN KASTNER for City Commission 



ASTNER 



City Conimbsion 



• 



FUTURE-MINDED 



LEADERSHIP 



" ^w\^%. xKAd^tHA^w.O' coM^i^Koift' ^»^ o-te p^^M^t t«> Mtpp^^l 



&sA\y Andenon 
N»niiii Schi'iill 
l^avc S. Kdgers 
Itiil nrokcnii'ky 
Kircn Thurrtun 
Scwt A. Wilton 
Bruce McMillan 
Bartian Finnegan 
Marf an-l Strain 
Hinnie G Smitli 
Sally Ljinsilownc 
Ijicky Houghton 
Riclian) Colcmin 
Mile Ml Pol tenon 
Jacli & Jan Rtky 
Marin Brown 
John & Sally H«tin 



Kon ft Karolyn Tncha 
iX'nniti A Ithontl.i Mull in 
Keny S. 4 Sherry K Cartiion 
Tom ft Suz-innc Anhur 
Bill & April U(xkM 
Dixiild A CXtlonf O'Connor 
Larry ft Anne Becraft 
Henry ft Lillian Brown 
Sob Krausc ft Marty Vanier 
John ft Mary Lee Graham 
Dan ft Sanity Metselt 
Lane ft Elizabeih Milli 
Sue Pclcrton ft Chariie Thomas 
John ft Mary BMh Rcete 
Citerie ft Oavi*] Kwtg«>n 
Mei ft Donna Dec Chttilain 
Bob ft Jft^ue Meisner 



Helen Hayes 
Karen Rogcrx 
Jerry l>L-ltle 
Cam Feliner 
Marti Marsh 
Kim Winkler 
Dixie Roberts 
Gary Picnion 
Don WiKttnan 
Harry Marsh 
William Manth 
Tim ft Liiula Trulicy 
Terry ft Mary Gugle 
Don ft Suxy Ertcson 
Donna ft Terry Davit 
Karen ft Ixwii Martin 
Pal ft Tenxa Alexarnkf 



Kcnl ft Kieli ClotMOck 
Jerry A Rohin [%cley 
Joe A Lcola Kmith 
Bryan ft Holly HUion 
Roy ft Corla Jonei 
Bri«fi ft Beverly Cobb 
Btib ft Polly Altland 
Richard ft Jane Thleuen 
Vie\c ft Helen Cooper 
Dave A Claude ite Laurie 
Jim ft Mary Undquist 
WayiK! ftOndy Sloan 
Charlie ft Pat Huehe* 
Joe ft Melita Hancock 
Rill ft nancit Gloiicock 
Teny ft Morknc Gtaiucock 
Hlrvard ft Dana Town*cnd 



.<:ue Col ley 
J.-ick Com 
I^Hcfc Kayter 
R W. Krekcl 
Rod Howell 
Ann Slevent 
BobKnih 
Irene Harlan 
Rick Mann 
Bobi Hoover 
Becki Johnson 
Nancy Wition 
Barbam Wiliuw 
Mari Exfeld 
Jodi Bryant 
Scott Wimman 
Roo ft Pom Say 




The Ka-slncrs: 

Kansas State University 

Honorary Family 





Life-long resideol 
of Manliattan 



A Candidate 

witli a stalw in 

Manhattan's (kiture 



I 



Paid for fay Kailncr Tor City CommiMion. Chaiipenons: Terry Glaxscack ft Karen Rofen. Treasurer: Ljury Dectan 



E 



rq 



!■ I \ I 



U t I I !■ I- M I- \ 




For tut relict' from the nagging ache ot* taxet, we 
recommend TIAA-CREF SRAa SRAa are twi- 
rlercrred annuiliei deiigned lt> help build additional 
aucti — money thai can help make the dillercnce 
between living and livirig mv// alter your working yeai^ 
•re over. 

Contribuiioni to your SRA* are deducted from 
yoyr laiary on a pre-tax baaii- That lowertyour 
current taxable income, lo you atart Mving on lutea 
rtf hi away. Whal'i more, any earning* on your SRAi 
are aUo tax-delerrtd until you receive them aa income. 
That can make a big diltcrencc in how painlul your tax 
bill ta evtiy yeaj'. 



Aa the nation 'a Uf^feat retirement aytiem, we otter 
a wide range oF»lloc»tior> choicei— from TIAA'i 
tradition*] Annuity, with lit guarantee* ol principal 
and Interetl, to the aeven divenllied inveatment 
account* of CREF'i variable annuity. What 'a more, 
our expeniea are very low,* which mean* more of 
your money goet toward improving your (ulure 
financial heahh. 

To lind out more, call our planning ipecialiiti at 
I 800 S42-2S88. We'll tend you a complete SRA 
information kit, plut « free ilide-calculator that thowi 
you how much SRAa can lower >tHir taxe*. 

Cali tod^— it couldn't hurt. 



?FTn 




CRE 



Ensuring the liiture 
for those who Bha|i« it." 



*Suiiir) it fittr'j liumnmit Kflmi AMltt^ l^^i LippCf And^tl SwvicM. Inc. I^frrj)im1.w ' AnUflinil tMtn, IVM (Q>un>r|y) CHEF 

r«rnfif«l*4 *rt di«tnbi)r«d by TIAA-CHEP 1ndjvidu»l «nd Enifirmioiul 5«rvif*i, Tac. For mart fonpltl* inramutipA, .ncJudir>( ckftr^ti *nd 

Hp*A««4. fjU I 6CKt.943.2n3. u1 &S09 for i CREP |ifwp«frrM» RmA rht praoptctul n'vMly b*f4fv.ycM ihvnf ot »rn(l mcmey 



^ 



/ 



Q Monday, F«bni«ry 27, 1908 



KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN 



FEES UNDER DISCUSSION 

Sbdent S«fiate introckiced four Ms tN would m^^ 

groups. _ 

S&jdent Ssnaie would grant ^s«tf pemitesjon to 

rtview the shjderrt activ% fee M before Ih6 spring 
of 1997. 

11w Studerl PuUfcafiorvs &Mp(T»i( f^ *»t*) >>< 
reduced. 




$3.90 
2.30 

$1.60 



•^ CurTMttStudtrftPubtlcatlontFN 



^ Radudton In Student PuWicationtFM 
.^ New Student PubHcaUmne 



$2.30 * ntductkm ta Sbxlint PuMcilJMrNtj 

^ JiL 



$1.40-SluitonlAe8vtlrFte| $.9 0-'B»cl<liHhirtMdittt I 




$7.50 
» 1.40 

$8.90 



Money lerncwed torn the Suderit Publcalione Fee 
would be added to Ihe Student Actjvfties Fee. 



-► Current Student AcUvttlei Fee 




•^ Uonev taken from Student PubUctHom Fee 
New Student AdMtleeF^ 

Sudenl S«n3ie would create an Oicft ()( Sbdtnt 
Aclivitj« and Services (C^S) Une Ittm ^. 
Academic teams W(Jd receive 1 5 cents men ftnkig, 

Student Activities Fee Breakdown 



College CouncI Fee 
(stays the sffine) 

icCompethtonTeimi 



Groups and tnsdtutionai Services Fee 





Sou ice: Stu<l«rit Gav«ming Association 



HEATHER HOLUHaSWORTM/Collvgun 



6 



PREGNANCY TESTING 

All off our scrvfcei 
are ER££ & COWFIDENTIAL now open 

Prohlmm PrmgnanevT «,t. « %,J!^i!!^ 

You're not alone. *^ "*" ""^ ""^ 

«. », SJ7-91SO 

BmTHRIGHT OF MANHATTAN fxj 8 ITth 



^m^m?^. 



SPRING BREAK IS ONLY WEEKS AWAY , . . 
ARE YOU READY? 

NUTRITION. WEIGHT & 
EXERCISE CLASS 

Instructed by Registered Dietician 

CLASS BEGINS 
Tuesday. FEB. 28 - 3:30 p.m. 

LAFENE HEALTH CENTER 
ROOM 2 
532-6544 




► STUOEHT SENATE 



Bill Introduced to lower student fees 



LMAILUOT T 

Colle|iiui 

Senate Privilege Fee Comminee 
inUaduced four bills thai would 
decrease student fees by 90 cents 
next year. 

In effeci, the four interdependent 
bills wilt decrease the Student 
Publications Fee by $2.30, increase 
the Academic Competition Teams 
Fee by 1 5 cenis. reduce student fees 
by 90 cents and create a line-item 
fee to support the Office of Student 
Activities and Services. 

The fate of all four bills rides on 
the passage of the first hilt, which 
will allow the Student Activity Fee 
to be reviewed before it runs out in 
1996. 

Bryndon Meinhardt, Privilege 
Fee Committee Chairman, intro- 
duced the bills. 

One bill will decrease the 
Student Publications Equipment 
Fee from $3.90 to St. 60 a semester 
for full-time students. 

Meinhardt said the onginal leg- 
islation passed in 1991 called for 
the fee to decrease to $ 1 .60 in 1 995 

The fee was set up so the $ 1 .60 
could be used to replace and repair 
the equipment purchased with the 
1991 fee money, he said. 

"What they purchase is up to 
them," Trent LeDoujt, agriculture 
senator, said. "I wouldn't tell them 
what to spend." 

The question would not be if 
there was going to be a fee, but how 
much the fee was going to be. he, 
said. 

"The bone of contention is going 
to be the dollar amount," LeDoux 
said. 

The difference between the pro- 
posed and current fee is $2.30 



. Meinhardt said $ 1 .40 of that differ- 
ence will be put into the Student 
Activity Fee. The other 90 cents 
will be cut from student fees, he 
said. 

The fate of the bill is dependent 
on the passage of a bill that would 
allow the Student Activity Fee to be 
reviewed out of cycle, Meinhardt 
said. 

Every privilege fee has a cycle 
or term limit. When that cycle has 
ended, the fee is reviewed by the 
fee committee, and a recommenda- 
tion is made to Senate for whether 
ii should be continued or not. 

The bill creates a way to review 
the Student Activity Fee out of 
cycle, but once it has been 
reviewed, it will come up again at 
the end of the regular cycle, he said. 

"[ think we should all take a 
value interest in the money we 
spend." he said 

The other S t .40 would be added 
to the $7.50 Student Activity Fee. 
Meinhardt said. 

The fee would be reallocated and 
reduced to $4.90 per semester for 
full-time students upon the creation 
of a $4 line-item fee for the Office 
of Student Activities and Services, 
he said. 

The Academic Competition Fee 
would be increased from 30 cents 
to 45 cents per semester for full- 
time students. 

The bill in effect doubles the fee 
for academic competition teams, 
Meinhardt said. 

The fourth bill Meinhardt intro- 
duced would create a line- item fee 
for the Office of Student Activities 
and Services, he said. 

OSAS is currently funded at 
$3 90 per semester for full-time 




nancial Aid 

E A. ID L I INT E 

March 1 

may apply for federal finaiicial assistance 
completing and mailing your Federal 
Renewal Applicatioti or a Free Application For 
Federal Student Financial Aid by K-Stete's 
piioTity deadline ot March 1. Applicatloiia are 
available in 104 Fairchild Hall. 



Oc^VO 



AIJDITICN§: 

KSU SUMMER THEATRE 

MARCH 7 from 3-5pni 
Room 008 Nichols Hall 

We will be auditioning for the 

play "Lips Together, Teeth 

Apart" by Terrance McNally 

and a children's play. 

Scripts are available In 129 
Nichols. 

Rehearsals begin May 22. 

Productions take place in 

June. Student salaries and 

class credit are available. 

For further Information contact 
Marcl Maullar at 532- 



students. The line-item fee wilt 
increase its budget by 10 cents per 
full-time student per semester, 
Meinhardt said. 

LeDoux said the four bills are 
great because by increasing the 
money for academic competition 
teams, students will gel more from 
their money but pay less in fees. 

In other new business, the pro- 
posed parking structure in 
Memorial Stadium was the target of 
two pieces of legislation. 

Agriculture Sen. Paul Fricdrichs 
proposed a resolution stating Senate 
opposes building the parking garage 
in Memorial Stadium. 

Friedrichs said the unique and 
special atmosphere of the stadium, 
which is a memnrial for World War 
1 veterans, would be lost by build- 
ing the garage there 

"It's unfortunate that the bill has 
to be reactive." he said, 

Friedrichs spoke to the 
University architect about the park- 
ing garage before presenting his 
legislation. The architect asked 
Friedrichs not to tie his hands by 
placing restrictions on where the 
garage could be built, Fricdrichs 
said. 



"I would strongly encourage you 
to talk to your constituents about 
this." he said. "You' II get an earful 
cither way," 

Friedrichs said he proposed the 
legislation because of conversations 
he had with students in his classes 
who were upset about the parking 
garage, 

"A student petition would really 
supplement this." he said. "I think 
we should go ahead with both." 

Steve Weatherman, business 
senator, said the parking garage 
would be made of concrete, which 
is primarily sand. He asked 
Friedrichs if he would accept the 
parking garage in the stadium if ii 
were made a memorial to the sol- 
diers of I>esert Storm, 

Friedrichs said, "No." 

The second bill cttncerning the 
parking garage proposed bringing 
the issue to a student b(xly vote. 

Aaron Otto, arts and sciences 
senator, introduced the bill calling 
for a plebiscite vote of the student 
body to determine the stance Senate 
would take on the parking garage 
issue. 

■ S« STUDENTS Page 10 



g^rents 




Vianna Acadomy*-*- -■ 
Martin Haaelbdck, director 

Sunday, March 12, 3 p.m. 

Fmm its home in the historic Musikveretn. this period instrument 
ensemble brings a program (eatur ing trumpet concertos by Telemann , 
a (lute concero by Vivaldi, Bach's Brandenburg Concerto No 3, and 
Ofchesiral Suite No 3. 

Chauear's Cantarbury Talea* 
Starring Haw Vic Theatre of London 
Friday, April 7, 8 p.m. 

Join the lively, bawdy pilgrims on the local vicarage lawn tor the finals 
of the annual Geoffrey Chaucer Storytelling Competition . Tales are told 
of iove. of lust, and of laughter. Some are traditional and visual; Others 
are. in the funniest and most good humored way. a little less delicate. 

Awadagin Pratt, plano*+ 
Thuraday, April 27, 8 p.m. 

The musical (orte ol this Naumberg Prize-winner is the three B's, with 
torays into the Romantic repertory. A graduate of the Peabody Conser- 
vatory, Pratt is the only student in that institution's history to earn 
performer's certificates in piano, violin and conducting. 

For tickets call 532-6428 or como 1o the McCain box oltico. Box oldce hours: 
rKMn to 5 p.m. weeKdays; Irom 1 p.m, belore weekend matinees; and from S 
p.m. tjelore weekend evenings. Tickets are also availalste al l^anhatlan Town 
Center customer service desk, K- Stale Union Bookstore, and ITR (Fort Riley). 

B Persons with disabtiities call 532-6428. 

Fiee tHJs seivice to series events for palrons 55 years or older Is available. 
For details call Mane Dellen al 587-4000. 9 am lo 5 p.m wBekdays 

■Piesenlad m pait by llie Kansas Ails Cofumissiori. a slale aBercy, and the Noiional 
En<»owment (w the Arts, a lederal aoency Evenis in iris McCain Pertormance Senes aie 
supported by tha K- Slate Fine Af IS Fae. *Suppo(ied by iheFnendiol McCain. -Coipoiale 
support provided t>y Memorial Maspital 





RE-ELECT 



Till 




BOARD OF EDUCATION 

"Quality education 
is the t^est 
investment for the 
future." 



Parent ■ Business Woman « Resident - 29 years • Former Teocher * KSU Gfoduote 
I Support: 

• Responsible use of tax dollars 

• Meaningful parental/community involvennent 

• Adequate support for staff 

• Solid comnnitment to goals of Monhatton/Ogden 2000 

Eigfit year nnennber USD #383 Board of Education • Tnjstee, KSU Foundation • Trustee. Sunset Zoo • 
Board of Directors. Riley County Historical Society • Board of Directors, UFM • Recipient. 1994 
Sertonr>a Award of Outstanding Service to fv1anl<ind • Cfiomber of Commerce Education Committee 

Poia /Of byJoleen Hill for School Boara CommltteB, Jon Levin If eat 



#1 HABIT CONTROL PROGRAM IN THE U.S. 



STOP SMOKING 

IN TWO HOURSI 

• NO WnHDUWAi • NO WttGHT • NO WEfOHT GAIN 
Walk Out A Non-Smoker 




aifrordvM>b,niD.XHr. 
^^^^^^^^^^^ FIRST HOUR 

^^^^^^^^ST3i3i ^'^** don'l pay a p*nny until you or* 
™J**^*~™ abiol(rtohrcorfainyoueanb«hvpfH»ri>»d 
— ' and our program con week f or you 

Only »29" wsa nr 

t m «%o« S*"*""* 
BOTH SEMINARS *49" ^'^^ 

VOA « MAITIftCAIID • a«aC - CASH i "*- 



v«ry loU & tW^ C tiv lIMltlddl of 
droinatlcoUy cKonging oMhidw A 
h^hUi If U o raloklng and pitaaurftbW 
• ipHirivnc* Vov 9t* not oiUcp, but 

lunroundirkQt. Voti Vrilt l«0^ 

tftnirtor k«Jlng RfFUSHlD, RELAXED 



PruiiTitfd by 
Notionol Hypooili Sf.'minori 



Down Webb 

tkwitii, hnwial Smou kiiflhM I 



WRITTEN GUARANTEE 



B*couH w* inov ouf progrom «Hl 
wQti tor ypti, wm nl^ iktit wrl 

fout pn>bil*mi. yov can oltartd o ^Wibb 
rair^omin^vnt WfnIflW ol NO 
CKA«Gf And h»f*'4 mort . . dgflrtg 
hfip« llrtt howr of Hch MmJDQr^ 0* 
WWbb wyN cUck wch 4ndhridudli 

hiypnoli ^D ii ity. 



ffS^Sp*- l»in>*rt*-fttr>1 Ta^^TCfX 



ATTIND ONE 2-HOUR SEMINAR WEDNESDAY, MARCH 1 
HOUDAY INN (CONFERENCE RM. 5] S30 RICHARDS DR., MANHATTAN 
Weight ContTpf; 6 p«m. 



Step Smokiiifl: >;30 p.in. 



LOSE V\/EIGHT! 

• Effortlessly • Basily Withauf Dieting 



FOR AMYONE WHO NEEDS HELP WITH . . . 
* ^Will Power • Emotional Eating • Excr<ismg * Food 



._ - - . ^ .. 




IVERSIONS 



BROOKS AND DUNN TO PERFORM 

Sreoks and Dunn wi pertomt ^ pm liii^ S al Brairligs Gcl^^ 
TEtob are $ao and are anittto by cafti0>Mlclilol»« 532-7806., 



tWnOOUMtAN 



nUIWARYa7,1M5 



► CROSSWORD 



Acnoss 

1 Peopl«do 
ttwhen 
they 806 
red 

5 Swab 



34Ball- 
beaftng 
Item 
35 Network 
37 1964 Olym- 
pics site 



( Complains 39 Carrier for 
repeatedly three men 



12Ttie 
Bridges at 

13 McKinley's 
First Lady 

14Mayt>erry 
boy 

15 Nest-egg 
accts. 

18 Where 
Gates 
defeated 
Burgoyrie 

18 Saudi 
Arabia's 
capital 

20 Bran 
enhancer 

21 Below- 
average 
grades 

23 Deteriorate 

24 Dance akin 
to the 
minuet 

2» DEA oNkier 

31 "Rocks' 

32 Kilmer 
classic 



41 Hawaiian 
resort area 

42 Very 
minute 

45 Burrowing 

rodent 
49 Gulf of 

hteMcocity 

51 Disap- 
peared 

52 Portent 

53 Speck 

54 Aware of 

55 Qovem- 
ment 



employees 
58 Reveren- 
tial fear 
S7 LurKhtime 

for many 
DOWN 

1 Move 

2 Spelling 
of TVs 
•*,.90210' 

3 Fine 

4 Inn, to Inez 

5 Gets the 
message 
wrorig 

8 Harem 
room 

7 One of 
Henry's 
Catfierines 

8 Thought 

9 Religious 
deserter 





Soliitlon Ume: 


1 


Bmln. 




P T 

B, 1 


4 


c 


L 


A 


w 


Q 


R 


1 


M 


n 


1 
T 


C 


H 


L 
O 


A 


V 


A 





M 


E L 


E 


EB 


N 


Y 


t 


D 


E 


T A 


C 


H 




T 


ool^^ 


I^Hs 


H 


E 


H 


MfP 


T 
1 


Y 

E' 
A 


H 
A 


A 
V 


R T 
1 S 


EHJ EIT 

■p^arI 


■ k 
CO 


N 


E 


T 


1° 


E^HS 


M V 


e 


R 





R 


A 


a 


E 
M 


i 





H 


op^^ 


^^■l 


P 


O 


R T 


A 


L 


A 
R 


P 


E 


X 


m 


1 
I 


E 
A 


R 


E A 


S 


V 

N 
X 





T 





T 
S 


■ f 


1 

A 


M 


[e 


A 


H 


I 


11 


■ 


LL 



Saturday'* answer 



EtKlENESKErm 

10 Chevalier 
8or>g 

11 Pennor 
Your>g 

17 Swiss river 
19 Obligatkm 
22 Furtive sort 

24 Actor 
Alastair 

25 Expert 

28 Good as 

27 Belittle 

29 Clerical 
addr. 

30 One of 
the brass 

33 Having 

all one's 

marbles 
36 Us 

38 Shoptalk 
40 Again, 

to the 

orchestra 

42 Since 

43 Domes - 
tnate 

44 Last tew 
bars 

46 U2's lead 
sir>ger 

47 Quite 
involved 
with 

48 AuttMK Urls 
50 AAA job 



1 


2 


3 


4 


1 


s 


e 


7 


i 


i 


6 


to 


t1 


12 








ij 






H 








JT ■ 






■ 


iff 
















a 








i» 




i" 

~ 














SI 








■ 


23 






pn 


24 

31 


25 


Si 










27 


■ 


2S 






30 


■ 


3i 










P 


i* 






» 






sn 


U 


M 
















Pl 


U 




TT^ 


■ 


4t 








HHI 




a^ 








TT 


i 


^ 






*• 


47 


4a 


*i 












ST 




1 


ii 








u 








1 


S3 






U 








is 








a 






» 








SVI |UDBn9 ^'^ answers to today's crosswcrd. call 
9 1 UMr Ell ■ 1-WXM54-6873I 9^ per minut«. touch- 
tone /rowy phones. (18+ only.) A Ktna Features wrvkse, NYC. 



CRYPTOQUIP 

RX XPDQKD'M PMMRMUPCU 

OKUM RCUT UDTGYVK. 

BK BPM UT YPVK 

B R Q T G U , 

Saturday's Cryptoqulp: WHY DID THE CREATOR 
OF QUITE A FEW GROAN-PRODUCING 
CRYPTOQUIPS MERIT PUN-ISHMENT? 

Today's Cryptoquip clue: Y equals B 



► CALVIN AND HOBBIS 



BillWattekson 







taOLl HOT «} 
WM> NOT 93 

mut.' 1 wti 

T>ti^ sTwr 




► NON SEQUITUR 



WitfY 



Top ?RV3RrTYoF-n« 

VKv\cKMiEq!ET«jncc 




► FOXTROT 



BiuAjmchd 



Wta, MOM, I'Wf 
FibtWtP OUT WWM 
1 RtAi.LT WANT 
It) Bt WHEN 
I 6«0W Uf. 




► THE UNKNOWN 



Bundok Pe£x/0]ll£gian 



/[fit/ fht obftct 
Ms^alf.<jn it h<{. 





Cassie says stand by, listen to friend 



Dear Cassandra, 

My Iricnd of several years seems 
almost hopeless when it comes to rela- 
tionships with women. He has gone 
out with some very nice women, but 
for some reason or another, has 
become their "good friend" because he 
is too polite and a little shy to try and 
be anything but friends. He is seeing a 
great girl now he has wanted to ask out 
for over a semester, and I really want 
this to work out for him. What can I do 



to help him for a change? Any advice'' 
Signed. Friend of a Great Guy 

Dear Friend, 

Yeah, be there. Listen. Encourage 
him if it sounds like his knees are 
banging together. But that's essentially 
all you can do. If you gel too into play- 
ing Cupid, it will invariably backfire. 
So offer him a shoulder to cry on and a 
face lo bitch at. but stay out of it other- 
wise. 



► REVIEW 

Crowd has fun 
as Crow plays 
on antique set 

Cotlcgiui 

A near capacity crowd gathered at Memorial 
Hall in Kansas City, Kan., Thursday night to listen 
to new music sensation Sheryl Crow. 

All they wanted to do was have some fun. 

And have fun they did. 

Pete Droge, one of the opening acts, set the 
mood for the concert with his newest release "If 
You Don't Love Me (I'll Kill Myselfi." 

Fairly new lo (he popular music scene, Dro^c 
seemed to impress the audience. 

Droge and his band seemed to enjoy their music, 
and the audience responded to his somewhat sar- 
castic personality. 

The next act. Preedy Johnson, former Lawrence 
resident, performed selections from his album 
"This Perfect World." 

This album includes folk/pop melodies with u 
message. 

"He is a really good songwriter. All of his songs 
have a really deep meaning," Amy Anderson, 
Kansas City resident, said. 

Johnson was a little dry as far as stage presence, 
but his lyrics and the smooth sound of his music is 
what made him special. 

Crow then took the stage, which was set up to 
look like a parlor with antique furniture and lamps. 

Crow performed songs from her double plat- 
inum album, 'Tuesday Night Music Club." as well 
as songs from her new album which does not have 
a release dale. 

Crow spent the year before her album w;is 
released experimenting with a group of musicians 
on Tuesday nights, which gave her album its title. 

This album didn't come easily for Crow. In 
1991. she told A&M Records that she wanted to 
scrap the album that would have been her debut. 
A&M agreed to allow her to make her own album, 
her own way 

A former back-up singer for Michael Jackson, 
George Harrison. Rod Stewart and Don Henley, 
Crow has a vast background in music. 

Crow is a classically trained pianist who also 
plays the guitar and an instrument that has become 
somewhat of a trademark for her — an accordion. 

The crowd cheered as Crow strapped on her 
accordion. 

"A giri and her accordion, what a turn on." Crow 
said. 

Chris Street. Overiand Park resident, said he was 
impressed with the number of instruments Crow 
can play. 

"I'd never seen a steel guitar used by a pop 
band," he said. 

Crow sang her hit song "All I Wanna Do" in iin 
unplugged version with her band silting on tapestiy 
couches and Crow in an overstuffed chair. She also 
sang the song in its original form and the crowd 
went wild. 

CD Review magazine said Crow was one of the 
most intriguing new artists — and maybe the nrost 
compelling singer of the year. 
1 think the audience would agree. 

Crow put on a show that would be almost 
impossible for other ariists to beat. 



'No Coupon" Specials '''fJoNfTZri'' I Dr. Love's Video Cassette Rentals | .■:.?iixmaai;tuu,a.>:^ui.;viiy,mi3=H.t ;i,-3; 



Everyday 
Two-fers 

2 - PIZZAS with 
2 - TOPPINGS each 
2 - COKES with ice 



Everyday 
Three-fers 

3 - PIZZAS with 

1 -TOPPING each 

4 - COKES with ice 



$8.45 



$10.3- 



Prtotsdofiol 
Include ssIm ttitet. 




Uttle 776'5577 



i$15 CASHn 

•0^ Eveiy time you donate plasma. | 



I "Quick, safe, easy 

- •Study while you donate 

|^»^ •Watch movies while you donate 

|Xl •Donating plasma saves lives! ^^' 

I Manhattan Biomedical Center i 

I 1130 Gardenway (across from Westloop) | 
I jpN^Mpn.-Fr/. 9 a,m.-6:30 p,m,. Sat 9 a.m.-2 p.m. | 



1/2 PRICE MEMBERSHIP OFFER 
TO RENT CASSETTE TAPES 

$18.50 SAVINGS WITH THIS COUPON 
FOR NEW AND RENEWAL MEMBERSHIPS 

No membership Is requlrod for the purchase of toys, 
print, lingerie, or new or used video cassette tapes. 
We have over 500 tapes for sale - $19.95 to $39.95 

1/4 mite east of Manhattan Airport on 
K-18 Frontage Rd. - 539-0910 

This offer axplrai March 15, 1M6 Wa do not accept ehecka. 




Heartworm Season Begins in March 
Ifave Your Dog lesled! 



MjUihaitan a 



m 




ry clinics are offering special times 
for heartworm testing. 
'^UJr-^lpiSX yourveterin^an for an appointment. 
HDSPjfAUCUNIC PHONE DATES & TIMES 
Bh^e Hills AnltnaIHoq>tial £}7-84B2 



Candlewood\feterinary Clinic 537-0537 ' 
Eastside V;etertn9f|l Clinic <«9^7-3i719. 

K-StateVeteniuiylfediiig'Hospital 532-5690 

Konza Veterinary Clinic 776-9111 

< *, 

Lmie Apple Veterinary Clinic . 539-0191 
Mobile Veterina ry Service 537-0406 
VSfetside Veterinary Cliiuc 539-7922 
I^Po^ must be at least S 1/2 montha old 



SatMir. 25, 10 am-1 pm and 

\fij ajiipaintinen 

rlease call for an appolntinent 

Sat,Mar.i8a.m.-12p.in. 

Wed,>Ur.l5,8a.m.-SJ0p.m. 

Sat., Mar. 4 & Sat., Mar. 18, 

8-11 a.m. 

AH Saturdays in March 

8a.m.-12:30p.m. 

Please call for an appointineni 

Please call for an appointment 

PJeasecall for an appoiminent 



Spadals 



ChUI Burrlto $3 
Baby Bowl 



"TACO HUT 



^ Sun Ttvuc:- 11.>m Klpm Where ijiiod If teiuls gel logellifr' S 

ij Fii S.il ll.'im Mttlnifjtit Ovfrtoohing Wt^stloof Jl 

h 2809Claflin 539-2091 



IPUUVUVUVVVVVVVVVVVV< 



AY eafe,</a^ 

Mnixh 6, 7, & 9 (roni 6 - 8 p.m. 



n 



r<ml.i» I I'illiiT 

t an nun al ^VM7^M 

III 

kv.in.il =iV-~22l 



(. nnli'sl J.iUs \l.mll Kl \piil (v M iV 20 

Qy^OOCCOOCOOOCCCCOD 



^ t^ lionday, Pabrwry 27, lagB 



KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN 



► CAMPUS 



R'stlianil kiNMNledge of ttw human body 



AMY aiOLIR 



They stand over (he 
bodies with scalpels, 
determined to slice 
open human flesh, 
examine the muscles, bones, 
and organs, and get the 
learning experience or a 
lifetime. 

They are the cadaver team. 

For a scmesler, these 40 K-State 
student!! spend Tour hours a week 
learning ahout the structure and 
function of the human body, not 
through textbooks but firsthand. 

Anne Stalheim-Smith. associate 
professor of biology, said she start- 
ed the cadaver-team program in 
1976. 

**] was trying to find a way to get 
some of the 150-200 students in the 
class to be able to get some dissec- 
tion experience but have everyone 
in the class study anatomy from the 
cadaver," she said. 

Stalheim-Smith said K-Slate 
used to have a separate anatomy 
and physiology course but com- 
bined them in 1974 to benefit the 
students. 

Ron Gaines, professor of biology 
and adviser for the cadaver team, 
said the members of the cadaver 
team were selected on the basis of 



grade point average, class standing 
and lab schedules. 

"They have to be inieltigcnt and 
res{>onsible," he said, 

"They have to be intelligent 
because they have to get three 
weeks ahead of the class in less 
than three weeks. They have to be 
responsible because they have an 
extra four-hour course for the first 
few weeks, and they have to teach 
anatomy to everyone else." 

Gaines said the students on the 
team are responsible for dissecting 
the body, cleaning it up and going 
into their labs and teaching the rest 
of the Human Body class what 
they've learned in dissection. 

Seven students are allowed in 
the room with the cadavers at a 
time. While the students spend an 
hour in dissection, the other mem- 
bers of the team study in an adja- 
cent room. 

"It's the most valuable experi- 
ence they could have," Gaines said. 
"Most of the time, they just jump 
right into it. I've only had one stu- 
dent who never became comfort- 
able with the cadaver." 

For the first few weeks of the 
class, the students were on a mis- 
sion to remove the fat from the 
three cadavers located in a small 
room in Ackert Hall. 

"When we saw them with their 
skin on, it was kind of weird 
because they had nails on. and they 



all had different facial expressions," 
Tammy Linenberger, sophomore in 
pre-occupational therapy, said. 
"When we first started cutting into 
him, it was gross because it was 
very Juicy, and all of this juice 
spilled all over my gloves, and fat 
was everywhere," 

Linenberger said the first day 
was overwhelming, but the next 
time she worked on the cadaver, she 
was so interested in the dissection 
that she didn't want to leave the lab. 

"It was fun," Linenberger said. 
"I was so focused on what i was 
doing that it didn't seem like a 
human at all." 

Brent Sorensen. Junior in pre- 
medicine. said he thinks working on 
cadavers is more practical than dis- 
secting frogs or pigs to learn the 
structure and function of the human 
body. 

"You get extra experience with 
the human body," Sorenson said. "It 
takes a lot of time, but it's worth it. 
The first day it bothered me. but 
after that, they don't look like peo- 
ple anymore. Once you get past the 
smell, you're all right." 

Sorenson said he has names for 
the cadavers, which are on loan 
from KLf Medical Center. 

"We named them Phil, Helen 
and Iris." he said. 

"One of them had open heart 
surgery -— 1 want to sec what it 
looks like." 



Stalheim-Smith said the cadav- 
ers, which cost S450 each, are cur- 
rently funded by private donations, 
but the program could be supported 
by lab fees in the future. 

Stalheim-Smith said the team 
had one or two cadavers and a team 
of 20-30 in the past, but because K- 
State has three cadavers, 40 stu- 
dents were selected as members of 
the team. 

"Because of the generosity of the 
people in the health professions, 
we're able to have three cadavers 
this semester," Stalheim-Smith said. 

Linenberger said she sees the 
cadaver team as a valuable experi- 
ence that will help her in her 
career. 

"The knowledge is so much 
more engrossing because it's right 
there in front of you," Linenberger 
said. 

"1 have a respect for people who 
donated their btxlies becau.se thanks 
to them, we get to acquire more 
knowledge." 

Lisa Rhoden, sophomore in pre- 
physical therapy, said being on the 
cadaver team is a unique experi- 
ence. 

"You learn more depth about the 
body than in pictures," Rhoden 
said. 

"It's really good for people 
going into pre-hcalth professions. I 
think this will really benefit us in 
the long run." 



News Digest 


►CUNS BAHLE rN WAKE OF U.H. WITHDRAWAL 


IWOQADISHU, Somalia (AP) 


withdrawal of the last soldiers. 


— Rival clans battled each 


About 50 U.S. Army special 


other with mortars, machine 


forces soldiers already are 


guns and liglil arms near 


ashore to help the remaining 


Mogadishu's airport Sunday In 


Pakistani and Bangladeshi 


a possible preview of Somalia's 


troops complete preparations 


future after tf>e departure of 


to leave under the coalition 


U.t^J peacekeepers. 


shield. 


With a U.S. -ted military 


"This is the the heaviest 


coalition poised offshore, the 


fighting since the second day 


fighting also offered a taste of 


after we got here," said Capt. 


what American and Italian 


Joe Bovy of Arlington, Va., as 


Marines might face in the com- 


he watched the battle from a 


ing days as they guard the 


heavily sandbagged bunker. 


► 2 MASS GRAVES DISCOVERED IN CHECHNYA 


SHALL Russia (AP) — Usirvg 


Bodies ol ttie newly dead lay 


the same tactic that pusfied 


among a far larger number of 


rebel fighters out of Grozny, 


decomposing corpses in open 


Russian forces pounded south- 


trenches between Grozny's cen- 


em Chechnya on Sunday wtlh 


tral graveyard and a main road. 


heavy artillery and rockets. 


the newspaper said Some were 


Also Sunday, a newspaper 


clearly victims of exploding 


reported the discovery of two 


shells, but others looked rela- 


open mass graves in the capital 


tively unscathed 


of the breakaway republic. The 


There was no suggestion 


Observer of London said the 


that the victims had died in a 


graves contained the bodies of 


mass killing. The graves were 


more than 100 Chechens, most 


an IrKlicatbn of lack of burial 


of them civilians, including 


space In the devastated 


women and children 


Chechen capital 



► FACULTY 



Professor receives grants for cancer research 



t LUCKY ' 
•^REWGRILLE 



k. 



^^nn^ 



^i( \CGu;vii,i I 



Y LUNCH SPECIALS 



STKPHAHII STHNBOCK_, 

(\!Fle£'.in 

A K-.SiaiL" professor was award- 
ed $90,500 by the American Cancer 
Society and a five-year grant for 
$350,000 by the National Institute 
of Health, 

Monica Justice, professor of 
biology, is working on research to 
understand what causes leukemia 
and lymphoma in humans. 

Justice has been at K-State for 
two years and said she has found 
that K-State has supported her 
research. The amount of classes that 
she teaches is limited, and commit- 
tee work is reduced for her. 

"K-State provided me with quite 
a bit of startup money and money 
from the NASA program and the 
Sloan Foundation." Justice said. 

The award from the National 
Institute of Health will be used to 
pay for supplies to do the research. 

The NyiHHial Cancer Sncii^iy 



award designated Justice as an out- 
standing researcher in the area This 
money will be used to pay part of 
her salary so she can spend more 
time on her research. 

Justice said without these awards 
she would be running out of money, 

"Instead of forging ahead, I 
would be cutting back. This will 
provide me with money to build my 
research," Justice said. 

Justice started her project, "The 
Molecular Genetic Basis of Mouse 
B-Cell Lymphoma, " while working 
at the National Cancer Institute 
under a mentor. 

The types of leukemia and the 
lymphomas found in mice are very 
similar to human leukemias and 
lymphomas. Lymphomas in mice 
have genetic characteristics that 
allow researchers to isolate the 
genes involved in the development 
of cancer. 

Working with actual human 



tumors is the next step for Justice 
after identifying the cancer-causing 
genes. 

Through this research it is possi- 
ble to get a better understanding of 
the development of certain human 
cancers, which could help in eariier 
diagnosis and better treatment 
strategies. 

"In the future it is possible that 
we could say, OK, you don't have a 
high risk for cancer because you 
don't have these specific genes," 
Justice said. 

Being a teacher and a researcher 
is better for Justice than being a 
physician, she said. 

"I like being with people and 
asking questions. You never run out 
of questions in research," she said. 

Justice works in the lab with 
three graduate students, five under- 
graduate students, a technician and 
lots of mice. 

"Riphi now, we only b.ive 100 



mice, and that is not nearly 
enough," Justice said. 

The students who work in the lab 
said they have learned a lot and 
really enjoy it 

"From the hands-on experience, 
you leam a lot about what's going 
on," Antoinc Pcrchellet. sophomore 
in microbiology and French, snid. 

Gwenn Hansen, graduate student 
in biology, said she puts in extra 
time sometimes. 

"I enjoy it. That's why I'm here. 
I come on weekends if there's 
something interesting that I want to 
look for or find out," she said. 

Justice said she is fortunate to 
have good students working for her, 

"I'm lucky. 1 wo of the students 
in my luh are candidates for 
Goldwater scholarships, and my 
technician is a very goiwl veterinari- 
an," she said 



MONDAY 
C'hirkrn lUitriio IM.ih' - 

\ t'j'Ui** t iil/tmi' IMiilr 

TUrSDAY 
{ hirkt'ii I'ol Pit' PktU- 
Swi'ct I cUii'N Sdittc Cai/orie Pt.tti- 

WinNISLlAV 

I asagna Plaft* 
IitrkcN c al/oiif Plate 

lllllKSnAV 



ItHO licM-rSiinthvirh Plate 
■".HO ( hi« k«'(i { .il/oiH' Pla 

I KIDA^ 
(Titrkcii It it'd Steak ^laff 
Italian SiiusiiKt' C al^tfiK' .' 

710 H. Manhattan Ave. % 

776 - 9090 - 



Students can ask questions from inspectors 



CONTINUED FROM PAGE 8 

A plebiscite vote is a non-binding 
vote that would only express the 
opinion of the student body. The vole 
would not mandate any decision 
made by the administration. Otto 
said. 

The administration must make a 
decision by April I. but the Kansas 
Board of Regents will not decide 
until April 16, Otto said. 

The deadline fur the administra- 
tion may make it impossible for the 
issue to be brought to a student body 
vote, he said. 

The ballot would ask students if 
they were in favor of building a park- 
ing garage in McrTKirial Stadium and 
if they were in favor of building a 
parking gamge at all. 

The Student Affairs and Social 
Services committee presented a reso- 
lution promoting Safe Housing 
Week, today through Friday. City 
building inspectors and landlord rep- 



resentatives will be sitting at tables in 
the K-State Union to answer any 
questions students might have about 
the condition of their apartments or 
hou.ses. 

SASS also introduced a bill 
amending the recently passed revised 
Judicial Code. 

The Judicial Code provided for 
representation of all the residence 
halls except Boyd, Putnam and Van 
Zile, which were grouped together as 
a single complex. Otto, chainnan of 
SASS. said. 

The bill amends the Judicial Code 
by-laws to give each of the 10 halls 
open next year a representative tt) the 
judicial board, he said. 

"I^h hall has its own governing 
board and judicial board." said Lin 
Bliss, Kansas State University Asso- 
ciation of Residence Hulls president. 

Four special allocations also 
received first readings. 

The first special alkKation was 



for Mclazine, which produces 
Passages In The Empire of Chaos, a 
student publication of writings and 
pictures. Mcta/ine asked for $150 for 
publishing the inaga/inc. 

The Society for the Advanccnwnt 
of Management a.sked for $1,518 for 
contest entry fees and travel costs for 
the SAM International Management 
Conference in April. 

The National Organization for 
Women requested $1,039 for adver- 
tising, printing and an honorarium 
for Sarah Wedding ton, the attorney 
who tried the Roe v. Wade case 
before the Supreme Court. Wed- 
dington will be speaking in conjunc- 
tion with Won^n's History Month. 

The final special allocation was 
proposed for the purcha.se of a note- 
book computer to be used by the 
Senate chairman, vice chairman and 
the Senate secretary before and dur- 
ing Senate meetings. The allocation 
is for $1,920, 



STEVE HALL FOR CITY COMMISSION 

You Know Where He Stands 

"My two years on the City Commission have 

reinforced my strong support for citizen 

participation in local government, accountability 

and citizen input. If reelected, this will continue to 

be my main goal. Call me, and I w/ili be happy to discuss issues with 

you~776'6864 (work), 537-8787 (home). " 

i would appreciate your vote in the primary February 28 and in 
the general election April 4. 




LARRY WEAVER forSCHOOL BOARD 




Lair Gauche 

12th & Mora 
(Aggieville) 
Matihattan 

776-3302 



'Computers (new & used) 
** Safes 'Service 'Upgrades 
**High Quality Components 

*Mu9ic (1,0005 to pick from) 
"CD's (none over $8) 
''*Ca5settes(a]Ure$2) 

'Movies (lOO's to select) 
"VHS (none over $8) 
"We have Video Laserdisc 

'Software (over 650 titles) 
"For IBM & Mac 
"Far below normal retail 






Dilly'si 



I 1/2 saiulu'kli, 
I small salad & ilriiiK | 

r for $4.50 I 

! Willi this coupon [ 



NEW 

Kawasaki Dealer 
•ATVs •JetSkis 

•Motorcycles •Generators 

■ 'C Kawasaki 



Over 2,500 jq. feet of 
accessories and parts. 

1309 N. Washington 

Junction aty, KS 

(913)238-3411 



^ 




QUALIFIED 

Award-winning KSU Teacher 
Organizer of summer science programs 
for teachers and students 

CGIVIMITTED 

To responsible budgeting 

To greater parent involvement 

To preparing students for their future 



PiiliI'L.it Ailv Piiiil li.ir |iy LtKry Wt'.ivt.'P tur Ecliuol B(j. ipiI Vvolini." Uicy Tp' 



A CaiM Believe ItfA 



11th & Moro - Aggievjlle 
537-1616 



I Buy One, Get One Free! 



I Buy one cup or cone and receive one of 
I equal value FREE with this coupon. 



New Hours: 7a,fti. - 
lOa.m, 



11 p.m.paily 
• 11 p.m. Sunday 







Kansas State Union 

and 

TroUerHaU 

8at8«JBi.-10i30pjDD.«8uiLNoon>lCH30iMn. 

Comf> Join us when Uie dorm cafeteiias ore closfrf I 



|:> I <^'-;i ^ t 1 1 ^i 



<T3 



An evening of Indian Dance, Music and Food Extravaganza! 1 1 
A Glimpse into India's rich cultural tieritage and delicious cuisine. 
Date: Saturday, March 4. 

Venue: Manhattan Middle School, 9th and Poyntz. 
Time: 9:30 ■ 7:30 p,m. Dinner. 

7:30 - 9 p.m. Cultural Programs. 

Dinner la free tor all members o4 l,S.A. and tg tor non membars , Ttw 
cultural program Is free for all. A limited number ol tickets will be sold at 
ttw K-State Union on Feb, 16, 22, and 23 from 1 1 «,m. to 2 p.m, Tichats 
are not sold at the venue, 

Sponiored by t.C.C. (tntm-natkinal Coordinating Council] 



KANSAS fUn COLLEGIAN 



a 



■■cwdMfc F ebruary 27, 1996 ^ ^ 



S 



=£ 





WORD OUT 

ICI YOUR CUSflPHDAO Iff JODSir ids 



LASSIFIEDS 




1 DAY 20 words or lass — $5 

each word over 20 — $.20 per word 

2 DAYS ^ words or less — $6.25 

each word over 20 — $.25 per word 

3 DAYS 20 ^or6s or less — $7.25 

each word over 20 — $.30 per word 

4 DAYS ^^ w°^3 °r '^^ ~ ^ 

each word over 20 — $.35 per word 

8 DAYS ^ words or less — $8,50 

each word over 20 — $.40 per word 
(conaecuttv* day rata) 



TO PAY 

iMNttepMm 



DEAOUNES 



IliattOi 



CAjicSllATIONS^ 

Iw piiotd bf non KyaaMl)wriMMnyowMll«t 

toiun.C>iHiM*ptor*^<nu*ita mMMiid^a. 
Hiew)ty*pjB.l*Dw«|[tea i i^w p ri o r YteiswMciflMtMftnnoMltiadlv 



I ffii i4|0tti> tcfl, ii|MI or 
pnpHl|rd»M>VMyid 



1^ at •«• AMffit Ml pK ■ 
I riiMt yow M to cMA i» 



FREIFOUNOAOS l(|wM«iin«rkiyguiMt.plMM 

w niB Myi ini of flhirtib 



Call 532-6555 to place your classified. 



000 



BULLETIN 
BOARD 



0191 



iiniiounc»iT*»nt» 

ADVANCED FLIGHT Train- 
ing p)u> ground ichool 
for privtia, inslrumant 
And multi. angina rat. 
tnQs. K-State Flying 
Club approvad Inatruc- 
tor Hugh Irvin. 
S39-3128. 

COME FLV with u*, K-Stala 
Flylno Ctub ha* fiva air- 
ptanat. For tM() pricva 
call Troy Brockw*v> 
776-«736 •fWr 5:30p.m. 

DON'T FORGET- Gradua 
tlon tupf>4taa now avait- 
■ble at Varnay't Book 
Stora. A Joatant' rapra- 
aantallva will ba b*ra 
Monday, Fab. 27 and 
Tuaadiy. Fab. 28 (o taka 
your ordart for claia 
ringi and announct- 
manti. Pick up your 
cap, Qown, and t«itat 
now. Baat tha ruih. 
coma to Vtrriffy't for all 
your graduation aup- 
plak. Vam«/i Book Storv 
fnAglavilla, 539-0511. 
Opan 9- 9 Mon.- Sat., 
li-SSun. 

UOM AOAM rormally at A 
Cut Abova ii now at 
Joyca'a Hair Tamar*. 
Sha wvlcomea all form- 
•r and naw ellanlt. 
S39-TAME (S2S3J. 





Lost and Pound 


plaaarf 
day*. 


•da 

fra* 


oan 
for th 


b* 
ra* 







Wa raqulra a farm af 
piGtura ID (KtU, dilv- 
ar'a llcanaa or otharl 
whan placing a p^t" 



ADO A tplat^ to your naxt 
baih. Graat mid-larm- 
partias bag in with Wat- 
N-Wlld Moblla Hot Tub 
ranlala. 537-1825. 

ADD AN axtra loucb of 
clais to your ngxt par 
ty Call Wayna'i Water 
Party to rant a porta bla 
hot tub 537-7587. 
S39-7561 

COLDEST BEER on Waal 

tidal Graat talaction of 
apiriti. Polion liquor 
acroit from Food 4 
Lata. 3108 Andarton. 

537-«a8e. 




HOUSING/ 
REAL ESTATE 



For Rant- 
Apla. Pumlahad 

AVAILABLE JUNE 1, nica 
Btudio apaitmant with 
watar and trath paid. 
Vary near campua on 
Claflin Rd Call 
587-0634. 

NOW LEASING for Juna t 
occupancy. Furniihed 
or unfurniahad. Salf- 
contaiitad, onabed- 
room quality apart- 
(nant*. Vaara leaaa. Call 
537-9188 

OUIET SURROUNDINGS 
for itudy. Campua ona 
mile, ona-badtoom. 
and atudio aoma utlli- 
ilaa paid- Short-tarm 
laaaa, no pait. 
B37-a3e» 




Unfurniahad 



You'll never 
know unless you 
tty...advertising. 

i^yOLLEGlAN 



AVAILABLE APRIL 1, ona- 
badroom near Ag- 
giavilla and KSIJ cam- 
pua 1005 Bluamont 
$385 Water/ trath paid. 
No Pitt. 7T8-3e04. 



AVAILABLE APRIL 1. ona- 

badroom, ona block 
north »r campua. 1854 
Ctaflln S375. Water/ 
tiaah paid. Laundry 
fecilitiaa. Allowt imall 
psti 776-3804 



I 



FwnortApfc 

• Sandstone Apts. 

• OoNege Heights Apb. 
4 Cambridge Sq.Apt5. 

UigB t ■•dnom Onlta 

i9am-*3Dpm 



AVAILABLE FEB. 15. two 
badrootn at 806 Ailiaon 
$420, Naw earpat. diah. 
wnhar. Laundry faclii. 
tiaa Water/ trtab paid. 
778-3804 

AVAILABLE NOW, two 
badroom near campui. 
1500 McCain Lane. 
S450. Laundry fadlttia* 
Watar/ trath paid. No 
pall. 778-3804. 

AVAILABLE MAR. 1. one 
bedroom naar campui. 
1722 Laramie S370. Wa- 
ter/ iraah paid. Laundry 
facllrllai. No pata. 776- 
3804. 

AVAILABLE MARCH 1, 
onabedroom, thraa 
bttKki weet of camiHJi. 
1024 Sunsat. $355. Wa- 
ter/ traih paid. LaurKlry 
facilitiai No pata. 7T<^ 
3804. 

AVAILABLE NOW. ona- 
bfldroom Ihraa blockt 

waat of campua. 1026 
Suntal. 1360. Ramo- 
delad unit, Water/ traah 
>ald. No pata. 



room apartment, S490. 
639-2482 after 4p.m. 

FOR JUNE, large twobed- 
room apartmani Wa. 
tar/ traih/ gaa two- 
Ihlrdt peicf. S430/ 
month. Atao one. bed. 
room S310 for Aug. 
53»-24a2. After 4p.m. 

FOUR-BEDROOM AT 

Royal Towera. 1700 N. 
Manhattan $860. Avail- 
able now. VVttar/ trath 
peid. Laundry (acilitiat, 
lundeck, hot tuba. No 
pati 776-3804. 




paid. 
776-^804. 



AVAILABLE NOW, Ihree- 
bedroom, two btockt 
eaat of KSU S600 plut 
utilitiei. 537-1940. 



•2 bedrcxjm 

oporfments 
•Quiet, pork 

like setting 
a Private & 

personal 

bedroom 
•Large botti & 

closets 

Distiwasher 
•Laundry 

foclllty 
•2 large pools 



nn ■ UOTV 
T78-III8 

for an 
appointment 



AVAILABLE NOW, two- 
badroom apartmantt 
naar City Park. 1026 
Otag* S4S0 Water/ 
train paid. Laundry 
facilltlai. Within walk- 
ing dimnot to KSU, No 
patt. TT8-3804. 

FOR AUGUST. Next to 
KSU. deluxe two-bad- 



JSSSSJS£SSf 



STOP! 

so lOT BIIT 
AIAPABTHIVT 

nniLTOD 

COHSIDEE THI8I 

•Brand new uparkh 
iwimming pool 
•Spacwus 
'Avail. Ju>\ 
'Kitcke 



I t ij'aiiii r WZ 
dfoom v/lSiudy S8M 

Onice: 

2400 Kimball Ave. 
at College Ave. 

[ (Acints from Hramlage) 

Call Roy 

at 537-70a7 

I for an appointment. 



GET A JUMP ON NEXT 
VEARI Chaae Manhat 
tan Apartmantt it now 
laating two, ihraa and 
four-baditiomi lor Au. 

flutt. Our wailing list ta 
ong; drop by bafore 
they're gonel College 
and Clafl'n, 776-38«3. 

LARGE TWO-BEOROOM. 
one-ball block wait of 
campui Tri taval apart 
ment. 1825 College 
Haigtiii, $550 Water/ 
train paid. Two bath, 
walk-in cloaeti. No 
pMa. 776-3804. 

LARGE. THREE BEDROOM 
with large cloaal in a 
nina-plax Living room, 
dining area, one and 
one-half bath, fully 
equipped kitchen. $.210 
each, 822 Framoni 
Available Juna 1 and 
Aug. -t. <:;«ll 5377087 

ONE-BEDROOM ALL utill 
tiaa paid. Near Ag 
giaville 1220 Laramie. 
$375. Available Feb. 6. 
776-3804. 

ONEBEDHOOM APART 
MENT svailabts now at 
Waraham Hotel 418 
Poynti, S395 water/ 
Iraatt paid. Laundry 
facilitiai. No pett 
776-3804. 

ONE. BEDROOM APART- 
MENT, availabia Feb 
15 924 Fremont. S300. 
Water/ traih paid. Pert- 
ing available Cloia to 
Aggiaville. 776-3804 

PARK PLACE APART 
ME NTS. Now praleaa- 
ing ona. two and three- 




MAKE ANDERSON PLACE YOUR 
HOME AWAY FROM HOME! 

Now leasing for 1 995-96 
*1 bedrooms 
*'/] block from campus 
'Furnished and unfurnished 
Showings every 
Monday through Friday 
3-5 p.m. 



185^ Anderson Place #4 
776-1148 



bedroom apartmanli. 
1413 Cambridge aS. 
63»-»S1. 

THREE-BEDROOM AVAIL- 
ABLE now on main 
floor of houae 2303 An- 
darton SeOO. Water/ 
trath paid. Single cer 
garage. Waihar/ dryer 
provided No pata. 776- 
3804. 

TWO-BEDROOM AVAIL 
ABLE now. Baaement 
apartment, nice condi- 
tion 2303 Anderson 
$425 Water/ traah paid. 
Single car garage. 
Wether/ dryer provid- 
ed. No pell. 776-3804. 

TWO BEDROOM AVAIL 
ABLE now on Slagg 
Hill. 803- 805 Aliiion. 
$385 Water/ trath paid. 
Laundry (acilitiat. Oith- 
waahar 776-3804 

TWO BEDROOM AVAIL. 
ABLE now. Aggiaville 
Penthouae Apartmenta 
617 N. 12th $550. Wa. 
ter/ traah paid Oiih- 
wathar. microwave. No 
pata. 776-3S04. 



flooma 
Availabia 



MALE ROOMMATE want- 
ad: Will have own 
room. Available now 
until July 31. S1B0/ 
month plut ona-rourttt 
utilitlet. 539-6676. 



120 1 

For Rant^ 
Keuaaa 



NEXT TO campui two, 
Ihraa, four, five-bed- 
room houtea some 
with fireplace end ga- 
rage and apartmenti* 
Waiher/ dryer, central 
Sir. parking Past con- 
trol/ trash paid. No peta 
available, now or Aug. 
$450- S1200 537-8543. 




GARAGES FOR rent. 1866 
CDllege Heights 12 $50, 
1866 College Heights #4 
150. Large unit*. 776- 
3804. 



Roommata 
Wantad 



A NON-SMOKER, share 
houta, utilitiai with 
three rasponaible 
malet. Large attic 
room, private phone, 
laundry, parking, $160. 
539-2468 Kay. 

APARTMENT FOR rant. 
Mala roommata want- 
ad Have own room 
and bath 537-2894 or 
(913)527-5821 

FEMALE, NON-SMOKING, 
roommate, three-bed- 
room apartment, $195/ 
month plus utilities. 
Call Julie or Heather, 
537-4878 

FOR NON-SMOKER/ drink, 
ar. Roommata naadad, 
walk to class. 539-1554. 

HELP SHARE houia aouth 
of campua and cloaa to 
park. All billa paid. Call 
539-6098 for mora infor- 
matlon. 

MALE ROOMMATE want. 
ad two bedroom bate- 
mani apartmant. Cloae 
to Ahearn Field House. 
Call 537-9188. 

ROOMMATE NEEDED. 
Available Mar. 1. Threa. 
bedroom houia. one. 
third utillliat. $150/ 
month. 776-7602 

ROOMMATES NEEDED 
now, Two rooma avail 
able. Brittnay Ridge 
complex. Call 587 .8511 
ask for anyone who 
livat there. S negoti- 
able, 5B7-861 1 . 

ROOMMATES NEEDED to 
shart house. Own bad- 
room, wathar/ dryer. 
$165/ month plus one- 
fourth ullllllat. Call 
776-2387. 



A VERY nice one-badroom 

apartmant. Availabia 
Mar. 1 to Aug. 1. Fur. 
nithad, cloaa to cam. 
pui and Aggiaville, 
quiat end nice neigh- 
bors Can renew lease 
in Aug. Call 539-7500 
ortd leave meesaga. 

FEMALE NON-SMOKER 
wantad to subleese lar 
gait bedroom in three- 
backnxn apartmant $196/ 
month negotiable. 
587-0521 

FEMALE ROOMMATES 
waniad to ahare Ihre*- 




532-6569 

MX 

992-7309 






OFFICE HOURS 

MOHDAY-FIUDAY 
8 i>nii*8 Pi Ml 

nwMay^ 



bedroom apartmani, 
dote to campui. Mid- 
May to Aug. $190/ 
month nagoliabia Call 
Sara or Jennifer 
587-8507. 

FOUR-BEDROOM, TWO 

bath. Cloaa to campui. 
Call 776-344S. $600/ 
month. 

MIDMAV TO Aug. May 
paid, S1SS/ month. 
Royal Tower*. Own 
room. Walk to campua 
Call Joel 587-4629. 

STUDIO APARTMENT. 721 
Fremont, now through 
Aug option to renew 
lease. $220 plut utili- 
ties. Trash paid. 
539-9312, leave mes 



SUBLEASE AVAILABLE in 

May. Two. bedroom, 
clota to campus and 
Aggiayille. Furnished. 
Air conditioned, park, 
ing, $485/ month, call 
Sarah or J at 587^8074. 

SUBLEASE AVAILABLE: 
three-bedroom at 
Wood way, across from 
Btamlage, with pool, 
laundry facilitiet, $200/ 
month plus utilitiai. 
Call 395 3865. 

SUMMER SUBLEASE avail- 
able May- Aug May 
paid for, tvro-bedroom. 
11th and Bluamont. 
587-6766. 

SUMMER SUBLEA5E- 
Mtle roommata naad- 
ad to share three-bad- 
room, poolside. Wood- 
way Apartmanti. Rent 
negotiable. Call Jaion 
n 587-8567. 



2G» 



SERVICE 
DIRECTORY 



210| 

Raauma/ 



A PERFECT ratuma and all 
your other word pro- 
cessing needs. Lstar 
printing. Call Brenda 
776-3290. 

NEED SOMETHING typed? 

I'll type it for $1/ par 
page. Call 537-9480 
after 5:30pm, but 
plaata, no callt after 
10pm. Ask for Jackie 



DaaMop 
Publtahinfl 



TVPED PAPERS, graphics, 
cbartt and graphs. 900 
tonli and nine years ex 
parlance to make your 
paper look gtsal, Fenn 
Graphics 537-0448, 
f anr>Oktu kiu.adu 



Prag nancy 
Taatlnfl 



riL«iti;iiK\ 
It'stiny ( I'MliT 

539-3338 

•I iLV(iii'L:ii-uk.> 

•liil.illvoHilkLiiii.il 

•S>iiiviLi> iLMilt- 
•('.illliii.i|^'kiiiitiiiL'iii 

l.l^■,llal.H.fM^'■ lliilii 
i.tllll'tJMIl 



Mon.-Fri 

9 a.m. -5 p.m. 



Autenwttva 
Bapair 



NISSAN- DATSUN Repair 
Service. 22 years «x- 
periaftca. Ma2dai, Hon- 
das and Toyotas also. 
Auto Craft, 2612 Dipper 
Lane, Manhattan, Kan- 
sas. 537-5049. 8a.m.- 
Sp.m. Mon.- Fri. 



Othar 
Sarv t caa 




CASH FOR collage 
900,000 grants avail- 
abia. No rapaymenli 
ever Qualily imme. 
diotety. (800)2432435. 

FREE FINANCIAL Atdl 
Over $6 billion in pri. 
vate sector grants and 
scholarships is now 
available. All itudenti 
are eligible ragardlett 
or grades, income, or 
parent's income. Let us 
help Call Student Fi- 
nancial Sarvicat: 

18001163-6495 axt 
F57682 



*UafLU 



irf Cap! SI 



<5t 



IB.F- 
tElVE 

cppies 



PROMPT CONTRACEPTIVE 
and abortion services. 
Dale L Clinton, M,0., 
Lawrencs, 
(913)641-5716. 

RESUME PREPAf^ATION, 
TAX PflEPARATION, 
word processing, UPS, 
ahipping, copies and 
moral The Mail Center 
across from Alco. 3110 
Artdtnon, 776-6245, 

WEIGHT. COMPLEXION, 
or memory difficuttlai? 
Leave a massage at 
S87-8S7B for a free con- 
aultation and an all -nat- 
ural tolutlon. 

aM| 

NutTttional 

Walght Loaa 

AWESOME DIETI Lota 
40 pounds in only ona 
month. Proven luccaia- 
ful and medically lala. 
No drugs or axpanitva 
food For entire plan 
send S7, check/ money 
order (0 K T.A., P.O. 
Boi 1379, Wichita. KS 
67201 

WANTED too sludanla: 
Lose B- 100 pounds. 
New metaboliim tKaak 
through. I tost 16 
pounds in three weeks. 
RN ataisled. Guar 
antaed resuitt S35. 
(800)579-1634. 



300 



EMPLOYMENT/ 
CAREERS 



ai0| 



Hatp Wantad 



The Collegian cannot 
verify the finenciel po- 
tential of edverllaa- 
mente In the Employ- 
mant/Cereer claaalflca- 
tton. Reedera are ad- 
vlaad to approach any 
auch amploymant op- 
portunity with reaaon- 
flbta caution. The Col- 
laglan urges our read- 
are to contact the Bal- 
tar Bualneea Buraau^ 
601 SE Jefferaon, To- 
pehe. KS 88607-1190. 
<S13)232-0^, 

%%%% Fun, hard working, 
money motivated peo- 
ple looking for an op- 
portunity to succeed. 
Part time/ lull time. 
Will tram For appoint- 
mani call 539-8040 
extSU. 

ACCEPTING APPLICA- 
TIONS/ Raaumas for 
swimming pool manag- 
er. Muitl>e WSI certi- 
fied. Call (913)4573361. 
City of Westmoreland. 

AG BACKGROUND helpful 
10 tarn commission to 
15/ hour marketing 
unique agricultura pro- 
ducts (800)755-0032. 

ALASKA SUMMER EM- 
PLOYMENT- Fishing 
Industry. Earn up to 
$3000- $6000 plui par 
mortth room and 
board I Transportalionl 
Mala/ female No ex- 
perience necasaaryl 
(2081545-4156 
eKt.A57684 

CRUISE SHIP JOBS) Atten- 
tion: Studanti. Earn 
$3000 plue monthly. 
Part-tima/ full-time. 
World travel Carib- 
bean, Hawaii. All poti- 
tiont availabia No ex- 
perience CALL: 
1 602 1 453-^51. 

CaUltf SHIPS MOW 
HIRINO- Earn up to 
$2000 plua/ month 
working on Cruilt 
Ships or Land-Tour 
companiet. World trav- 
el (Hawaii. Mexico, the 
Caribbean, etc. I Sea- 
sonal and lull time am- 
ploymant available. No 
experience necatiary. 
For mora Information 
call (206)634-0468 
axtCS7684 

CUSTOM HARVESTER. 
Naed ambltiou* indlvid- 



ua)s for wheat and row 
crop fiarvast. Truck ditv- 
ers and combine opara- 
tors naadad. For infor- 
mation phone 
(913)525-6326 or 6330. 
Naegale Combine Inc. 

DELIVERY PERSON after 
4p.m. Appty in partorr- 
Hunam Reataurant, 
1304Westloop. 

EMPLOYEES NEEDED to 
assist in family oriented 
custom harvesting op 
eration Salary negoti- 
able and reflective of 
employees compatibili- 
ty with empioyers fami- 
ly, customers ar\d other 
employees. For more 
inlomation reply to 
Gary at 1316)225-0079 
after 5p.m. 

FAST FUNDRAISER- raiia 
SSOO in live daya- 
greeks. groups, clubs, 
motlvalad individuals. 
FaM, 4MV> rvo financial 



obHgatli 
(800)77! 



(800)775-3851 EXT ,33, 

FRUSTRATED WITH $475/ 
hour? Perttlme/ full- 
time openingi. Excel- 
lent pay. VVill train. 
Flexible hours. Call iZ- 
HINi (or interview. 537- 
0782. 

GRAND OPENING naw 

Manhattan office now 
has openings lor part- 
time and full-time. We 
need halp in all araaa. 
Full training, muM have 
positive attitude. Trival 
options. W7-O805 

HARVEST HELP needed. 
JD9600 and truck driv. 
era wanted. Must ob. 
tain a CDL and will halp 
obtain. Call for vary 
good salary options. 
May to Nov Clydatdala 
Harvesting and Truck- 
ing. Call Randy 
5^5232. 

LIVE-IN GRADUATE aa»i»- 
lantship available in De- 
partment of Housing 
and Dining Services be- 
ginning immadiataly. 
Contacl Family Hous 
ing Office at 539-1097 
lor information. 

LIVE- IN NANNY naadad 
loi east coast couple. 
Two children: good 
pay, benefits. Mult pro- 
vide refaiancai. Call 
537-9745, after 5p.m. 

NEEDED TRUCK dilvara 
for wheat harvest from 
Texas to North Dakota. 
May through Aug. Da- 
lana Raimai 

1405)167-3367 

NEEDED: 38 people M lose 
weight now, all natural, 
guaranteed, doctor rec- 
ommended, works at- 
pocially wall for wom- 
an. Call 537-6892. 

NEW ENGLAND Brolher- 
Siater Camps- Mai. 
ti^chusetts. Mah-Kee- 
Nac for Boys/ Danbae 
for Girls. Counselor po- 
sitions for program 
Specialists: All Team 
Sports, esiiacially Baaa- 
bali. Saskatball, Golf. 
Field Hockey. Roller 
Hockey, Soccer, Volley- 
ball; 30 Tennis open- 
ings; alto Archery. Ri- 
flary. Pioneering/ Over- 
night Camping. 
Weights/ Fitnasi ind 
Cyciino; other openingi 
incluflB Performing 
Arts. Fine Arts, Pottery, 
Figure Skating, Gym- 
nastics, Nawipapar 
Pholography. Year, 
book. Radio Station, 
ftocketty. Ropes and 
Rock Climbing, Ail Wa- 
terfront Activities 
(Swimming. Skiing, 
Sailing, Wlndiurring, 
Canoeing/ Kayaking). 
Graat salary, room, 
board and travel. June 
18. Aug te. Inquire: 
MsflJtlfiJiii: (Boys) 
190 Linden Avenue, 
Clan Ridge, NJ 07026. 
Call (800)753 91 18 DtO: 
bee. I Girts) 17 Westmin- 
ster Drive. Montville, 
NJ 07045. Cell 
(800)392^752. 

PART TIME RESIDENTIAL 
construcllon axpaii- 
•nce necessary, will 
work around clatt 
schedules. 776-4954. 

SPORTS MINDED. If you 
have a competitive 
edge but are a team 
player we need you 
now Full trainino/ trav- 
el options. FulHtima/ 
part-time 45K income 
potential 537-0801 

STUDENT REPHESENTA 
TIVE needed to run 
marketing project on 
campus, part-time, 
great earning potential. 
1-(SMM«»>VISA 
k35 

SUCCESS MINDED indi- 
viduals needed for 
talaa and management 
poiitioni in axploiive 
growth company full- 
time preferred, part- 
time alto. Serious inqui 
riet only Call Patrick 
687-9700 ext 914 

SUMMER HARVEST help 
needed. )1un John 
Deere 9500'a and 9600 
and drive truck. CDL 
preferred. Parkar Har- 
vetting Call 

(9t3)3n-»27. 



SUMMER HARVEST help 
and run 1188 Casle I.H 
combines and three au- 
tomatic trucks. Wanted 
experience: CDL for 
truck drivers and com- 
bine operators Payroll 
$1500/ month for ex- 
parianca Will a)so work 
with other to gat CDL. 
PraCar non-smokert. 
non-drinkers and non 
drug uteri. Call 
(913)689-4660. 

WANTED: HARVEST Kelp. 
Combine oparalort for 
four new 9600'i JO't. 
Semi drivart, mutt 
have C^ will help Ob- 
tain. Circle C Farmi. 
Call Susan at 587-8823 
or Slave at (316)672- 
3299 or 5633 



Volurrtaars 
Naadad 



INFORMATIONAL MEET- 
INGS. Beach Art Mu 
leum. Tour Guide Pro* 
gram. Mar. 1, 
9:30- 11a,m„ 6:30- 
Sp.m. Room 146 KSU 
Foundation Building. 
Call Katharine Walker, 
531-7110, 



Bualnass 
0|>pQrtMn>tlas 

Ttio Collaglan cannot 
verify tHa financial po- 
tential of advartlaa- 
manie 1« the Entploy- 
manl/Caraar ctaaalfloa- 
tlon. Raadari ara ad- 
vlaad to approach any 
auch bualnaaa oppor- 
tunity with raaaonablo 
caution. The Collegian 
urgaa our roadara to 
CHHitact tho Salter Suai- 
naaa Suraeu, 601 SE 
Jatforaon, Tapaka, KS 

e«ao7-iiao, 

lailia 32-0404. 

$1750 WEEKLY poaalble 
mailing our circulara. 
No experience re- 
quired. Begin now. For 
Infor call (202)298-8933. 



4^ 



OPEN 
MARKET 



BEGINNERS SAXOPHONE 

newly padded. Conn 
trumpet Crate amplifi- 
er. Soloflex. 286 com- 
puter, 80 M harddrive, 
Mark 539-1025 until 
1l:30pm, 

GOOD USED Zarox 645S 

Memorywriter word- 

Crocettor, will take 
est offer. Call 
(913)191-4250 weak 
dayt- 



Antlquaa 



TIME MACHINE Antique 
Maul artd Gaab Empori- 
um, 6000 square feet, 
antiques, collectibles, 
estate lewelry, lurni- 
tura. 4910 Skyway Dr 
four blocks eait of Man 
hatlan Airport. Opan 
Tuai- Sat. 12- Sp.m, 
539-4684 



Conmutara 



COMPLETE AMIGA com- 
puter system. Two disk 
drives, mouse, color 
stereo monitor, tons of 
aoftwara. Five joysticks, 
much more S190 (or 
beat offer) 395-2017 

MACINTOSH Computer. 
Complete system In- 
cluding printer only 
$599, Call Chrit at 
(S00)28»-6«85, 



Muale 
Inatfumants 



WELCOME TO THE MUSIC 
CO. In the Mtdtown Pla- 
ta, 523 S 17th Street. 
New and used instru- 
ment sales end tarvka; 
accatoorias for ttta mu> 
tlclan. 539-t9S8 



Pais and 



PERFECT DDRM room 
peta. Two adult Boa's 
about five feet One Cei 
man, about two feat 
$50, cages available. 
Call Ja7f, 776-3501. 
Leave ntetaage. 



Tlekatata 
■uy/Sall 



WANTED: MEN'S baikat- 
ball Tourney tickatt. 
Call (913)384-6944 or 

(800)387-6944. 



SOD 



TRANS- 
PORTATION 



Automobtlas 



1985 CHEVROLET Celebri- 
ty. Sedan, lour-door, 
V6, 1ieK. New battery, 

mufflaf. Excellent condi- 
tion. $1600, negotiable, 
539 3868. 

1985 HONDA Accord. Two- 
door, automatic, good 
angina, graat condition, 
good for long distance. 
S1800 nagoliabia. 
537-8225. 

1985 MUSTANG, Four cy 
Under, Four-speed, air, 
power ataering, locks, 
upholitary, 63,000 
milat. Asking $2450. Ex- 
cellent condition 
(913)456-1841. 

1986 HONDA CRX five- 
speed. Looks and rum 
great $2900 or bast off- 
er. 537 1479. 

1987 VW GTI, fiva-tpaad. 
AM/FM casiatte, runs 
strong, naw lirai and 
shocks, security tys- 
lam, sharp. Call 
537-1446, $6000 or belt 
offer 



600 



TRAVEL/ 
TRIPS 



Tour Packagaa 



You'll never 
know unless you 
try ...advertising. 

CmNMSiruTt 
OLLEGIAN 

K*diii lU Ul-UU 



yjhen you're 

ready to 

advertise, tune 

in with the 

Classifieds. 

OLLEGIAN I 

^KidzitlTb S32-6SS 



;<c«/.4ti««l«iA<i; 



6201 



Alrplana Tickats 

SPRING BREAK in Colora- 
do. One round trip tick- 
et to Dttnver, Colorado. 
Call Denny at 539-1143 
for more details. 



Not enough 
I time on your 
, hands to get 
^ everything 
done? 

Check the 

Classifieds 

setvice directory. 

CKIU4U) JtAfl 
OLUGIAN 



fin 



OUT 



OaUHSW CUSSES 



4 9 Monda]^«bnian^7^995 



KANSAS STATE COLLEGUN 



Forum focuses on budget, 
community involvement 



CONTINUED FROM PAGE 1 

Hill said presenUy there is a fee sched- 
ule, md gmups can icnl facilities. 

*t)ur facilities are for the commu- 
nity's use," she said. 

But with extra hours come extra 
maintenance and safety expenses, she 
said. 

Nuss is supponive of the idea of 
opening the schools mote. 

"We need to provide youth with 
places to go to do thing.s." she said. 

She also said open facilities might 
promote time for paient-child oppor- 
tunities and increase parent involve- 
ment in schools. 

She said some groups that have 
asked for the use of buildings have 
thou^t the current fee schedule pro- 
hibited them from taking advantage of 
building facilitiKi. 

Wells said if opening buildings 
can keep kids out of detention and 
off the street, she favors the plan 
over building an expensive city 
youth center. 

'It can work — it is not that hard." 
she said. 

Nichols said she is in favor of get- 
ting the community involved with 
schools. However, she said, it is hard 



to begin innovative programs when 
facing budget restraints. 

Diveisity and budgets were issues 
discussed at the Amanda Arnold 
fonun. 

Pearson said he hopes to use his 
experience as an accountant to ease 
the budget crunch. 

He said he platis to sift through the 
budget and look for more ways to 
save money. 

"I'm not convinced there isn't 
something moie to be found," Pcatrmn 
said. 

Nichols said the decisions the 
board makes concerning the budget 
will not only affect the students but 
could endanger staff morale as well. 

Morgan said teacher raises are an 
area the district needs to find mote 
money for. but he said that no matter 
what, the focus of the board should be 
toward giving children the best educa- 
tion possible. 

Hampton favon user fees, which 
would charge studoits a small amount 
to participate in activities such as 
band, an and mhletics to offset costs. 

She suggested scholarships could 
be established for students who would 
not be able to participate in such 



activities because of a fee. 

Garretson is in favor of a local 
option lax to offset budget slrein. 

A local option tax is the ability for 
the district to raise the mill levy on 
property taxes. 

He said the increase per household 
could equal only $42 a year, an 
expense, he said, equivalent to one 
evening at Lc Palme, a local French 
restaurant. 

On diversity, Nuss said acceptance 
of all people should be encouraged. 
She said similarities of different cul- 
tures should be pointed out and appre- 
ciated. 

She said we need to get past the 
differcfKes that only create a lack of 
sensitivity. 

Weaver said the No. I thing that 
should be taught about diversity is 
that divei^ity is fun. 

He said we must be accepting of 
living and working with people differ- 
ent than ourselves. 

"This is the world our kids are 
going to be functioning in." he said. 

Hill pointed out how diversity will 
continue to become part of everyone's 
lives as people become even more 
technologically advanced. 



Candidates look at schools' future 



CONTINUED FROM PAGE 1 

The main ideas, Garretson said, 
behind Outcomes Based Education 
and the state's Quality Performance 
Accreditation procedures are ways 
for schools and students to prepare 
for the 21st century, 

OBE is an educational practice 
designed to promote mastery of basic 
skills and for students to achieve cer- 
tain academic outcomes. 

QPA is a state -mandated program 
created to accredit districts by stu- 
dent performance on assessment tests 
instead of through more quantitative 
measurements of the district's worth, 
tike the number of books in the 
library. 

He said the district needs c«npet- 
itivc standards. 

"Students are not just competing 
in Manhattan. They are competing 
globally," he said. 

Garretson said he doesn't think 
anyone would object to the ideas 
behind the OBEi/QPA issues if they 
understood them, but said a few 
glitches may need to be worked out, 
like testing procedures and standards 
that are too high. 

He said he believes state stan- 
dards for basic skill scores should be 
at a level at least half of all students 
can reach. 

Garretson is turning away all 
campaign contributions for ethical 
reasons. He said he believes a board 
member needs to be free to make 
independent judgmcnls. 



MCNULPiARSON 

Michael Pearson, parent, K-State 
graduate and owner of a private busi- 
ness, isn't upset about anything the 
board has done. 

He said he is just concerned about 
the future. 

Pearson said he believes the need 
for OBE links 
back to stu- 
dents not being 
trainnJ to face 
their futures. 
He said he does 
not have prob- 
lems with the 
concept. 

"If students 
meet the out- 
comes the 
schools want," 
he said, "then 
they should be 
able to succeed in the work force." 

He said he would tike to see if the 
public's concerns about OBE are 
legitimate or just communication 
problems. 

Budgets are also a concern of 
Pearson. He said the district needs to 
make sure it gets the best value pos- 
sible for its dollar and is funding pro- 
grmms that need to be funded. 

For the most part, he said he feels 
the district is on the right track. 

"Overall, the district is doing a 
pretty good job educating students," 
Pearson said. "1 just want to continue 
that." 





Wens 



Pearson 



UMBEflLVWEIS 

Kimberly Wells, juvenile intake 
officer for Riley County, works in 
the same office that houses the alter- 
native school. 

The alterna- 
tive school 
educates up to 
10 expelled 
childiVn from 
the middle or 
high schools, 
teaching them 
also about 
issues includ- 
ing how to han- 
dle anger. 
Wells said. 

Wells said 
she believes the alternative school 
needs to be expanded. Right now. 
she said, it has t>ecoirte man or less a 
dumping ground. 

She said she also believes preg- 
nant teenagers should be taken out of 
the high school during their pregnan- 
cies and incorporated into the alter- 
native school for safety. 

"Teen mothers shouldn't be 
there," she said. 

She said too many teenagers 
today have to worry just about sur- 
viving. With no reganl for authority, 
she said, many tvm to guns, bats and 
knives. 

On the topic of QPA, Wells said 
students should be accountable for 
what they leam and what the teacher 
is teaching. 



Economic diversity needed, candidate says 



CONTINUED FROM PAGE 1 

Manhattan State," Crowder said. 
"Return K-State back to what it 
was. Leave the tax money out of it. 
The town is just money-hungry," 

•WCISKAO 

As a member of the Urban Area 
Planning 
Board, Bmce 
Sncad said 
tw has had an 
inside view to 
what being a 
city commis- 
sioner 
involves. 

"In over 
three years as 
a member and 
past chair of 
the Urban Area 




Smad 



Planning Board, I have attempted to 
balance the potential enhancements 
from development and growth with 
the maintenance of community and 
neighborhood quality, ' he said. 

Snead said two main issues of 
economic development and sales 
taxes will come out in the cam- 
paign. 

"Forging our economic develop- 
ment path with the sales-tax 
resource, we have committed a key 
challenge that will tap all the cre- 
ativity we can muster." he said. 

The community will have to take 
part in Manhattan's economic 
development, he said. 

"We're a regional community, 
and cooperation will also be some- 
thing 1 want to talk about. Manhat- 
tan must diversify economically if 
it is to be stable and sustainable. 



Economic development efforts 
should reflect this, building a wider 
base of activity through investing in 
people and projects, which open or 
broaden the assets we have." 

One of the assets Manhattan 
does have is Fort Riley, he said. 

"Reductions at Fort Riley will 
have an impact because it has the 
features thai it has," Snead said. 
"It's a big part of the community." 

TtMOTHYSCHRAQ 

Although his name will appear 
on the ballot. Timothy Schrag said 
he is not participating in the race 
for city commission. 

Schrag applied to be on the bal- 
lot and later found he could not 
withdraw his name. He has 
declined to comment on why he 
does not wish to run in the election. 



CCaORTYME) 



WHATS RICHT FOR YOU. 

50% OFF 

1st Months Rent 

w/coupon 

Starling @$7.99 

per^Wjjek 

We Have: 
19" TV's 
Dinettes 
Microwaves 
VCR's 
Shelf Stereos 
Dorm Refrigerators 

1235 Washington. 

Junction City 

762-7602 




GET 
THE 



HHSK^ 




SECOND SET OF PRINTS EVERY TUESDAYf 



Receive a second set of 3" piints FREE with any 
exposure roll ot 35mm, disc, 1 10 or 126 cotor prirl 
film left tor devetoping and printing at our everyday 
prices! C-41 process only. Excludes larger 4' size 
prints, photo galaxy or kodalux finishes. 



. Kodak . 
Cchrwatch 

\^systcm/ 



Dally 9 a.m. to 9 p.m., Sunday 1 1 a.m. to 6 p.m. 
3007 Anderson Ave.. Village Piaza Shopping Center 



► TAXIS 



Taxpayers give to local wildlife 



WAM AMMIWOII 



Money donated througb the 
Kuiii State income tix forms to 
Kantaa WltdUfe lod Parks is turn- 
ing up locally. 

Each year for the last 14 yean, 
Kansas State income tax forms 
have included the Chickadee 
Checkoff box. If one checks this 
box, money will go to wildlife- 
related projects in Kansas. 

Mari^ Shoup, news release edi- 
tor for the progrvn, said, "Both 
contributions and contributors 
peaked in 1987, when more than 
250,000 taxpayers donated 
1209,000 to the program." 

Last year, contributions totaled 
$I4S,000. Shoup said 

Kea B run son. Chickadee 
Q>eckofT coordinator, said desig- 
nated amounts are taken cither 
from tax refunds or added to tlie 
amount of taxes owed. 

The box as well as a bird 
appear on line 12 on Ibis year's tax 
fomi. 

Brunson said some money 



donated makes it back to the 
Manhattan ttea. Bniwon said the 
CUckadee Checkoff hat funded 
two local pR:^ects in Manhattan, 

They are the Veterinary 
Medicine's Project Release pro- 
gram and an Outdoor Wildlife 
Learning Site at Roosevelt School. 

In September. Joe Gelroth and 
Roger Gibson, teachers at 
Roosevelt, began working on a 
design plan for a learning site. 

Gelrotb said they had to submit 
the plan to be considered for a 
grant from Kansas Wildlife and 
Parks. In October 1994, Roosevelt 
received a S2.000 grant, which is 
the maximum grant givee for a 
learning site. 

No school-district money was 
used for the project Without the 
money from the Chickadee 
Checkoff, there would be tM pn- 
ject, Gelroth sakL 

Thete is nowhere to go to get 
money for stuff tike thai," he said. 

Although fiinds are not easily 
accessible, die project has an edu- 
Ipiffpoae. 



*The site is trying lo get kidis 
involved with nature," he said. 
"Lots of kids don't have that 
opportunity. We hope it createi 
pride at the schocrf." 

Gelroth saiB^ Roosevelt Is the 
first school in Manhaltan to 
receive a grant for a tcamiag tHe. 

K-Sute*s Veterinary MedJeise 
uses its grant money to care for 
birds primarily from the 
Manhattan area. 

Brunson said Project Release 
received a grant for a flight agfi. 

Kara Barrett, junior in veteri- 
nary medicine and Project Release 
volunteer, said the outdoor cage 
allows the birib an area in which 
they can exercise. She said smaller 
cages don't allow enough room 
for birds to fly around in. 

The cage is abool 60 fbet b>Bg, 
20 feet wide, 20 feet tall ad made 
of soft netting. 

"We're able to sec if an animal 
can be released," Barrett taid. It 
birds have a big area to Qy anjuail 
in, they can rehabilitate them- 
selves." 



Bullriders describe riding 
as electric, cliaiienging event 



CONTINUED FROM PAGE I 

Jeff Gibson, junior in animal sci- 
ence, has been riding bulls for five 
years. 

He said it started out as some- 
thing he just wanted to do. 

After he tried it, he fell in love 
with it, he said, 

"A lot of people think bullrid- 
ers are just wild and crazy people. 
But it's more than that. It's the 
bullridcr and bull becoming one. I 
have to out-think and out-maneu- 
ver him to stay on and win," 
Gibson said. 

Gibson said it's not money or 
fame that makes him want to con- 
tinue riding. 

He said it is the pride he gets 
from doing something that is a 
challenge. 

"If it was for the money, I 
wouldn't still be doing it," he said. 

Gibson said he hopes to take at 
least a year off from school to ride 
the circuit because school and work 
are holding him back right now. 

"I want to dedicate the time to 
see how good I can actually 
become. It's kind of heartbreaking 
when 1 ride a weekend and then 
have to quit for a while. I can't 



think about anything but riding 
again," he said. 

Tipping back and getting nasty 
is how Jimmy White, senior in ani- 
mal science, describes bareback 
riding. 

"It's the most electric event. 
You have to be aggressive and just 
try to rip that horse's head off. If 
you weaken, you'll be off in a sec- 
ond," he said. 

White said the thing he likes 
about rodeo is that it's about friend- 
ship and comrade ry, 

"Everybody is pulling for every- 
body else. You get done riding, hop 
up, and if somebody needs a hand, 
you give it to them, " White said, 

Katzer said saddle bronc riding 
gels in your blood. 

Many people don't understand 
that it's not a spon but a way of 
life, Ik said. 

"I can't imagine not doing it 
anymore. I'll ride bucking horses 
till I'm too old. I guess," he said. 

Suderman said the crowd was 
very enthusiastic. 

"There were a lot of students. 
That will really help get the word 
out about the rodeo in the next few 
years," he said. 



Tills SPACE IS 
RESERVED 

(for you I) 



Collegian Advertising 532-6560 



i m^t\t ' mti ' m\tt><^tn\tt »»t»t»<»»tTi'<-n-t»f«f<Tti«-t«fwrcTftrrtn.-TTt-cfrTt>t» 



CALENDAR 



GIRL 




at Silverado Saloon 

Starting Feb. 15. ..Every Wednesday 

at 8:30 p.m. we will chose three-four 

^.«iinaU»ts to be ia4he-.i^A5,544IA6i!:^^ 




innets wiUjtecli' 
torn varioul»M 
p-up begins 



f all: saaiiiZ2 




A< 



shft%d pri 
Nfejchan 
tteilverado 



D 

o" 



■^1 



Sk tor Job 



i 

r 



f you have aoy .que^i^ns feel fre.e_ 
^ itPfall:.S: 

"^•V-, r Fa r r e H or Gfc^ G i 1 1 m a'lifC^'^^-^ 
So for alllUoTse that thought you had 
to wear cowboy boots and know how 

to two-step, Don't Worry... 
This isn't just for Cowgirls!!! 



531 N. Manhaltan Ave.'Aggieville 

irmmm III inl Jim wii tFiiiiiinii Miiirwwiiiiiwn It, rii Fit iFiiiiiiitii III imf 




THE BEST SWIM SUITS 

are at 

1224 MORO 
AGGIEVILLE 



Mon.-Thurs. 10 a.tn.-7 p.m. 
FrI. & Sat. lOa.m.-Sp.m. 



FEB 



12 



DON. 



2fiM 



M27 



li 



28 



M 



2£ 



MikKH 
1 



A 



1£ 



M 



M25 



ml 



IQU 



SPRING BREAK 
ONLY 21 DAYS 



lyeh Nuss for School Board 

A strong voice for education 

• Quality Education at AU Grade Levels 

• Responsible Financial Management 

• Parent & Community Involvement 

• Proven track record of success a^ft'^^^l.* 

Political adv. paid for by Nuis for School Board. Janiw Schroeder, TVeaaurer ; aydc Jones, Chairman. 




M 



\ 



Date 



00/00 



KaMM 



' '"';.r«>.t.'-»' «"•" 



state 



m A 



He^rtpsp*" 



SectioP 



^'» * '""l 6W.12 



Top** 



i% 



hi 



cms as ^'tci'i. 



n 



\^LLEGIAN 



Interning With 
The Space Center 

Ibree engineering students are 
living in Trtuwite, Fla., working 
Hitti the Locitheed Sf^cp 
OpIWons Go. at Kennedy Space 




HIGHLIGHTS 

The WMcats wof(^ out of tlvee 
gams In weekend action at tt» 
Lake Area Classic Toumamenl in 
L#CharieUa. ^ 




MOiS 



TUESDAY 

HtQH LOW 

31 14 

snow 

WEATHER — PAQEt 




UUiMlmiliMMff ^ lUNHAnAN, lUU^ 



VOUim Ml/ NUMBER IM 



Fkil ton "*•. MMvid copttt in 2S ctnli. 




What's in a 




student strives to live up to his name, gets involved 



Shannon Cox, trathmin in pr»-v«t8rlnary m«dlc4na, talks about her sxperlenc«s with people of other races Monday night in the 
basement of Goodnow Hall. Cox and attout 15 ottier people participated In a Gripe Session, an informal meeting that took place to 
discuss Issues such as discrimination, relatlonsMps and representation In e«m|Hja affair*. 

Hall residents talk about racism 



SJUUHLUIHUV 



Colleiiwi 

The first Gripe Session for 
fitudcnts living in Goodnow Hall 
was Monday night. 

"The original idea was to 
meet people that didn't know 
each other," Shannon Cox, fresh- 
man in pre- veterinary medicine, 
Miid. 

Cox said she organized the 
meeting to help minority stu- 
dents who live in Goodnow Hall 
meet each other and discuss 
some race-related incidents that 
have been bothering them. 

"Sharing with other people 
can give you different perspec- 
tive," Karen Martin, director of 
minority programs in engineer- 
ing, said. 

Martin led the discussion. A 
group of about IS black, 
Hispanic and white students 
gathered for (he meeting. 
Students were asked to talk 
about positive and negative 
experiences and perceptions 
among races. 

Mike Bell, freshman in envi- 
ronmental design, said although 
he doesn't anger easily, he does 
gel frustrated trying to cross the 
sidewalk in front of Goodnow 



bnkvlll say I donl dress like a black 
psiirar I don't act like a black per* 
son, and I controni them. I ask them 
what a black person Is supposed to 
dress and act like. 




Marloi 



Hall at night. 

"At night, I wait for a white 
person to come along, and then 1 
cross the sidewalk." Bell said. 

He said he feels safer crossing 
the sidewalk if a white person is 
croKsing at the same time 
because the cars arc less likely to 
hit a white person. 

Marlone Davis, senior in 
nuclear engineering, is a black 
student from Memphis, Tenn., 
and said he likes to be seen as an 
individual. 



"People will say 1 don't dress 
like a black person, or I don' I act 
like a black person, and 1 con- 
front them. 1 ask them what a 
black person is supposed to dress 
and act like," Davis said. 

iared May is a white student 
who recently dropped out of K- 
State. He said he realizes a lot of 
people make generalizations 
about different cultures and 
races. 

He said people often have a 
preconceived idea of what peo- 



*1>l^in i.<;rtain races are going to 
act like because of the media. 

"1 think people will watch 
MTV and all the gangsters on it, 
and a lot of people will automati- 
cally make generalizations from 
that." May said. 

Claudia Strccler, a secreury 
at the minority engineering 
office, said she agreed with the 
idea of preconceived notions. 
She said people often put a value 
on race. 

"Race is not a value," she 
said. 

Davis said he saw a big dif- 
ference in the way different 
races were treated in the South 
as compared with the Midwest. 

Davis also said he can't 
believe there are prejudices in 
today's society. 

"Docs this still exist? Does 
this really still exist?" he said. 

Martin said a lot of stereo- 
types were disclosed during the 
Gripe Session, She said the most 
important thing for students to 
understand is that it is necessary 
to confront any negative feelings 
that may arise. 

"If we could shed our skin, 
everybody would be the same," 
Martin said. 



His name stands for being 
open-handed and giving, 
well-educated and a servant 
of truth. 

lawwad Adib Abdulhaqq has 
more to live up to than most stu- 
dents. 

He said he strives to live up to 
his name. 

As Abdulhaqq, sophomore in 
political science and English and 
president of Black Student Union, 
fmished a discussion about his own 
multi-faceted history, he admitted 
he is tired after all the Black 
History Month activities. 

But he said he doesn't mind. 

"I really love being busy. It is 
part of my character." he said. 

Abdulhaqq grew up in St. Louis, 
graduating from Ritenour High 
School in the suburb of Overland. 
Mo. Then he joined the army and 
was stationed at Fort Riley. 

Then war broke out in the desert, 
and the 1 3th Bravo Company, for 
which he was an artillery specialist, 
was sent to the Middle FOast. 

It was there that Abdulhaqq said 
he found himself and his religion, 
Islam. 

Without knowing anything about 
how the faith was practiced, he 
said, one day he left his tent and 
felt drawn to put his face to the 
ground, as Moslems do to pray. 
Abdulhaqq said that to him, this 
spiritual experience felt naturaJ. 

He said the experience was a 
confirmation of self. While he had 
been around certain aspects of 
Islam his entire life, he said, his 
experiences in the desert were like 
the cork in the botdc. It scaled his 
faith. 

His time in Dcscit Storm made 
him think of his background and 
experiences as a circle The center 
of that circle is God, he said, and it 
took that type of environment for 
him to realize it. 

Upon his retum to the states, 
Abdulhaqq said he was a totally 
different person. So he decided to 
change his name. 

"I wanted a new name — of 
something I wanted to strive to be." 
he said. 

So, when his time in the military 
ended, he pledged himself to being 
a giving person, to continually edu- 
cate himself and to be a servant of 
the truth. 

He decided to stay in Manhattan 
and enrolled at K-State. 

Besides his studies and being 
president of BSU, Abdulhaqq owns 



his own investment business, Dis Is 
It, and is writing a book on his life, 
tentatively titled "From the Ghetto 
to Desert Storm," 

To be a successful person in the 
different facets of his life, 
Abdulhaqq said he patterns himself 
after three mentors: the prophet 
Mohammed, his foster father 
Ahmad Abdulrahman and Assistant 
Provost for Multicultural Affairs 
Mordcan Taylor- Archer. 

He also said he patterns himself 
after this motto: 

"Enjoin what is right and forbid 
what is wrong," 

And on top of all these motivat- 
ing factors, he said he approaches 
every situation with a single idea. 

"How will this situation get me 
closer to God?" 

A self-described get-in vol ved- 
kind-of-pcrson, he jumped right 
into BSU upon enrollment at K- 
State, serving last year as the club's 
publicist. 

Marcy Burks, freshman in psy- 
chology and prc-law and BSU's 
administrative secretary, said 
Abdulhaqq is a role model for oth- 
ers. 

"He sets a good example for 
everyone to follow," she said, "He 
takes a lot of responsibility on him- 
self he shouldn't " He always wants 
to make sure things get done and 
done right, Burks said 

As far as getting things done, 
Abdulhaqq said his proudest 
accomplishment as BSU president 
is restoring the respect and credibil- 
ity of the club on campus. 

Mordean Taylor- Arc her, assis- 
tant provost for multi cultural 
affairs, said Abdulhaqq has been a 
motivation for BSU's growth. 

"I'm impressed with his leader- 
ship as president of BSU," Taylor- 
Archer said. 

BSU has 150 members, a num- 
ber Abdulhaqq said he is proud of. 

Taylor-Archer said it is 
Abdulhaqq's leadership skills, com- 
passion and his savvy to work with 
others thai motivate other students 
lo join the club and be active. 

"He's committed to social jus- 
tice and issues to improve the quali- 
ty of life for everyone in general." 
Taylor- Archer said. 

Abdulhaqq said he is often 
looked to as a voice for the African 
American student body, but he 
doesn't mind expressing the con- 
cerns and goals of the gniup. 

"I think in any group environ- 
ment there always has to be a 
spokesman or leader." he said. "I 

■ See BSU Page 10 



^ AQRICULTURE 

K-State educators 
tour state to debate 
bill with farmers 



CoUcfiui 

Three K-Statc economists and an agronomist 
are now touring the state, discussing the big 
issues for the 1995 farm bill debate with Kansas 
farmers. 

Hans Kok. assistant professor of agronomy^ 
Art Bamaby. professor of agriculture; Michael 
Langcmcier, assistant professor of agriculture; 
and Bairy Rinchbaugh, professor of agriculture, 
ate on the road conducting statewide seminars 
organized in conjunction with Kansas' county 
extension offices, 

Barnaby said he believes there are three 
approaches likely to receive the most attention: 
continuing present policies, modifying current 
law to allow farmers more flexibility in planting, 
#nd adopting some form of revenue insurance. 

The present farm bill policy requires farmers 
to plant a certain crop on a specified amount of 
Acreage lo receive their deficiency payments 
Irom the government. 

"Right now, about half of the farmers' net 
ncome comes from deflciency payments. It's a 



■ Sec FARM Pa^ 10 




VOTING PRECINCTS 

Foflowing is a Bsl ol vobng districts in Manhanan. The polls wtll be open 
ttom 7 a,m, to 7 p.m. 



WanJI Manhattan Public Library 

1 -2 Hunters Island Communrty Center 

Woodfow Wlson School 

Bluermrt School 

Army Reserve Building 

Northview School 

Churdio* Christ 

first Presbytenan Church 

UFMHoiM 

MeadouM Hft Retirament Ham 

OertiyFMOinlir 

Northvie* 

RoosMlSduol 

EductfanCwM 

KSUFoundMonCentor 

RedbtJciEsttlasCUIwuse 

WesMe* Cotniv% Church 

CHizenseank ft Trust 

Coffin Campus Center Conf. Rm. 

Eugene FnM School 

Let School 

WlwtonUwnr 

MinhMn J««Mh Synagogu« 

Mutatt School 

Manhaflan Arw Tec^nicai C«nter 

AmwdaAmld School 

Skineytiioak fletirwneni Oxivtunity 

St. Thomas More Churdi 



Juliette & Poyntz 
1000 S.Manhattan 
31 2 N. Juliette Ave, 
714BluemontAve. 
715Grl(ithDrNe 
aOOGnftiUiOM 
2400CMinillPd. 
BOt Letwmmlh SL 
1221 Thuiston Si 
2f21Meadowlarlind. 
K-State 

300 Griffith Driw 
1401 Houston St, 
2323 Fledbud Estates 
2323 Anderson Ave, 
Redbud Estates 
SOOtFLWeyBM. 
atMSAndenonAA. 
1419 Laramie St 
t700Leflven«wrthSl 
701 Lee Si 
2101 OaDtn RoBd 
1509 Wreath Ave, 
2715 Hobbs Drive 
31361>dcensAve. 
1435 Hudson Ave. 
2025 Little Kitten Avt, 
SOD IQmbal Aw. 



TniSHA BENNWOACoHagian 



O TUwdiv r^bnamry 28, IMS 



KANSAS HATE COLLEGIAN^ 



©News briefs 



► K-STATE ALUMNUS APPOINTEE TO DEPARTMENT OF HUMAN RESOURCES 



TOPEKA (AP) - A K-Slale 
alumnus seemed to please mem- 
tiera of both pafUes during a Senate 
Commerce CommWee confimiation 
hearing McKHlay. 

Wayne Franklin, a Democrat, 
was named as Gov. Bill Graves' 
appointee to the office of secretary 
of the state Department of Human 
Resouices. 

Franldln, a tormer Southwestern 
Bell area manager for external 
affain In Manhattan, saki t)ls biggest 
priority was to streamline trie 
agency, making It more efftcient. 



The secretary of l>uman 
resources oversees the administra- 
tion ol worker compensation and 
unemployment twneMs. 

The department also supervises 
all fadarally mandated job training 
pfograms. 

Committee Chairwoman Alicia 
Salisbury, R-Topeka, said Franklin 
seemed to be a strong leader as he 
assured senators he would make 
soma cfianges in human resources. 

She said she was Impiessed by 
the fact that he wants to consolldale 
the large number ol federal training 



programs and has already talked 
with federal officials about creating a 
one-stop career shopping system 

Franklin also said he wants to 
break down the barriers between 
applying for unemptoyment and fed- 
eral training programs, Salisbury 
sakj. 

There seem to be artlflcial. if no 
real walls, between these federal 
programs,* she sakl. 

FranMJn's insistence on lollowing 
the administration laws ot compen- 
sation and unemployment benefits 
was another plus, she said. 



► 3 PEOPLE SHARE ► ARCHITECT NAMED ► U.N. TROOPS PLAN 

CASH LOnO MONEY TO STATE OFHCE TO LEAVE SOMAUA 



TOPEKA (APJ — The Kansas 
Lottery on Monday Identified an 
Overland Park couple and a 
Kansas City, Kan., man as co-wtn- 
ners ot last week's Cash Lotto 
jackpot, worth $420,508. 

Lisa and Nick Finn of Overland 
Park and Steva Harrily of Kansas 
City each claimed half the jackpot 
at a news conference at lottery 
headquarters. 

Finn Is a finarK» manager with 
Xerox Corp., and his wife works 
part-time as a water aerobics 
coordinator The couple have two 
children, age 4 and 7. They pur- 
chased their winning ticket at a 
supermarket at 11200 Antioch 
Road in Overtand Park. 



TOPEKA (AP) - Lt. Gov. 
SheHa Frahm announced Monday 

ttM selaction ot Thaine Hoffman of 
Topeka as the new state architect. 

Hoffman, a graduate ot K- 
Slate, replaces acting director 
Gary Grimes. 

As director of architectural ser- 
vices for the state, he will be 
responsible for planning the 
design and construction aclMty for 
state buildings 

Hoffman has spent 25 years 
with the Sarita Fe Railway, joinirvg 
that company In 1970 as a drafts- 
man and working his way up to 
manager of architectural services, 
in charge ot the entire Santa Fe 
system from Chicago to California. 



MOGADISHU, SomaHa (AP) — 
Rival dans t>attled each other wHh 
rttortars, machine guns and light 
arms near Mogadishu's airport 
Sunday In a possltiie preview ot 
Somalia's future after the depar- 
ture ot United Natioru forces. 

With a U.S.-led military coali- 
tion poised Just offshore, ttte fight- 
ing also offered a taste of what 
American and Italian Marines 
might lace In tfM coming days as 
they guard the withdrawal of the 
last UN. soldiers. 

About 50 US Army special 
forces sokjiers already are ashore 
to help the remaining Pakistani 
and Bangladeshi troops prepare to 
leave urxjer ttie coalHion shield 



►STATE ADVISES JUDGE TO DEUY ENACTMENT OF K-STATE TAX PLAN 



TOPEKA (AP) — Judge Terry 
Bullock of Shawnee County District 
Court took under advisement 
Monday a request by the slate to 
delay implementation of statewide 
reappraisal ol agricultural larid. 

Bullock said he would have a 
dec! skin within a rrtatter of days on 
whether to grant the Property 
Valuation Division's motion to let 
county appraisers carry over 1994 
appraisal figures on farmland to 
1995. This motion Is supported by 
the attomey general's office and the 
Kansas Livestock Association. 

Bullock's comments during a 
hearing indicated he is uncomfort- 
able with a year-long delay In cor- 



recting Inequities in how agrlcuttural 
land is valued and with the possibili- 
ty ot using a new set of proposed 
valuations on tt>e various types of ag 
land developed by K-State. 

According to the Kansas 
Constitution, agncuitural land is sup- 
posed to t>e valued lor property lax 
purposes on its ability to produce 
income II has not been reappraised 
SirK» 1992. 

Late last year, the Kansas Board 
of Tax Appeals ordered that it be 
reappraised for 1905 based on the 
values K-State farm economists 
assigned to different types of larm- 
land. 

But the Properly Valuation 



Division, wttKh has changed leader- 
ship since Gov. Bill Graves was 
elected in November, now seeks a 
one-year delay until those figures 
can be checked tor valklity. 

The issue of updating the agri- 
cultural land valuations has come to 
a head because ot the 1992 school- 
finance law That act esialiilshed a 
uniform property -tax mill levy that is 
now assessed statewide to support 
public education. 

Delaying reappraisal for another 
year only perpetuates the inequities 
rtow in the system, lawyers said 

Also, if the valuations are not 
uniform and equal statewide, 
Bullock sakl. It results in a lax shift. 




You've Shot your friends, co-workers, families and 
significant others for the Royal Purple yearbook. 

ihal are you goi 
do about it no^ 

Come to the K-State Union from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. 
Feb. 28 and look at the Shoot Yourself proofs set up 
on a table outside the Stateroom cafeteria. At this 
time, you'll be able to order copies of your proofs 
($7 for a Sx7 and $10 for an 8x10). You will also 
have the opportunity to purchase a 1995 Royal 
Purple yearbook for only $21, so grab your 
checkbook and reserve your yearbook now. 




Ufisas state university 




^ 



TU D to 
ROYAL 



<^ Police REPORTS ^Bulletin board 



MfcttreeoMliaaiHlMr 

K-STMIPOUCE 


krfle 


IM* ssMMak, «N * Ml M Miribata, 



SUNDAY, rasmJARY 29 



At 9:30 p.m.. Bob VinClcivc 
TtpQnt4 1 5r« flltrm lounding it 
1003 HuBllii Avi. The olMcer 



icporlHl dut the aJvm wH r«MI la 
ttK (xncfli l»t itiould be ctiecUd b>y 
(■cUilio. 



MONDAY. raBRUARY a? 



ANNOUNCRMIKTS ^^^^^^^1^1^^ 

AppMcatlaai tar Am awl Sd— cti Aitn—inr* m «vul(ble in Ih* 
den't otfkc. Appli^raiioni m due tf 5 p.m. Much 16. 

Hrip M tmUt*Miomti itneiat wtlll tpofcn EafUA m) Icini rtm Imd 
ibout 4lff«niM curturu. Be > vgiunieer lubr for [lie ConvetiHriHui £nglU}i 
Proftam. Canua Jim Endhui u i)k InumMtioMi Sludent Cenler, ;}1-644S 

Ktmtan Ouirira wlU S* Oittmilmt hli daclor^ d t» tT li rt «« liLI«l 
■Applicuion of Af>ifict4l NeurtI N«t*oAi md Oaot in Chemicd Piaxtitt" 
■I 1;30 p. ID loili} in Duiljnd llA 

ttMtj Wtkk wia b< ii(f*Bdlii| bcT datiaral dJwtrtMtaB ttUcd "TV 
Ktnut Eiperience: A Siue-Wide AiKtimcnt ind Kccommenditiom lot 
(jomiMMiqr-BiMi) NMriiin tmemliip*" u IOlri. lotisriniiiuin 147, 



A( 10:13 i.m.. Juilin [>entoii^ 
1%; Collete Hcifhu Rud. idviied 
ilui 1 rmk Hi>ii«i Ind pwid oM. A 
Riley County iMMteM n^Dodid, 
ind llK <ul)}ecl WW IiMlpofled to 
Meimriil Hoipilal. 

RiLEV coumr pouce 



Kt lOM Lflt.. Kimbcrty Miller'i 
vchkk wu HTUck by Ehc Buskirt't 
Ychkk in the drive be fwcc n kMi A39 
wd AMI Then wu man than S300 
In dAfni|e. Miller^i vehicle wu 
(owed by ManhaUui Wr«cli<T. 



SUNDAY. raWHIARV SS 



■ SmdHti tT SurtilMfcBtty 

will be niaetinf M ^ lonl|til in Union 
111. 

■ HALO will meei tl 6:30 
toniflH in Itie Ecumcnicil Cun^u 
Minimrie* bui1din|. 

■ Ciirlt K iBtenuOMd will 
meet u 9 toni|lH in Union KM. 

■ KSU CiapKi MtvUlrlt) 
wilt nieei a 6 tonighi In ih« Btfida 
Cemput Center At ISO I Andenon 
Avt. fof I Shfove Tuodjv pencikr 



I will meet 
U 7 tonight in BluemoM 106. 

■ AStA will meet et 3:30 
Hxilght in the Intetnuioral Student 
Center lounge. 

■ CU Alpbs CkrMlMi Ftllm- 
Mp will moel u 8 tonight in Unioii 

xa 

m Alpha ep«ll*h Dtll* will 
mca « T 30 tiwlghi in Durluvl 174. 



At 7:01 Lm. Bfian Roee; 211 S. 
Fifth St., wu Arretted tor fiilim to 
ifipeir for ■ preliminary hearing. He 
waa reteaaed on 1 1 ,000 bond 

At 1:40 p.m., Angela Bennie 
reported an attempted burglary at 
2S70 Ocmann Drive. The wintlow 



ecnena. door, door Crame and locttt 
were damaged Loai waa t400. 

At 11:13 pm., Matctu Cftoper, 
731 BhtefmM Ave., wti arttMnl tot 
failuiT to appear. He wia telcajed on 
tlOObond 



EUCTROmC COLLEGIAN 



hmgarte 



MONDAY, PKBRUARY 27 




Al 4:36 un.. dMM(e wu ttpan- F*M Lu*, 1 130 Weatknft. No entry 
ed to the Info frenl doon il Dwa't wu fwwd. Lmt wm tlJOOO. 





LETTERS TO THE EDITOR 

W« aocmpl MtefB to Iha «ik)i by i 
Mk^AM « ooll«gn4>|iauiaii,t 



Tha Karms Slate Coleglwi 
|MSPS291030),a5lU(tont 

rwmpaper al Kansas State 
Urwersily, is puUnhed by 
SludaniPiMadiansInc, 
K«dMHa«103.Manhaltafi, 
Kan., 6GS06. 'Pw CoHegtan ts 
puWisheiJ weeltdays iiuring the 
school year and once a week 
through the sunimef . Second- 



class poatage « paid at 
Manttattan, Kan., 66SQ2. 
POSTMASTER: Send 
address changes to Kansas 
Stale CoHegian, circuLatiori 
desk, Kedae 103, Manhattaji, 
Kan. 66506-7167. 



e Kvnas 9ai« CoHagtm, 1 ses 



Weather 



YESTERDAY'S HIGHS AND LOWS 




GOOOUNO 
32/ a 



CITY 



Russai 



HMtumn 

It . 



39/33 



3S/M 

wKHrn* 



TOKKA 
COfflEYWUI 




• DENVER 
62/31 



• TULSA 
57/4S 



• OMAHA 
3t/31 



• ST. LOUIS 
51/40 



State Outlook 

OccasiortaJ light snow or flurries ir> 
the north. Freezing drizzle char>ging 
to light srKnv or flurries in tfie south. 
Highs from 25 to 30. 



''^j^ Manhattan Outlook 

V35/33 TOOAY aa^i^^^^ 

Occasional flurries. 
High around 30. 
Northeast wvid from 1 
to tSmph. 

TOHORflow mmam^ 

Occasional flurries. 
High around 30. 





OUR LOSS IS YOUR GAIN! 

TEXTBOOK 
SALE 

Feb. 24 -March 12, 1995 

We have cleaned out our storerooms 
and have HUNDREDS of selected new 
and used textbooks to sell at great prices! 

$2.00 Hardbacks 
$1.00 Paperbacks 

^Various fields of study* 
sJ^Some previously used at K-State* 




n 



BOOK STORE 
IN AGGIEVILLE 

We Give You Our Best 



i> 



9 a.m. - 9 p.m. 
Mon. - Sat. 



Noon - 5 p.m. 
Sunday 



H 



I 



I 



KANSAS SMI tOl J FHUN 



'ni««l«y, r«bniary 28, 1 0flB f^ 



Finding a way to 

COMPETE 

Student overcomes 
IriJuries to play sports again 



Cullcfun 



J 



oshua Bartel stopped playing soccer 
in tlie sixth grade. It was the day he 
Vfoke up with a wrist swollen to the 
size of his hand. 



The doctors diagnosed him with juvenile 
rheumatoid arthrilis, a disease in which body joints 
become stiff and inRamed, immobile, weak and 
deformed. 

They aJso told him he had rheumatic fever, which 
causes joint inflammation and sometimes permanent 
damage to the hean valves. 

Doctors told him that any physical activity 
would be dangerous for his heart. They told him he 
would have to live a life devoid of all physical 
activity 

"They took me out of school and told me, 'You're 
not going to be right anymore," Bartel said. 

He lay in bed for nine weeks before a doctor told 
him the rheumatic fever diagnosis hadn't been right. 

The arthritis remained a reality, however, being 
active in Bartcl's body from ages 12 to 14. 

Through special training programs and a lot of 
hard work, he had gained most of his mobility back 
by the day before his 15th birthday. Then came the 
wreck. 

"I was with a church group with a friend of mine," 
Bartel said. "We were going to Worlds of Fun to see 
a band or something." 

A semi truck was also traveling Interstate 70, but 
it was moving at 55 mph which was slower than the 
van carrying the 10 church youths. 

The van driver glanced away from the road for a 
second. It was one second too late 

"He didn't even hit (he brakes." Banel said. "He 
hit the back of the truck going 70 miles per hour." 

Six of the children were killed, Bartel said he 
remembers parts of the accident. 

"I remember 1 woke up in the van, and t noticed 
my leg had a new knee," he said, "tt was bent and 
twisted in a new position. 

"The only thing I fell was my lip. It was hurting." 
He had broken every limb in his body. His leg was 
broken in four places. Thiny-pound weights were 
strung through his elbow to set his arm in place. 
Ropes, pulleys, lubes and siic needles were holding 
him together. 




Joshua Barteii graduate student In mechanical engineering, has ptayed table tennis for four years, 
Bartel has overcome juvenile rheumatoid arthritis and severe injuries sustained In a car accident to 
twcome one ol K-State's Table Tennis Club's twat players. Bartel made the Association of College 
Unions International team, which will compete at Georgia State University In April. 



"I was in one position for iwfrmonths," Bartel 
said. 'That's where ( lost (tiy mobility — laying in 
that hospital bed " ■"' 

When his parents came to visit him in the inten- 
sive-care unit, they thought they had entered the 
wrong room. 

"It was me," Bartel said. "My parents didn't rec- 
ognize me." 

Taking up soccer again was hardly an option for 
Bartel — he couldn't move the joints in his mouth 
even far enough to eat a Big Mac. 

"They'd have special-sauce-lettuce-cheese every- 
where," he said with a laugh 

He was in a wheelchair for his sophomore year at 
Augusta High School. Six months later, he was 
walking on cnitches, and by his junior year, he was 
walking without them, although with a significant 



loss of motion 

He graduated from high school in 1990 and began 
classes at fC -State. During his freshman year. Bartel 
realized he missed the competition of sports. 

He wanted something that would be fun and com- 
petitive, something he could play. 

He tried golf, but bccau.se his hips don't move at 
all, it was difficult. Bartel saw a notice in the 
Collegian for the KSU Table Tennis Club and joined 
the following week. 

"Probably the hardest thing was to start calling 
this thing 'table tennis,'" he said. 

Now, the hollow sounds of pla.stic balls bouncing 
off a wooden table, the tiled floor or even the ceiling 
of the tiny Ecumenical Campus Ministries building 

■ See PU^YER Page 8 



► CAREERS 



Students realize 
dreams, work 
on space shuttle 



eANV COPIOVM 



Colkgian 

For three engineering students, dreams of 
working with the space shuttle are becoming 
reality. 

Nicholas Holman. Brian Wika and Scott 
Woerpel. all seniors in electrical engineering, 
are living in Tiiusville, Fla.. working with the 
Lockheed Space Operations Co. at Kennedy 
Space Center. 

Their experiences have been made possible 
through the Cooperative Education Program, a 
program that pairs students and companies based 
on the students' major fields of study and allows 
them to take paid internships with the compa- 
nies, 

"The Jobs they have must be related to the 
student's career objective or major field of 
study," Toni Herzog, coordinator of the 
Cooperative Education Program, said. 

Herzog said there is a difference between 
internships and work done through a co-op 
agreement. In a co-op, there is a learning objec- 
tive agreement, in which after two weeks, stu- 
dents mail in an interim report to Career and 
Employment Services in Holtz Hall. The report 
describes the job in terms of criteria such as 
work environment, employer expectations and 
employee attitudes. 

Herzog said even if a student wasn't com- 
pletely happy where he or she was working, at 
least the student had the foresight to know if it 
were something that would be a good lifetime 
career choice or not. 

All three students said they are happy with 
Lockheed. 

"I've always thought that working for the 
space program would be the ultimate engineer- 
ing job. I had an internship with General Motors 
that I turned down. It was a tough call. I lost 
some sleep over that one," Wika said. 

By paying a S7 registration fee at Career and 
Employment Services, students like Holman, 
Wika and Woerpel had their names put on a disk 
that, at Lockheed's request, was accessed to 
obtain a list of names of students meeting GPA 
requirements, status and major. 

Then it was up to Lockheed to pick and 
choose prospective students, 

"I knew absolutely nothing about these peo- 
ple wanting me until after I received the letter 
asking me if 1 wanted to interview with them," 
Woerpel said. 

Holman, Woerpel and Wika were three of 
four K -State students flown to Florida to inter- 
view with Lockheed before Thanksgiving break 
last semester. They all started working at the 



I See STUDENTS Page 8 




DVERTISE 

in the 

LoMnN 




imRODUCIIW: 



1»80ll*tCOUNaL 

1*800*tt6«86S4 




The Lowest Student Fares 



j% NEEDED 

PEER AIDS EDUCATORS 
FOR FALL SEMESTER 

STUDENTS INTERESTED IN JOINING 

A TEAM OF STUDENTS TO TEACH OTHERS 

ABOUT AIDS 

REQUIREMENTS: 

SELF MOTIVATING, CREATIVE, 
ABLE TO TALK TO GROUPS 

ARE YOU INTERESTED ? 

CONTAa HEALTH EDUCATION AND PROMOTION 

AT LAFENE HEALTH CENTER 
APPLICATIONS ARE AVAILABLE NOW 

532-6595 




I 



, -, 

HOW TO GET STUFF CHEAPER. 

( WITHOUT POSING AS A SENIOR CITIZEN. ) 



#1 HABIT CONTROL PROGRAM IN THE U.S. 



STOP SMOKING 

IN TWO HOURSI 

* NO WTHDHAWAL * NO WIIGHT • NO WEfGHT GAIN 
Walk Out A Nort'Smoker 



HYPNOSIS 



aifferdWebb,PH.D.,CHt. 

You rfoftt poy a pwmy until yeti an 

obielulaly CMtotn you con bo ttvpnofixod 

and our program can work for you 

Only »29" awa^ Ps" 

* _ ^^o, $tvo«nt 
BOTH SEMINARS »4y'* '^"* 

VISA • MASTtiOUU) • CHfOC • CASH L^ '"'' 




Approvvd by ih* Amtrktin MadJcdl 
AiaoekitloA *»"« 1972, HfptiotU U Q 
w*ry iO^ & tfftcHv* nvlhod ol 
dfO'mo'^flly ctwngJng oHllud*! A 
Kobiit }t U D rvioiMlnp and pUoMrrobUi 
•Kfrtritncv You oim not Qv\m*p, \mt 
awoL« & lul^^ owort ol ywr 

lA^.rxof W^hd REFRESHED. RfUXEP 
1 MOTIVATED 



PrfifKffd by 
Ncitional Hypno&ib Seminars 



Down Wvov 

IMrtitarH Nnonat Wcchi biiriMi I 



WRIHEN GUARANTEE 



guoraflf**. if yo*t cw ach^ Mp wUh 
yokX prdblafn, ytM con DHw nd a Wpbb 
rainfofCHTWit Hfninor ot NO 
CKARGC And fwA'i morm . . . dirflAp 
1^ hnt hottf fli Aoch h#4fii]Agr, Or, 



ATTEND ONE 3-HOUR SEMINAR WEDNESDAY, MARCH 1 
HOUDAY INN (CONFERENCE RM. 5) 530 RICHARDS DR., MANHATTAN 
Weight Cpntrol; 6 p.m. Stop Smoking; 8i30 p.in. 

LOSE V\^EIGHTB 

• BHarflBsmly • Easily ^Mfhauf Dieting 



FOR ANrOIME WHO NEEDS HELP WITH . . . 
• Will Power • tniotional Eoting • EKercising • Food 






Check expiration dates. 

If It's going bad tomorrow, it's 
probably on sale today. 

Look for product flaws. 

A scratch or a nnissing button nneans 
bargain savings at the register 

Go generic. 

Same as name brands, without the 
cartoon mascots. 

Buy in bulk with friends. 

Connect the leftover boxes to make 
a human Habitrail* 

Use a Citibank Classic card. 

If you find out you didn't pay the lowest 
price. Citibank Price Protection can pay 
you back up to $ 1 50.' 

*NjtLirdM<r. conditions and exclusions ippty LMm all 
about it when ^u become d tardmember. 





PINION 



MiM • 1 « < i a > > > > < • n. 



-iM,.,ifc^V*^r eHPuiBWOII ..,,... SeraLlteik »1UMlMn 

SmwiAikkna* UWftAnMt IBtTOfc . . Amy Zkiia 

.CriuiuJinKy IPMTIIDmM . PtiUl Spftn tttlt UMMI . . < 

. RDtuKJddiwfcr UtfMKI IMTM ..... Trulu Beuiiait TUMtOTt MM . 

I Mat UffluweU GOfT mm . Dave 01km IV 

CfariilrLink emttO*. IWTOII Mike MuIcK u 

.SttcbAfeNipi AWt IMmt menu . . . . . Jtreaty Cnton 

!T<M < Mfte Boadi 



|i|**f»tl 



■ ttt4*4t*J 



tt^deU Unte 
fiBDuBois 
. Aaron Qfihim 
NatniyoKemi 
. Ron Johiuoo 
Ctorii FmliBd 



NMLLMIUIWTMI 






Tww<mrn.ww 



In Our Opinion 



fy Ou CotUgian Editorial Board 

BWBBteTtfci'^'i"'.— .Mi 



Students need answers about garage 



TIms* forum* 
provide an out- 
lot to loam 
mora aboirt ttio 
propoaod i>arli- 
Ing garaoo and 
to voico an 
opinion. 



Good or bad, the proposed $12 nulliwi 
parking garage in Memorial Stadium will 
have two main repercussioits. 

First, the paridng garage will dramati- 
cally alter the appearance of Memorial 
Stadium. 

Second, the money to build the parking 
garage has to come from somewhere. 
More than likely, it could come directly 
from students' pocketbooks. 

It's important that each student become 
educated about the issue before it's too 
late to voice an opinion. 

Fortunately, there are two student 
forums planned for next week. 

The first is scheduled at noon March 8 
in the K-State Union courtyard. The sec- 



ond is scheduled at 5 p.m. March 9 at 
Lucky BrewGrille. 

In addition, students can also attend the 
next Parking Council meeting at 3 p.m. 
March 16 in Union 205. 

While there, students should ask the 
following unanswered questions: 

Exactly how will the parking garage be 
funded? How much will the price of a 
parking permit increase? Why exactly is 
the price for metered parking tripling? 

Often times, it is easy to criticize a 
decision after it is too late to make a dif< 
ference. These forums provide an outlet to 
learn more about the proposed parking 
garage and to voice an opinion. 

Act now while there's still time. 




I 



Maybe we could start ty making English tKe 
official language for people wha speak EnglisK. 









VMTMftSm 
QWtSTrON? 



i 




Mansur- 
SMrm 



When men suffer like women do, they'll get a month of their own 



I was talking with a 
group of women about 
International Women's 
IVfonth, which begins 
March 1. 

During the last few years, 
Women's Studies have come to have a 
great deal of meaning for me. and I 
had looked forward to writing a col- 
umn about it for some time. 

I came across a great many star- 
tling statistics in preparation for writ- 
ing, when I chanced Co overhear a 
remark made by one of my colleagues 

"When," he grumbled a little angri- 
ly, "are men going to get a month?" 

I'll admit when I heard this I 
became furious. It seemed to me a flip 
and immature response from a mem- 
ber of the dominate gender in our 
society, denigrating the small amount 
of respect paid to members of a gen- 
der considered, for far too many cen- 
turies, as subordinate. 

But after a while, 1 began to think 
about what he had said and thought 
perhaps he was right Maybe there 
should be a month dedicated to the 



Wh«n ■«• Is no 
longttr tHamad 
for giving tfio 
apple and Adam 
Is for taking It, 
than thare will 
b« an 

iittamational 
Man*i Month. 



celebration 
of man- 
hood. 
Perhaps 
there 

should be a 
whole 3 1 
days con- 
secrated to 
looking at 
male politi- 
cal, reli 
gious and 
spiritual 



leaders, 
great men in history and male contri- 
butions to the aits. 

And I'll tell you when that will 
happen. 

When Eve is no longer blamed for 
giving over the apple and Adam is for 
taking it, then there will be an 
Intcmational Men's Month. 

When the reproductive rights of 
men are whittled away, pushed by a 
radical few and sanctioned by a 
female-dominated Congress and 
Supreme Court, we will have a month 
for men. 

When men are placed unfairly in 
"Daddy tracks," and legal sanctions 



are being seriously considered against 
teen-age boys exclusively for father- 
ing a child out of wedlock, then we 
will have an International Men's 
month. 

When 90 million boys are denied 
primary education around the world 
and 640 million men arc illiterate, 
then we will have an International 
Men's Month. 

When math and science are 
deemed "un masculine," and little boys 
are unconsciously belittled and pushed 
away from those areas, then we 
should have an International Men's 
Month. 

When men's genitals are mutilated 
to protect their virginity, when they 
are stoned to death for committing 
adultery, and when boy babies are 
strangled, smothered, or aborted sim- 
ply by virtue of their sex, we should 
have an Intcmational Men's Month. 

When children in grade school 
refer to John Adams as Abigail 
Adams' husband and ask in their his- 
tory classes "what were the men 
doing?", then we will have an 
International Men's Month. 

When the president, the Joini 
Chiefs of Staff, and the Pope menstru- 



ate, and we refer to God with a femi- 
nine pronoun regularly, we will have 
International Men's Month. 

When one in 1 1 men die every day 
as a result of domestic abuse, and we 
refer to 25-year-old males as "boys" 
and 25-ycar-oId females as "women" 
almost exclusively, I'll introduce the 
bill myself. 

When a man sleeping with 10 
women in one night is considered a 
stui and not a stud, you-know-what 
will happen. 

Let's be perfectly clear about the 
flip side as well. 

When men pay lower insurance 
rates, and have "Men's Night" where 
they don't have to pay cover at the 
local bar: International Men's Month. 

When a man has the right to let 
every emotion show without being 
deenied a weeping wuss. there will be 
an International Men's Month. 

When men can take paternity leave 
for more than six weeks if they wish 
it, and are allowed to use "hormonal 
imbalances" as an excuse for bad 
behavior, we'll have International 
Men's Month. 

When "man bashing" becomes as 
unacceptable, uncouth and incorrect 



Whon a man 



tan wfomen In 
ona night Is 
considered a 
slut and not a 
stud, you-know- 
what will 
happen. 



as making 

sexist 

remarics 

about 

women, then 

there will be 

an 

Intcmational 

Men's 

Month. 

When 
aggression 
just becomes 
stupid and 
not mascu- 
line, and being pro-woman doesn't 
insinuate being anti-man, then then 
will be a Men's Month. 

In other words, when men are ven- 
erated, loathed, feared, loved and 
abused, as rnuch, as badly and as often 
as women, then there will be an entire 
month strictly dedicated to their con- 
tributions in our society. 

1 hope to God, for their sakes, the 
pendulum never swings that far in the 
opposite direction. 

Erin Maiistir>Sinilh Is a senior Id 
prelaw, English and theater. 



Readers Write 



^ PARKINO 



Drop l«n«ra o(T it KMlzta 116 or Mnd ttivm to L»tt*ra to lh« EdKor, c/o Chrtaty Llttl«, KanMS 
State Co)l«glan, K*dzl« t IS, Mantiattan, KS 66S0e. W* accept imttmn t>y •snail alao. Our 
■ddraat la l«tt«raOipub.kau.«du. Lattara should b« addraaaMl to th« •ditor and Includa a 
nam*, addrwu and pttotf numtiar. A photo Identification will ba nacaaaary tor hand-dall¥> 
arad lattara. 



► WOmLITV 

Right and wrong dearly deflned 

Dear editor. 

After reading Kevyn Jacobs' column in 
the Feb. 20, 1995, issue, we were com- 
pelled and inspired to respond in some 
manner. We decided that the public forum 
that you and your staff provide would be 
one of the best opportunities to have our 
voices heard. 

In today's society, it is becoming 
increasingly clear dial we need to re-evalu- 
ate where the lines are being drawn 
between right and wrong. Mr. Jacobs 
demonstrates our concern about the rise of 
relativcncss in our community. Moral 
decisions cannot be made with the idea 
that somehow that decision will land in a 
gray area. 

We can no longer make decisions, form 
ideas and even tnake laws hoping not to 
step on anybody's toes. There has to be a 
dcrmite, an absolute, that we, as a society, 
can turn to rely on. Jacobs fails to offer us 
that absolute. We can no longer accept this 
philosophy. 

The goal of this letter is to offer that 
absolute. Right and wrong should be as 
clear as black and white. If we look to the 
right alternative, then this black and white 
picture of right and wrong will become 
clear. The Bible. God's revelation to man. 
is that alternative. Actually, it is the only 
alternative. The Bible reveals what love 
tmly is. It becomes apparent that love can- 
not be an emotionally charged reaction. 
Love is much more than a "giddy, heart- 
thumping feeling." Love is an intellectual 
acceptance and commitment to an individ- 
ual. 

Love, as Mr. Jacobs describes it. is 
nothing more than a misplaced and mis- 
handled tug of the bean strings. God is 
natural law. 

Homosexuality falls well outside of 



"Right and 
wrrong Is a 
black and white 



homosexuality 
falls outside of 
what we, aa a 
soclatM can or 
should accept 
aa an accept- 
able lifestyle." 

LAKaCOFFMAN, 

Chius Reed 

K-Stste. Manlwttan 
ChfMianColl«0e 



what is natural 
and good. 
Homosexual 
feelings might 
not be a sin; 
that decision is 
better left to 
God. However, 
acting on those 
feelings is 
wrong. 
Certainly, we 
arc not respon- 
sible for our 
feelings, but we 
are responsible 
for our actions. 
When we real- 
ize our own 
weaknesses and 
we turn to God, 
then we can 
overcome every filing, every thought that 
we have, even the thoughts and feelings 
that Mr. Jacobs describes as his "homosex- 
ual orientation." 

Right and wrong is a black and white 
issue, and homosexuality falls outside of 
what we, as a society, can or should accept 
as an acceptable lifestyle. 

The downfall of every great civilization 
from the Greeks to the Romans to Nazi 
Germany to the Soviet Union has been the 
acceptance of deviating from God's 
absolute truth. 

The only way for the United States to 
avoid an identical downfall is to turn back 
to God and the Truths that He has revealed 
to us. 

Lance Cofftaian 
n^shman in sccondiry 
educatton/ChristUn education 
K-State, Manhattan Christian College 

Chris Reed 
pastoral mlnlstrfa 
Manhattan Christian College 



Forget about garage idea 

Dear editor, 

I have reviewed the ideas of building a 
parking garage in Memorial Stadium. I 
feel a need to reflect on the origin of the 
memorial. 

In June 1918, K-State was still under a 
different name and was a young college. 
The world at war was a new concept our 
nation had not yet experienced. Students 
still answered the call of protecting free- 
dom abroad. On June 6, 1918, the United 
States engaged in an effort to force 
entrenched Germans out of place called 
Belleau Wood, a place of only one square 
mile. U.S. Marines fought through matted 
undertHUsh, rocky terrain and had to attack 
repeatedly. A great amount of the Tighting 
was hand-to-hand, with fixed bayonets. 
After the fighting was over, 7,800 
Americans lie dead, woimded and missing. 
It was one of the most savage battles the 
Marine Corps has fought, for one square 
mile. This raw combat was typical of the 
ground offensive during World War I. 

Where did such men come from? The 
bravery and valor that was expressed, 
where did it come from? Their ideals and 
value of freedom must have been their 
highest ^ority. Men who left their fami- 
lies and farms went on to engage in a war 
with an outcome that could not be predict- 
ed. Some of these even left their pursuit of 
education behind. 

I feel that it is an honor to attend a 
school that would dedicate a memorial to 
men with such courage. My family has had 
a participant in every war the United 
States fought, ftom Worid War I to Dcsen 
Storm. I have been taught great respect for 
memorials to those who have made the 
sacrifice. Degrading a nvcmorial would be 
a slap in the face on the people to whom it 
is dedicated. Those men were from a coun- 
try that places a high value on educatitHi. 
Students who fought in World War I 
probably received dieir primary education 
in a one-room schoolhouse. We must not 
fOfgCt the sacrifice they made. A memorial 
of their commitment to freedom placed at 
their university is all fitting and proper. 

The Memorial Stadium is still in great 
use. 1 personally enjoy running there in the 



evening. Classes meet there, which I have 
attended. The stadium is a beautiful place 
that adds to the aesthetic value of K-State. 
We must not stand for any type of degrad- 
ing construction that would hinder its use. 
I am aware of a parking problem at K- 
State. There are better solutions than the 
gross remodeling of Memorial Stadiiim. 
The sacrifice those veterans made does not 
equal that of waiting for a pt«:e to parit. 

Russell McCabria 

park resource nuinageinent 

► PARKINQ 

No one will buy garage permits 

Dear editor. 

Among the argumenU being presented 
against building a multi-level garage to 
solve the parking problem at K-Stale, a big 
reason is being overlooked: price resis- 
tance. 

In making the proposal, the Parking 
Task Force apparently thinks that employ- 
ees and students will buy parking permits 
at any price the University cares to set. 

Here's what is going to happen if the 
University builds this garage: everyone 
who lives within a half mile to a mile of 
campus will begin walking or riding a 
bike. They will Hnd all kinds of things to 
do with the additional $ 165 or SI IS a year. 

Even those cooperative souls who use 
this parking garage will give up soon after 
spending untold minutes per day jiist wait- 
ing to get out onto one of the local streets. 
If you think traffic is busy at the two inter- 
sections of 17th Street and Anderson 
Avenue and Denison and Anderson 
avenues now, put a 1, 200- stall parking 
gan^e in Memorial Stadium and turn all 
those cars loose at 5 p.m. 

When people who can walk to campus 
stop buying parking permiu, the cost of 
permits will rise again. Someone has to 
pay off those bonds. When that happens, 
even those who have to drive to campus 
will stop buying permits and start parking 
on streets in the surrounding neighbor- 
hoods. 

The University has no moral right to 
take employees and students who must 
drive to campus with additional parking 
costs until it takes all d>e no-cost measures 



it can to nuximize use of current parking 
spaces. 

This would mean denying the sale of 
parking permits who live within a half 
mile of central campus and eliminating the 
elitist practice of selling reserved stalls. 
Filling the reserved stall that sits empty 
almost every day would help the present 
parking situation considerably. (Or move 
reserved stalls farther out in the lots so that 
when they sit empty they don't deprive 
others access to valuable space.) The 
University has to decide if its goal is to 
provide parking or to generate income by 
catering to the laziest of die lazy. 

Michael J. Dorcey 

Editor, Engineering Extension 

► TOtiRAHCi 

People should mind own business 

Dear editor. 

At the risk of being labeled a "totoler- 
ant" person, 1 don't understand how in one 
sentence John Hart in the Thursday Feb. 
23 Collegian can say that he "find[s): 
homosexuality immoral," and in the sainc 
sentence say "but [1] treat gay pe<^lc with . 
the same, if not more, respect than the- 
average person." 

Why, Mr. Hart? Why bother to convey; 
your respects if you find their lifestyle; 
choice so immoral? You know what? 1] 
doubt they want your respect. \ 

Why should something as deeply per-| 
sonal as sexual preference make any dif-! 
ference in what you think? Why is it any' 
of your business, anyway? 

It's ironic that you preach tolerance andj 
say in die same article that homosexuality; 
is imnuwal. I understand that it is just your* 
opinion, but if you find it so repugnant,; 
tlun why even bother to pretend tolerance?: 

It must be difficult for people like John : 
Hart, being perfect and all. to try to con-, 
vert the godless heathens. ! 

If Hart docs not wish to be labeled^ 
"intolerant, hateful, bigoted and homopho- ' 
bic," then perhaps he shouldn't say things; 
that fit diosc definitions. 

Megan Welngart 
sophomore, pre-med 



KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN 



Tuesday, Febniary 28, l^^^fS 



► CITY 



r. 



Locations exist for all occasions 



•TIMtMIII awMMR 



CollefJBn 

Planning the per- 
fect party, the 
best reunion or 
the most orga- 
nized meeting can be a 
stressful event. 

Finding tbe right place to have 
a party or function can be difficult 
and time-consuming. 

The Manhattan area has a wide 
variety of creative location 
options for functions, meetings, 
parlies, dances, family or class 
[cunions and weddings. 

All if takes to locate the perfect 
place for your party or function is 
a phone number and some cre- 
ative ideas. 

Barbara Leiker. banquet man- 
ager for Park Avenue Banquet and 
Catering in Manhattan, said she 
likes to work with her customers 
to design the perfect function. 

"We are flexible with our cus- 
tomers' requests," Letker said. 

She said she has worked with 
parties smaller than 30 people and 
parties larger than 300 people. 

"We have done a couple of fra- 
ternity and sorority parties and 
also some KSU retirements," 
Leiker said. 

"For a real, real private, out-of- 
the-way place for a party, we can 
also use Valentino's side room, 
but it's not renovated yet." she 
said. 

The price for a party arranged 



by Leiker and Park Avenue varies 
depending on the number of peo- 
ple and the type of party that is 
being planned, she said. 

The Manhattan Holiday Inn 
Holidomc and Days Inn also offer 
a variety of party and banquet 
options. 

Wendy Jensen, general manag- 
er of Days Inn. said they have a 
banquet BiBHiBl^^^^H 

"Pttopl* can b« 
vary eraathra. 
Probably our 
moat uniqua 
avant is an 
upcoming 
wadding. ** 



Angie Fenstermacheh 

Marketing and 

deveiopment director tor 

SuriMi Zoo 



room 

that 

seats 

L50 

people. 

Item 

be 

divided 

into 

two 

rooms 

or left 

as one 

large 

room. 

Days 

Inn does not offer a full-service 
restaurant, so whoever is having 
the party picks a caterer if one is 
needed. Jensen said. 

The cost associated with rent- 
ing the banquet rooms depends on 
the number of people, Jensen said. 

Bob Hutchinson.food and bev- 
erage director for the Holidome, 
said the Holidome has 10 rooms 
available for rental. 

"The biggest room can seat 
810 people, where the smallest 
room seats 10 people." 
Hutchinson said. 

"The price range for tenting a 



banquet room ranges 
from $75 to $1,500, 
but it also depends 
on food or bever- 
age," he said. 

"We may cither 
lower or drop the fee 
depending on the 
number of people 
and the menu they 
choose," 

For a different 
twist to the tradition- 
al function, why not 
try your local bar or 
zoo? 

Lucky BrewGrille 
takes reservations for 
private parties, Tara 
Hunt. Lucky's host- 
ess, said. 

"Wccandoafaji- 
ta bar, barbecue bar 
or any food chosen by tbe cus- 
tomer," Hunt said. 

An alternative to the typical 
banquet is a beer dinner. Hunt 
said. 

This event takes place usually 
once a month. 

"In the back room, we have 
soup and salad, and different 
beers from around the world," she 
said. 

"The beer dinner usually costs 
around S25." Hunt said. 

Manhattan's Sunset Zoo offers 
an open-air pavilion for a small 
rental fee, Angie Fenstermacher. 
marketing and development direc- 
tor for the zoo, said. 

The pavilion can accommodate 
a.1 many as to 200 people, and the 



BANQUET FACILITIES 


Several places in Martfianan oHer banquet facilities 


and catering. 




Park Avenue Banquet S Catering 


537-7770 


Days Inn 


S3»639t 


Houston S^eet Ballnxm 


539-1234 


Lucky Srewgrille 


776-9090 


Manhattan Holiday Inn & Holidome 


539-5311 


Waretiam Opera House 


537^8646 


Blackjack Hills Fiecfeation Area 


49W707 


Sunset Zoo ■ 


iSB7-2737 


Amebutg Park ^^^ y 


' 587-2796 


HHK ^-i^ 





► CAMPUS 



Construction teams win 
regional competition 



TRtSHA BEMNINGA/Collogiin 

ZOO has picnic tables that will seat 
about 40 people, she said. 

"People are welcome to bring 
in tables and lawn chairs for more 
seating," she said. 

The pavilion can be rented dur- 
ing zoo hours 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. 
beginning Wednesday, Fenster- 
macher said. 

For an additional fee, it can be 
used in the evening from 6 to 8:30 
p.m. 

She said the zoo also offers 
barbecue grills, but zoo policy 
does not allow any alcoholic bev- 
erages in (he park 

"People can be very creative," 
she said. "Probably our most 
unique event is an upcoming wed- 
ding." 



JILL TlOTIW Mm 

Twelve K-State construction sci- 
ence and management students 
brought home two fiist-place ux>phies 
last weekend from the Associated 
Schools of Construction's second 
annual construction management 
competition in Nebraska City. Neb. 

K-Statc won both the Commercial 
Division and the Heavy/Highway 
Division, winning a $250 prize by 
beating four other regional schools. 

Each team was required to take the 
rote of a traditional construction man- 
agement firm and come up with a 
proposed solution for a constiwtion 
project that is being worked on some- 
wheie in the United Stales. 

The competition's judges were 
facilities managers and contractors 
who participated in the original pro- 
ject 

The judges knew the solution artd 
could fairly judge the teams, said Jim 
Goddard. assistant professor and 
coach for the Heavy/Highway 
Division team. 

Dave Fritchen, assistant professor 
and Commercial Division team 
coach, said the Commercial Division 
project was a large-.scale expansion to 
Reming Corporation, a food distribu- 
tor in C^io. 

"They had 24 hours to take the 
plans and specifics they were given 
and then create a written proposal of 
how they would complete the pro- 
ject," Fritchen said. 

Jeff Bangs, Commercial Division 
team captain, said dealing with limit- 
ed time was the tough part. 

"1 think we slept about two hours 



that first night. We had to get our 
written proposal done by Friday after- 
noon, and then Saturday morning, we 
gave a 25-minute presentation to the 
judges," he said. 

Fritchen said the competition 
brings students as close to the real 
world of enginemng aitd construction 
as possible. 

Bangs said the team was pleased 
with its presentation. 

"We did good The judges really 
drill you with questions to catch you 
up on something, but we were calm 
and handled it well." he said. 

The leconstruction of a bridge in 
Pa.sadena, Calif,, was the projea for 
the Heavy/Hi^way Division teams. 

"The; team was well prepared. 
They had a thorough analysis and 
proposal," Goddard said. 

Solving pnDblems is 90 peraent of 
getung things dor>e correctly, he said. 

Aaron Wilcox, senior in constitic- 
tion science and team member of the 
Heavy/Highway Division, said he 
thinks a big factor in winning was that 
they all get along. 

"For six people being cooped up in 
a small room for at least 4S hours, we 
did very good. I think everyone real- 
ized that to accomplish what we 
wanted, we had to work together as a 
team," he said. 

Fritchen said he was pleased with 
the perfonnance by both teanis. 

"I think our students achieve a 
high standard of performance and 
professionalism as a result of their 
construction education at KSU. and 1 
think that was reflected in their 
Construction Management Compe- 
tition," he said. 




Laif Gauche 

12th & Moro 

(Aggieville) 

Manhattan 

776-3302 



*Coinputen (new & used) 
••SalefS«rvlce'Upgradei 
••Hlrfi Quality Components 

•Mu»k (1,000» to pick from) 
•*CD'9 (none over $8) 
**Cas»ette9 (all are $2) 

•Movies (loo's to select) 
••VHS (none over $8) 
••We have ^deo Laserdisc 

^Software (over 650 titles) 
••For IBM & Mac 
••Far below normal retail 



We ar« the only 

genuine dealer 

or Harley Davidson 

motorcycles, 

service, & accessories 

within 60 miles. 




Over 2.500 
sq. feet of 
accessories 
and parts. 



1309 N. Washington 

lunctlon atf, KS 

(9 13 )238- 34 11 

B H 9 



rh 






Dilly'si 



I \ri saiulwifh. I 
I Miiall Stil.ul »!si cifink | 

I roi$4.50 I 

with I his anipon 

I i*\|»iics .1 l.> ').^ I 

1_ ^Kt^*^vil[j^ 'i'^'ii J 



TUESOAYS 



PITCHERS 



omi^S^t 



INTRODUCING 



THE PO/ITIVELY 




CHECKING ACCOUNT 




MOW you can bank at a strong 
and secure full-seirice financial 
institution whei^ your deposits are 
FDIC Insured and iiave a FREE 
checking account 

Ir No service charges or monthly fees, 

w No minimum balance requirements. 

ir No limit on check writing. 

W No Issue fee or monthly 

maintenance fee for VIA card. 

w PLUS a monthly statement listing 
all account activity and, for your 
convenience, the bank retains all 
canceled items. Duplicate checks 
are recommended. 

EARN IHTERE/X 
TOO! 

ir You'll eam Interest on 100% of the 
daily collected balance in your account 
as long as you maintain an average 
collected balance of $750 or more. 




• AND now available for your 
convenience - CHECKIT - 24 hour access to 
your Sunflower Bank account Call the location 
nearest you for more information. 



ffinS 



SUNFLOWER 
BANK 

FOR THE BC/T DEAL . . . GUARANTEED 

Colby 913-462-3313 / Hays 913-625-8888 
Victoria 913-735-2201 / Russell 913-483-6322 

Osborne 913-346-2044 / Manhattan 913-537-0550 

JuncUon City 913-238-3177 \ McPherson 316-241-1220 

Wichita 316-685-5441 / Salina 913-827-5564 



6 




PWBIWMiyiS.'lWB 



PORTS 



■I.IJ^-* P! ,..li 



:je^ 



KANSAS STATE OOLUQIAN 




K'State's David 
Hendlil reaches around 
a Missouri Weslern play- 
er during the Cats' 10-3 
victory Wednssday at 
Frank Myers Field. The 
Cats won two of three 
games during the week- 
end at the Lake Area 
Classic Tournament In 
Lake Charles, La. 

Pit* Photo by STCVt HaBCIIT 

Coll«giBn 



Cats take two of three during weekend 



mCO LlPOMLL 



T 



he wins weren't pretty, 
but the K-State base- 
ball team will take 
them. 



The Wildcats took two out of three 
games in weekend action at the Lake Area 
Classic Toumajncnt in Lake Charles, La., 
improving their record to 4-3 on the sea- 
son. 

Friday night's game saw the Cats go 
extra innings against Oral Roberts before 
Mitch Running scored the winning nin on 
a Golden Eagle error. 

With ihe score locked at 2-2. K-State's 
Matt Miller started the lllh with a walk. 
Pinch runner Ryan Buell was sent in for 
Miller but was forced out at second base 
when Chris Hess grounded to third. After 
Hess was called out stealing second, the 
Cats were down to two outs. 



Chris Bouchard made it to first after 
drawing the Cats' second walk of the 
inning. With the pressure on, it was fresh- 
man Heath Schesser to the rescue. 
Schesser came through for Ihe Cats with a 
single to center, moving Bouchard to sec- 
ond. 

With the Cats' Scott Poepard at the 
plate. Running was sent in to run for 
Bouchard. Poepard hit a line drive that 
glanced off the glove of Eagles' first base- 
man Doug Pearce. Running managed to 
score from second on the error, scaling the 
3-2 victory for the Cats. 

K-Statc starting pitcher Jon Oiseth had 
a good outing, giving up just two hits and 
one earned run in seven innings while 
striking out five and walking five. Dan 
Albrecht pitched the final four innings of 
relief for K-Slate. as he gave up just one 
hit and earned his first win of the year. 

Tfw Cats' Todd Fereday and Bouchard 
both had successful turns at the plate, as 
Fereday went 2-for-4 and Bouchard was 2- 
for-3. With one win under their bells, the 



Wildcats were looking for No. 2 going 
into Saturday's game against the 
Crcighton Bluejays. 

THc Cats jumped out to an early lead, 
scoring two runs in the first inning of play, 
Crcighton answered with a mo of its own 
in the bottom of the first, making the score 
2-l,K-State. 

But the Cats were just getting started, 
as they put four runners across the plate in 
the second, increasing their Icul to6-L 

The Bluejays fought back, scoring two 
runs in the second and third innings to get 
within one run of K-Staie. 

The Cats' Larry Walty came on in 
relief of starter Matt Koeman in the fourth 
but quickly gave up three Crcighton runs, 
putting the Bluejays up, 8-6. Walty recov- 
ered to pitch five more innings of score- 
less ball for the Cats, but the K-State bat- 
ters were through for the night. 

One of the bright spots for the Cats in 
the game was Hess, who extended his hit- 
ting streak to five games with a 2-for-4 
outing against the Bluejays. 



It was another nail-biier as K-State met 
the McNeese State Cowboys Sunday after- 
noon in the Caus' final game of the tourna- 
ment. 

The Cowboys struck first, scoring one 
run in the bottom of the first on a solo 
home run off K-State starter Jack Witt. 
But the Cats answered in the second on 
Brad Harker's second home run of the sea- 
son to start the inning. After loading the 
bases, it was K-Statc's Schesser driving in 
nin No. 2 with a fielder's choice ground 
ball. 

The bottom of the second saw 
McNeese State score two additional runs 
to take a 3-2 advantage, but the Cats came 
back with a three-nin third inning. 

The lead continued to go back and 
forth, with Ihe Cowboys adding one run in 
the fourth and the Cats managing a run in 
the fifth. 

McNeese came through with another 
three runs in the fifth to take the lead 
again, 7-6. 

That's when the K-Stale bats came 



back to life. The Cats tied it up in the sixth 
when Tim Decker led off wiih a double 
and scored on Adam Green's single. 

It was Decker again helping the Cats in 
the seventh, as the Cats look a IU-7 lead 
on his three-run home run. his first of the 
season. 

K-State added two insurance runs in the 
ninth, but the Cowboys weren't finished 
yet. 

McNeese threatened in the bottom of 
the ninth after scoring three times off K- 
State reliever Jon Albrecht, but the Cats 
stopped them in time to ensure the 12-10 
victory. 

Recording the win for K-State was Eric 
Yanz, who improved to 2-0 on the year. 
Albrecht notched his frsi save of the sea- 
son. Hess extended his hitting streak to six 
games with a I -for-5 performance. 

The Cats hit the field again this 
Wednesday night when they are host to 
the nationally ranked Wichita State 
Shockers at Dean Evans Field in Salina. 
Game time is 7 p.m. 



► BIO EIGHT TELECONFERENCE 

Coaches ready for showdown 



TODD arnvART 



Collcfiu 

The pitrily in this Big 
Eight season is evident with 
Rvc conference teams ranked 
in the Associated Press Top 
2S. and with less than one 
week to go in the season, no 
seeds have been determined 
for the postseason tourna- 
ment. 

Kansas, currently ranked 
No. 3. saw its No. I ranking 
of a week ago removed cour- 
tesy of the No. 1 6 Oklahoma 
Sooners. 

Kansas coach Roy 
Williams said he knows there 
is no rest in Big Eight play, 

"You're not going to get 
any free ones," he said. 

The Sooner victory on 
Feb. 20 helped set the stage 
for this weekend's champi- 
onship showdown between 
Kansas and Oklahoma State, 

The Cowboys played Iowa 
State last night as their final 
preparation for Saturday's 
battle. 

"It's important for us to set 
up the showdown with 
Kansas this weekend for the 
Big Eight Championships," 
Cowboy coach Eddie Sutton 
Slid. 

On the other end of the 
Big Eight standings, K-State 
is trying to stay out of the 
conference cellar with victo- 
ries in its final two games. 

The Cats will be host to 



Nebraska on Wednesday and 
Colorado on Saturday. 

With the Big Eight tourna- 
ment looming on Ihe horizon, 
Asbury said his team must 
play well now, 

"We try to stay sharp this 
lime of the year where it is 
important to finish strong." 

Sutton said he is looking 
forward to the upcoming 
postseason play, where his 
team is a little more of a mys- 
tery to the opposition. 

"It's always exciting for 
me to get into the NCAA 
Tournament where every 
team doesn't know you so 
well," Sutton said. 

Oklahoma, which has won 
three in a row — all against 
ranked opponents — appears 
to be setting its stage for an 
NCAA Tournament run. 

Williams credited all of 
Oklahoma's success to their 
new Coach Sampson, whom 
Williams himself recom- 
mended for the job. 

"I think Kelvin's the kind 
of guy we need in college 
basketball," Williams said. 

The slightly superstitious 
Sampson is going to do all he 
can to keep the wins coming. 

He was worn the same 
outfit in each of the last three 
wins. 

"I'm not sure what I'm 
going to pack for Ames, but 
I'm sure it'll be in there." he 
said. 



»> CLUBS 



Soccer team making 
big strides this season 



CoUc|un 

The women's soccer team is 
focusing on team effort after a r«ce&t 
victory over Kansas and with the Big 
Eight Tournament looming in the 
distance. 

The team ii cotBposed of about 15 
tnembert ranging ^m fretfaitwn to 



Women's soccer it « club tport at 
K>State, which aie«is it is only par- 
tialiy ttitaitd by the aihletie tlepait- 
meot. It hai b«efi a chib ipon at K- 
State for 10 yeara, said Hcntber 
Hamilton, Junior in Molctiy and isam 
coach for 1-1/2 yora. 

Because the tfeam is only partially 
funded, the women on the' team have 
to pay $20 in dues and alio pay for 
some of the travel to away games, 
Hamilton said. 

"We kind of have to pay to play." 
she said. 

Hamilton tald the team pUyi 
three or four games each semester 
plus three or four tournaments. She 
said toumamenis usually consist of 
four to eight teams. 

The fall and spring seasons both 
begin a coupk oi weeks $tia school 
has started. 

The fall season ends lis early 
November, and the spring season 
ends in late April. 



The team pracUcet at 4:30 p.m. 
Tuesday, Tburtday and Sunday at 
Memorial Stadium. 

Hamilton said the team has an 
infonnatioaal meeting to recruit team 
members at the beginning of each 
semest«'. 

"Tben they come to practice and 
decide if it's for tbem or not," 
HuniltoD s^d. 

The team's most recent tooma- 
meat was Feb. 10-12 at the 
Univenity of Nebraska at Lincoln. 

They won the flv«-team toumft' 
meot by defeating KU 2- 1 In the 
duunpionstup game. 

Hamlttoa said tbe team had a 
rocky season last fall, so the wia 
against KU was a voy Hg deal to tbe 
te^m. 

It was more than just beating KU 
for tbe champiooship." Hamilton 




"They pushed thenisetves their 
faaidest ud were rewarded for that It 
was Idad of a moral victory." 

Tbe five tearoa at tbe toumameni 
were K-Siate, KU. University of 
Nebraska at Liacolo. Concordia 
College of Seward. Neb., and 
Nebtaska Wesleyan. 

The ream entered the champi- 
onship game in second seat behind 
KU. 

Ttek only kiat dmini the tourrta- 



(Tiva (WBurr/Coteghn 

Iridgat C«wait, aoptKHnora In pr*i>'ofta«lonal a«f:orMtory acluctUon, 
■nd Biifty Bayer, fr««hman undacldMJ, tighl for a loo«a ball during m aoe- 
e*r aerlmfflaga Thurwtay aflerfKKMi art Itomorial Stadium. 



ment was to Nebraska Wcsleyan, 0- 1. 

Hamilton said KU scored right off 
the bat. but the K-Slate team was 
able to pull back to win the game and 
the tournament. 

Hamilton said KU was the team's 
toughest competition during the totir- 
DotnenL 

"They had more speed, and ibey 
were quick on the ball," Hanilt^ 



said. 

Tbcy also had good passing." 

Stsphante Henson, sophomore in 
psychology and criminology, said the 
team got off to j good start 

"Hofiefully. we'll do as good or 
better in the other ones," she said. 

The Big Eight tournament is 
scheduled for April 22 at tbe 
Univenity of Oklahama. 




IVERSIONS 



WVUTINQ COMTEST ^^^ 

Kansas Votees, i Me-mie wriling contesi, is accepting entries in Ms 1995 competitiort. The 
(xntest t^ a poetry and prow dmon and Is open to al Kansas writem. (700 h prtie rnoney 
wito aNwded. EntiiM rruBt be postrarked by Marcti 1& Wrtothe 1^^ 
HiinaniK Ckxind JOO Ga/y, Suite A, Winyti KS 67l5SI!or mmH^^ 




jmmsmTicouiouui 



PUmiARVaS, 1999 



► CROSSWORD 



Eugene SHtFFa 



ACROSS 
1 Treaty 
5 Jazz style 
t It oets in 
the whey 

12 Green 
acres 

13 MImk; 

14 EngllBh 
painter 
John 

1$ Sixth-day 

creation 
16 Stirrer 
18 Spoof 

20 Supectxjy's 
adopters 

21 Sea bird 

22 Evergreen 

23 Mother- 
ot-peart 

2S Woodwind 



format 26 

7 Shell -game 
need 

8 They 
manage 27 

9 Fairy-tale 
preposition 28 

10 l^ugh-a- 

minute 29 
11 



30 Dam org. 

31 Diet. 

32 Lingerie 
purchase 

33 Pequod 
weapon 

38 Hirsute 

38 Bad toupee 

39 1940s 
headline 
grat}ber 

40 Tray 
contents 

43 Mont- 



goifiers' 

transport 
47 Cuspidor 
49 Vortex 
60 Acidic 

51 Chipper? 

52 Quiet 
assents 

53 Pretentious 

54 Dramatist 
Ttwmas aw»)fs 31 

55 Gaelic 17 Equipment 
DOWN for Alberto 34 

1 Ring out Tomtja 35 

2 Verdi worV 19 Raw roct( 36 

3 Pull an 22 Ser»d. in 
all-nighter a way 37 

4 Disposition 23 Ultimate 

5 Relay-race 24 Ms. 39 
prop Gardner 40 

8 Touma- 29 Gridlock 

ment component 

Solution time: 24 mini. 41 



42 



s" 


T 



K 
A 
V 


T 




M 
1 


"0 
D 


"a 




N 


A 


'Q' 


s 


T 


SI 





P 


1 


E 


S 


A 


R A 


T 





Q 


A 


A 





H 


|R|A 


1 


B 


1 


M 




D 
A 


E 
B 


E 
A 


LI U 


u 


u 


1 C 


U 


[i 


W 


i:; 


A 


n 

E 


C 

E 




T 


R 


E 


E 


s 




T 


ME 


s 


[D 


S 


A 


R 


A 
N 


J 

A 


E 


V 







T 


u 


B 


|K 







A 


J 


O 


M 


1 


M 


Q 


E 


R 


Bll L 


8 


AN 


A 


8 


OITIAHO 


blN E 





ME 


a QQD BdDQ 


m 




\oi 


8HA|W!EHN|0|O|N] 



Yeetefday'e aniMtr 2-28 



1972 
Michael 
Jackson 
sor>g 
Kimono 
accessory 
Stk:k 
figure? 
Vea 

car>celer 
Captain's 
wrtte-up 
Attractive 
Eject 
•2001" 
computer 
DaNor 
Francis 
Dedirted 
The Thin 
Man- 
pooch 
Practice 
pugilism 
"Java' 
man 

43 Squarish 

44Blood- 
hourKl's 
cue 

45 Tote-board 
tally 

46AMEX 
counter- 
part 

48 Erstwhile 
acorn 



1 


2 


3 


4 


1 


s 


6 


T 


1 


e 


e 


10 


11 


^2 








ii 






u 








tS 








1ft 
















It 








1^ 






■ 


20 












21 




1 


i 












U 


H 






■ 


sT 








2^^^^^^ 


i6 


29 


30 






pa 


5i 






pa 


3S 






as: 








3S. 






i 




at 










a 








^ 






m 


^M 




41 


42 






■ 










44 


4S 


4« 


47 










^ 






1 


4e 








S6 








1 


ii 






ii 








S3 








M 






a 








"STl lUDER? ^'^' answers to tcxlay's crossword, call 
9 1 URIr CU I 1-900-4M'ea73l9gcperminule.louch- 
tone / rotary phones ( ie+ onty ) A King Features service, NYC. 



2-28 CRYPTOQUIP 

GHLE ISTSE ABDBEHTTR 

NHTTV LDPS PGB 

IHPBASER SN GFB 

LP RSFEVBTN. 

Yesterday's Cryptoqulp: IF FARMER'S ASSlSTAhJT 
GETS INTO TROUBLE, HE HAS TO BALE HIM OUT. 

Today's Cryptoqulp clue: E equals R 



NEW CBYPTOOUIP BOOKI Send $4 50 (check/mo.) to 

CryptoClassics Book2, POBox641 1 , Riverton hU 08077. 



The Cryptoqulp Is a substitution cipher In which one 
letter stands for another. If you think that X equals O, It 
will equal O throughout the puzzle. Single letten, short 
words and words using an apostrophe give you clues to 
locating vowels. Solution Is by trial and error. 



► CALVIH AND HOBBES 



BULWATiaSON 



Vtlut happciwJ m 
Concoid m 1775? 



L&fs RE MoMfcSt HUfA 
Oi^ttf, ME atout CaHCeKdf 

H) rifW m OWM HIW5E f*°h 
HE.RE . (oHCoSd coUU BE. 




oCoP rw « tui I <km't 

t ie/Hiii H<M 4 SU«:A OF 
lOMtEtt For s)i« OF Wii 
it I HOftUSS. HiW 
HiftlLSS. 




► HON SGQUITER 



WiLET 




«R«5NtkUX 
LUHCtt... 



O. 




► FOXTROT 



Bill Amend 



t€LLo, FBI ? 1 WAS 
VMMDCRiHCi IF TOU 
CPutt) Sli« ME Some . 
INFORMATION ASOUT J 
KCoMINe ANXflUS J 




IbU iOkiW. LIKE IN T>C 
TV JHOW. Trtt PEoPlE 
WHO iSVESTieATE ThiNM 
LIKE UFOs ANP ALIEN 
ENtoUNTEBS AHO-... 
HELLO? HEao, 
ABCTtXJTWtt? 





► UNKNOWN 



BtANDON PiCX/COUlCUN 




► POETRY 



Student needs ice cream runs, talks with pals 




OearCassie, 

I have been getting massively into 
my studies, so I never get to iice my 
friends. I have tried to set aside some 
special time once or twice a week with 
them, but with midterms coming up, 
thai time has been sacrificed more than 
once for the sake of studying. 

1 know my friends understand, but 
this is our senior year and we don't 
have that much time together left. 
Help! 

Signed, I Am An Island 



DnrlaUuKl, 

Take unscheduled study breaks. Go 
on ice-cream runs in the middle of the 
night and keep up regular phone con- 
versations even if ihey arc brief Even 
though this is your senior year, you 
should take the time to be with friends. 
After all. no man (or woman) is an 
island. 

Cassie 

Write to me at: 

Cassie 

116 Kcdzle Hall 

Manhattan, Kan. 66S06 



^ 



To submit poetry, call ttw Collegian 
al&3Z-6&5€ or e-mail atz@ltsu. 
ksu. edu. Poems must be typed 
witti the author's name, major at»d 
vear at the top and must be 
between 200 and 450 wonte. 



Between Realities 



Conversation with a man I thought to be some- 
one else 
or maybe in a motive undeitoe of un thoughts 
I was desperate to be touched by a foreign voice 
calmer, less abrasive than my own 
Each internal whisper like a whisker escaped by a 
dull razor 
that makes my reality flinch 

A manic morning subsides into a 
slurof not yet 

I'm not done with this one yet 
Not ready to come down 

Crashing into the barbed wire blanket of perception 
Still absorbed in crooked vanity 
Tangled, tangled, intervals of grasped and aban- 
doned touchstones 

How hard to keep an empty stomach down 

Self pity wringing its laxative cold front through me 

Climbs and surrenders. 

Slides into regret 

Another minute dccomposinglnlo the ashes of every 

second spent sinking 

Into thought — friendly fire 

Still, it's fire 

Too late lo renegotiate with the shaman sandman 

For another hour of wake 

Too tired to fight an uninvited mantra 

Jane Fonda said it first 

Then the Guru 

And yesterday 1 heard it from the only poet 1 know 

"Just don't forget to breathe" 

and she smiled when she said it. 

Page Getz te a freshman In pre-journalisni and 
mass communications 



The (Un)common Drudgery 



O 



' ne time euphoria was all I knew. 

My mind burst its bustle as she came by. 
and now the needle's beckoning me too. 

Sparkling sapphires fed this need of mine. Through 
her eyes, my delusions were clear. I'll try lo forget 
the euphoria's all I knew. 

Flesh sucks. I can't feel hers or mine now to 
calm, but I've fought too long lo just cry; 
now I hear the needle beckoning too. 

Looking through my glass eyes. I'm sure 1 flew 
too high. Control has escaped again. Why 
is that euphoria's all 1 knew? 

His girl, my girt, who cares? Five, four, three, 

two 

my lime is slipping away as I try 

to stand. I hear the needle beckoning me too. 

Her strong lips sadly asked for trulh. "Do you 
careT* I do, but 1 can't have her till 1 
stop. Now, euphoria is all 1 know, 
and I know the needle beckons me too. 

by Michael Tebbe, fresbman in business 




KSU SUMMER THEATRE 

MARCH 7 from 3-5pm 
Room 008 Nichols Hall 

We will be auditioning for the 

play "Lips Together, Teeth 

Apart" by Terrance McNally 

and a children's play. 



Scripts are available In 1 
Nichois. 



Rehearsals begin IVIay 22. 

Productions take place in 

June. Student salaries and 

class credit mre available. 



k 



For further Information oontact 
Marcl Maullar at 532-6875. 



J 



• RESPONSIVE 

Planning Board Leader 
for 3-112 years 

• RESOURCEFUL 

KSU Energy 
Extension Specialist 

• READY TO 
REPRESENT YOU! 

Resident/or 19 years 
Experienced, Independent 




/'"Citv Commission 



Po)klcalAdv.Mdfo(tirl 



tSmidfcratyl 



; Muk Kiuctsndollel, lYeaiunT 



IF YOU WAIVT TO MAKE rr 

IV THE REAL WORLD, 

SPEND A SEMESTER 

IN OURS. 



Walt DUncy World Co. re prcsenia lives wilt tx.' on campus tu 
present an infurmailun session lor Undergraduate Stud<.■l]l^ on 
the WALT DISNEY WORLD Summer/Fall 'JS Colkite Prottrnni 



wni \:\\i:i).\i:si).\v. M.viun i, \i 5:.M)p.\i 

Wni KC: SUDIM IMO.N, KOOM 212 



Attendance at Ibis presematlon is rf quired l» 
imtertitett'Jbr ibe Summer fall '95 Colk-jfe PrngnmL 
inlcmcw* will l>c hckl Thursday, March 2 
The tollowinf! m;iiors arc encouragrJ la altcnJ: 
Business, Conimunicatitin, Rccrcaticin/I.cisun' 
StuJics. t{ospilalily/R<f»lauranl Vlan^gcnK-nt. 
Travel & Tourism, Theatrc/Dramj, HoniLUllurv, 
and AKncuhure. 
litcKuanls arc needed lo wort: at niir many 
Water Parks and Resorts Students with 
MN\ major are eligible tu apph Yoti 
need to hold lifcguartl cenifiwtion OR be 
a stttini! swimmer and well provide the 
traming needed fur an cxt Hint; 
experience (his summer or liiU! 
For mote tnformation contact: 
r>rAruiii FiiUer 
Phone. 552 1681 

VVbrtdCo. 







^Ijfrr ^tudifitta tfhrttti if w»Wft^ ffViftt^ft 
nttdyfi/r ibt nfi uftbeir iti\'% 



O Tuesday, F«l>ruary 28, IjWB 



KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN 



► HEALTH 



Support group offered for diabetics 



JILL TIOTIMHW 

Cotlcfte 

Diabetes is a disease millions 
of Americans have. 

However, most people who 
have it aren't sick. They're just as 
healthy as everyone else; they 
only have to work a little harder at 
slaying that way. 

Maintaining good control is a 
continuous and often tiring 
process, especially for college stu- 
dents. 

Manhattan's Memorial Hospital 
and Lafenc Health Center are 
starling a special support group 
for college-age diabetics in hopes 
of making their lives a little easi- 
er. The meetings will be on the 
fourth Tuesday of each month. 
The first one is 7 p.m. today at 
Memorial Hospital, said Wini 
Schaedel, Clinical Nurse 
Specialist at Memorial. 

College students often have 



irregular schedules and cannot 
always eat at the times they are 
supposed to, Schaedel said. 

A lot of students put their 
classes and homework ahead of 
themselves. That is when their 
blood sugars go crazy, and control 
is not maintained, she said. 

"We don't expect you to do it 
on your own. We want to help 
you adjust throughout your life by 
providing support and education," 
Schaedel said. 

Matthew Barnes, freshman in 
geography and recently diagnosed 
diabetic, said the hardest thing to 
get used to is the fact that he can't 
eat whatever he wants whenever 
he feels like it. 

"I can't just grab a bag of chips 
and Stan eating. I have to plan out 
what I'm going to eat for the day 
using a point system," he said. 

Barnes said it can be kind of a 
drag to always have to plan. 



It is important to keep light 
control of blood sugars. Diabetics 
who maintain a blood sugar aver- 
age below 160 milligrams per 
decimeter can significantly slow 
the onset and progression of long- 
term complications, including 
eye, kidney, he an and nerve dis- 
ease, Schaedel said. 

Diabetes is the No. I cause of 
blindness and amputation in the 
United Stales. 

Schaedel said Lafene is not 
going to plan out a specific agen- 
da for the college support group. 
"We want the students to tell us 
what they would most like to do." 
she said. 

"They can sit and talk, work 
out in the exercise center or do 
whatever they think will beneflt 
them most." Schaedel said. 

Barnes said he would like to 
hear information and lips other 
diabetics have to share about new 



sugar- free foods, where they can 
be purchased, and the new equip- 
ment designed for blood glucose 
testing and daily insulin injec- 
tions, 

Barnes said he is looking for- 
ward to the college suppon group, 

"I've never been to a suppon 
group before, but I think it will be 
nice to meet other people in the 
same situation as I am." he said. 

Schaedel said she wants to help 
people enjoy life to its fullest. For 
some, that's fuller than others — 
it's totally up to them. 

"It's the best, quote, chronic 
illness, to work with because it's 
the most hopeful," Schaedel said. 

Education is the key, she said. 

"We want to teach not only 
students, but everyone with dia- 
betes how to take care of them- 
selves," she said. 

"That's all it takes to live a 
healthy and happy life." 



Player dreams of international competition 



CONTINUED FROM PAGE 3 

echo with Banel's additions. 

After buying a $130 paddle and 
attending a professional table-tennis 
camp. Josh got serious with the 
spon. 

"I went to the camp, and they 
pretty much told me I'd better stan 
over." he said. 

In December, Banel attended a 
national tournament in Las Vegas, 
along with 633 other players. 

Out of 70 disabled members, 20 
made it on the team. Twelve spots 
were available, and Banel made it 
into one. 

"Josh's skill development has 
been nothing short of meteoric," 
David Surowski, KSUTTC coach, 
said. 

"In four shon years, he has not 
only become one of the club's top 
players, but has also evolved into 
one of the sport's most visible play- 
ers." 



Such a feat doesn't come for 
free. Bartel drives to Oklahoma 
once a month for lessons, which 
cost $73 for three hours of coach- 
ing, he said. 

Because he is classified as dis- 
abled in the table-tennis games, 
Bartel plays in a separate division. 
This helps to ensure parity in the 
contest. 

"Now, I get to play other people 
who have been through the same 
thing I have." he said. 

Banel told of one contestant who 
has only one leg and half of one 
arm. 

He plays by fixing a paddle to 
his arm. 

Even so. this man has an 800 rat- 
ing, Bajtel said. 

An 800 rating is roughly equiva- 
lent to your average basement table- 
tennis player, Surowski said. 

Bartel has already made the 
Association of College Unions 



International team, which takes the 
top four regional players for the 
tournament on April 21-23 at 
Georgia State. 

From there, Bartel has the 
chance to qualify for the Pan- 
American games in Argentina. 

"If I do well there, there is the 
19% Disabled Olympic Games." he 
said. "The U.S. is usually very 
strong in (hat." 

It will cost money to get him 
there, and funding from the 
University is not a guarantee, he 
said. He is accepting donations so 
that he can meet the $2,000 in 
expenses for each international 



News Digest 



►SIMPSON TRIAL TAKES TO THE AIRWAVES 



LOS ANGELES (AP) — If a 
television is out of reach while 
the O.J. Simpson case is in ses- 
sion, tnal enthusiasts turn to AM 
radio for a quick fix. 

Whether they are on the road 
or in the office, the trial is r>ever 
more than a twist of the knob 
away in this Simpson -saturated 
city. 

While all-news station KNX <n 
Los Angeles scraps its usual 
programming the moment Judge 



Lance I to opens proceedings, 
radio stations across the nation 
satisfy the appetite for live cover- 
age with feeds and commentary 
provided by radio networks. 

This one's got me fascinat- 
ed,' said Los Angeles taxi driver 
Noel Akametu, who like a soap 
opera fan can'l bear to miss a 
single plot turn. 

The case is too complicated, 
and it's too interesting,' Akametu 
said. 



i$15 CASHH 

•^ Every time you donate plasma. | 

^1 






•Quick, safe, easy 



•Study while you donate 
-M^ 'Watch movies while you donate 



ate "'****ji 
I ^^ -Donating plasma saves lives! ^^ 

I Manhattan Biomedical Center i 

I 1130 Gardenway (across from Westioop) | 
I p=,,J^n.-Fn. 9 a.m.-6:30 p.m.. Sat, 9 a.m.'2 p.m. | 

^^^ i>^f Bir^MgnrnAT.qion'ga * 



I 




I 



Shrove Tuesday 

Pancake Supper 

All are g ^^ 

y/eVcOtne' Baptist Campus Center 

1801 Anderson Rd, (comer of Anderson & Dcnison) 

Ash Wednesday 

with imposition 
of ashes 

7 p.m. 

Danforth Chapel 

(behind McCain 

Auditorium) 

All denominations arc 

welcome to worship. 

SponiOt«d by KSU Campu* Miriiitriei 




event. 

For more information on the 
donations, contact Surowski in the 
Department of Mathematics. 

Bariel said he is happier now 
than he's been in the past. 

"I'm married, we're moving to a 
bigger house, and I'm getting to 
play people who are in my class in 
table tennis," he said. 

Bartel said his dream is to walk 
into a room at the Olympic touma- 
mcni to see 80 tables set up — at 
$800 each. 

"It's the neatest feeling in the 
world," he said. "There is so much 
more for me to do." 



S/%/J^K2 &^E^/<:(( (Ski upci) 




This could be 
you and your 
friends 1 -> 



Breckenridge 
Colorado 
March 17 -22 

$250.00 

* Round trip transportation by charter bus 

•3 nights lodging om K-stif union 

'3 days lift tickets Ou«t»«Nt 

WEDNESDAY, MARCH 1ST IS THE LAST 

DAYTOSIGN-UPII 

Sign up In ttw UPC Office, 3nl floor K-Stata Union, 

Monday • Friday 9:00 a.m. • 4:00 pjn. 

For mor* tnfo call UPC at 532-6571 



TH^ BEST SOUNDS AROUND ■ COME FROM BOOMTOWN SOUND 

PROFESSIONAL INSTALUTION AT LOW, LOW PRICES 
MIRCO CAR ALARM Installed 

Inctud*! 
• i R«mot«a ' Bultl-ln Stfock S«n«or 

■ Flaatting LEO • R«mol« Pinic 

• S Ton« Slr*n • Startar Kill Option 

• Auto RM«t 




CAH & HOME STEREO ■ OPEN 11 a.m.-7 p.m. Mon.-Frt. • 11 am, -5 p.m. Sal 
1015 HOSTETLER RD. (BEHIND HARDING GLASS • MANHATTAN) 




SPRING BREAK IS ONLY WEEKS AWAY . . . 
ARE YOU READY? 

NUnunON. WEIGHT & 
EXERCISE CLASS 

Instructed by Registered Dietician 

CLASS BEGINS 

Tuesday, FEB. 28 - 3:30 p.m. 

LAFENE HEALTH CENTER 
ROOM 2 
532-6544 




Students watch shuttle 
launch, gain experience 



.!W» 



CONTINUED FROM PAGE 3 

beginning of this semester. 

Holman works in the communi- 
cations and design department and 
has been putting targets on the 
space shuttle's rocket boosters for 
the video cameras at Kennedy 
Space Center. 

Wika and Wocrpel both work in 
the digital communications depart- 
ment working with engineers in 
completing design packages, such 
as parts lists and cable labels. 

The students found many of the 
engineering classes at K-State pre- 
pared them well, although much of 
what they do at Lockheed was 
learned there. 

"A lot of it's on-the-job training. 
It's applying a whole lot of theory 
we learned in school," Wika said. 

In addition to working from 7:30 
a.m. to 4 p.m. every weekday, the 
three have managed to get to see 
firsthand what many people will 
only be able to see on television. 

All three witnessed the takeoff of 
the Space Shuttle Discovery 
Mission STS-63 earlier this month. 



in which the space shuttle flew by 
the Russian space station, Mir. 
Holman watched from the Launch 
Control Center as Woerpel and 
Wika watched from the press site 
area. All three were only about 
three miles away. 

Wika and Woerpel said they, 
were surprised to see how bright the 
space shuttle was. It look off at 
night and was visible until it 
dropped over the horizon. When it 
dropped over the horizon about 10 
minutes after ukeoff. it was about 
500 miles away 

"Hell, that's half the distance 
between here and Kansas, and you 
could still see it," Woerpel said. 

Living in a warm place like 
Florida is nice when they could be 
like most other K-State students 
who have to cope with cold Kansas 
weather, but the three students said 
they definitely thought they were 
gaining valuable experience prior to 
graduation. 

"Just being on the same launch 
pad as the shuttle for an engineering 
student is just heaven," Wika said. 



*ua 



-.J 



JUSTIN KASTNER for City Commission 



ASTNER 



City Commission 



FUTURE-MINDED 



LEADERSHIP 



JUSTIN KASTNER has a vision for Manhattan's 
future. He will: 

* Work for efficiency in government 

* Promote economic diversification and quality 
Job opportunttieii 

* Provide a unique perspective on youth issues 



"As a life-long resident of Manhat- 
tan, I recognize the challenges and 
successes our community has 
experienced. / am-eager to serve 
the city which I have grown up in. 
/ have a stake in the future of 
Manhattan. " 



Pollltett Adv. p« id for by Kuincr Tor City Commission. 
^hai^lle^^lln^: Terry Classcocli & Knrcn RogeK Treasurer I. airy Becrafi 




sc-nt*. 



t>0^ 




An evening of Indian Dance, Music and Food Extravaganzalll 
A Qlltripse Into India's rich cultural heritage and delicious cuisine. 
Data: Saturday, March 4. 
V«nii«: Manhattan Middle School, 9th and Poyntz. 
Ttma: 5:30 • 7:30 p.m. Dinner. 

7:30 ' 9 p.m. Cultural Programs. 

Dinner It free for ait membera of I.S.A. and S6 for nofi memt>ere . The 
cultural program is free for aJI, A limited number of tickets wiii t>e sold at 
the K-State Union TODAY from 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. Ttckets are not sold at 
^^ venue. 
'-^ Spomored by I.C.C. (Intamational Coordinating Councl) 



Your Aggievlite Altomative 

lOCK CAFE 

w 
1 1 a.m. to 1 p.m. i 

$1.01 Hamburger with Fries . .::^ 
$1,00 Draws: Red Dog & Miller Llt# 




$1.25 Miller Bottles 



3043 Anderson 



In the Stateroom 
February 27- March 3 
10:30a -1:30p 



y ; :r 




EXPRESS 



Teriyaki Chicken Strips. .$1.99 

(boneless and skinless) 
w/hc6 or fii«(l pasta 

Sweet & Sour Pork $1 .99 

w/ rice or fried pasta 

Vegetable Egg Roll $1.55 

w/ rice or fried pasta 

White Rice $0.75 

Fried Pasta $0.75 

Stir Fried Vegetables $0.99 



Meal Deal $3.69 

YOUR CHOICE OF 

Chicl<en Teriyaid 

or Sweet & Sour Pork 

witfi side of RJcd or Pasta 

AND 

EggRd 

Stir Fry Vegetable 

and Fortune CooMe 



u 



K-Slate Union 
FoodServiM 



KANSAS STXTE COLLEGIAN 



■^ 



TU»«d«y, F«bn iary 2 8, 1995 O 




GET THE WORD OUT 

PUei YOUR CLASSIFIEO AD W KEDOI lOS 



LASSIFIEDS 



20 words or less — 
each word over 20 



I 20 words or less — 
each word over 20 

; 20 words or less — 
each word over 20 

; 20 words or less — 
each word over 20 

; 20 words or less — 

each word over 20 

(coneaeuHve day 



$5 

— $.20 per word 

$6.25 

— $.25 per word 

$7.25 

— $.30 per word 

S8 

— $.35 per word 

$6.50 

— $40 per word 
rate) 



HOW TO MY 

Ml 






IS CANCBLUTIONS 

|w«nl|«w><I cqM,«(iittra(inl]fautefttw 

Tte MuM cil » Mon MM til d^^ 



-^4 



BULLETIN 
BOARD 



otol 



Anneune*in«nti 



ADVANCED FLIGHT Train- 
ing plui ground (ctiool 
for prtvala, initrumanl 
and multt-angina rat- 
ing*. K-Sttta Flying 
Club approvBd Initruc- 
tor. Hugh Irvin. 
S3»-lt2S. 



Tight on 
Cash? 




MANHATTAN 

BIOMEDICAL CENTER 

11 30 Garden way 

776-9177 

TUna Tii 9 a.in..4:ja p.rti.. 



COME FLY with ui. K-Stata 
Flying Club hai fiva air- 
plana*. For bait pricai 
call Troy Brocltwav. 
77M735 a»»r 5:30pm. 

DONT FOflGET- GTadua- 
tkm auppliaa now avail- 
abla 11 vsrnsv* Book 
Store A Jostana raprn- 
aantativa will ba hera 
Mor>dav, Feb. 17 and 
Tueadav. Fab. 38 to taka 
your ordert for clsas 
ringa and announca- 

. manti. Pick up your 
cap. gown, and lata el 
now. Beat the rush, 
come to Vameyi for all 

; your graduation lup- 

fllael Varney a Book 
tor* in Aggiavilla 
: S39-0511 Opan 3- 9 
Mon.'Sat, 12-SSun. 

LpM AOAM formally at A 
Cut Above i> now at 
Joyca't Hair Tamara. 
She waleomea all form- 
' er and naw clients. 
SSS-TAME 192631 



tjB»t«Ml Pound 

FbMiid ada can ba 
plaead free for thraa 



HELPI BRACELET loal on 
campua. Gold lannla 
bracelet, If found 
plaaaa call S 39-1 3 34 
t13S. Raiward. 



Wa require » f«rm »1 
rtlcture ID (KSU. drlv- 
■t'a lloanea sr stberl 
i4>ien pl««lng a par- 



-r 

/fbo A aplaah to your naxt 
•' baah. Great mid-tarm- 
'' partlat begin with Wet- 
r N Wild Mobile Hot Tub 
;: renlali- S37-1B2$. 

XDO an extra touch of 
■ eliB* to your next par- 
: ty. Call Wayna'i Water 
' Party to rent « portaMa 
; hot tub S37-7S87, 
;- M9-TM1. 

CpLOEST BEER on Weat 

. aidal Great aalaction of 
aplrita. Pnlaon liquor 
acroat from Food 4 
Lta*. 31 OS Andarion. 

; SST-OOM. 

MALE EXOTIC daftcar- 

Aveilabla for partle* 

ale. LadJM, embarraa* 

her with the tunniaat 

; gift everl Raaaontbia 

• rate*. Rob, »9-«e21 




HOUSING/ 
REAL ESTATE 



Per R*nt> 
Apte. Fumlahed 

AVAILABLE JUNE 1, nice 
(tudio apartment with 
water and trash paid. 
Very near campui on 
Clatltn Rd. Call 
587-0634. 

QUIET SURROUNDINGS 
for study. Campus one 
(nila. ona-badroom, 
and studio soma utili- 
ties paid. Short-tarm 
lease, no pat*. 
S37-S3a» 

1101 

For Rant- 
Apt. 
Unfumtshad 



AVAILABLE APRIL 1. one- 
bedroom near Ag. 
gieville and KSU earn, 
pu*. taOS Bluamont 
S3«S. Wtter/ trash paid. 
No pan. 779.3804. 



HUfiCMlf 

ricllt««*i*i 



AVAILABLE NOW, two. 
bwlroom near campus 
ISOO McCain Lane. 
S4S0. Laundry fadlitleB. 
Walar/ traah paid. No 
pats 778^3804. 

AVAILABLE MAR. 1, one 
bedroom naar campus. 
1772 L^ramia 1370 Wa- 
tarV trash paid. Laundry 
facilliias. No pata. 77S- 
3804. 

AVAILABLE MARCH 1. 
ane-bfldraom, three 
blocks wast of campus. 
1024 SunieL S3S5. Wa- 
ter/ traah paid. Laundry 
facilitiea. No pati. 776- 



COfmCTIONS 

H |M IM » mcr In inuritf, ptMW 

Call 532-6555 to ptace your classified. 




PARKING 

SOUTH OF THE 



OR 
S^.6568 eoLUMM 

PAX 

632-7306 



OFFICE HOURS 

MONDAY-FNDAY 

6 1.II1.-S 
(ticapl 



■9 Biltii 



I 



• FrermntAf^ 

• Sandstone Apts. 

• Cdege Heights Apis* 

• Cambridge Sq Apts. 

nomDntti 

U7<90M 

ii't>»<iii>iiiiiiiiiii nfifiiii 
l10ua<3|un 



AVAILABLE APRIL 1, ona- 
badroom, on* block 
north of campua. IBB4 
Clafltn S37S. Wstar/ 
traah patd. Laundry 
fscilitJes. Allow* «m*ll 
pets 77&3804. 



•2 bedroom 
apartments 

•Quiet, park 
like setting 

•Private & 
personal 
bedroom 

•Large bath & 
closets 

•Dishwasher 

•Laundry 

focllttv 

•2 large pools 



nrmaAosotT 
uu. 

7TB-III8 

for an 
appointment 



AVAILABLE FEB. IS. two- 
bedroom at 805 Alliaon 
$420. Naw carpet diih- 
waahar. Laundry facili- 
ties. Water/ trash paid. 
776-W)4. 



AVAILABLE NOW. ona- 
badroom thraa block* 
wait of campus. 1026 
Sunset. S360. Ramo- 
daled unit. Water/ trash 
paid. No pals. 
776-3804. 

AVAILABLE NOW. Ihraa- 
bedroom, two blocks 
east of KSU »600 plus 
uti lilies. £37-1940. 

AVAILABLE NOW. iwo- 
bedroom apartmanls 
near City Park. 1026 
0*aga S4&0. Water/ 
Irasn psid. Laundry 
racililias. Within walk. 
Ing dlManea u> KSU. No 
pan. 776-^804. 

FOR AUGUST Next to 
KSU, deluxa two-bed- 
room apartment, S430. 
S:»-24S2 Bftar 4p.m. 

FOR JUNE, larga two-bed- 
room apartment. Wa- 
ter/ trash/ gas two- 
third* paid. S430/ 
month. Also ona-bad- 
room (310 tor Aug 
&3»-24«2. Aftar 4p.m. 

FOUR-BEOROOM AT 

Royal Towef). 1700 N. 
Manhattan SS6Q. Avail- 
able now. Water/ traih 
paid. Laundry facilities, 
sundack, hot tubs. No 
paU.77e-.3S04. 

GET A JUMP ON NEXT 
YEARI Cha** Manhal- 
lan Apartment* I* now 

leafing Iwo, three and 
four-bedrooms for Au- 
oust Our waiting liat is 
long; drop by balore 
they're gonaf Collage 
and Claflln, 776-3663. 

LARGE TWO-BEDROOM, 

one-helf block weat of 
campus. Triteval apM- 
ment 1825 Collage 
Haiahts, fSSO. Water/ 
iratn paid. Two bath, 
walk-in closet*. No 
pets. 776-3804 

LARGE: THREE-BEDROOM 

with large closet in a 
nina-plax. Living room, 
dining area, ona and 
one-half bath, fully 
equipped kitchen. $210 
each. 822 Fremont. 
Available June 1 and 
/Ujg. I.C«IIS37.7087. 

LEASING FOR Aug. '95- 
Ona, two. Ihrae, four 
and six-bedroom apart- 
ments and houses At 
31* N nth, 1019 
Otaga, 1530 Houston, 
800 Vattier. 606 Vattiar, 
eiO Valtier and S12 
ThursMn. 778-2102. 

ONE, TWO. three, four-bed- 
room apartments, close 
to campus, no pels, 
June leua. fi3ft-19T5 

ONE-BEDROOM ALL utlli- 
tiei psid. Near Ag- 

tieville 1220 Laramie. 
375. Available Feb. 5. 
776^3804. 

ONE-BEDROOM APART- 
MENT available now at 
Warehim Holal 418 
Poynti, S39S water/ 
trash paid. Laundry 
facilities. No pels. 
776-3804. 

ONE-BEDROOM APART- 
MENT, available Feb. 
15. 924 Fremont. »300. 
Water/ traah paid. Part- 
ing availabla. Cloe* to 
Aggioville. 776-3804. 

PARK PLACE APART- 
MENTS. Now pre-less- 



AUKE ANDERSON PLACE YOUR 
HOME AWAY FROM HOME! 

Now leasing for I99S-96 
*7 bedrooms 
* 'A block from campus 
•Furnished and unfurnished 
Showings every 
Monday through Friday 
3-5 p.m. 



1853 Anderson Place #4 
776-1148 



Ing ana. two arKJ thraa- 
bedroom apertmant*. 
1413 Cambridge tS. 
638-28S1. 

THREE-BEDROOM AVAIL- 
ABLE now on main 
noor of house 2303 /An- 
derson $600. Walar/ 
trash paid. Single car 
garage. Washer/ dryer 
provided. No pets. 776- 

TWO -BEDROOM AVAIL 
ABLE now. Basement 
apartmani, nice condi 
tion. 2303 Andarion 
S42S. Water/ irsih peid. 
Single car garage. 
Washer/ dryer provtd 
ad. No pais 776-3804 

TWO-BEDROOM AVAIL 
ABLE now on Stagg 
Hill. 803- SOS Allison. 
$38S. Walar/ trash paid 
Laundry facilHies Dllb- 
wathar. 776-3804. 

TWO-BEDROOM AVAIL- 
ABLE now Aggievllle 
Penthouse Apartments 
617 N. 12th ISSO We- 
tar/ trsih paid. Olah- 
washer, microwave. No 
peti, 776-3804 



Avallabi* 



MALE ROOMMATE want- 
ed: Will have own 
room Availabla now 
until July 31. S160/ 
month plus one-fourth 
utIIKJa*. 539-0676. 

1401 



For ftont- 



GARAGES FOR rent. 1886 
Collaga Haighta »2 $50. 
IMC CoUaee Haigm 94 
SfiO. Larga utttta^ 778* 
3804. 

14i| 



WanlMl 



A NON-SMOKER, share 
house, utilltlea with 
three responsit>la 
males. Large attic 
room, private phone, 
laundry, periling, S160. 
538-2468 Kay 

APARTMENT FOR rent. 
Mala roomimsta want- 
ad. Have own room 
and balh. 537-2894 or 
(913)527-6621. 

FEMALE, NON-SMOKING, 
roommate, three-bed- 
room epartmenL $199/ 
month plus utilities. 
Call Julie or Heether, 
537-4878. 

FOR NON SMOKER/ drink- 
ar. Roommate needed, 
walk to class 539-1554 

ROOMMATE NEEDED 
Available Mar. 1. Thrae- 
bedroom house, one- 
third ulllitie*. $150/ 
month. 776-7502. 

ROOMMATES NEEDED 

now. Two rooms avail- 
able. Brtttnsy Ridge 
complex. Call SS7-8611 
ash for anyone who 
lives there $ negoti- 
able, 587-8611 

ROOMMATES NEEDED to 
share house. Own bed- 
room, waahar/ dryer. 
$165/ month plua one- 
fourlh utilit!**. Call 
776-2397 



A VERY nice one-bedroom 
apartment. Available 
Mar. 1 to Aug. 1. Fur- 
nished, close lo cam- 
pus and Aggieville. 
quiet and nice neigh- 
bors. Cen renew leaae 
in Aug. Call 538-7500 
and leave massage. 

FEMALE NON-SMOKER 

wanted to sublaese tar- 
seat bedroom In three- 
badroom spartmenl. 
$195/ month negoti- 
eble. 587-0521, 

F0UR.8EDRO0M, TWO 
balh. Close to campus. 
Call 776-3445. $600/ 
month. 

NEW THREE BEDROOM, 
two balh, dishwaahar, 
$73D/ month, includaa 
eabia, water/ irash. Mid- 
May 10 July 31 May 
paid. Option lo leasa, 
5B7-em 

STUDIO APARTMENT. 721 
Fremont, now through 
Aug. option to renew 
lease $220 plua utill- 
lia*. Trash paid. 
539-9312, leave mes- 



SUBLEASE AVAILABLE In 

May. Two-bedroom, 
close to campua and 
Aggievllle. Furnished. 
A^ conditioned, park- 
ing, $485/ month, cell 
Sarah or J at 587-8074 

SUMMER SUBLEASE avail- 
able Mey- Aug. Mey 
paid for, two-bedroom 
11th and Bluamont. 
687-8768. 



SUMMER SUBLEA5E- 
Msle roommalB need- 
ed to there three bed- 
room, poolsida, Wood- 
wey Apertments. Rent 
negoileble. Call Jason 
at M7-8S67 



2oe 



SERVICE 

DIRECTORY 



aio| 

R«»um«/ 



A PERFECT reium* and all 
your other word pro- 
cessing needs. Laser 
printing. Cell Brenda 
776-3290. 

NEED SOMETHING typed? 
Ill type it for $1/ per 
page Call 537-9480 
after 5:30p.m.. but 
pla***, no call* after 
10p.m. /\*k for Jaclile. 



Desktop 
Publishing 



TYPED PAPERS, graphic*, 
chart) and graphs. 900 
font* and nine yeen ex- 
pa rienca to make your 
paper look great. Fann 
Graphic* 537-0448, 
f*nn9k*u.kiu.*du 




l'rt'j»aanf> 
lt'stiii«; ( t'littT 

539-3338 

•f nviniriLUKA 

kMlll;j 
•rn.iilwtXlliilL'llll.ll 

•i1A \\.V 
•S.UiiL'itt\ llMllls 
K'.ill liit,i|^ii4l1UIK'iil 



■ lit' J .H.'IO^^ I III 



Automotiv* 

Ir 



NISSAN- DATSUN Repair 
Service. 22 yeara ex- 
perience. Maidas, Hoo- 
ds s and Toyotas also. 
Auto CrafI, 2612 Dipper 
Lane, Maiihattan, ICan- 
aas S37-S049. 8am.- 
Sp.m. Mon.- Fri. 

DONNIE'S AUTO Works 

Foreign and Domestic 
Car Repair IFormer 
Noble Auto Works). 
Donnia is the winnar 
of the Sports Car Club 
of America Beet Ma- 
ohMile award 1809 Ft 
Riley Blvd e39-5Sn 
With ed S1Q off for 
labor over tlOO 



01fi«r 
S«rvlea« 



CASH FOR college. 
900.000 grams avail 
abla. No rapaymenti 
ever. Qualify imme- 
diately. (800I243-243S. 

FREE FINANCIAL AidI 
Over $6 billion in pri- 
vate aactor grants artd 
scholarships is now 
available. All student* 
are eligible regardlea* 
of flradst. income, or 
parent's income Lei u* 
h*lp. Call Student Fi- 
nanelal Services: 

18001263-6495 *xt 
FS7e82. 

PROMPT CONTRACEPTIVE 
and abortion aervlcaa. 
Dal* L. Clinton, M.D., 



(913)841-5716. 

RESUME PREPARATION. 
TAX PREPARATION, 
word processing, UPS, 
Shipping, copies and 
moret The Mail Canter 
ecross from Alco. 31 10 
/\nder*on, 776-624S. 



Claflln ^ 

Resumef 

CmH Uxiayt 779^771 



WEIGHT. COMPLEXION, 
or rnamory difFiculties? 
La«va a message at 
587-^78 for a free con- 
tullatton snd an ell-nat- 
ural solution. 



NutrtUonal 

W«lght Lo— 

AWESOME OIETI Lose 
40 pounds in only ona 
month. Proven suceass- 
lul and medically safe. 
No drugs or expensive 
food For entire plen 
send $7, check/ money 
order to K.TA., P.O, 
Box 1379, Wichit*. KS 
67201 

WANTED 100 student*: 
Lo*e 8- 100 pound* 
New melebollsm break 
through I lost IS 
pounds in three weeks. 
RN asiiiled Guer- 
aniesd results S3S 
(8001579-1634. 

^0» 



EMPLOYMENT/ 
CAREERS 



H»lp Wawtod 



Tha Collaglan eannnt 
verify tha f I nan eta I po- 
tential of arfvarttsa- 
mant* In tha Employ- 
mant/Carvar claeelflca- 
tlon. Raadere are ■<!- 
vieed to approach any 
such employment op- 
portunity with raaaon- 
abls caution. Tha Col- 
IsBian urgea our read- 
•ra to contael ttia ■•!• 
tar Buelnesa Bureau, 
601 SE Jaffaraon, Ta- 
paha. KS 66S07-11SO. 
r913>332-04S4. 

••tt Fun. hard working, 
money motiveled peo- 
ple looking for en op- 
portunity to succeed. 
Psri-time/ full-tinne 
Will trein. For eppoint- 
manl call S39-8O40 
axt.622. 

$17S0 weakly possible 
mailing our circular*. 
No exparlence re- 
quired. Begin now. For 
information call 

(202)298-4933 

ACCEPTING APPLICA- 
TIONS/ Resume* for 
swimming pool manag- 
er. Musi ba WSI certi- 
fied. Call 1913)457-3361. 
City of Westmoreland, 

AG BACKGROUND helpful 
to earn comiDtsston to 
IS/ hour msrketing 
unique agriculture pro- 
ducts 1800)755-0032, 

ALASKA SUMMER EM- 
PLOYMENT- Fishing 
Industry, Earn up to 
$3000- $6000 plus per 
month room end 
board! Transportation! 
Male/ female. No ex- 

fiarienca nece**aryl 
2061545-4155 
axt,A57684 

CRUISE SHIP JOBSI Attan- 
lion: Student*. Earn 
$2000 plu* monthly. 
Part-time/ full-tlma. 
World travel. Carib- 
bean. Hawaii. All poal- 
tiona available. No ex- 
perience, CALL; 
1802)453^4651. 

CRUISE SHIP* MOW 
HIRINO- Earn up to 
$2000 plua/ month 
working on Cruiie 
Ships or Land-Tour 
companies. World trav- 
el (Hawaii, Mexico, tha 
Caribbasn, etc.). Sea- 
sonal and hill lima em- 
ployment available. No 
experience necessary 
For more InFormetion 
call 1206)834-0468 
eM.CS7e84 

CUSTOM HARVESTER 
Nead ambitious individ- 
uals for wheat and row 
crop harvest. Truck driv- 
er* and combitM opera- 
tors needed. For infor- 
mation phon* 
(9131526-6326 or 6330 
Naegele Combine Inc. 

EMPLOYEES NEEDED to 
aaaiet In family on anted 
custom harvesting op- 
•ration. Salary negoti- 
able and reflective of 
employees compatibili- 
ty wfth amplovers lemi 
ly, customers and other 
employees For more 
tnfomatton reply lo 
Gary at 1316)225-0079 
after 5pm, 

FAST FUNDRAISER- raita 
•SOO In fIva deya- 
greak*, groupa, clubs, 
motivalad individual*. 
Fast, easy, no finartcial 
obllgsiion 
t800T77S-385» EXT 33 

GRAND OPENING new 
Manhattan office now 
has openings for part- 
time and full time. We 
need help in ell eree*. 



Full training, must have 
positive attitude. Travel 
options, 537-0805. 

HARVEST HELP needed. 
JD9600 and truck driv- 
ers wanted. Must ob- 
leln e CDL and will help 
obtain. Call for very 
good salary options. 
May lo Nov. Clydesdale 
Hervesting and Truck- 
ing. Cell Randy 
6^-«232. 

INTERNATIONAL EM- 
PLOYMENT- Earn up 
to $25- $45/ hour teach - 
Irw basic conversation- 
al English in Japan, Tai- 
wan, or S. Korea No 
leaching background or 
Asian languages re- 
quired. For in form alio n 
call <30S)832-114S 
•Kt.JB7eS2|. 

LIVE-IN GRADUATE a**!*- 

tentthip availabla In D«- 
perimani of Housing 
and Dining Service* be- 
ginning immediately, 
Conlaci Femlly Hous- 
ing Office at 539-2097 
for information. 

LIVE-IN NANNY needed 
tor east coast couple. 
Two children: good 
pay, benefits. Must pro- 
vide relerences. Call 
537-9745. after Sp.m, 

NEEDED TRUCK drivers 
tor wheat harveat from 
Texas to North Dakota, 
May through Aug. Da- 
lane Relmer 
(405)267-3367 

NEEDED: 38 people to lose 
weight now, all natural, 
guaranteed, doctor rec- 
ommended, works es- 
pecially well for wom- 
en. Call 537-6892. 

NEW ENGLAND Brother- 
Sister Campa- Mas- 
sachusetts Mah-Kea 
Nac for Boys/ Oanbee 
tor Glrta. Counselor po- 
sitions tor program 
Specialist*: All Team 
Sports, especially Basa- 
ball. Basketball, Golf, 
Field Hockey. Roller 
Hockey, Soccer. Volley- 
ball; 30 Tennis open- 
ings; also Archery, Ri- 
fle ry, Plonaerir^ Over- 
night Camping, 
Weights/ Fitness and 
Cycling; o^er opaninga 
include Performing 
Art*, Fne Arts, Pottery. 
Figure Skating, Gym- 
nastics, Nawspeper 
Photography. Year- 
book, Radio Station. 
Rocketry, Rope* and 
Rock Climbing; All Wa- 
terfront Activitie* 
ISwimminp, Skiing, 
Sailing, Windsurfing, 
Canoeing/ Kayaking). 
Great selary, room, 
board and travel, June 
IS- Aug. IS. Inquire: 
Mah-Kaa-Nac (doysl 
190 Linden Avenue, 
Glen Ridge, NJ 07028. 
Call 1800)7539118 DoO: 
bit. I Girt* I 17 Westmin- 
ster Drive. Montvllle, 
NJ 07045. Cell 
18001392-3752. 

PART-TIME RESIDENTIAL 

construction axparl- 
enca necessary, will 
work around class 
schedules. 776-4954 

SPORTS MINDED. It you 
heve a competitive 
edge but are a team 
player we need you 
now. Full trainino/ trav- 
el options. Full-time/ 
part-time 45K income 
potential 537-0802. 

STUDENT REPRESENTA- 
TIVE needed to run 
marketing project on 
campus, part-time, 
great earning poleniial 
1-lS00)-4Sft-VltA 
x3S 

SUCCESS MINDED Indi- 
viduals needed for 
salaa and msnagemanl 
poaiiions in explosive 
growth company tult- 
tim* praferred, part- 
time also. Seriou* in^ui- 
rie* only Call Patrick 
587-9700 ext 924, 

SUMMER HARVEST help 
needed. Run John 
Deere 9fiO0'* end 9600 
snd drive truck. CDL 
prelsrred. Parker Har- 
vesling Call 

1913)363-2527, 

SUMMER HARVEST help 
and run 2188 Casie l,H 
combine* and thraa au- 
tomatic trucks. Wanted 
experience: CDL lor 
truck dnvers and com- 



bine operators Payroll 
$1600/ month lor ax- 
pener>ca. Will also work 
with olher lo get CDL. 
Prefer non-*mok*r*, 
non-drink*r* and non 
drug u*er*. Call 
(913)689^4660. 

WANTED: HARVEST Help. 
Combine operilort for 
four new 9600's JO'S. 
Semi drivers, must 
have COL, will help ob- 
tain, Circle C Farms. 
Call Susan at 587-8823 
or Steve at (316)872- 
32S8W&B33. 



4^ 



OPEN 
MARKET 



4101 



Horns for S«l« 



BEGINNERS SAXOPHONE 

newly padded. Conn 
trumpet. Crate amplifi- 
er. Solotlex. 2B6 com- 
Butar. 80M harddriva, 
Isrk S39-102S until 
11:30p.m, 

GOOD USED 2erox 6458 
Memorywrlter word- 

Crocessor, will ttke 
est offer. Call 
I913)292~42S0 week- 
day*. 

WORD PROCESSOR- like 
new. with monitor. 
Smith Corort* , More In- 
formation on disk or 
u** as a typewriter. 
$160 or best offer. Call 
(9131396-3045. 



TIME MACHINE Antique 
Maul and Geeb Empori- 
um, 6000 square feet, 
entjques. collectibles, 
estele Jewelry, furni. 
ture, 4910 Skywey Or. 
four Wock* eeet of Man- 
helten Airport, Open 
Tue*,- Set. 12- Sp.m. 
S39-4684. 



CoWjHltOfS 



COMPLETE AMIGA com- 
puter system. Two disk 
drives, mouse, color 
stereo monitor, ton* of 
soltwar*. Five joysticks. 
much mora. $190 (or 
bast offer) :»6-2017 

MACINTOSH Computer 
Complete system in- 
cluding printer only 
$599. Call Chri* at 
(800)289-6688. 

SEGA GENESIS Sy*tem 
plus mortal Kombat II 
ar>d other games $125. 
IBM harddnva 5,25 inch 
floppy drive, $25. Key 
iMSrd* 5 each, XT 8088 
CGA monitor, primer 
and more 486 SX33 
CPU chip, 639-4643 



PERFECT DORM room 
pats. Two adult Boa s 
sbout rive feet. One Cai- 
man, about two f**t 
$50, cagea evallabla. 
Call Jeff, 776-3501. 



Tlekots to 



WANTED; MENS basket- 
ball Tourney tickets. 
Cell (9 1 31384-6944 or 
(800)387-«944 



Whaf do you do if you see a fire? 

1. Call 911 

2. Then call us 



News Tips 

532-6556 



Kansas St/oi Collegian 



SOD 



TRANS- 
PORTATION 



Biol 



Automoblloo 



1976 DATSUN truck, runs 
good, 1971 (3odge tn>di 
runs good, 1982 Audi, 
needs work. 639-657S. 

1976 FORD Ihrae-quartar 
ton, 390 V8 four-ipead. 
Good solid truck- $600 
in new tiras- SIOOO ne- 
gotiable. 539-2453. 

1983 BMW 320; Flva- 

speed, iwo-door. air, 
sport seats, many naw 
part*, start* right up, 
K750, 587-9374, ask lor 
Rob. 

1985 DODGE Deyton* 
sport, automatic, two- 
door, new tires, 109K, 
runs good, asking $960, 
negotiable 776-0013 
after 6p-m or vmiekand. 

1985 HONDA Accord Two- 
door, eutomatic, good 
engine, great corxlition, 

rsod for long diatanc*. 
1800 negolltbia, 
537-622S. 

1985 MUSTANG, lour cy- 
linder, lour-*p**d, air. 
power Bteering, lock*, 
uphol*tery, 63,000 
mlla*. Asking $2460. Ex- 
cellent condition 
(913>46»-2841. 

1987 VW GTI, five-spaad, 
AM/FM cassette, run* 
strong, new tira* and 
shock*, sacurily *y*- 
tem. sharp. Call 
S37-1446. $6000 or baM 



1994 I5UZU Amigo, blue, 
loaded. 9,000 miles r>ew 
$17,600 asking $14,500 
or best offer 539-4643. 
leave message, serious 
Inquirie*. 

swl 



Motofcyel— 



YAMAHA 1974 TX500 
14,000 miles, new bat- 
tery good tire*, $1800. 
395-3943, Jamie. 



600 



TRAVEL/ 
TRIPS 



6101 



Tour Focfcogos 



Ski Colorado 



Discount Lift Ticki?ts 



SUAraa Har* 

Kaystone/ 

Bfeckenfidga^*42 "33 
A-Basin 

Copper Mnt, *39 *33 
Winter Park ^9 *32 

• Lifl obkets musf be ordurwd 
inadvaftcttommum 
avatlabitify 

• H onMring >or Spring Bramk 
phase ontar before Man:h 9. 

537-7S4S 
Of t-S00-842'1S70 

Classic 

IVavel & Tours 

1212 Moro Aggl^llto 



Alrptono Tickots 



SPRING BREAK In Colora- 
do, Ona round trip tick- 
et to Denver, Colorado. 
Call Denny at 639-1 1« 
for more details. 



Not enough 

I time on your 

^ hands to get 

^everything 

done? 

Check** 

Classifieds 

service directory. 

OLLEGlAN 

KnlilalO} S31-4SSS 



4 Q l^wsdaKFebnuiry^Si^dd^ 



KANSAS STATI COLLEGIAN 



Farm bill might focus 
more on property rights 



CONTINUED FROM PAGE 1 

very important program," Bamaby 
said. 

The present farm programs are a 
safety net for farm income. They 
provide some stability in a business 
environment that can change 
overnight due to everything from 
bugs to floods. In turn, they provide 
a stable U.S. food supply at reason- 
able prices, Flinchbaugh said. 

Over the past 1 years, the pay- 
ments have been cut in half. The 
push is coming, and the government 
wants to make more cuts, Bamaby 
said. 

For the 1995 farm bill, some 
farmers are requesting more flexi- 
bility in planting. If the farmers had 
more lenient provisions, they could 
respond to the market and crop 
rotations. 

"So now there is a trade-off 
between cuts in income or flexibili- 
ty in planting," Bamaby said. 

The revenue insurance is a new 
approach getting attention. This 
way, govern men I ensures farm rev- 
enues will never fall below a certain 
level. 

The group has been talking to 
farmers who mn all sizes of farms 
because each farm is an individual 
case with individual needs. 

Flinchbaugh said he doesn't 
support the idea that the govern- 
ment can reduce costs by eliminat- 
ing commodity program payments 
to farmers with large-scale opera- 
tions. 

Large-scale farms not only pro- 
duce the bulk of U.S. farm com- 
modities and income but also 
encompass much of the acreage. 



WHAT KANSAS FARMERS WANT 



Rat$e defidency payrnents trotn Ihe govemnient 
No gowmmeni invo^OTeni 
Keep tlwprssent farm bill 
Lower (Mdency payments 



NofHWponsas 



27% 
11% 
3% 




Souim: B«(n«t>y, FlinchtMuoh. Kok mna Langtmtlar 



JUSTIN STAHLIMN/CoMgtan 



Directing payments to farmers 
with small- to mid-scale operations 
would eliminate most conservation 
efforts. It could greatly increase the 
instability of U.S. food output, 
Flinchbaugh said. 

He also said crop rotation and 
flexibility of the farmers is better 
for t?ie land and the farmers. 

Environmental groups helped 
draft and support the I9S5 and 1990 
form bills, he said. 

"Of course, our new Congress is 
less environmentally friendly than 
the previous one. It's going to be 
giving more consideration to indi- 
vidual property rights." Flinch- 
baugh said. 

Congress, farmers and the envi- 
ronmental groups have the same 
interests and goals — it is Just a 
matter of working all the ideas into 
one bill, he said. 

"Environmental and farm groups 
aren't natural enemies like sheep 
and coyoies The media have over- 



dramatized their conflicts. Both 
groups will be telling Congress they 
support much the same things." 
Rinchbaugh said. 

Their research has shown that 27 
percent of the farmers want no gov- 
ernment involvement and want to 
phase out the deficiency payments. 
The majority, 53 percent, of the 
farmers want the deficiency pay- 
ments raised. 1 1 percent want to 
keep the present bill, and 3 percent 
want it lowered. The other 6 per- 
cent was non- responsive. 

Bamaby, Flinchbaugh, Kok and 
Langemeier are conducting semi- 
nars in about 20 cities all over the 
state. The group has traveled to 
Goodland, Hoxie. Hugolon. Beloit 
and several cities in the eastern 
region. 

Congress will start to write the 
1995 farm bill in a few months. 
Once the process gets started, the 
bill will become law by the end of 
the year, Bamaby said. 



News Digest 



►LIQUOR-SALES BILL DODGES CHANGES, MOVES CLOSER TO BEING UW 



TOPEKA (AP) — A Senate 
committee on Monday endorsed 
a Sunday liquor sales bill and 
steered clear of amendments, 
even though some lawmakers 
think the House-passed measure 
has a problem. 

The Federal and Slate AHairs 
Committee sent to the Senate a 
measure that would allow liquor 
stores to be open on Sundays. 
as well as Memorial Day, Pourtti 



of July, and Labor Day. 

In addition, the bill would 
altow people to buy liquor with a 
lenders' card. That is a credit 
card issued by a bank, such as 
VISA or MasterCard. Credit 
cards offered by companies, 
such as Discover or American 
Express, could not be used. 

The House passed the mea- 
sure on a 63-61 vote, to the sur- 
prise of many observers. 



While Sen. Lana Oleen, R- 
Manhattan. the committee chair- 
woman, said she wanted to cor- 
rect what she sees as a flaw in 
the measure and change 
lenders' card to credit card, sup- 
porters of Sunday liquor sales 
declined to offer an amendment. 

Under the bill, county resi- 
dents would have to vote to altow 
Sunday liquor sales. The earliest 
election could not be until 1996. 



► RESPONSIBILITY FOR SCHOOL-ACCREDITATION-SYSTEM UNDER REVIEW 



TOPEKA (AP) - The Kansas 
Board of Education received a 
clear message from the House 
Monday when it advanced two 
measures attempting to modify 
the state's controversial school- 
accreditation system 

The House advanced a bill 
designed to wash the Kansas 
Legislature's hands of responsi- 
bility for the board's Quality 
Performance Accreditation sys- 
tem, or QPA. There was no dis- 
cussion before representatives 
approved the bill on voice vote. 

The House also recommend- 



ed changes to the system in the 
form of a resolution, which has 
rK> legal authority. 

The two measures do not 
directly affect QPA because only 
the board has the constitutional 
authority to change or eliminate 
the system. 

But the Legislature, which has 
heard hours of testimony from 
opponents of the system, can 
remove its endorsement of QPA 
from the 1992 School District 
Finance and Quality 
Performance Act, putting all 
responsibility for the system on 



the board It also can ask the 
board by resolution to scrap or 
change QPA 

The board is scheduled to 
consider at its March meeting a 
Senate resolution adopted two 
weeks ago that asks it to atnlish 
controversial Student Outcome 
V, which stresses student emo- 
tional and physical well-t>eing. 

The House resolution recom- 
mends that the board continue to 
streamline the papenvork 
required for accreditation and to 
judge schools on measurable 
academic standards. 



BSU president stresses need 
for group to recruit students 




I jT llair Company '^ i 



CONTINUED FROM PAGE 1 

think it is an honor." 

Abdulhaqq said BSU is the 
biggest recmitment and retention 
tool of minority students the 
University has except for athletics. 
Taylor-Archer said she agreed the 
club gives Afncan American stu- 
dents more visibility on campus. 

However, Abdulhaqq said he 
feels the campus does not acknowl- 
edge the group for its recruiting and 
retention aspects, especially when it 
comes to financing. 

"People don't realize how much 
time, energy and finances that it 



takes to put on a month of evenLs 
like Black History Month," he said. 

Although BSU did not directly 
sponsor all the events, it did work 
to promote them, he said, adding 
that he believes the entire month of 
events has been successful. 

Abdulhaqq also said it is impor- 
tant for BSU to have scholarships to 
aid in the recruitment and retention 
of African American students. 

With that in mind. BSU is gear- 
ing up for its next event, a campus- 
wide kick -ball tournament to raise 
money for its scholarship fund. The 
event will be April 22 at the Chester 



E. Peters Recreation Complex. 

After college, Abdulhaqq plans 
to continue striving to be the person 
his name prescribes. Through poli- 
tics, he said, he would like to repre- 
sent this district on both the local 
and national levels. 

"This is home," he said. 



^»**» 'o^ 




t!4L 



7J6-J330J 



(;uo( i:kv(<)-oi' 




Student 
Discount! 



NAUTILUS 



^SBfflTNCSi ttAIHOtUC CChTtlH 

1100 Moro 77f-l«54 

Aggievllle 
Manbxua 



Haallli EihiriHim 8 Pramolian 

Laf ene Baalth Gentei 

•A resource center for written health materials 
•A resource center for aucUo-vlsual health materials 
•Provides presentations to groups on a vaitety of 
h«ilth topics 

•Provides one-on-one evaluation and referral 
information 

For More Information 
Call S32-6S95 



Auto -^Z 
-^^r\irectory 




Financial Aid 

> March 1 

tbu may apply tor federal financial assistance 
\'by completing and mailing your Federal 
' Rsriewal Application or a Free Application For 

Federal Student Financial Aid by K-State's 

priority deadline o( March 1. Applications are 

I available in 104 Paiichild Hall. 




Taco Tuesday 

500 TacOS (Chicken or Beef, 

Hard or Soft Shell) 

$1 Margaritas (Reg. or 

Strawberry) 

$1 Frosty Mugs 

•Bobby T's'Candlewood Shopping Center' 
Featuring Dally Drink & Food Specials 




>VVVV«;»VV«VVVVVVVVVVVVVVVVVVVVVVVVVV!VVtf 

I 
I 

■{ 

j j 539-KICK * 231 5 TUTTLE CREEK g 



$2.99 8 oz. Ribeye 

Every TXiesday and Wednesday 5-8 p.m. 
N — 1 ^ Saloon <St Grill 



No Coupon" Specials 



(NO COtipOd rn'iilttl 

NONE tittcptL'd) 



Everyday 
Two-fers 

2 - PIZZAS with 
2 - TOPPINGS each 
2 - COKES with ice 



Everyday 
Three-fers 

3 - PIZZAS with 

1 - TOPPING each 

4 - COKES with ice 



$8.45 



PriCMdonM 
include saJM Uwo* 



JS10.34 



Pizza Shuttle 776-5577 




DONNIE^S AUTO WORKS 

Foreign and Domestic car repair 

•TUne-ups 
•Engine Rebuilding 
•Race Engine & Race Chassle 
Preparation 




Donnie is the 

winner of the 

SCCA's "Best 

Mechanic of the 

Year" award. 



539-5511 



$10 discount on bill 
over $100 with this ad. 



1809 Ft. Riley Blvd. 
(Formerly Noble Auto Works) 




Rose 
Muffler House 

**Our Business is Exhausting** 

•GUSS TINTING SERVICES AVAILABLE 

•MUFFLERS •TAILPIPES 

•DUAL SYSTEMS 

• 'AUTO (AMERICAN & FOREIGN) 

•RVs* LIGHT & HEAVY DUTY TRUCKS 

•CUSTOM PIPE BENDING 

• COMPLETE BRAKE SERVICE FOR 

AMERICAN, FOREIGN, & LIGHTTRUCKS 

• SHOCKABSORBERS • STRUTS 

• U-HAUL TRUCKS & TRAILERS 

FREE ESTIMATES 

Open Mon.-Fri. 7:30 a.m.-5:30 p.m., Sat 8 a.m.-Noon 





^^ 



2049 Ft. Riley Blvd. 1-800-439-8956 776-8955 



^H j^.«X. 



Exp. Dste WW 
ranus Stste HistxiCJ) Society 
Netspaper Section 
i:o W lOtih 
Topeki ¥S iitl2 



■/.i 



imsci^ ^1^n:i, 



n 



\^OLLEGIAN 



MARCH IS 

AsJarvAmerion Awareness Monlfi 
aret Wnnerfi History Month. Many 
adMlM Hi take piace throughout 
Mwtt in celebration of tfiei 




LIVING WITH 
A GHOST/ A 

MwntMrsofPi I ^ * 
KipptPM 
raoountnom 
about Duncan, 

Inshiheir 

hom nuii 



/i \ 




HIQH LOW 

24 15 

snow 

WBATHEJI^PAatt 




nm Mpr f""*- UdWefMi e«p<M w* as c«iib. 



► ILECTIONS 



City-wide turnout fair; 
few on campus vote 



City-wide turnout may have 
been average, tnii for those working 
ihe campus precinct at Derby Food 
Center, it was a long day. 

Only 43 of the 335 registered 
campus voters turned out to cast 
their ballots — and that included 
E*resident Jon Wefald's family, who 
live on campus, said Kara Bieberty, 
Ward 3, Precinct 4 chair and fresh- 
man in political science. 

Besides the Wefalds, people eli- 
gible to vote in the campus precinct 
were locally registered voters living 
in residence halls and Jardine 
Terrace Apartments, Blebcrly said 

City-wide turnout was 24 per- 
cent, I peaent shy of what County 
Clerk ttene Colhen had predicted. 

"1 was afraid it would be a lot 
less than that. I'm gtad at least we 
had that many," Colbert said. 

Colbert said the turnout was 
about average for a city primary. 

Jody Mathews, campus precinct 
clerk and freshman in economics, 
said many students register in their 
hometowns, but she said they 
should vote in Manhattan because 
they live here nine months of the 
year, 

Bieberly said she agreed. 

"It only takes a couple of min- 



utes to go down and register," she 
said. 

Ruth Burk. supervising judge for 
Ward 3, Precinct 2, which voted at 
the UFM House, said that for her 
precinct, this election had more stu- 
dents vote than Manhattan citizens. 

"I'm glad to see that students arc 
taking an interest in it," Burk said. 

Voting at the UFM House were 
registered voters living directly east 
of campus, 

Gertrude Leppla, supervising 
judge at Ward 2, Precinct 2, which 
voted at Bluemont Elementary 
School, said she was surprised more 
students had not turned out, consid- 
ering a student, Justin Kastner, was 
running for city commission. 

Leppla attributed a lack of 
response to the numbers of elderly 
living in the district and the bad 
weather. 



mm 



^ For coverage of 

Justin Kastner and 
the USD 363 Board of 
Education runoff 




1ST-R0UND ELECTION WINNERS 

Thefoilowtng indicates which candiditesfor Muihattan City Commssion and USD 
383 Schtxil Board wM be on to b^ ftK the gemral ^adtan Aprt 4. The total 

number and pefcsnta^ of votes tftey received foiows Mr nam«s. 



Mmhflttan Ctty Commistion USD 383 SCHOOL BOARD 



CD Stanley A Crowder 296 3.0% 
^ Steve Hall 2273 23.1% 

^ Edward Home 1512 1S.4% 
^Justin Kastner 2469 25.1% 
^ MAteliAenring 917 9,3% 
flB Lax M. Pearson 571 5,8% 
CD Tim SchfBfl 136 1.4% 

fl* Bruce Snead 1673 17.0% 
ENgibte votere who paftidpatsd in ttM 
•ltctlon:4665,24ptrGNrt 



CD Rk* Crow 266 2,0% 

CD PetefW.Garretson 324 2.4% 

■i Colleen Han^pton 796 6,0% 

M JoteenJ.Hiil 2709 20,5% 

^PtiliMoigtfi 1537 11,6% 

^ MwyMchois 1976 14.9% 

^ Debbie LNuss 2070 15.6% 

ۥ Michael Peaiion 930 7,0% 

^ Larry Weave: 2136 16,1% 

^ IQmbariyV,Wells 400 3,7% 



CAKV CONOVin'CQNegian 

After filling out her ballot, Ruth Ann Wefald walks out of a voting booth Tuasday aftamoon In Derby Food Canlar. Wetald was the 24th 
parson of the day lo vole «t Derby, which was where all atudenta living on campus were assigned to vote, 

► CrTY ELECTIONS 

Kastner, Hall lead the pack 



TRISHA SeNNIHaA/CoiMglW) 



SARAH LUNDAV 

Stanley Crowdcr was knocked off 
the lir<t of city commission candidates 
when the results of primary elections 
were tallied on Tuesday night. 

The 4,665 voters picked from six 
new candidates and one incumbtcnt, 
Tim Shrag pulled out of the election 
early in the race bul still received 1 36 
votcii. Incumbent Steve Hall cume in 
second, just behind newcomer and K- 
State student Justin Kastner 

Hall said he feels good about his 
performance during the last two years 
and is trying to reconnect with that 
petlommnce. 

"1 did wtiat I ^id I wa.<> going to 



do, and I didn't do what 1 said 1 was- 
n't going to do." Hall said. 

He said the important i&.sues con- 
cerning the city are out there, and vot- 
ers just need to know where tlie candi- 
dates stand on them. 

Fourth-place candidate Edward 
Home said an issue that needed to be 
focused on more was unity within the 
Manhattan community. 

He said as a community, Manhat- 
tan needs to unify and think about pre- 
serving itself with a strong job base. 

"It has been talked about, but it 
needs to be at the top of the list," 
Horrw said. 

Home said it looks tike an interest- 
ing race, and he is looking forwanl to 



getting his message out lo voters. 

Lex Peatson said he wants to get 
the mess^e across thai the city com- 
mission is there for the future. 

"The commission is there for the 
good of the city and to think of the 
^ture — not just what's happening 
today and tomont»w, but for years to 
come," Pearson said 

He said one reason he thinks he 
didn't place high in the primary was 
because he needs to get his name out. 

Attending all the fonims, iiKreas- 
ing advertising and shaking some 
more hands are ways Pearson said he 
was going to increase publicity. 

Bruce Snead, third-place candi- 
date, said he looks forward lo going to 



more forums and meeting people over 
Ihe next few weeks. 

New techniques in his campaign 
will include putting out yard signs, 
which weren't available earlier, and 
continuing to meet with petite, 

Justin Kastner, junior in food sci- 
ence and industry, placed first in Ihe 
polls Tuesday night and said one strat- 
egy he will lake during the nexi weeks 
will be to have coffee meetings. He 
said he will be anending foiums, and 
nrwre walks are scheduled. 

Fifth-place candidate Mike 
Manning was unavailable for com- 
ment. The final three city commis- 
sioners will be chosen by voters at the 
polls on April 4 




1 ► CITY COMMISSION 

• Preservation Board gets aid 



TOGO railAOK/ColMeian 



K could bt the end of the line for Manhattan's tnin depot unlaas a use can be found for the 
structure, which Is on the Ksnsse Register of Historic PIscss, Ths dspol Is surrounded by a 
enow fenco to help prevent vsi^dallsm. 



MILWU MO YT 

Ci>ilegian 

The Msnhattan Community 
Preservation Board received an 
increase in support from the Manhattan 
City Commission. 

Although there was no official vote 
taken in the ciiy-commission work ses- 
sion, a general census was taken in 
favor of allowing the Preservation 
Board to take on more projects. 

The Preservation Board was created 
to help maintain the historic structures 
in the downtown district. 

Those structures located on Third 
Street and all structures located down 
Poyniz Avenue were in the board's 
jurisdiction. 

The original role of the Preservation 
Board was to be an advisory board, but 
there were no provisions made to give 
to board any power over the groups it 
serves. 

The Manhattan/Riley County 
Preservation Alliance spoke in support 



of increising the power of the 
Preservation Board. 

Alliance President Dixie West 
spoke for Ihe group. 

West presented four mtin points: 

■ The 
Preservation 
Board would be 
able to promote 
sensitive fillings 
of houses in older 
neighborhoods 
and regulate the 
quality of Ihe fill- 
ins. 

West said the ___________ 

older neighbor- 
hoods are having 

the old houses replaced with cheaply 
made duplexes that do not follow the 
architecture of the neighborhood, 

■ The Preservation Board would be 
able to make quality housing afford- 
able 10 workers in the industries that 



MAKING 
WAY FOR 

5c-177s 



Manhattan is trying to attract. 

"Not everyone thai comes to 
Manhattan is going to be able to afford 
housing in Sharing Brook. We need lo 
provide quality housing to those who 
make $2S,000 a year and have fami- 
lies." West said. 

'Trailer houses are not the answer," 
she said. 

■ The Preservation Board could 
coordinate the moving of houses that 
no longer have homes to new neighbor- 
hoods. 

West said because of construction 
projects, such as the Kansas Highway 
177 bridge project, quality houses in 
Manhattan ore being torn down. 

"If we move these houses to the 
older neighborhoods, we can relocate 
Ihe houses and assure that the quality 
and architecture are in accordance with 
the existing structures." West said. 

■ The Preservation Board could 

■ See OLD Page 5 



► K-177 



Preservation Alliance fights to save train depot 



t.Um WIWHWAM 



Callt|(in 

The old Manhattan Depot liti 
desolate along Fori Riley 
Boulevard with no funding to keep 
it up. 

The Manhattan/Riley County 
Preservation Alliance would like to 
change that, 

The depot is on the Kansas 
Register of Historic Places, 

In order for the depot to suy on 



the register, the structure can't be 
altered, 

"We are concerned about the 
structural integrity of the build- 
ing," said Dixie West, president of 
the Manhattan/Riley County 
Preservation Alliance. 

"We would like to tee the depot 
stay on the Kansas Historic 
Register," West said. 

"We need to find a use for It 
before grant money can be applied 



for," she said. 

The depot has fallen prey to 
vandalism, and some of the origi- 
nal brick that has fallen off the 
depot during the years has been 
stolen. 

West said the city of Manhattan 
has secured the depot with a fence 
and removed the fallen brick to a 
safe area. 

There have been many ideas for 
the depot, such as a meeting space. 



a museum, a gallery or a studio. 
Nothing has come of these ideas as 
of yet. 

Bruce McCallum, director of 
public works, said there have been 
extensive architectural studies 
done on the old depot to determine 
possible uses, 

Blaine Thomas, Manhattan resi- 
dent, has an extensive collection of 
old music machines and slot 
machines. 



Thomas said he would like to 
refurbish the old depot to its origi- 
nal state and use it as a museum 
for his old music machines and 
slot machines. 

This may not be possible. 

Problems that have plagued the 
old depot are limited parking and 
difficult access to the building, 

"We have to wait and see how 
much parking is there," Thomas 
said, 

McCallum said the new Kansas 
Highway 1 77 bridge will run adja- 
cent to the depot bul should not 
hamper access. 



"Access has always been a 
problem," McCallum said, 

Kitty Cool, Manhattan resident, 
said she would like to sec the old 
depot preserved, 

"It's been here longer than I 
have — and I've been here for 50 
years," Cool said. 

Cool said she was at the old 
depot to greet the K -State men's 
basketball team in 1 93 1 after they 
lost the national championship 
game to the University of 
Kentucky. 

"It holds a lot of memories for a 
lot of us." Cool said. 



2 Wednesday^ March 1, 1995 



KANSAS STATE COLLEGIA^ 



#News briefs 



► RILEY COUNTY POLICE ARREST SUSPECTS IN HOOD ORNAMENT THEFTS 



n your car has been brohon Into 
or vandalized in tde last coupttt ol 
days, file your report now: 

The Riley County Police 
Oepanment has reoovefod 2S stolen 
hood ornaments, several stolen 
stereos and radar detectors that It 
suspects were stolen from the 
Manhattan area. Several suspects 
have been arrested in connection 
with the thefts. 

The police need peopte to caH or 
come in to Identify the stolen Hemt 
so the juveniles can be charged, 
Detective Ryan Rurtyan said. 

The recovered hood orrvaments 
are from cars Including Bulck. 



Oldsmoblle, Chrysler and Dodge 
models. Runyan said 

The Items were taken from cars 
In Westchester Apartments and the 
surrounding areas ol the K -State 
campus, Including College View 
Road arx) Hunting Avenue. 

"We think the tnatonty of the car* 
burglarized belong lo students.' 
Runyan said. 

Three juvenile subjects have 
tieen identified who are sus|>ected 
of committing numerous burglaries 
ar^ damaging vehicles 

The police department has 
arrested two ol the subjects and 
hopes to have Itie third under arrest 




To (dentefy Stolen property, 
contact f^Rw^ga^ 115 N.. 




► MEETING TO DESCRIBE ELECTION GUIDELINES 



Want to run lor a Siudenl 
Governing Association position, but 
not sure where to begin or what you 
want to do7 

The Senate Elections Committee 
will be sponsoring an inlormational 
meeting at 4:30 p.m. today In Union 
204 The meelir>g wiH tte cor>ducted 
a second time at 7 p.m. Thursday In 
Union 209. 

The purpose ol the meetings is lo 
describe elecliKt positions and 
responsibilities to students interest- 
ed In twcoming SGA car>didatS5 

Students will be told wtvat posi- 
tions are available, as vireii as what 
Iha expectations and realistic lime 
commitments are, Trtcia Ktolfi. coor- 
dinator of student activities, said 

Some of the elected positions 
available Include student tmdy presi- 
dent and vice president, student 
senators. Board of Student 




tnltirmei meetings to learn 

about running for Siudent 
SAfialewi be at 4:30 p.m. 

finUniQR2Q4ar)d7p.m. 




Publications, Arts and Sciences 
Council. Agriculture Council. Fine 
Arts Council. Judicial Board and the 
Union Governing Board. 

these meetings are atxMJt the 
wfiole. big picture ol student govern- 
ment and a precursor to tl>e elec- 
tions,' Nolfi said. 



soon. All three subjects are in high 
school. 

If your car has been tiurglanzed 
within the past tew days, contact 
Runyan at 1 15 N. Fourth St. or call 
537-2106. 

CMnsnwMOHT 



► SENATE INCREASES 
FUNDING TO SCHOOLS 

TOPEKA (AP) — The Senate 
•(Jnnced a bill Tuesday that 
would increase state aid to all 
school dtslricts by $21 a student, 
up from the present base budget 
rate ol $3,600 a student. 

In addition, larger school dis- 
tricts — those with more than 
1 ,fl67 students — would receive 
an additional S43 15 per pupil 
under a "high -enrollment" weight- 
ing provision. 

Some legislators contend that 
the larger schools have been 
stvortchanged since the present 
school finance law was passed in 
1992 Small distncts receive low- 
enrollment funding under the law 

The smaller sctiooi dtstrtcts 
receive more money per pupil 
because they qualiiy for Ihe low- 
enrollment weighting. 



► KANSAS SUPREME COURT RULES SENTENCE NOT CRUEL OR UNUSUAL 



TOPEKA {AP) — Sentencing an 
armed robber to pnson lor a longer 
period ol time than a murderer 
would gel, virtually ensuring that he 
will die in prison, does not constitute 
cruel or unusual punishment, the 
Kansas Supreme Court decided 
Tuesday. 

Michael McCloud appealed his 
sentence ol 96 years to life after 
being convicted in Johnson County 
District Coun ol t2 counts ol aggra- 
vated rotibery on grounds ttiat those 



convicted of multiple murders 
receive lesser senter>ces than ha did 
and that he effectively was sen- 
tenced to death in prison 

The court rejected his arguments 
and affirmed his sentence it said his 
sentence was not excessive or dis- 
proportionate lo the olfenses he 
committed. 

McCloud was 37 when he com- 
mitted the robberies and is 4t now 
He had no prior criminal record. 

'The fact that a minimum sen- 



tence imposed by a district ludge 
exceeds the life expectancy of the 
defendant Is not grour>ds, per se. for 
finding that the sentertce is oppres- 
sive or constitutes an abuse ol dis- 
cretion.' said the opinion written by 
Justice Tyler Locltett. 

Justice Sob Abbott concurred 
with reluctance with the decision's 
result bui noted that under Kansas' 
new sentencing guidelines, the ntax- 
imum term McCloud would receive 
a 17 years. 



<^ Police REPORTS ^Bulletin board 



Hardeer 

Delivers 
9 a.m.-l a.m. Daily 



"^1*4) 



Inside Manhattan 
City Limits Only 




Now 



Now 



1^ Kansas State Uolon jg^ 

and 

Trotter Kail 



8«t 9 ajiL- lOSO pjn. • Sun. Noon • l(hSO pju. 

Come Join us when the dorm cafetertaa are dosed I 




"Bui be doers o/ike Hbrd, and not heartn 

only, deceiving yountlvti. 
-Jime*i:22 



AdvcftlKmenl 



"f'ii (If) if /n'\/ 



from 



i/ic i>llh('..Mt'\( 
'jt>t w»»/i' li ifii(l\ 



f r iDtnr^ ii\t'i it II 



itiuini 



iiuiiith > iiH'finr^ 



<il>lhiiiiti)k nr t 



hjiit t"i im /i» L'«'t /ill It 



.hill'-.' li.i J.I 



A better choice, 
not a better excuse. 

Having a mammogram just got easier 

at Memorial Hospital. Our advanced 

imaging services department offers 

mammograms during evening hours. 

So after your office is closed, your dinner 

dishes are done and your kids have finished 

their homework, you can schedule some vital 

time for yourself. Have a mammogram. 



Ytittrdiy'l vtiutf , toiTiorrow'i tKhnology * Sunttl and Clafltn * Manhittin « 913-776-3300 



tfncHy hwH 1m MIf Itfi *f ttkt K^tite Mid RIcf C#Mflt| 



ANNOUNCIMINT* 



AppllcsUaiu r«r ArU *i 
deai'i ciirKt. Appiic«i«K 3RdiKitSp.ni. Mardi 16 



; ivsili^ m iIk; 



K^ATE POLICE 



BULLETIMS 



MOHDAY, FEBRUARY Z7 

A( 10 ^^ J iTi J iTiJiiiir iiijmiiger 
nun-injury vehitle mxitkm invutvmi 
Kimberly Miller And Bt\c Bu^kifk 

RUJEYCOUKTY POUa 



occurrtd at I he dnvt lieiwetii L<M> 
A -3« Ml A- 10. 



MOHDAY, PIBRUARY 27 

j/TT^ieit fiH r^ilup? tu Appear in (Durt 
Bund wai itt al S5(I0 

A< ii.ih, Toikt A Oswill. mil 
hHittwQituAiie Cuun. wia arrf^ed for 
prol^uufl violMlion Bond was ie\ tl 
SI 34, 

Al 2 p.m.. Jeroine A Olupic, 
100 Cuunhatite Piui. nm imilcd 



Al 4 01 am. Aivin M 
Sctiueitler, Sedgwick. repuri«d i 
vehicle wai burfltrittd al 24 U 
Woodwsy Drive Taken were i 
ponible RuluiK ampaa div pliiy 
er. Whmler nidir detecint. Mmon 
CB r*dio, a CB imemia. io upe> *nd 
oflc CD. Lou wu $W]. 

Al 1114 i.m.. Corey 
Wonhlnflon. 401 Diion Dnve. wai 



The K.Sl' !ilillBt Cllb will 
metl 11 8 lonisht in Dniim }M 

Career mat EiiiplojfmtBt 
Scrrkev will ttmduci a Jub Search 
Sli«iegie> Wnrkihup at .i: 30 today tn 
UnkinM? 

TIk Nitioiul .SucMy of Bladt 
Enfln*m will meet at r>: )(> <iKii|hl 
inlXirland 144. 

KSU Campui MlnMrlH will 



have an A<h Wcdnevliiir Service al 7 ; 
limiglM in Danrmth Chapel. > 

ChrWUit Selnct Ortas-ln. ', 
Um will ineet al 4)0 p.in. [odt) la J 
Dinlunh Dupel. ; 

TteOmeeofgBiJwl Actt-vMM. 



matkHul mcding on kulenhip oppor. ' 
lufiiltei in ^ludeni govemmeni from ^ 
410lu6pTn ltiila>inlJnion2M 



Tor parole wlolillon. Nn bund wai set 



LEHERS TO THE EDITOR 

W» aoo«|>t Mtortto th« •dHorby ^-maU. Our 
fMMH l» MMri«apub.t>M.oclu. VV« nMd your 
mm, addnM, fihori* rtimriM* «id •tucMK 

tor 




CORRECTIONS 



■ in Kevyn Jacobs' column on Monday, it was 
written that in 1973, the American Psychiatric 

Association finally concluded that homosexuality, 
while possibly resulting from environmental factors, 
was Immutable once set — you could change it. It 
should have said you could not change It. 

■ In Monday's Collegian. It was reported in the 
front-page story on Jawwad Atxjulhaqq that one 
day Atiduthaqq left his tent and felt drawn to put 
his (ace to the ground, as Moslems do, Moslems 
should have been Muslims. 

The Collegian regrets the errors. 



ELECTRONIC 

The Kansas State Collegian tiat 90(M 
electronic. Updated daily, you can find thb 
BectTooic Collegian on tfie WorW WkJe Web O 



The Kansas Stale Collegian 


Class postage is paid at 


(USPS 291 020).a5tu(»ent 


Manhattan. Kan.. 66502 


newspaper at Kansas Stale 


POSTMASTER Sand 


University, is published by 
Studeni Publicalrans Inc., 


address changes to Karsas 


State Collegian, circulation 


KedzieHali 103, Manhattan. 


desk. Kedzie 103. Manhattan, 


Kan.. 66506 The Collegian is 


Kan. 66506-7167. 


published weekdays during the 




sctnol year and once a week 




tfitough the summer Second- 


Kanus Stale CcMgtvi. t99S 



Weather 



YESTERDAY'S HIGHS AND LOWS 




State Outlook 

Snow likely in ttte west, light snow 
possible in th« east. Highs from 
upper teens In the mrthwesi to oM- 
20s in the southeast. 



Manhattan Outlook 

TODAY H^HI^^^Hi 

30-percent chance of 
light snow. Highs 20 to 
25. East wirx) from 10- 
20mph, 



• DENVER 
15/15 



• TULSA 
37/31 



• OMAHA 
24/13 



• ST. LOUIS 
36/33 



TOMORROW 

40-percent chance for 
snow. Highs in the 
mid-20s. 




Lair Gauche 

12th & Mora 
(AggieviUe) 
Manhattan 

776-3302 



*Compute[S (new U used) 
••Sales • Service • Upgrades 
••High Quality Components 

•Music (1,0009 to pick from) 
••CD's (none over $8) 
••Cassettes (all are $2) 

•Movies (lOO's to select) 
••VHS (none over $8) 
••We have Video Laserdisc 

•Software (over 650 titles) 
••For IBM & Mac 
••Far below normal retail 



Intengews 

March 4,1-4 p.m. 
Contact Jim at 587-8133 

Contest dates: 

March 29, April 5, 12, and 19 



111, » p [ I I I n 1 1 1 k i > > • ' M ' 

STREET SCENE 



( MtlUiti 



T7 



•'If* 
- It 



M ^^i[ 



' t \ 






• < I 



T<) 



M\|{<II<'I1 H|i.iii. 

\lt t \IN \l lllIOKM \I 

mil IK ti\ ' > Ml ■' II" I 

Ml Ml ll\ . - 
i\l<|i MiV I ^Nt.MuMll i.llJ -v 

l>. Ill . \l, I ><t| II.,. llMlM V >>>l I*' ' lutl "11 rit < ' l>l 



KANSAS STXTE COLLEGIAN 



W>dw»iiay, March f , 1995 ^ 



Kastner moves on 



"If atud*nt« 
racognizs thait 
w* hav* a 
chanca to wint 
thay'll g«t out 
to raglstor to 
voto." 

Ixisrm Kastner 

Junior in food tctenco and 

Induilry and city 
commission candidate 



K-State Junior 

receives most 
votes in city 
commission race 

MMHLUNDAV 

K-Statc student Justin 
Kastner led iKe race for city 
commission votes in the pri- 
mary elections Tuesday 
night. 

Kastner, junior in food 
science and industry and 
native of Manhattan, swept 
the ballots with 25-percent 
voter suppoH. 

"To get that many votes is 
indicative of the fact of hav- 
ing lived here all my life. 
I'm a local product," 
Kastner said. 

The first tally of precinct 
votes that came out at about 
7:30 p.m. showed Kastner to 
be in the lead and ahead of 
incumbent commissioner 
Sieve Hall by 31 votes. 

Overall. 2.469 of 4.665 
voters supported Kastner in 
the primary elections. 

"Something like this is 
incredible." Kastner said. 

On-campus votes, not 
including greek houses and 
off-campus residents, 
totaled 43 out of 335 regis- 
tered. 



Kastner said the low cam- 
pus voting shows that he is 
not depending on the 
University for votes. 

However, he said the 
election is something the 
campus can really get 
involved in. 

"If students recognize that 
we have a chance to win. 
they'll get out to register to 
vote," he said. 

Voters can register to vote 
until March 20, he said. 

Kastner said the voter 
support motivates him to 
work hard, continue pursu- 
ing debates and keep meet- 
ing people. 

"It is all so real, and t rec- 
ognize that," he said. 

Kastner said he looks at 
the possible position as a 
city commissioner as a pub- 
lic service. 

"I'd love to get a four- 
year term." he said. 

The K-Staie student will 
graduate in less than four 
years, but said he already 
has several jobs in 
Manhattan lined up and is 
planning on slaying in town 
as long as possible. 

Kastner is pushing for 
economic development by 
emphasizing aid to business- 
es and offsetting predicted 
cuts in Fort Riley personnel 
with city government 



involvement. 

He said the voter response 
definitely built his faith in 
people, his family and in 
God. 

"This is by far the most 
faith-building experience 
I've been through," Kastner 
said. 

Larry Becraft. treasurer 
for Kastner's campaign, said 
financial support from a 
large number people has 
been helpful throughout the 
campaign. 

"People have handed me 
checks at church, at school, 
and Ihey come to my house," 
he said. 

One reason people sup- 
port Kastner is because he 
really knows what he is talk- 
ing about. Andy Oavis, 
junior in business, said. 

Helen Roser voted for 
Kastner and said the election 
results were exciting, 

"This is the sort of thing 
thai youth all across the 
country need to hear about," 
she said 

Roser said that if a person 
checked Kastner's grades 
and his leadership roles, they 
would be impressed. What 
he is doing is very coura- 
geous, she said. 

The final vote for three 
city commissioners will take 
place April 3. 



6 




,9 








'1 



MIKC WILCNHAMWCollegian 

Justin Kastner, junior in food scl«nce and Industry, l«ads th« city commission race. 



6 people 

advance 

in school 

board 

election 



lUntTIH pfVOHTOM 

CuHefian 

November's trend of replacing 
incumbents didn't take over 
Manhattan when voters went to the 
polls in the Manhattan-Ogden USD 
383 School Board primary Tuesday. 

Present board members Joleen 
Hill, Deh Nuss and Mary Nichols. 
along with K- State physics professor 
Larry Weaver, led the pack of 10 
candidates in the primary election. 

Rick Crow and Peter Garretson 
were eliminated. 

Also surviving the primary were 
Phil Morgan, Michael Pearson, 
Kimberly Wells and Colleen 
Hampton. 



Four candidates will be elected to 
the board April 4. 

Hill, who received the most votes, 
said the board must begin to look at 
issues the new board will face. 

"We have to advocate for our 
schools with our legislators and 
other legislators. ' Hill said. 

Hill said one of the main issues, 
how to handle the district's budget 
crunch, will be cleared up before the 
general election in April. 

Tonight, the board will discuss 
what to do about the budget, which 
has not had an increase from the 
stale for three years. One of the 
options will be to raise the local 
option budget, which would raise 



property taxes. 

Hill, who is a landowner, suid it 
is always hard to make a decision 
about raising taxes. 

"I'm a landlord and owner I 
don't like the idea of raising! taxes, 
nor do I want to sacrifice the level of 
education we have," she said 

Weaver, who placed secimd in 
the primary, said he felt really (sood 
about his position. 

"That level of support means I 
must be supported across the com- 
munity," he said. "I want i« repre- 
sent the whole district." 

Nuss said she is feeling gund 
after her position in ihe primary, 
adding that she is looking forward to 



talking to Ihe public more and mak- 
ing them more aware of the issues. 

Nichols said it has been hard to 
put her full attention on the election 
when the board presently is facing 
difficuli decisions. 

"So much has to be done the next 
tew months." Nichols said. 

Nichols said she wished more 
voters had turned out, but said she 
was happy to have survived the pri- 
mary-- 

"I'd really like to be able to serve 
Ihe public again," she said. 

Morgan came in fifth in number 
of votes. He said be still has his eyes 
on the top four spots, adding that he 
hopes to catapult up into contention. 



Pearson, an accountant, said he 
wasn't surprised he came in sixth. 

"I really am not that well- 
known, " he said. 

Pearson said he hopes when peo- 
ple see the board face the decision 
about the local option budget, they 
will see that the board needs some- 
one with his financial experience. 

"I don't think people realize how 
much that wilt affect people's pock- 
etbooks." Pearson said 

Garretson said he would like to 
see the remaining candidates look 
toward fixing the budget and not 
worry about issues that are settled. 

Crow, Hampton and Wells could 
not be reached for comment 



You Are Cordially Invited To Attend 

~A Special 




^ Dav At Dillard 



-^)^MvHk 



Get Advice From 
Local Wedding 
Experts 

From 1:00 p.m. - 4:00 p.m., an 

esteemed group of local 
wedding experts will consult 
with you on plans for both your 
wedding and wedding 
reception. 

Atwood Rentals 

Bridal Exclusives 

Complete Music 

Confetti's • Kimages 

Designs By RLj 

Kansas State Travel 

M.G. Custom Engraving 

Personally Yours Cakes 

Portraits By LBJ 

The Tux Shop 

Nails By Marilyn 

Booker's II Catering 



To Begin Your Wedding Plans 




Sunday, March 5, 1995 



1 


P- 


m. - 4 p.m. 


PROGRAM OF EVENTS: 


1:00 p.m. 




Check-in 


1:00 p.m. - 4:00 p.m. 




Meet Our Bridal Consultant & 
Receive Gifts 


1:00 p.m. - 4:00 p.m. 




Meet Local Wedding Experts 


1:00 p.m. - 4:00 p.m. 




Housewares Demonstrations 



Meet Dillard's Bridal 
Consultant 

Our knowledgeiible brid.il 
consultant, Karen Miller, will be 
here from 1:00 p.m. - 4:00 p.m. 
to schedule an appointment ftir 
you to register your gift 
preferences at Dillard's. 



Gifts For The Bride-To-Be 

Every bride who registers her gift preferences 
during our Bridal Event will receive a copy of 
Dillard's exclusive wedding planner, "I Thee Wed." 
And just for attending our event, every bride-to-be 
who makes an appointment to register will receive 
a gift bag of special treats. 




Dillarcl's 



The Efficient Kitchen 

Professionals from our 
housewares department will 
demonstrate the latest in 
cooking and culinary techniques 
from 1:00 p.m. - 4:00 p.m., plus 
offer creative ideas on how to 
furnish a modern, efficient 
kitchen. 

Calphalon 

Farberware 

Oster • Krups 

Westbend 

Circulon 



For Your Convenience We Accept Vtso, MoitefCard, Ameficorr Express, Diicover, Code Blanche. Diner's Club Or Your Dillord'j Chorge 
INTEGRITY. . .OUALITY. . .VALUE. . .DISCOVER THI OIFFERENCEI Shop Today 10 A.M. - 9 P.M. 



— ' — -^ -* *v^«' --S--2 




PINION 



■fcmilCH 1. I9W 



WtORt . 



Mmm 



SaiLTMk nir MrtHftnitn ■ BjnrffBtink 

...»N.StewHtAidaioi) AII/nATWIU IWTOII. . . Amy Ziegler AKt IttllUai MDttBois 

■AlfMIM lomw CmntJmey •»»» IMTM Pliill Sptket MUMWIUMM AM«Qnhi» 

MMMnil ..».*»itotnnlCick]Uefer MIMMS OITM TlUt Baaup TMIWMIIIJWl .... J^OttfO KfflM 

fWm«TOII......;..M«kLefGM««0 Cmmm , . . . Dive Otiot MM AMMi >*.... Km Mumw 

«MIK«IMT(NI CMruUle Cmi-«MllWrM MiteMvIefl A0 AOmn ....*. v Glerit FMand 



l40LLIfllU IMTM 



StesteutFaqut AMtamRiJMfM. . ..^JaHKOnMni 

,.M^8uiKb mtLmomnmmn MibwekMMi 



uuiMlimioouiouii 



In Our Opinion 



by the Coliegian EdUorvU Board 



Open-meetings act protects students, citizens 



PuMte offidala 
can attend tli* 
•am* social 
gatharlnga 
MiHiar tha act, 
butthablll 
makas It claar 
ttiat public 
business can- 
not ba dia- 



The Kansas House of Representatives 
passed a bill on Feb. 21 that would 
strengthen the Kansas Open Meetings Act. 
The biU would add quast-public bodies, 
such as library or airport boards that have 
appointed members, to the list of groups 
that must meet and conduct business in 
public. It also encourages Kansas courts to 
broadly interpret the open-meetings act 

Public officials can attend the same 
social gatherings under the act, but the bill 
midces it clear that public business cannot 
be discussed. 

What the open-meetings act means to 
you is that government bodies must let 
you in on the decision-making process. 

Open-meetings laws give you the right 
to go to city-commission. Student Senate 



and Elections Committee meetings and 
have a say in how your tax money is spent 
and your community is run. 

It gives you the right to be at Student 
Senate or Elections Committee meetings 
where people are making decisions that 
will affect you. 

It is not just a cause for journalists, llie 
open -meetings act protects everyone's 
right to know about and participate in 
government. 

The open-meetings act is something 
that needs to be protected. 

The bill will be considered by the 
Senate next. 

We encourage you to call your legisla- 
tors and support strong open- meetings 
laws. 




Many lessons learned 
when adulthood hits 



I 



turned 21 yesterday. 




EMtMc ^ou atk, no, I did not follow my adult 
brttimn down to Aggie v ill e to celebrate. I did 
enougl or that when I w^ younger, instead, I 
went out to dinner, had a glass of wine with my 
meal, counted my birthday checks and turned in 
early. 

Why? 

Because I have class today and don't enjoy 
squinting at my instructor with eyes that look 
like road maps of the eastern seaboard. Call me 
a goody -two-shoes. 

Since I've reached the ripe old age of 21 and 
have officially reached the era of adulthood, I 
thought I'd look over what I've learned in the 
past few years, and months, just to see if any of 
it applies lo my new status. 

Surprisingly, a lot of it does. 

Sift through what I've listed and see if any of it helps — if not. pass 
it on to a friend or an enemy. 

I've learned that walking into a situation like you're supposed to be 
there generally means thai people will treat you tike you do. 

Flunking a class is not the end of the world, although everyone else 
seems to think so. 

Convincing my litUe brother that going to Africa is a good idea is a 
fantastic way to get him out of my hair for six months. 

Speeding is fun; getting caught is not. 

Talking someone else into speeding while they arc driving is even 
morefijn. 

There's no such thing as a simple little wedding. 

If you tell a readership of 20,000 people that you want a cat, you'll 
get one. {Her name is Max, and she's adorable. Ask me about her 
sometime.) You know, I've always wanted a Mustang convertible. ... 

I've learned that sitting in front of a computer for three hours will 
get my homework done and will also make me see in black and white. 

I've learned writer's block really is physically painful. Lying down 
helps. 

Telling a crowd of people I'm from Hays invariably gets the 
response, "Hey, I've been to a party there." Yeah, me too. 

People will ic II you the most amazing stuff if you act interested. A 
guy in one of my literature classes felt the need to tell me just how he 
got his amazing scar — complete with sound effects. 

Drinking coffee as soon as it comes out of the filter basket will bum 
your tongue. 

Fresh basil thrown on a flame smells like marijuana. 

The leather couch in the Collegian newsroom will sap your strength 
and suck out your brain if you sleep on it. 

Learning lo crack a bull whip is an incredible feeling of empower- 
ment. 

Carrying a clipboard around makes people think you're in charge. 
My Mom taught me that. 

Holding a pen while reading makes other people think thai you are 
studying something very important and will leave you alone. That was 
one of my Dad's gems. 

Temper tantrums arc childish, and their effect is limited. 

If you want to, take a dance class, even if you have no rhythm. 
Especially then, becau.se you'll give everyone else in your class a com- 
plex. 

Never mix vodka and ice cream. 

Just because it's 70 degrees in February doesn't mean spring is 
here. This is Kansas — every possible weather combination can and 
will happen in the same week. 

Always find out who "they" are. 

The powers- that be aren't always powerful, just intimidating. 

When subtlety doesn't work, be loud Phis applies to clothes, loo. 

Try to gel it in writing, and if that doesn't work, get it in blood. 

Question authority. I got that from an athletic-shoe ad, but it seems 
like good advice, nonetheless. 

Most of this seems pretty obvious when it's written down, but a lot 
of the things I've learned are. Maybe thiit's what being an adult is — 
finally learning the lessons that have been beaten into me for the last 
21 yean. 

I know I'm not done learning yet, but maybe now I can Icam new 
stuff. 

KJKly Mas.sey Is a sophomore In miss communications and 
JounuUam. 



Americans should study everyone's history 



Black History 
Month may be 
over, but the 
struggle to give 
black people their rightful 
place in mainstream 
American history goes on. 



Some people think that one 
month a year is sufficient enough 
to recognize the accomplishments 
of black Americans, They're only 
loo happy to have black history in 
the "colored section" of the history 
books and give "regular" history 
free reign. 

This isn't an attitude exclusive 
to white people. Afrocentrism has 
arisen as a reaction to the lack of 
attention America has historically 
paid to the people who came from 
Africa. 

These two camps of philosophy 
are based on racism and ethnocen- 
irism, two attitudes our educational 
system needs less of. What 
American schools need, from 
kindergarten lo college, is pure his- 
tory. 

Right now, most Americans 
have no idea what they're truly 
celebrating every Fourth of luly. 

Here's some of what you cele- 
brate in addition to your paU'io- 
tism. 

Manifest destiny was the term 
the religious conservatives of the 
19th century used to justify geno- 
cide. Relative lo the Nazis, who 
exterminated people and tried to 
conquer a continent while the cam- 
eras rolled, the extent to which 



America's self-granted manifest 
destiny was used as a license to 
conquer a continent arid its people 
has gone undocumented for the 
most part. 

Nonetheless, millions of Native 
Americans, blacks and Hispanics 
were slaughtered by whiles as 
either obstacles to manifest destiny 
or weie worked to death to bring it 
about. 

By the same token, most people 
don't know that Helen Keller was 
a socialist. 

Most people don't know that 
President Woodrow Wilson racial- 
ly segregated the federal govern- 
ment and lumed a blind eye to the 
abuse of the First-Amendment 
rights of anti- World War I protest- 
ers. 

Charles Lindbergh was a Nazi 
sympathizer who was decorated by 
Hitler. 

Thomas Jefferson held slaves 
(although perhaps bcgrudgingly) 
and had an adulterous relationship 
with one of them. He also grew pot 
for profit. 

Wall Whitman was gay. 

Ronald Reagan, the icon of tra- 
ditional values for the late 20th 
century, rarely attended church. 

If you're wondering why your 
high-school history teacher never 
told you this stuff, maybe you 
should. 

You should realize how igno- 
rant we all (including you) are 
about each other. 

This is why an emphasis on 
black history in America is needed. 
While most while people can trace 
their roots lo somewhere in Europe 
via family records, appearance, 




surname and 

relig ion . 

Africans 

were 

stripped of 

their tribal 

tics, names, 

religions and 

traditions 

when they 

were shipped 

lo the new 

world. The 

children of 

slaves who 

were taken 

as mistresses 

or raped by 

their white 

masters lost much of the hereditary 

traits of their ancestors. 

This isn't whining, revisionism 
or white- bashing. 

These are some simple facts 
about history that a lot of history 
teachers aren't even comfortable 
with. Even if they taught these 
facts to students, parents would 
pressure the teachers to sweeten 
(mythify?) history. 

What does this have to do with 
Black History Month? It goes to 
show that if most Americans are 
ignorant to white history, they 
would probably tend to be very 
ignorant about the contributions 
black people have made as well. 

That's why Black History 
Month has to end. Instead of a pal- 
try and patronizing month for 
black people to recognize their 
progenitors, the entire year must be 
for everyone's history for every- 
one. 

Mainstream society isn't ready 



to accept that its history may be 
different than most people think. 
This is why it's about time for 
Black History Year. 

Maybe K-Siate should desig- 
nate next year as Black History 
Year. If the idea catches on, there 
would be no need for Black 
History Month/Year/etc. in a gen- 
eration or so because it would be 
integrated into the American main- 
stream consciousness. There would 
only be pure history. 

Then again, white people would 
have to drop the defensiveness 
we've had over the years about 
history. After all, none of us have 
ever enslaved anyone. Instead, our 
responsibility is to be open to 
including the histories of all 
Americans into our own individual 
perspectives. 

We also have a responsibility to 
base our individual prejudices on 
wisdom, not ignorance. 

Black people and other minori- 
ties would need lo set aside some 
of the free-floating anger thai leads 
to the tendency to create scape- 
goats and separate. 

They would stop shedding the 
blood of their proud and wise 
ancestors that flow through their 
veins. 

They must be shown by all 
Americans that they can succeed 
here. 

As you can see. it would be eas- 
ier to keep the histories separate 
and unequal. 

It wouldn't be better. 

Scott Allen Miller is a Junior In 
Interdiscipltury sociaJ sciences. 



Readers Write 



Drop lattcra ott at Kadzta 116 of awtd ittMn to Latter* to th« Editor, c/o 
Ctiflsty LJttl*, KarTM* Stat* Coll*gtan, KMltl* 116, Manhattan, KS 66506. 
Wa accapl lattara by a-mall alao. Our addr«a« la lattaraOapub.kau.adu. 
Lattara ahould Im addraaaad iq tli* aditof and Include a nam*, actdr*** 
ar>d phon* number. A photo Identification will Im nacoaaary lof h«nd-d*l(v- 
•r*d l*tt*r*. 



► CATTLE 

Grazing under control 

Dear editor, 

I am writing in response to Mr. 
James Griffin's letter of Feb. 21. 
Therein, Americans are encour- 

"Portunately, 
scl«iic« 
allows a 
clearer pic- 
ture of the 
situation 
described In 
his letter." 



abandon 
beef con- 
sumption 
based on 
his per- 
ception 
that graz- 
ing beef 
catdeare 
responsi- 
ble for 
the 

degrada- 
tion of 
federally 
owned 



western 

rangclands. 

He claims that unless domestic 

livestock are removed from these 

areas, the wild horse population 

will suffer and certain plant 

species will become extinct. 



K.C. Olson 

rMeafch aaalatam 

an(ma) •clenoee and 
Induatilea 



Griffin relies on emotional lan- 
guage and rhetoric to make his 
point. 

Fortunately, science allows a 
clearer picture of the situation 
described in his letter. First, no 
conclusive proof has ever been 
published in a peer-reviewed sci- 
entific journal to show that cur- 
rent grazing practices on public 
rangeland threaten native biodi- 
versity on a regional scale. In 
fact, the condition of BLM land 
improved dramatically from 1936 
to 1984 (U.S. Dept. of the 
Interior, 1984). indicating 
improved biodiversity. 

Secondly, grazing manage- 
ment on public lands is a govern- 
ment mandate and not simply left 
to the discretion of the lease 
holder. While abuse of particulv 
areas has occurred, problems 
have arisen due to short-sighted 
government policies (e.g. 
Homestead Act, 1862; 
Slockraising Homestead Act. 
1916) during the late 19th and 
early 20th centuries and not due 
to the ominous "cattle lobby 
activities" Griffin refers to. 

Third, the number of feral 



horses that inhabit the western 
United States has increased more 
than tenfold in the last 30 years 
(Journal of Animal Science 
58:433). This could not have 
happened had domestic livestock 
been the menace described by 
Griffin. In fact, the reverse sce- 
nario may be true. Mustangs arc 
among the most uneconomical 
grazers in the animal kingdom, 
accounting for roughly 30 per- 
cent more forage removal 
(through consumption and tram- 
pling) than cattle (Grazing 
Management, Academic Press, 
Inc. 1990). 

In closing, a beef boycott will 
do nothing toward achieving the 
rangeland reform urged by 
Griffin. About S percent of 
American-grown beef originates 
in the seven westernmost states 
(Western Livestock Roundup. 
1983). 

As such, the importance of 
those lands in maintaining the 
supply of beef calves for the 
feedlot is certainly not enough to 
coerce the industry into comply- 
ing with Griffin's ideas even had 
it the power to do so. I respectful- 
ly suggest lo Griffin that he be 
more responsible when assigning 
blame for ecologically unsound 
management of public lands in 
the future. 

K.C. CHmhi 

researth assistant 

animal science and Industries 



► COFFEE 

Thanks for the education 

Dear editor, 

I just wanted to thank the 
Collegian for informing us less- 
sophisticated Kansas folk about 
those new types of coffees called 
espresso, cappuccino, caffe tatte 
and caffe mocha 

Maybe now you can do a story 
on those funny-looking metal 
birds thai make so much noise 
when they fly overhead. 

I heard that people can actual- 
ly ride in them and fly to far-off 
places ail over the worid. 

I would also like to see a story 
on those newfangled horseless 
carriages I've heard so much 
about. 

E^pie say that they travel so 
fast that I can get from my par- 
ents* pig farm near Smith Center 
to K-State in a single afternoon 
instead of the two days it takes 
by covered wagon. 

I think it would be veiy useful 
for the Collegian to continue pre- 
senting articles on new ideas and 
technologies so that when we 
graduate we'll be better prepared 
for die real worid in the 20th cen- 
tury, 

DavMLcvlii 

graduate student In entontology 



KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN 



W>dn»»€iay. Mareh 1, 19gB ^ 



► AMAH AWARINISS MONTH 



► WOMIN'S HISTORY MONTH 



Activities planned to inform 
students about Asian culture 



Essays discuss famous female pioneers 



Colletwi 

Activities ranging from poetry 
readings to guest speakers will be 
conducted this month in honor of 
Asian-American Awareness Month. 

"We want everyone to experi- 
ence Asian American issues and be 
more culturally aware from our per- 
sp^iive," said Betty Low, senior in 
management systems and president 
of Asian American Students for 
Intercultural Awareness. 

Vandy Paul, sophomore in com- 
puter science and vice president of 
Asian American Students for 
Intercultural Awareness, said the 
keynote speaker will be Jude 
Narita. 

"She's one of five prominent 
Asian American comedians and a 
wonderful act," Paul said. 

The one-person performance 
will feature a piece that Narita not 
only performs but wrote. Her act, 
"Coming into Passion," is a por- 
trayal of the lives of Asian 
American women from various per- 
spectives. 

A Saigon bar girl, a Filipino 
bride and a troubled teen-ager are a 
few of the examples. Low said. 

The performance, which tries to 
abolish sexual and racial stereo- 
types, will be 7 p.m. March 8 in 
Union Station, Paul said. 

Also at noon on March 8. in the 
K'State Union Cottonwood Room, 
Janet Benson, associate professor of 
anthropology, will be giving a slide 
presentation. Her topic, "Rice and 
Beef: Growing Up Asian American 
in Southwest Kansas," will feature 
some of her research, Dina Bennett, 
coordinator of multicultural student 
organize! lions, said. 

The luncheon will cost S7, and 



P^IAt^lliCAN AWARENESS 
iMONtll ' 

ifl Tbuiiticy - mi^ donunslration Inttw K-Slato UnkmCoulyaRl, noon. 

tfi%n% - -MerTKiies o( Itt Vieinani War; 7 p.m., Unioi unto Th^ 
■ Itoi^^ Asjar-Afiwtcan /Mwweness Month Itipcfie^ 

■NMh HHAneriiigMmesiatunl ni(^ 7pm, Eciin^ 



SoufM: K'Stat* Nawi SarvtoM 

reservations need to be made by 
Friday to the multicultural organi- 
zations office in Holion 201 or by 
calling 532-6436. Bennett said. 

Cultural night has been planned 
for 7 p.m. March 1 1 at the 
Ecumenical Campus Ministry 
building. The potluck meal wilt be 
accompanied with entertainment in 
the form of a fashion show and a 
piano soto. 

But not all of the plans are fin- 
ished. 

"We arc still working on the 
entertainment details," Paul said. 

However, postcards were sent to 
Asian American alumni inviting 
them to cultural night. 

"With each multicultural month, 
we try to involve the alumni in 
some way," Bennett said. 

"Memories of the Vietnam War" 
will be presented at 7 p.m. Monday 
in the K-Statc Union Little Theatre. 
Quoc Nguyen, sophomore in jour- 
nalism and mass communications, 
will present selections from his 
writings. 

After Nguyen's presentation, a 



ANDREA COneV/Cotagian 

haiku poetry reading will take place 
at the same location. Haiku is a 
style of poetry that only contains 
three tines. 

"Anyone can do it. It's really 
easy, and it's a Japanese form." 
Bennett said. 

Aikido, a form of a martial art, 
will be demonstrated at noon on 
Thursday in the K-Statc Union 
courtyard. 

A display of cultural artifacts 
will be in Holton Hall and by the 
Stateroom in the Union through 
Friday. 

The Asian -American Awareness 
Month activities will draw to an end 
as students from K-State travel to 
Champaign, 111.. March 23-26. to 
attend the Midwest Asian American 
Student Union Conference. 

At the regional conference, the 
students will attend workshops as 
well as see the performing group 
Here and Now from California. 
Low said. 

"It's a great way to network with 
other universities. U's usually three 
days, but now it's four," Paul said. 



Colkfiin 

The College of Education and the 
Women's Center are working 
together to help K-State celebrate 
Women's History Month. 

Bob Shoop, professor of educa- 
tion and chair of the College of 
Education's diversity task force, 
said this is the third year K-Staie has 
officially celebrated Women's 
History Month. 

"Many pec^le go through a pro 
gram without sitting down and 
thinking about how society has 
changed," Shoop said. 

Maijorie Hancock, assistant pro- 
fessor of elementary education, 
coordinated the Celebration of 
Women Essay Contest, which was 
open to students in kindergarten 
through 12th grade in Manhattan 
and surrounding area schools. 

Hancock said there were more 
than 200 entries for the contest. 

"Most of them wrote about the 
women they admire most," she said. 
Contestants could also have written 
about the women they thought had 
the greatest effect on history. 

Hancock said seven winners had 
been selected. The winners will be 
announced at noon March 10 in the 
Blue mom Hall Media Center. 

Shoop said he encouraged stu- 
dents to attend the award ceremony 
for the contest. 

"We will have a birthday cake 
there to celebrate Susan B. 
Anthony's birthday," Shoop said. 

The featured speaker for the 
month is Sue Hosteller, a social doc- 
umentary photographer from Man- 
hattan, said Susan Allen, assistant 
director of the Women's Center. 

"We heard about Sue's work in 
social documentary photography, 
and because she's from Manhattan, 
we thought it would be fun to bring 
her back and listen to her talk about 
her work," Allen said. 

Hosteller will present a lecture 
and slide show of her work at 4 p.m. 



Old depot to receive materials from K-177 bridge project 



CONTINUED FROM PAGE 1 

oversee the non-renewable or 
potentially expensive resources, 
such as old bricks and lights, that 
can be used to repair existing his- 
toric structures, 

"Bricks such as the ones that arc 
going to be destroyed from the 
bridge project could be used to 
make repairs on the depot," West 



said. 

Also, the Alliance proposed thai 
the old lights on the existing K-177 
bridge be used in cither lighting up 
the area around the depot or be used 
to make Majihatiao C|ty Park a 
safer place: - 

The decision of the commission- 
ers to increase the power of the 
Preservation Board was well 



received by the members of the 
Preservation Alliance. 

"Preservation is even coming to 
Manhattan," West said. 



THIS SPACE 

IS 
RESERVED 



( Miii i]i,!r) AcJverlisitig 532-6560 



ycw^1^^TT^l■^^■l■^^'^^'^1■^^^^l■^^^■l■lWll■n«^■l^■^^■^^^^^^ 1■ ^T^^ ■ ^^ ■ ^.^ I■t ^■ T ^1 ■^-^■l :^^■^^^^^»^l^^^^ 



ments 




ViMina Acaitomy*-f- 
Martin HasalbAek, diraclor 

Sunday, March 12, 3 p-rn. 

From Its home in the historic Musikverein, this period instrument 
ensemble brings a program featuring trumpet concertos by Telemann, 
a llute concero by Vivaldi, Bach's Brandenburg Concerto No. 3, and 
Orchestral Suite No. 3. 

Chaucer's Cantarbury Talas* 
Starring Naw Vic Theatra of London 
Friday, April 7, 8 p.m. 

Join (he lively, bawdy pilgrims on the local vicarage lawn tor the tinals 
of the anr>ual Geoffrey Chaucer Storytelling Competition. Tales are told 
of love, of tust, and of laughter. Some are traditioDal and visual; others 
are, In the funniest and most good humored way, a tittle less delicate. 

Awadagin Pratt, piano*-f 
Thursday, April Z7, 8 p.m. 

The musical forte of this Naumberg Prize-winner Is the three B's. with 
forays into the Romantic repertory. A graduate of the Peabody Conser- 
vatory, Pratt is the only student in thai institution's history (o earn 
performer's certificates in piano, violin and conducting. 

For tickets call S32-642S or come la (he McCain box office. Box oKice tiours: 
noon lo S p.m. weekdays; from 1 p.m. tielore weekend matinees; and from 5 
p.m. before weekend evenings. Tickets are also availabie al Manhattan Town 
Center cuelomer service desk. K-Slate Union Bookstore, and ITR (Fort Riley). 

B Persons with disabilities call 532-642B. 

Free bus service to series events lor patrcx>s &5 years or older is availabte. 
For details call Marie Dellen at 587-4000, 9 am. to S p.m. weettdayt. 



CALENDAR 



GIRL 




at Silverado Saloon 

Starting Feb. 15. ..Every Wednesday 

at 8:30 p.m. we will chose three-four 




So fj ^dl^l jtcf^e that thought you had 
to wear cowboy boots and know how 

to two-step, Don't Worry... 
This isn't just for Cowgirls!!! 



531 N, Manhattan Ave.*Aggieville 

t . tm ■ ■ m J 1 1 rrnittmynnnrmtmrrrrrfmrrrm n-wn » ■.■,. u m . > j .. tin i »^ 



WOMEN'S HISTORY MONTH 

■ March 8, 7, 8 - Three-part video "A Centi*y of Women," noon to 1 p.fn. in 
dflerent (ocabons. March 6 in Bluerrvont Hal Media Center March 7 in Bltjemont 
256; March 8 in Bluemont 342. 

■ March 9 - Firm 'Amman's Race' and 'Girls Can' noon 10 1 pjn. in Blueinont 
Hal Media Center. Followed by discussion. 

■ Uareti 13^ - D^y for Women's History Month, Rtst-floor shcwcase, K- 
StateUrnon, 



Sourc* K-StaW Newi Services 

March 28 in Union 2 1 2. 

In 1 994, Hosteller, a graduate of 
Manhattan High School, Tocused on 
the wars and economic hardship that 
led her to travel to Rwanda, Cuba 
and Guatemala. 

Hosteller has also chronicled the 
daily lives of wonten with AIDS in 
a scries titled "Invisible Women." 



AMDREA CORCV/C(i4«0lWt 

Shoop also said an awareness 
month for women's history was 
necessary because of the way a lot 
of people have been educated. 

"I think that most of us have 
been educated in a way that I 
believe is very narrow." he said. 




•Home Cooked Meals 

•Blue Plate Specials 

•Weekly Specials 

Students Wslcoma 

1 103 Nonh 3rd '537-7776 



teie^fieeS ' ^n'dA/'Mf * fuitd * Jf J/im^r 



Manhattan 
Kansas 



^./..-,;. 



^:Vi:- 



i 



13 

Hour Sale 

Thursday, March 2 



All Fall & 
Holiday Fashions 




New Spring Arrivals 

20*%. Off 



Mon.-Sat. 10 a.m.-9 p.m. 
Sun. Noon-6 p.m. 



M.ANH.ATT.AN 

1\ AV\ ( :i:NTI-,R 



Manufacture restrictions may apply. 
Please ask a sales associate for details. 



I m part tjv IHe Kansas A'(s ConvnsEwn. a stale agency, and Ihe Norional 
nl lo» th« Art*, a leMral agancy Et'ants in the McCain Parlormarice Sanes are 
Kippon«dtiylheK-StaleFineArl$F«e .tSuppO'tedbylheFnendtolMcCairv -Cofpotale 
tuptxxt p'ovKlad by Mamoiiai Hospnai 




Don't Miss Audio Junction's 







Ona 




We're doing some early spring cleaning! 
only, Sat. March 4 from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. yoi 
tereo cd's, amps, cassette decks, speakers, h< 
[ents, and more at or below costl Tape decks f( 

amps from $59 and more! 
[ve demo's, one of a kind, close outs and more, 

martlil dO¥m to pennies on the dollar! ^ 

ho Ity tiuiMf installers can buy kits, crossove7§lini 
:-:^ • df hardware for way below cost! _ 20 Minutes west Thru r 
Shop early for the best selection. 

UDIO 
JUNCTION, INC. 




•30 Oram 
Jundion Clly. KS 



60441 



HI R— Car Storao— Vidrc 




llon.-Frl. 10 i,m.-7 p.in.| Sit Ifl a.m.-6 



C^WiLDOff Watch 

^^ KAHSAS STATE COLLEGIAN WEEKLY SPORTS SECTION MARCH 1,19SS 



PURPLE POP QUIZ 

Send u year aaiwer, aid frwn ill of the correct 
■Dswtrs oor will be ititcltd riadonil)' tor i free 
snnaltr sutracription to tbt Wilch Tor wimncnf yc» 
wiBi to stod Jl lo. Brini your inswtr or »nd It to 
Witcb Tri«ii Conttsi, 116 Kfdiit Hill, KSV, 
MiBhiltin, KS 6iS06. All inswtrs must bt m«l«td 
btfore Mirdi 8. WimMniHl be DodTied by mtiL 

■ What seed was the K-State women's 
basketball team at last season's Big Eight 
Tournament? 

I Last week's answer: 19S8-S9 



WOMEN'S STANDINGS 


,' 


mmm 


smm. 


IfilM 


1 L 


H L 


Colanido 


t4 


24 2 


QIWioiM 


t1 3 


19 7 


Kmim 




11 S 


OUi. State 




» 10 


K-SWt 




14 12 


Hiatourl 




15 11 


NtbTMki 


4 10 


13 13 


Iowa Stall 


1 13 


t 11 



WILDCAT RUNDOWN 



BRIEFS & NOTES 



mmR^ tB fdce Cuts 



K-Stata will try to crawl out of 
th« Big Eight callar tonight as the 
Wildcats entertain sixth -pi ace Nebraska at 
Bramlage Coliseum. 

"We've been having pretty good 
practices," K-Staie coach Tom Asbury 
said. "We've had a couple minor injuries, 
but we're mentally alert of what we have 
to do against Nebraska. Whether we can 
physically do it — who kivows." 

The main concern for the Cots tonight 
will l>e the tempo and Nebraska's inside 
play. Nebraska's game includes pushing 
the ball upcourt 

"Sometimes they make mistakes trying 
to push the ball so much," Asbury said. 

In the Cats' game earlier this season in 
Lincoln, Neb., K-State had its shots 
blocked or changed by the Huskers' Mikki 
Moore. 

"He blocked six shots." Asbury said. 
"That means he changed at least a dozen." 

K-Stata will ctoia oixt the regular 
••aaon agalrtst CU Saturday. 




ROAD Mnil la lissBbiill 



Th« K-Stata baseball team 
had Ita first suceeaaful road 
outing of 1995. picking up two 
wins in three games during 
weekend play at the Lake Area 
Classic Tournament in Lake 
Charles. La. 

The Cats' first game of the 
tournament againiil Oral Roberts 
went down to the wire, with K-State pinch 
runner Mitch Running scoring the 
winning run in the I Ith inning on an ORU 
error. K-State's Dan Albrecht picked up 
his fir^l win of the season. 

Saturday's action saw the Cats get an 
early lead against the Creighion Blue Jays, 
but in a disastrous founh inning. K-Slate 
reliever Larry Walty gave up three 
Creighion runs to put the Jays up 8-6. 

White WaJty settled down and pitched 
five innings of scoreless ball, the Cat bats 
never recovered as the Jays tallied the 8<6 
win. 

K-State took anodier game down to ihe 
wire in Sunday's contest against the 
Cowboys of McNeese Slate, as Ihe Cats 
racked up their second win of the 
tournament, 12-10. 

K-State improved to 4-3 on tlK season 
and face Wichita Slate tonight in Sallna. 



mm upoiis mLoniis 

After a waekerxj In which Coach 
Stave Blatau aald hia team was 
outplayed, (he women's tennis team will 
mvel to Det Moines, Iowa, this weekend 
in an attempt to get back to their winning 
ways. 

Saturday's 6-3 loss lo New Mexico at 
Cottonwood Racqueiball Club in 
Manhattan caused Bietau to question his 
team's mentality. 

"Overall, I didn't think the team was 
into this match menially," he said. "We 
didn't want to fighi a tough fight." 

No. I singles player Karina Kuregian 
capture! the only singles win for the day 
for the Cats. 

Next for ttte womerf'a tsnnia taam 
are Drake and Norttwrn IIKnois. Both 
mslshes will be played In iowa. 

Tooo anwART 




After taking the 

lead against 
Colorado last tweak, 
K-State coach Bdan 
Agler raises his fist 
In excitement. 
However, ttte Cats' 
lead was short-lived, 
as CU came back 
and won 77-74. Agler 
said Ihe Cats want 
another shot at the 
Buffs. 

BAfMHI WHITLIV 

CoHagian 



The Big Eight Tournament starts Saturilay, leaving teams 

Dreaming of a championship 



CullcKiin 

Y 

■ ou would thitik that a team 
that flnlshes with an undefeated 
record in conrerence play 
shouldn't have much trouble in 
the postseason tournament. 

Tliink again. 

After finishing the season with a 
perfect 14-0 record in the Big Eight 
Conference. Colorado coach Ccal Barry 
said her third-ranked Buffaloes will have a 
tough challenge ai the Big Eight 
Tournament this week in Salina. 

"It feels good to go 14-0," Barry said. 
"However, 1 now feel that we'll have a big 
target on our back," 

No. 1 -seeded Colorado will face ihc 
No 8-seeded Iowa State in first-round 
play of the Big Eight Tournament. 

This will be the third time the Buffs 
have faced the Cyclones — a fact that hits 
Barry concerned. 

"That's the hardest thing about the Big 
Eight Tournament," Barry said. "It's hard 
to beat a team for three limes. I don't care 
who you are playing, 

"We play Iowa State firsi, and you 
know it's hard. After 14 games, seven 
here and seven there, we're tired." 

The Oklahoma Sooners have the No. 2 
seed. Coach Burl Plunkeit's squad will 



face off against the No. 7-seedcd Nebraska 
Comhuskcrs. 

"It's going to be a lough ball game," 
Plunkelt said. "It hard to believe thier 
record (13-13 overall). Nebraska can 
match up with anyone in the conference." 

Kansas nailed down the No. 2 seed and 
will face defending Big Eight Tournament 
Champions Missouri, 

"Last year's experience can't hurt us," 
Missouri coach Joann Rutherford said. 
"We've got 10 put 40 minutes together to 
win. We can't have breakdowns." 

That leaves Oklahoma State and K- 
Siate The Cowgirls are the fourth seed, 
and the Wildcats are the fifth seed. 

This maich-up could be the most 
interesting game in the first round. Last 
season, the Cowgirls, who were the No. 2 
seed, defeated the sevcnth-^eded Cats to 
end Iheir season. 

Then, this season, the two teams split. 
as they boih defeated each oiher on the 
road. 

Oklahoma Stale coach Dick Harrington 
said he thinks the Cats-Cowgirls match-up 
is the best first-round game. 

"K-State will be coming in with a lot of 
confidence," Harrington said. "We're 
going lo have to challenge our kids to get 
up and get for ready for this game. 

"1 really believe that it's the best 
malch-up of the first round." 

K-Slaie coach Brian Agler said the 
Cats are familiar with the Cowgirls, 

"We always have to have really similar 



WiLDai Watch 



CchSlg Eight Playtn of the Yev 

Angela Aycock, Kansas 
Shelly Sheetz, Colorado 

RntTNin All-Big eight 

Angela Apck. Kansas' 
Shanele Stires, K-Stats' 
Shelly Sheeiz, CokHado' 
NikkiSmfth,Miss(HHJ* 
^ Coffey, OMahoma State 

* 'Mcates a (xianNous dnioe 



'S BIG EIGHT AWARDS 



Newcomer of the Yaar 
Patn Pennon, Oklahoma 

FfiahflMnoltheYear 
Angle OeFbfge.Nebrasica 

K-StitaPiaytrofttieYaw 

Shanele Stires 



K-StMtNttKOffl«o(tfieVMr 
BritJa»)t>SQn 




games with them," Agler said. "We played 
in the first round last year and got off to a 
real slow start. We got a win against them 
a week ago on iheir home fioor, and 1 feel 
good about uur basketball team right now. 

"Whether we win or not on Saturday, I 
don't know." 

However, if the Cats do win, Ihey 
might get another crack at Colorado — an 
opportunity Agler said he hopes to gel. 

"We may play each other again 
Sunday, and I hope that we do," Agler 
said. "I think that we match up well with 
ihem. Our kids believe Ihai they can beat 
them. 

"We're capable of beating that team. 



JEREMY STEPHENS/Cotl«aian 

Whether we do or not, I don't know." 

■ Despite Colorado's record, almost all 
of the Big Eight coaches agree ihat any 
team can win the toumameni. 

"It's going to be a great loumameni," 
Plunkett said. "It's going to take 40 full 
minutes. You've go to play 40 minutes 
and pui three wins together to win." 

Rutherford said there is very little that 
separates the third-place and the siKlh- 
placc teams in the conference. 

"Top to bottom, this is one of the best 
conferences in the country," Rutherford 
said. "A couple of wins separate the third- 
through six-place teams. 

"Anybody can win." 




Cats ready for OSU challenge 



CAMV eONOVIWColleOMn 

K-Stlit't ig«raton Uraon defends MU'a Erlka Martirt In the 
Cats' loss earlier this season. K-State enters the Big Eight 
Tournament on a two-game losing streak, but they ere coming 
off only a three-polnl loss to No. 2-ranhed Colorado. 



"We've played everybody 
incredibly tough, and I think 
we're a team people are scared 
of," K-State senior Shanele 
Stires said. "I think they see us 
as a dark horse — a threat." 

If the rest of the Big Eight 
sees the Wildcats as a threat, 
they might be very observant. 

Despite their 6-8 conference 
record. K-Siate might be one of 
Ihe most threatening teams in 
the tournament. Big Eight, 
co»:hes said. 

While Colorado is ihe 
obvious favorite going in, K- 
State has both the statistical 
strengths and intangibles to 
turn some heads in the Big 
Eight tournament, K-Siate 



coach Brian Agler said. 

Count on Stires lo score big. 
She's the conference's second- 
leading scorer, averaging 20.5 
points per game. She can bang 
it up on the blocks or take it 
outside for the trey, where she's 
shooting 34.3 percent. 

The Cats' primary scoring 
threats can keep a defense off 
balance. Sophomore Missy 
Decker is the second-most 
accurate three-point shooter in 
Ihe conference and can take 
opponents off Ihe dribble, 
Freshman Brit lacobson can 
take anyone off the drive and is 
increasingly accurate from the 
outside. 

With a strong post player, a 
quick slasher and a spot-up 
shooter, K-Siaic's offense has 



the diversity ii needs. 

And the hits just keep on 
coming. Junior-college transfer 
Carlene Mitchell comes off Ihe 
bench to shoot 32 percent from 
the arc. Sophomore Andria 
Jones has recorded two double- 
digit performances in the last 
three games, adding another 
inside scoring threat. 

"We're capable of beating 
anyone in our conference when 
we can put a total game 
together." Agler said. "Thai 
means gelling quality minutes 
from Andria Jones and Lisa 
Gaiior." 

Last year, Oklahoma State 
defeated K-Slate in the first 
round of the tournament by 
falling back into a zone and 

■ See CATS Page 8 



KANSAS STAIE^y^l EIAN 



•Wildcat Watch. 



W^<ln^»lia^ Jhiich 1, fWm y 



Sophomore guard starts career slow but becomes K-State's 

SHARP SHOOTER 




DAHLIWIMMZ 



DMHttM MrMrn.tY/Coll*gwn 

Mltsy Decker tignals an offensWa ptsy to har teammatM in a ganw 
earlier this season. Decker has stepped In to replace Shawnda 
DeCamp to twcome the Cats' No. 1 three-point threat. Aner starting otf 
cold during her first 18 games, she has made 10 out ot 22 trom twhIrKJ 
tha three-point arc. She has hit at least one trey in each o1 her last 
•Ight games. 




more bang 

for your 

advertising buck 

C KANSAS STATE 
OLLEGIAN 



'^f^i^feWS 



lOlll.Ul L'iliUM 

taiuiiiii.U ^V)-I744 

(II* 

Kv.in.il =;i:-722i 



( (iiilo'il tlali'*- \l.ii\li 1(1, April (1, n i^ 2lt 

(i>ocoococoocooc»oco 



KSU STUDENTS ONLY! 



$1 OFF COUPON 



Colkgitn 



I 



ONEiF 
-^ on 

^ONE 



.fa biography of 
sophomore Missy Decker 
were written. Its title would 
be "My Heart is in 
Mlnn^ota." 

Despite her heart in Minnesota, 
her hands and sweet shooting touch 
twlong here at K-State. 

A native of Rochester, Minn., 
Decker was brought to K-State as a 
shooter. 

"1 was known as a shooter in 
high school, and (previous K-Siaie 
coach Susan Yow's) staff recrvited 
me. When they first contacted me, it 
wasn't really serious. But they 
became more serious as the recruit- 
ing process 
went on. 

"I signed 
early, in the 
November 
signing period 
when 1 was a 
senior," 
Decker said. 

"When I 
came to visit, 

1 really liked the people. The facili- 
ties were wonckrful, and I was look- 
ing to go to a big school." 

Decker said she knew that K- 
State was a good fit for her. 

"1 just figured it would be a real- 
ly great place for me," Decker said. 

"And academically, too, it's been 
a great place for me." 

That picture was temporarily 
shaken with news of Yow's depar- 
ture and the hiring of Brian Aglcr. 

However, Decker soon saw it as 
an opportunity to help rebuild a pro- 
gram. 

"At first 1 was shocked. I didn't 
find out that the previous coaching 
staff was leaving until April of 
1993, and I didn't know what to 
think," Decker said. 

"Alt of a sudden, this picture of 
what ii was supposed to be like was 
totally shattered. I had no clue what 
was going to happen. 

"But 1 had confidence that the 
administration and the athletic 
department were looking to bring in 



someone who would be a positive 
step toward building a program. I 
was going to have to adapt, but I 
knew whoever got the job was look- 
ing to bring success," 

Decker came off the bench as a 
freshman, catching fire toward the 
end of the season. 

After hitting only one three- 
pointer in her first 18 games. 
Decker shot lO-of-22 from the arc 
down the stretch, connecting on at 
least one trey in each of her last 
eight games. 

"When you come in as a fresh- 
man, people don't expect you to 
shoot. I think maybe I caught some 
people off guard last year in being 
able to come in and hit some 
perimeter shots. 

"Last year, toward the end of the 
season, I was really happy with the 
way I was playing. I was able to 
contribute some good minutes." 

Decker came into this season 
with questions about personnel and 
her own conditioning. 

"1 didn't know what to expect 
this year in terms of the team 
because we had so many people 
coming in. I lore cartilage in my 
knee during the season last year and 
had surgery when 1 went home at 
the end of May. 

"I was really skeptical when I 
was out — I was all nervous about 
whether my game would be ready 
when I came back." 

But Decker has answered all of 
the questions, shooting 41.3 percent 
from the field and leading the team 
in three-point percentage. 

Decker's ability to shoot the ball 
earned her a starting spot after the 
departure of senior wing Shawnda 
DcCamp in January. 

"I've tried not to do anything dif- 
ferent," Decker said. 

"When you're thrown into a situ- 
ation, sometimes you think you 
have to do more. I've had to con- 
centrate and tell myself to play 
within myself I've just tried to play 
my role the best I can." 

She has done thai and more. 

Decker has led the Big Eight in 
three-point shooting for much of the 
season and is currently hitting 46.3 
percent of her attempts in confer- 
ence play. 

As a result, defenses are doing 
everything they can to keep her 
from shooting. 



PET HEALTH ALEK I 



Heartwonn Season Begins 
.ilove Your Dog Tested! 

Manhattan aiea veterinary clinics are offering special times 

and daya for heartworm testing. 

Call your vet^ririarian for an appointment. 

HOSPITAUCXINiff> PHONE DATES & TIMES 

Blue Hills Animal Hoipital -SS^^g^fl^^AMa 25, lOam-l pjn.and 

Candiewood Vfetednary Clinic 537-0537 "^Tiease call for an appointment 
Easttide Veterit^iy Clinic yi^37-a?l9. Sat, Mar. 4, 8 a.m.-12 p.m 



K-State \%lerinar]flfad*g Hospital 532-5690 

Konza Veterinary Clinic 776-9111 

URle Apple Veterinary Clinic 539-0191 
Mobile Veterinary Service 537-0406 
Weststde Veterinary Clinic 539-7922 
^^Poga must be at least 5 172 months old 



Wed.XaT. 15, 8 a,m.-5:30 p.m. 
Sat., Mar. 4 & Sat., Mar. 16, 
8-na.m, 

All Saturdays in March 

8a.m.-12;30p.m. 

Please call (or an appointment 

Please call ibr an appointment 

PleasecaD for an appointment 



J 



World's Greatest Haircut 

Reg, *7" 
BUT WITH COUPON 

$^95 



I 

I ONLY ^^ 

I 

I snip rr CUP 

E-^-MILY HAIRCUT SHOPS 
I NIGHTS AND SUNOAVS JUST DROP INI 




* VILLAGE PLAZA 539-4043 
(NEAHALCO) 

• 431E.POYNT2 776*110 
(K-MARTPIAZA) 

Under 12 KIDS CUTS iS 



Expires; Mt-K 



I 
J 





need™ 



PEERAffisiDuiydRS 
FOR FALL SEMESTER 



STUDENTS INTERESTED IN JOINING 
A TEAM OF STUDENTS TO TEACH OTHERS 
MIL fiXBOUT AIDS 

wseSmc 



^UIKEME 



TEACH OTHERS 



SECFMOTIVATING, CREATIVE, 
ABLE TO TALK TO GROUPS 

ARE YOU INTERESTED ? 

COr^SCr HEALTH EDUCATION AND PRO^fOTTON 

AT LAFENE HEALTH CENTER ^-^ 
APPLie^O^ ARE AVAILABLE NOW 

32-6595 



:^o^> 



But from that, Decker has devel- 
oped into more than jusi a spot-up 
shooter, often taking her opponents 
off the dribble. 

"I knew that if I started scoring 
more points at the lieginning of the 
Big Eight Conference schedule, 
people weren't going to let me sit 
out there and shoot. 

"When I can put the ball on the 
floor, not only can t score, but 1 can 
look to pass, and it keeps our 
offense going. 1 can see openings in 
the defense better when I go with 
the dribble. I'm just trying not to be 
so one-dimensional." 

Decker's ability to penetrate has 
enabled her to lead the team in 
assists in four Big Eight contests. 

But getting attention as a shooter 
also has its down side. 

Decker is coming off her first 
shooting slump. 

Though she landed four of eight 
from three-point range last week- 
end. Decker hit Just three of 16 
attempts from behind the arc in the 
previous three games. 

"I'm very hard on myself, very 
critical. It's hard sometimes. 
t>ccause when you're playing well 
and then you turn around and have a 
bad game or a bad weekend, you 
feel responsible. I've really had to 
tell myself that I'm doing ttte best I 
can, that I'm trying as hard as 1 can 
just like everyone else, because 



we're all in this together." 

It helps that the team is becom- 
ing more balanced, she said. 

"When you're balanced like we 
are. the defense can't just triple- 
team Shanele (Stires) or deny me on 
the wing. If they leave Carlene 
(Mitchell) open, she'll hit a three- 
pointer, ir they leave Brit 
(Jacobson) open, she'll drive right 
to the middle." 

"Our offense the system coach 
has implemented, really allows for a 
lot of creativity. A lot of different 
things can happen, so we're less 
predictable." 

"This year, we're more of a unit 
on the floor. Last year, it seemed 
like everyone was in five different 
directions. But this year, in the 
games we've played well, every- 
one's thinking the same thing, doing 
the same thing, talking to each 
other. [ think we do a better Job of 
communicating this year." 

And it shows. 

The Cats have already secured 
their best Big Eight record since the 
1990-91 season 

"It's been special. When it's all 
over, Andria (Jones). KJerslen 
(Larson) and I were here from the 
start." Decker said. 

"We went through the peaks and 
valleys of the first couple seasons, 
and that's going to help us down the 
line as upperclassmen." 



Stressed about grades? 

find out "How to get better grades^" 

with Charlie Qriffiii 
professor of speech 

Thui^day, March 2, 7 p.m. 

KAe House 

Sponsored by Campus Crusade for Christ 

> Open to all KSU Students 

-)V— - ■ ■ -■■... ■ — ^» w 



S/^/J^K^ &^&tK^(( (Ski UPC!) 




This could be 
you and your 
f riendsl -» 



Breckenridge 
Colorado 
March 17 -22 

|$250.00 

'Round trip transportation by charter bus 
'3 niglits lodging grm K-Sfia omon 

'3 days lift tickets '^"«= ^*-' 

WEDNESDAY, MARCH 1ST IS THE LAST 

DAYTOSIGN-UPI! 

Sign up In ths UPC Office, 3rd floor K-Stata Union, 

Monday - Friday 9:00 a.m. • 4:00 pjn. 

For mor* Info call UPC at 532-6571 



great research., 

Kaplan spends over $3 million annually developing 
products and rosearching the tests. We've proved 
that we know the tests inside out. 



lSAt 



gRe 



GIVIAT 



mCAt 



SAT 



In 1992, Kaplan predicted the elimtnation 
'^ of an LSAT question type and changed our 
course in anticipation of the change. 



In 1993, the ETS was forced to 
>^ withdraw a GRE question type t>ecause 
Kaplan "broke the code." 



In 1994, Kaplan research brought to light 
„.^ security flaws In the computer-based GRE 
tests. As a result, the ETS temporarily 
pulled ttie test. 

great results. 

Kaplan's expertise translates 
Into higtwr scores and greater 
confidence for our students. 
Put our research to work for 
you on test day. 



1-800-KAP-TEST 
gat a higher score 

KAPLAN 



a W»dw«cl<^ March 1, 1— B 



WnDai Watch. 




KANSAS STATE CX)II£G1AN 



Cats could be spoilers 



TOOO mSACK/Coll^wn 

l^lVlt LMngiton took third in the SS-meter hurdles with 8 time of 7.37 tecond*. Oklihoma's Terry Blackshlre took first with a time of 7.34. 
The K-State women's team took second, and the men's squad finished In sixth. 

Jumps cany Gits in Big Eight indoor meet 




Wentland 



Calk|iHi 

Welcome to high jump universi- 
ty. 

K-State swept the top two spot.s 
of the women's high jump and three 
of the top five in the men's high 
jump at the Big Eight Tournament. 
The events pushed the women's 
team ahead of Colorado for second 
place in the conference with 131 
points. Nebraska won its 16th 
straight title with 184 total points. 

The men finished in sixth with 
72- 1/2 points. 

Ed 
Broxterman 
and Gwen 
Wentland 
took home 
titles in the 
event with 
heights of 7 
feet 4- 1/2 
inches and 
6' 1-1/2" 
respectively. 

"I was just 
having a good 
tiiiw." Broxterman said. 

"Last year. I was so worried 
about my techniqtie that I didn't 
think enough about jumping high. 

"This year, 1 decided just to get 
back to the basics." 

Broxterman said his mind wasn't 
on the event the night before or dur- 
ing the afternoon leading up to 
Friday night's competition. It 
proved to be good strategy. 

"I stayed up pretty late studying 
for a test lust night," Broxterman 
said after the high jump Friday. 

"It was the hardest test I've ever 
taken. 

"I never started thinking about it 
until the lest was over, about 1:30 
in the afternoon." 

Broxterman's clearance of 7'4- 
1/2" automatically cjualifies him for 
the indoor NCAA championships. 

"I just felt light all day." 
Broxterman said 

"The sun and the air and every- 
thing just felt different tixlay." 

Teammates Itai Margalil and 
Perccll Gaskins placed third and 
fifth in the event 

Both cleared 7*1" 

Wentland look second in the 
pentathlon, third in the triple jump 
and eighth in the long jump to go 
along with her high-jump win. 

"I felt a little pressure at the end 



because I knew I had to make that 
jump to seal up the championship," 
Wentland said. 

"The crowd here obviously helps 
out. but 1 think what helped the 
most was I fmally got my approach 
down," 

Wentland beat teammate Wanita 
Dykstra, who finished second with 
a leap of 6'. 

Jill Montgomery captured the 
first tide for the women Friday with 
a win in the pentathlon. Her total of 
4.093 points was a personal best 
and the second-best score in the 
nation this season behind Wentland, 
who scored 4,1 15 points earlier this 
season. 

"i couldn't have done it without 
Gwen," Montgomery said. 

"She really pushes me while we 
compete. It helps my mental psyche 
a lot." 

Karissa Owens established her- 
self as the top female sprinter in the 
conference with gold medals in the 
55-meter dash and the 200. 

Her time of 6.85 in the 55 auto- 
matically qualified her for the 
NCAA indoor championships. 
Owens dominated the event, finish- 
ing ahead of Nebraska's Annette 
Hall with a time of 6.95. 

"I've been working on my start a 
lot," Owens said. 

"I felt a lot of pressure coming in 
with the t(^ lime, but I just tried to 



go as hard as I could and just see 
whai happened." 

The men's squad had some suc- 
cess despite injuries that hurt its 
point total. 

Bill Fields continued to improve 
by placing third in the 400-meter 
dash and the 200 with times of 48.7 
seconds and 2 1 .77 respectively. 

It was the first time Fields ran 
the 400 this season. 

"He competed very well," Coach 
Cliff Rovclto said. "He never even 
ran the 400 this year. He went in 
with no time. 

"I knew he could score in the 
event, but I didn't think third." 

Marlone Davis entered the finals 
of the 600-yard run with the top 
lime but placed second with a time 
of 1:11.58 behind Oklahoma's 
Ryan Kite. 

The team's hopes for success 
took a serious blow when all- 
America triple jumper Dante 
McGrcw was unable to compete 
due to an ankle sprain. 

Margalit also had to lay out of 
the triple jump. 

Both scored in the event at last 
year's meet. 

Additionally, junior-college all- 
American Steve Durcn wasn't up to 
par because of a nagging hamstring 
injury. 

"We're still short 1-1/2 scholar- 
ships on the men's side because of 



"No Coupon" Specials 



NONE .»Ui^|it«tl| 



Everyday 
Two-fers 

2 - PIZZAS with 
2 - TOPPINGS each 
2 - COKES with ice 



Everyday 
Three-fers 

3 - PIZZAS wtth 

1 - TOPPING each 

4 - COKES wHh ice 



$8.45 



Prtecidonot 
includ« aalM taxM. 



^$1 0.34 



Pizza Shuttle 776''5577 






Dilly'si 



I 



I 1/2 saiulwich, | 
I small sakul tSi tli ink \ 

ioi$4.50 



111 Mils anipon 



.u * igiga] 



Ash Wednesday 

Service 

wUh imposition of ashes and Holy 
Communion 




7 p.m. 

Danforth Chapel 

(behind McCain 

Auditorium) 



Ail denominations are welcome to wonhip. 
Sponsored by KSU Cimpus Miniithei 



I 
I 
I 
I 
I 
I 
I 
I 
I 
I 
I 
I 



Wf 



NAUTILUS 

FITNESS & AEROBIC CENTER 

1 MONTH FREE 



WOO Moro 
Ag^ieville 
776-1654 



OPer«on»l Trainer 
CJFree Weight* 
O&Me ClM»e«« 
OR»ce\ueti>a\l Court 



Mien you ipuy 2 months 

f/hen paU in full 

OStcp A Aerobic Clasoes 

OLtfeetride Tre»<imitl 
ONureery 



I 
I 
1 
I 
I 
I 
I 

ONautilue Machines ' 

DBikeft and Stair Cllmbere ■ 
CJMa»»a^9 Thffrjiplftt | 

G&auna & WhIHpool | 




nm 



I Gwen Wentland and Ed 

BroxtefTTtan captured fiist place in 

the high jump. 

I JJH Montgomery captured lir^ '«\ 

the pentathlon. 

I Kar^ Ow^s captured M In 




probation, plus we had two of our 
top athletes, Dante McGrew and 
Steve Duren, limited because of 
injuries," Rovelto said. "That's just 
too much for us to overcome. 

"We have to have everybody 
ready to be one of the top three 
teams in the conference." 



Koiirby^ Rvstacirant 



CdN-EflT 
BUFFET 

Salad & Dessert Bar included. 

10% OFF 

On Thurs. Nights 
W/K.S.U. I.D. 

Hours; ■nies.-SaL 1 1 a.m.-9 p.m. 

Sunday 10a.m,-2p.in. 

2 miles East 

Of Ttiwn Center Malt 

Hwy. 24E-539-1332 



(colortyme) 



WHATS RIGHT FOR YOU. 

50% OFF 

1st Months Rent 

w/coupon 

Starling @$7.99 

per^w^ck 

We Have: 
19" TV's 
Dinettes 
Microwaves 
VCR's 
Shelf Stereos 
Dorm Refrigerators 

1235 Washington, 
Junction City 

7^;^-7602 




CONTINUED FROM PAGE 6 

daring the Cats to shoot. That might 
not work as well this year. 

The Cats rank third in the con- 
ference in scoring defense, allowing 
only 65.9 points per game, and 
despite their lack of size, the Cats 
have been successful defending the 
post. 

Stires ranks 11th in steals in the 
conference, and Jacobson and fel- 
low freshman Amanda Chamberlain 
arc averaging at least one steal per 
game. Mitchell would lead the 
league in charges taken if they kept 
stats for that sort of thing. 

But most important is the ten- 
dency for the Cats to help. Whether 
it's our guards collapsing on the 
post or a post player stepping in to 
stop a drive, you rarely see an 
uiKontested shot by a K -State oppo- 
nent. 

"We've got to make them play at 
our tempo, and we've got to make 
them play against our defense," 
Agler said. 

Though officially it's a neutral 
site, the Bicentennial Center is as 
much a home floor for the Cats as 
Kemper Arena is for the University 
of Kansas. 

Only oat hour away (as opposed 
to seven or more hours from 
Colorado and Iowa State), Salina 
boasts a strong K-Slate suppon sys- 
tem. And the Cats have already 
played there this season, defeating 
Wichita Sute 60-55 on Nov. 29. 

"I think it's nice this year that 



we've played down there," Stires 
said. 

Agler said he agreed. 

"I don't think it hurts us at all." 
Agler said. 

Several of the Cats have been 
successful in Salina. Jones recorded 
her best game of the year in last 
year's tournament, and 
Chamberlain won the 4A stale 
championship there last March. 

It doesn't hurt that Stires is play- 
ing in her hometown. 

"We've been a team of momen- 
tum," Agter said. "We just need to 
get on a positive streak." 

Although they have lost their last 
two games, K-Statc is playing as 
well now as they have all season. 
The Colorado game showed that K- 
State can play with anyone in the 
conference — if not in the country. 
Wins over Kansas and Oklahoma 
Stale late in the season were emo- 
tional boosts for the team. 

Additionally, the Cats have 
proven their mettle in close games. 
K-Statc withstood late runs by 
Nebraska, Oklahoma State and KU. 

"I feel a lot belter right now than 
— going into the tournament — 
than I did a year ago, because 
we've been extremely competitive 
with every team we've played," 
Agler said. 

No one expects the Cats to 
sweep through untouched. But 
among the challengers, they have as 
good a chance as anyone to write 
this year's Cinderella story. 



This WMk't SpwHato ^ 



GhiU Bnrrtto $2.06 (m, tt.fiM.» 
Babf Bowl80C(it|.ne) 



.-I- vVliere (jood (fiends yel loyelliei ^•stL. " ' 

YT* 2809 Claflin 539-2091 ""^ ^ , :■: 

-iij,\w-.i3Cit.c -Kia. J .^i-i-.':ii|i:)AM(%t3cn,t--'iii>;:;.;' ,'i ic i. >. m-H- . .^ 





SELL I 
FIN 




mmi IT. 



C Kamas Slat£ Colkm n 
LASSIFIEDS 

$5 for up to 20 words 
103Kedzie 532^555 



3E AN ANIMAL 



FOR 3 PAYS! 



Any v(\\cfo, import mlrro. or ^p^^^^nA^uit has an 
'_, ANIMA i^*^ mKm 

.w on it is 20% off for a 12 oz^ngT^ottle: 
or 1 5% off any ^-^d^oV. 

'Thi'. tK, Krfles any major promo aSlelteme or hum»ii ti*(iir<'^. 

OVER 325 INCREDIBLE 



521 N. 12th 
539-5269 



BEERS TO CHOOSE FROM! 7)p jAhjl 

THE LEADING WHOLESALER \^y^M^ 

IN THiS CATEGORY IN THE STATE TTC^rfrrTr 



KANSAS ?Ettl COLLEGIAN 



1^1 le or bust 



■Wildcat Watch. 



W»dn0»day, Mareh 1, 1005 Q 



Conference teams converue on Saliiia 



Buffaloes are the No. 1 seed - again 



Colorado was only the second 
team in Big Eight Conference his- 
tory to go through league play 
undefeated. 

However, the Buffaloes have 
bigger goals than Ihc regular- season 
championship. CU wants a Big 
Eight Tournament title and a No. I 
seed in the NCAA Tounxament. 

"Prior to last week, a No. I seed 
wasn't our goal." CU coach Ceal 
Bairy said in reference to the unde- 
feated conference run, "Now that 
we are close to getting a No. I seed, 
we know that we have to continue 
to win to get that seed." 

To do that, the Buffs will proba- 



bly have to win in the Big Eight 
Toumament. 

"It's difficult," Barry said. 
"There is an added incentive on our 
o{^nents. Winning the Big Eight 
Toumament is the road we want to 

go 

Leading the Buffs is all-confer- 
ence player Shelly Sheetz. 

Sheetz is le^ing the conference 
in assists while being the sixth- 
leading scorer in the conference. 

"Words can't describe what she 
has accomplished here." Barry said. 
"She is a total team player." 

The Buffs are riding a 19-game 
winning streak. 




4jlj 



^ Season reooni: 2K 
Big Eight FMont 14^ 

■ Coacfi: Ceal Barry 

■ Ftoor leaders: Sheify Sheetz, ' 
DeCite Tbon^ Ainv Pabnef 
I StrangHts: B^eriencs, senior 




Sooners are surprise of Big Eight 



Though Nebraska lost two 
games to the Sooners by a com- 
bined total of three points, the tal- 
ent of the Oklahoma team is still 
troublesome for the Huskers. 

"Oklahoma is so athletic, and 
they're also very deep." Nebraska 
assistant coach Amy Kramer said. 

It's that depth and athleticism 
that has earned Oklahoma an 1 1-3 
conference record and a No. 2 seed 
in the Big Eight Tournameni this 
weekend in Salina. 

With seniors Mandy Wade and 
Angi Guffy and juniors LaNae 
Jones and Etta Maytubby. the 
Sooners can boast one of the deep- 



est front courts in a conference 
dominated by post play. 

Jones and Guffy are both among 
the conference leaders in blocked 
shots. 

But the key to Oklahoma's suc- 
cess is its guard play. Junior Pam 
Pennon leads the Big Eight in 
three-point percentage. Both 
Pennon and senior Sharee Mitchum 
are among the top five in assists. 

With its depth and athleticism, 
look for Oklahoma to try to push 
the pace. 

At 78.3 points per game, the 
Sooners have the second- most pro- 
ductive offense in the Big Eight. 




I Season reoini: Wl 
B»gBgfrtfBC0»rf:11-3 

■ Coach'etjrtPlunketl 

I Floor teatters: Mandy Wade, Angi 
6u%, Etia Maytubtiy »id LaNae 
Jam 

■ Strengths; Expenenced guan) 
plBjr, qtldcmss, soortng pitfK^ and 




Jayhawks depend on Aycock 



The Jayhawks' best shot at 
liking up postseason wins can be 
summed up in one name — 
Angela Aycock. 

The all-America senior 
guard/forward is flrst in the Big 
Eight in scoring (22.7), second in 
steals (3.4), third in rebounds 
(8.0), fourth in assists (3.8) and 
eighth in three- point shots made 
(1.4). 

"I'm not sure you can control 
her at all." said Missouri head 
coach Joann Rutherford. 

Despite not having a true point 
guard. Kansas is a perimeter team. 
In atklitJon to Aycock. sophomore 



Angie Halbleib leads the confer- 
ence in three-pointers. Junior 
guard Charisse Sampson ranks 
fifth in the conference in scoring 
(14.2), and sophomore Tamecka 
Dixon is 1 3th (1 2.6). 

The pressure defense of 
Kansas has been effective against 
first-round opponent Missouri, 
sweeping the Tigers this season. 

But Kansas will need to over- 
come its poor showing on the 
boards to guarantee success in 
postseason play. 

Look for junior-college trans- 
fer Keshana Ledet to come off the 
bench. 




Cowgirls lack strong inside force 



Oklahoma State is one of the few 
Big Eight Conference teams not 
dominated by post play. 

But its inside game is still to be 
feared, several Big Eight coaches 
said. 

Junior center Amy Scales leads 
the team in scoring with 12.5 points 
per game, and junior forward Stacy 
Coffey is not far behind at 1 1 .8. 

Against K- State, freshman for- 
ward Renee Roberts put in 17 
points to lead Oklahoma State in 
Stillwater. 



Reserve center Gina Shaterkina 
can also pack a punch, scoring 13 
points and grabbing 1 1 rebounds 
against the Wildcats in Manhattan. 

But the guard play can make the 
difference for Oklahoma State 
Senior Regi Smith nailed five three- 
pointers on her way to 17 points 
against K-State earlier this year. 

OSU wins its games on defense 
with the second-best scoring 
defense in the conference. Coffey 
is leading the conference in steals 
for the third -straight year. 




■ Seasoniwsnt; 16-10 
Big Eight record: 7-7 

■ Coach: Died Haltemian 

■ Floor iBKiers: Stacy Cotfey, Yogi 
IRagiSmith 4^^ 

: Defense afxJs>ow« 




DAM LMWUUNZ 



GRADUATION FAIR 



Get the tassel with less hassle 

March 7,8 & 9 K ^^ 

Bachelor Apparel Special 

bctudes cap, gown & tmsel 



$14.95 




K-State Union Bookstore 

10 a.m. - 4 p.m. 



BalbiM; 



K-State Union 

Bookstore 532-6583 



Sliopal lhcsl(»!v iIkii i^ivcshack 



Tigers hope for repeat of last year 



Last year, Missouri came into 
Salina with the No. 7 seed and a 
first -round match-up with national- 
ly ranked Kansas. 

The Tigers upset the Jayhawks 
on their way to winning the tourna- 
ment, becoming the lowest seed 
ever to do so. 

What's different this year? The 
Tigers are coming in seeded sixth. 

Senior center Nikki Smith, last 
year's tournament's most valuable 
player, ranks first in the Big Eight 
Conference in blocked shots ( 1 .9). 
third in rebounds (8.0) and eighth in 
scoring (13.4). 

Junior forward Erika Martin 



ranks third in scoring (19.7), fifih in 
rebounds (7.S) and seventh in 
assists (3.4). Smith and Martin tie 
for fifth in steals, each grabbing 2.5 
per game. 

Junior Andrea Siemer and fresh- 
man Tamika Bates will come off 
the bench to relieve Smith and 
Martin. 

But the key to another Cinderella 
story in Salina will be the guard 
play of the Tigers. 

Junior Mandy Bryan and fresh- 
men Tanisha Johnson and Alison 
Lucy must hit their shots, or oppos- 
ing defenses will simply collapse on 
the post 




■ StasortfecontlMl 
Big Eight racotd: 5-9 

I Coach: Joann Ruthetf ord 

■ Floor leaders: Nildd Smith. Ente 
Martin and Andfira S«OT«r 

I Strengths: De(efidng dismpion, 
toumainentdxpHtence, s&ong 
jniiJegBroeantgeaJSir" 




Huskers suffering in down season 



Things aren't the same as they 
used to be in Lincoln. Neb. 

After having a successful sea- 
son last year, which included an 
invitation to the NIT toumament. 
Nebraska women's basketball has 
fallen on hard times. 

This season, the Comhuskcrs 
finished with a 13-13 record and 
a seventh-place finish in the Big 
Eight. 

However, with the Big Eight 
Tournament this weekend, 
Husker coach Angela Beck said 



she thinks her team is playing 
confidently. 

"I feel like we are playing the 
best ball of the season right 
now." Beck said. "This has been 
a real positive year. 

"It has taught us a lot," 

The Huskers' leader on the 
court this season has been fresh- 
man sensation Angie DcFor^c. 

On the season, DcForge is 
averaging 13 points a game to 
lead her team. 




LEAD 



rflcorcJ; 13-13 
IK0n):4-10 
Angela Beck 

ftoor leaders: Kate Gdlgafi 
Oeftxge 

Strong guani 
tench and 




Cyclones learn from last season 



Iowa State has the biggest task 
of any team at this weekend's Big 
Eight Toumament. 

The Cyclones have to face No. 
I -seeded Colorado. To make things 
even more difficult for Iowa State, 
the Buffaloes are on a 19-game 
winning streak. 

"We're always chasing the teams 
at the top." Iowa State coach 
Theresa Becker said. "We welcome 
the invitation of playing the best." 

Sounds like the Cyclones don't 
have a chance. But last season. 
Iowa State faced the nationally 
ranked Buffaloes in the first round 



of the Big Eight Tournament, and 
they were within five points in the 
fmal minutes. 

"We make reference to that 
game last year." Becker said. "If 
you look at that game, we had five 
freshmen on the floor at that point, 
and now they arc sophomores. But 
Colorado is a handful." 



If the Cyclones are going to 
spring the season's biggest upset, 
they will need to dominate down 
low. That's where Janel Grimm and 
Jayne Olson come in. 

Currently the freshman duo 
ranks ninth and 10th in conference 
rebounds. They also rank in the top 
10 in field-goal percentage. 




^:1»'^^* 



Hi 

I Season recofd:S-1S 
BigEprecortMS 
■ Coach: Theresa Becker 
I Floor leaders: Janel Gnm a/id 
.teyneOiBon 

i Siranglis: Spsett, iraide play, 
reboundng. tisfofuo aftd bal- 
Ml 




THIS 

SPACE 

IS 

RESERVED 

(for youl) 



Collegian Advertising 532-6560 




Wednesday, March 8 

K-State Union Flint Hills Room 

1:30 p.m. to 3:30 p.m. 

Haw a bflfltar undentanclng of the differanea 
I between contract and aetf-Ofioratlon food senlco^ 
and how the branding concept can be a part 
of either aystom In the K-ttate IMoik 



01 nam* 






Gel ready lerSpring BrealiaLtlie K-Slatelini Bookslore's 



Clothing 

Clearance 

Sale 

Ftli27-llarlO 




,0 WsdnMday, March 1, 1998 

Ad prices effective 
March 1 thru 7, 1995. 

Quantity rights reserved. 

In Manhattan: 401 E. Poyntz, 
222N.6th, 3011 Anderson 

lOPEN 24 HRS. DAILY! 



KANSAS SWrECOl 



Food41Less 






Oscar Mayer Lunchables 

FUN 
PACK 

Assorted, 
11.2 oz. Pkg. 

Oscar Mayer 

LITTLE 
SMOKIES 

16 oz. Pkg. 



78 




i^ CHICKEN 
FRY 
PATTIES 



88 





lb. 



Farmland 

SLICED 
BACON 

16oz. Pkg. 



98 







Fresh, Ripe 

RED 

TOMATOES 



69 





lb. 



Medium 

YELLOW 

ONIONS 



39 







lb. 



fblger^fblgers^lgers 



SWEET CORN 




DUNCAN MINES 

CAKE MIX 



FOLGER'S 

COFFEE 




LIBBY'S 
VEGETABLES 

> 1 5.5 to 17 oz. Cut Green Beans, Cream < 
Style or Whole Kernel Corn. Sweet Peas 



LIMIT 8 
PLEASE 




Our Special Touch 

GARLIC 

BREAD 

STICKS 



BAKERY 
DEPT. SPECIAL 

29 



Package 
of 8 





3 Pound 
Bowl 



PARKAY SPREAD 

MARGARINE 





99 




Hiland 
CHOCOLATE 



MILK 



1/2 Gallon 



99 



COCA-COLA 




AND 

RELATED BRANDS 



^4 rmi 

5 



TONY'S PIZZA 
D'PRIMO 




Assorted 
Varieties 



Afo" 



BUDGET GOURMET """•' 

ENTREES 




8.7 to 
10.5 oz. 
Pkg. 



Vini:^! ,Varl fltld« 

■ for%/ 




GUY'S CHIPS 

14oz,Ba9,X ^ ^ 
Assorted ^^^ x^^ ^^ W 
Varieties ^■rTOr^^ 



Nabisco 
TOASTEHES 




Assorted 
Varieties 

13oz.Box 




FLORAL SPECIALI 

"KACTUS 

PEOPLE 

GARDEN" 




99 



In 5" 
Red 
Clay Pot 



SAVE $1.00 

ON MIRA( LK 

Willi' 48 oz. 



IN-U> COUPON 



VAUP: MARCH 1 THRU 7. 199S 



SAVE$1PQ 

on QHE 48 01. jar of any 
MIRAOl WHIP* Product 



RV0100 




B!ffiK«Wia't!»SSSmi' 



CW«QM.«llMa.t NhoM 



lDDa"MSQ7b 



Xl^Gif 



^l^^ "'^^^m^iSeSSr'^' CBmJ 




haucni.ims 



uz 



11 



KANtAS STAn COLLEOiAN 



I 




i 

A slain 1950s fraternity 

member is still on the provl^ 
terrorizing 1716 Fairchild 



Story by Janice Melia 



I'iii}^ aloiu* ill I he luitisc 
iii;i> tint In- a ^imkI idcii. 



]h\A \ airvhitil Si likv-s In do iIk' l_\]iiL;il 

;jllitM ,Kll\ lilt'"-. i.'«v|X-i.iall\ whfH [Viipk' 

■iiv 111 ihf imiiM- h> llK•lll^L■l^t.'s 

iK- !ik(.'^ 1(1 iiK-ss wiih vtui uh(.ii 
MHi'ro aiiiitf." I>rc\v firLvn. sophotuivrc 



It 111 fViiiK-.m iliL' uhosi h;is aKi) hccii 
iIk- siivjvi.t in MUtii' iittiiMial liappcntnjis 
lltal liavc iiunlvcil ihc Ikhim.' 

\ 1 1 IV iliat look [il.Kt' in iIk- skvpidi; 



ilii v\ itli 1 )uikaii 

ShaiiM J'Kkciitijj. Iroslnnan in 
lniMik'ss. woke u|) io >.i'c soincoiit.' walk 
jiast 111 111. iIk'ii ^-IhH -inJ lock llic mujiIi 
wmiliiw ol ilif slccpinj! room Tlu- 
|ni-.oM. whom I'll kcriiij: al (lie iiiitt.' 
iIhhil'Iu w a> ^ ^ 



Photo by Mike Welchhons 

Oil iIk' vv.ill whciv I lie hloiul sbowcil 
llUMiii;li. iIk'> pamk-il il a ilaik iVilili^lt 
hrovMi W lu'u' iIk' niilltne ol ilic fiatKllf 
showcJ lliiouifli. tlk'> spatkk'J liLM\il\ 
■nut used a Livam p.iinl |o iiner u|i llic 
pailitk* imaiic. Hii'W Ciiwn saiti 

MtluuiL'!) till' lii|j (.■\i'nls <;i.'l a loi ol 
aik-iiiiiHi. ik' link' lhiii;-'H lUat nfciiihcuiii 
adding it|i .IS wl-II. 

"\'\\\ not a hit; Ian ol L'ho\|s." l.aii) 
KL'lk'i. jiiiiioi ill niarki.11111;. satil 

Kt'lk'i vaid Ik- v\as hni-hiii:-' hi-- U'clli 
111 ilu' bat 11 room y^\y^ xwiXw wlu-n ilu* 
halliioom diior MiddciiK went sliul IIkmi. 
ihf Kuliioom Ian iiiruod on and v\aU oil 
again When il liapfX'Hi'd a Mvnnd linit.'. 
Ik- clicikal to vee (! iIk' InsL- wa^ h^A Hut 
llic\ toniul iIk- Ian was m ilie oil posifnm 
the enure nine 

■Nk'edk'ss lo sav, we took oil a^ la>l ,is 
weeotikl I linishi'd hiiisirinv' ni\ teetli in 
the kiteltcn." Keller said. 

Miisv. a lonnei house memher. had a 



hunk hed One 
ilioiiuii'j. the tan. 



at scared to death and was 
up all nighU kept my head 
under tlie covers. 



jilni'i'i d Ml. •,'. .1% 
11 rllillli'u'itl with 
I he I Old wia|)|H'il 
lUMllv aroniid the 



lave d 1 



eoiu I nee me. 



Some ol liie 



M\\\ saw him Lio 
h>. ' I'k kei in: 

said " ■ - , • - ■ II 

llnl Uianileit Ml< MUl C.VKsos ' "^■\>-''' '^•''l>> 

denies he w aN Sphhw <n arinuiinnq helie\ed in 

il|i, .aid \M one t;hnsts. hiU it there 

luMiil I he person 

eome up ihe si.uis to ; 

uel into lI bed. Iea\c hs the stairs or 1:0 seinoi in noiiieinuire. s.im 

down the woollen planks, ulneh arc just Some ol liie liji meinheis sa\ the\ 

outside the east ilnoi renieniher events that took |il.iee when 

Ihe old heal ilk! blanket hejian -^\\\m the\ lived in the lionse 

nil smoke slnrrtlv alter that. The sontli ()ne mt;l»t. a jjn) t'*'l "P '" '-" '*' ''"•' 

wniilow vv.ts sitkk shut, and the house bathroom dtmnstairs. winett onl\ had one 

tiieiiibeis eon Id not open it lo jjet an> an door \s the meiiihei enleieil. he bumped 

etuiilition When lliev opened the iloor into sonieone Uiii when he mined mi the 

It. uet tint. Itesh air lannetl the lit:hi onl\ a seemul later, no one was 

sinoklernij; mallress into llames there I here wasn't an\ one m the hallwav 

Ihe house ineinlvrs said there was no or anvwhere elose eitliei. lerrod Burns. 

vva\ sdiiieone eouki have eome up the seiiinr in mdustiial ps\eholo;jv. said. 



up onto ilie hetl 
and over the 
sleepiip^ person 

{M)\ "I never reallv 

ini.t,r} believed in 

i;hiists. hill it there 
was one lliint; to 

Ih.il was il." \,iion (iieeii. 

lullure. s.ud 

le liji meinheis sa\ the\ 

eiits that took jil.iee when 

le lionse 



stairs without heiii'J lieaul 



Miehael Carson, senior in aeeoitniini; 



\on ean hear hetoie aiivone iieis up was asleefi npstaiis one nij! 
V ItsiHellv loml." Piekenm: said. awoke In hear someone em 



iliere }ts piellv loml." V 
INekeitiiL! desei ibet 



11 .IS stairs 
i;hl (".irso 



limed eiothin;^ and laei: 



■J I h tol- 



as kind ol spookv when he said wen! p.isi m 

le was w.ilkini; aroiiiul." I>rew he s.iul 

.ud "i was se; 



someone emmii^' up the 
shone in the rotuii. and 
\ed the sound ol' the 



li'jhl M\\.\ 



d I never saw anvoiie. 



Oil IK an. a Iheia \i pledjie in th 
house in Ihe IM.'iOs. w.is killed in Ih 
hbiarv dining .1 ha/int; e\eni, Ihe kit; 
blow to Dnikaii's he.id e.inie while h 
was heiiif naiktied 



Idle W.IS huni: on tin 
o liini Hut wlieii Ihi 



"i was seared to de.iih .nu! w.is up all 
the nii;ht I kept nu lie.id under the eovers It 
Ihe w.is le.dlv. leatlv seaiv." taismi said 
l.ital Mike Overhev seiiim in lueehanie.il 

: he eiit-'ineeiinu. said one ot the i.'U\s sia\eil 
til the house iliinn;j seinestei Ineak b\ 
,is .1 himsell 



the wa 



e sh.iiie ol the 



p.iiiititi'J the walls when the> moved 11 
iliniii'j I'KtS llui. wfieie blooil h.ul been 
Ihe vv'.dls Would nol Like painl. Instead 



n oil bill while he w.is ui the bathroom, it iioi 
ddle turiiei! up all the vv,i> Alter liirninu it 
ilowii. he elieeked the house to see il 
iiied aiivone vv.is around 
•d III "lie letiiiiied to the b.ithiooni onlv to 



'[ lUiIni 



s bled through reil In the e\penenees. bm 



l> onee .ip.un. 

,)ii\ personal 
iliin>: went wroii«j. 



[laddles pi.silion. there was a faint we hl.inievi 11 t 

t h.ireo.il loloied nut line, (ireeii saiil goml se,i|ie;jo,ii. 

I veiuu.illv. the lifis eoveieil ihe lovvei Andv Ohines 

(i.irt ol the wall with p.iiiehuL! .iiul p.nnled .ind a I'l K.ip (il 

ihe to(> with a eie.1111 i^aiiit leaiiine .oj.iiiis 

Ihe I'l K.ips weie told about the wall ileeree .inyle wli 

piohkins when !he\ l.uei nuivetl to the Hut the wav I 

liMii^e in I't'M riiev deeido«i to lake the thai il l.inded ill 

H.aielmi; oil .ukl tr\ p.imlinL; it .iiivw ay pushed over, e 



we hl.inievi 11 on Dimeait Me maile a 
goml se,i|ie;jo,ii.* Oveibe) saiil 

Andv Ohines, Ireshm.ni 111 eiij.'ineeiin;j 
,iikl a I'l K.ip (iledee. s.iid Ins mirror w.is 
lean me .oj.iiiist .'1 w.ill .it a sh.irp -15 



.tosiiion 



o one was 



Hin w hen 



i! e.ime oil. the ne.ii it. he s.nJ 



I'.iddle showed llnoiiijh onee .igaiii 

■■(hii p.neiits were helpint:- .md thev 
lie.iked out.' Uri.in Howeil, si»phoiiioie in 



I he V 



I'Ltine s 



K.ips liieil p.iintin-.'. 
md lep.niilmg lanall). in 
•iiiv Haiiei ,iiul Mo \!nsy, 
iklenis in the house, redid 



I wo eii]>s tli.ii were sitting "n Ohiiu-s" 
eoueh moved on then own as Ohines 
w, It tiled (tne tdass Hew oil. then the 
lemote to the televismn went aeioss the 
room, .md then the olliei 'jLiss |k-w oil ol 
the eouih. he s.nd 

■ \ lot ol thines that .ite weinl liaiitvn 



,ire line 




12 *•*'"*»<'•»» March 1, 1905 



KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN 



Video focuses on colorism 



Beauty should 
not be defined 

by skin color 



African Americans should 
appreciate their diversity and 
themselves because of the 
essence of who they are, not 
because of an Eurocentric stan- 
dard of beauty. 

This is what Mordean 
Taylor-Archer, assistant provost 
for Multicultural Affairs, said 
after Tuesday night's video pre- 
sentation of "The Color 
Complex." sponsored by the 
Black Student Union. 

The video was a PBS docu- 
mentary that addressed the ques- 
tion of colorism among African 
Americans. It examined atti- 
tudes about shades of color in 
the African American communi- 
ty- 
Freeman Davis, adviser to 
the National Pan-Hellenic 
Council, and Olga Davis, assis- 
tant professor of speech, facili- 
tated the discussion after the 
video as a pan of Black History 
Month. 

"Our intention of the discus- 




OK 

TORY 

ISTTH 



sion is to contemplate some 
questions that are raised in the 
film. We ask why we would 
look at someone's hair texture, 
complexion or facial features 
and be swayed toward an under- 
lying prejudice against each 
other." Freeman Davis said. 

According to the film, color- 
consciousness came out of slav- 
ery. Lighter-skinned people 
were chosen to work in the main 
house and were given more 
advantages, while darker- 
skinned people were relegated 
to field work. This caused divi- 
sions among people based on 
color. 

Men and women interviewed 
in the film said that whether 
they were dark or light skinned, 
they had all experienced dis- 
crimination in the black commu- 
nity. 

The film also noted that these 
attitudes can affect people's 
self-esteem and cause them to 
feel badly about their natural 



hair or undergo plastic surgery 
to change their facial features. 

Beauty contests and the 
media feed into what is the 
acceptable standard and what is 
not. Freeman Davis said. 

"We need to look at what is 
the basis for the choices we 
make about the way we look. 
We should be honest and truth- 
ful with ourselves about the way 
we treat other people," he said. 

During the discussion, stu- 
dents shared personal experi- 
ences with colorism and gave 
possible solutions for dealing 
with the issue. 

"I finally got comfortable 
with my color when I went to a 
NAACP convention in 1988 and 
saw so many different hues of 
people, I saw some dark- 
skinned sisters who really had it 
together," Syvette Davis, Junior 
in English, said. 

Monrovia Scott, senior in 
industrial engineering, said she 
thought colorism is an issue that 
must be dealt with on an indi- 
vidual level. 

"It takes a lot of growth in 
one's self to be able to say you 
appreciate everyone whether 
they're blue, black or brown." 
Scott said. 




BO* McMAinS/Collagian 

PrMman Davis, facilitator or vldoo and discussion group on "Ths Color Complex," spoke to studenU at»ut 
wliy oolor-consclousnets is Important. 



► KANSAS PRODUCTS 



Land of Ahs foods 
marketed worldwide 



Classes make adjustments to deter cheaters 



LUmAHARnV 

Cotktiin 

Brownies, popcorn and cheeses, 
oh my. 

Foods produced in the Land of 
Ahs are being marketed worldwide. 

By participating in the From the 
Land of Kansas program, Kansas 
food production and processing 
businesses are now getting the 
chance to market their products in 
Bloomingdale's. Harrod's of 
London and Mexico City. 

"The program came from a 
homespun effort and is now into the 
international and national scene," 
said Eldon Sastrup, director of 
domestic and international marltct- 
ing for the Kansas Board of 
Agriculture. 

Since its inception in 1984, the 
program has grown from just 24 
products represented to more than 
400. Relaiters in the program recent- 
ly pitched products to QVC, a 
home shopping network, in Wichita. 

Brad and Karen Streetcr, co-own- 
ers of the Vista restaurant franchise, 
put together a gift box titled the 
"Top 10 List From The Home 
Office In Manhattan. Kansas," to 
present to QVC in the hope of gain- 
ing Kansas products some exposure. 

The Vista franchise was one of 
the first programs to join the Savor 
Food From Ae Land of Kansas food 
service program, a spinoff from the 
original program, 

Vista has registered its home- 
made brownies and tries to use as 
many Kansas products as possible in 
their pnxluction. 

"We believe very much in sup- 
porting the state," Karen Streeter 
said. "You can tell we believe in the 
program." 

Eastside and Westside markets 
and the Country Gift Shop are both 




I »ll% 



Qfffiffl 



532-6560 



Manhattan businesses that also carry 
From the Land of Kansas products. 

Taste the Heartland is a spinoff 
program that targets specialty shops 
and grocery stores year round. 

"What Kansans do with their 
products shows how determined 
they arc." said Deborah Hix, K-State 
alumna and manager of the foods 
and feed program for the Kansas 
Value Added Center. 

The Kansas Value Adtkd Center 
at K-Slaie helps the food program 
by offering technical assistance and 
limited funding to Kansans develop- 
ing new food products from Kansas 
commodities. 

"Ninety to 95 percent of our 
clients utilize the From die Land of 
Kansas program," Hix said. 

"It's very important to us for peo- 
ple to proudly put the program 
trademark on their products. It 
makes their products unique and 
provides pride for the state," 

"We've had a lot of highly suc- 
cessful projects," Sastrup said. 



Classes with histories of cheating 
problems are changing dieir curricula 
and testing procedures. 

The instructors of Natural 
Disasters and Principles of Biology, 
two classes that had problems with 
cheating last semester, have taken 
steps trying to prevent cheating. 

"This .semester. I'm teaching the 
course entirely different." George 
Clark, professor in geology, said. 
"We also increased the number of 
monitoi^ around the room." 

Clark said the exams are now 
given as a group effort. 

"The students bring their own 
answer cards to take the quiz. 
Questions are then displayed on a 
slide, one at a time, in front of the 
room. A group can then work togeth- 
er because it is an open-book test" 

"The situation last fall was really 
oveihlown. Some people took advan- 
tage of it, and there were others that 
were really trying," he said. "You get 
the impression eveiyooc was cheating." 

Larry Williams, associate profes- 
sor of biology, said things have 
changed more since last scnKstcr. 

"We had some changes last 
semester, but we added more this 



semester," Williams said. 

The biology department ha.s also 
added a detailed de^scriptinn of acad- 
emic honesty to the syllabus of 
Principles of Biology and made sev- 
eral changes when ii comes to 
administering the tests. 

Different forms of the exams are 
given for the early exam time and 
regular exam time. 

'We have always given an early 
exam to the students who have con- 
flicts at night with children and 



work. That is why there are three 
forms of exams — two alternate 
exams at night and one during the 
day," Williams said. 

Students must sit in alternate 
rows, and there arc two proctors for 
every 120 students per exam room. 
Students must show a picture ID and 
use their Social Security number on 
the tests. 



THE BEST SOUNDS AROUND ■ COME FROM BOOMTOWN SOUND 

PROFESSiONAL INSTALLATION AT LOW, LOW PRICES 

Iristatled 

plus tax 



MIRCO CAR ALARM 

trtcluctos 
•ZRsmotM ■ Built-in Shock Ssnsor 

• Flashing LED • Ramot* Panic 

• 8 Ton* SIran • Sl«r1«r Kill Option 

'AutoRM«l 



$60-- $100 



FmAMam iTrui.fipuf 
I 53»7«g0 I 



sach plua tax 




CAR & HOME STEREO • OPEN 11 a.m.-7 p.m. Mon.-Ffl. • 11 a.m -5 p.m Sat. 
1015 HOSTETLER RD. (BEHIND HARDING GLASS • MANHATTAN) 




WILDCAT 

Pet Resort 



Now taking reservations 

• Safe indoor runs 

• Climate controlled 
facility 

• Indoor/outdoor play 
area 

• Walked several times 
daily 

• Convenient drop off/pick 
up hours 

The only pet boarding 
facility in the city. 

539-1515 

Rod Franz • Herb Kalmar 

2720 Amherst 

Manhattan 



FREE 


J% 


PREGNANCY TESTING 


[1 


An of our services 


19 


■re FREE & CONFmENTlAL 


NOW OPEN 


FreMtfM Prefiuincyr g, 


FH> I^pJM. 


Y«ii*re not alone. "" ZL'TTJ^ I 


BlRTHRIGRT OF MANHATTAN 






ancial Aid 

E A. Ty I^ 1 TSI ^L 

March 1 

may apply for federal financial assistance 
completing and mailing your Federal 
ewal AppUcation or a Free Application For 
eral Student Financial Aid by K-State's 
norlty deadline of Marcli 1. Applications are 
available in 104 Paircbild Hall. 





Steak Nite 




One Biff Dinner 

•T-Bone Steaks & K.C. Strips* 

-Serving until 10 p.m.- 

includes salad, potato, veg., toast 

•Bobby TVCandelwood Shopping Center* 
Featuring Dally Drink & Food Specials 





Roadblocks In Your Way? 

Like roadblocks, financial problems or difficulties with 
•itudics force a change in direction. If your priorities have 
changed, the Air Force can help. 

The Air Force offers educational assistance, high-tech 
training and job experience. It'll take more than a high 
school diploma to succeed in die 2 1 st century. 



Call: 1 800 423 USAF 



Earn up to $90 
before Spring Break 

Receive up to $30 
a week when you 
donate plasma. 

MANHATTA 

BIOMEDICAL 

CENTER 

1130 GARDENWAY 776-9177 

» BlOMgDlCALClWlTO 




THE BEST SWIM SUITS 

are at 

UDERCOVER 

1224 MORO 
A66IEVILLE 



Mon.-Thurs, 10 o.nn.-7 p.m., 
FrI. & Sat. 1 a.m,-5 p.m. 



FEB 



12 



2fl 



2i^ 



11 



rvti. 



^ 



z 



M 



^ 



8 



Ik 



M 



m 



a^2fi 



15 



iz 



IM. 



11 



SPRING BREAK 
ONLY 1 8 DAYS 



KANSAS STATC COLLEGIAN 



W»dn0»d«y, March 1, 19M IQ 



► LIQISLATURI 



House strengthens 
open-meetings laws 



Bill would make 

more meetings 
open to the public 



UUBLUOTT 



Colkfiwi 

The Kansas House gave flnal 
approval Feb. 21 to a bill that 
would strengthen open-meetings 
taws. 

The bit! was introduced by Rep. 
Doug Lawrence, R-Burlingion. 

"Neither the United States 
Constitution nor the Kansas 
Constitution guarantee the people 
the right to open meetings," 
Lawrence said. 

That right is protected only by 
statutes, which can be changed al 
any time, he said. 

"We have to have it. and it has to 
be strong," Lawrence said. 

The bill added quasi-public bod- 
ies to the list of groups that must 
have open meetings. 

Quasi-public bodies are created 
or incorporated by public bodies. 
The members are appointed rather 
than elected. 

"[( a body is created by a public 
body, it is a public body," 
Lawrence said. 

Under the current law, bodies 
created by a public body arc exempt 
from the open-meetingK law, but 
this provision would include them 
as public bodies, he said. 

Lawrence also added the lan- 
guage from the open-records act 
that asks the courts to broadly inter- 
pret the open-meetings act. 

"Either through legislation or 
court intervention, we have turned 
the taw into something that doesn't 
protect the public's right to know," 
he said. 

Lawrence said he tried to put a 
little life back into the open-meet- 
ings law by encouraging broad 



interpretation. 

"I am concerned in general with 
a string of court cases eroding the 
law," he said. 

The bill would also formalize the 
attorney general's interpretation of 
the law, which said public ofTicials 
can attend the same social gather- 
ings. 

The interpretation was made 
when the first open-meetings bill 
was passed. 

Mike Bates, president of the 
Kansas chapter of the Society for 
Professional Journalists, said SPJ 
has never been opposed to officials 
attending the same social gather- 
ings, 

The final provision of the bill 
would eliminate the constraints of 
notification by public bodies during 
state of emergency such as the 1993 
flood, Lawrence said. 

Although Lawrence said he did 
not think notification hindered a 
body's ability to respond to an 
emergency, some people were con- 
cerned about it. and the provision 
was added. 

"I'd like to see it stronger, but I 
want it to pass," Lawrence said. 

The House bill will be sent on to 
the Senate for approval. 

The executive board for the pro- 
fessional chapter of SPJ met to 
write letters and make phone calls 
[o senators requesting they vote in 
favor of the House bill. 

The House introduced two ver- 
sions of the open-meetings act, and 
the Senate introduced one version 
earlier this session. These bills did 
not advance. 

The second House bill concern- 
ing open meetings would have 
allowed the majority of a quorum of 
any public body to gather and dis- 
cuss business outside of a meeting 
without notifying the public. Bates 
said. 

This bill did not advance. 



SPJ members were most con- 
cerned at)out this section of ttie bill 
because public bodies would then 
be able to discuss everything out- 
side of the public view and only 
vote at the meetings, Bates said. 

The Senate bill would have 
allowed governing bodies to meet 
and discuss appointments to com- 
mittees such as water boards in 
executive session, he said. 

The Senate has no plans to go 
ahead with its bill, said Sen. Mark 
Parkinson, R-Olathe and chairman 
of the Local Government 
Committee. 

Parkinson said the Senate was 
waiting to see what the House 
would do with open meetings. 

"The Senate bill attempted to 
clarify that it is not a violation to 
have a social gathering, as long as 
official business isn't discussed," 
he said. 

Once the Senate was sure the 
House bill was coming over, it 
decided to wail for it, Parkinson 
said. 

Lawrence said he was optimistic 
the House bill would do well in the 
Senate. 

"[ think it's going to get a fair 
hearing," he said. 

"I don't think there's over- 
whelming controveniy. ' 

Parkinson said he expected a bit 
of controversy because open -meet- 
ings laws always bring about con- 
troversy. 

"In general, the press loves the 
open-meetings law," he said. "In 
general, the elected officials find 
the open-meetings law to be bur- 
densome." 

Parkinson said his committee 
won't start having hearings on it 
until the first half of the session is 
over and the houses exchange legis- 
lation. 

"1 think what we have is a real 
balanced bill," he said. 



► FORT RILEY 



Base closings still keeping 
Fort Riley soldiers on edge 



Port Riley la not 
on the Base 
Roallgnment 
and Closure 
Commission's 
current base- 
closure list. 
More base 
closures will b« 
announced 
May 17. 



ASSOCIATSO 



JUNCTION CITY — 
The communities around 
Fort Riley were relieved 
the post wasn't on a 
base-closure list released 
Tuesday, but officials 
plan to remain vigilant. 

"If we're not added to 
the list by May 18, then 
we're out of the woods 
for now," said Casey 
Thomas, a Junction City 
veterinarian and chair- 
man of Kansas for a 
Strong Fort Riley, a 
booster group of nearly 
300 people. 

The Base Realign- 
ment and Closure 
Commission has until 
May 17 lo place addi- 
tional installations on the 
list released by the 
Pentagon on Tuesday. 

Thomas and others 
aren't expecting Fort 
Riley to be added to the 
list but are watching 
closely. 

Officials in Kansas 
and lobbyists hired to 



look out for Fort Riley in 
Washington will monitor 
every hearing and action 
by the commission, said 
Fred Heplcf, chairman of 
the Governor's Task 
Force in Support of Fort 
Riley and a retired 
colonel whose last duty 
was as garrison comman- 
der at the base. 

Kansas overall was 
hardly touched in the lat- 
est round of base clo- 
sures recommended by 
the Pentagon. 

The only installation 
in Kansas scheduled for 
a shutdown was the 
Naval Air Reserve 
Center in Olathe, a rem- 
nant of what was a 
vibrant Navy air station 
from 1942 until 1970. 

The Pentagon propos- 
al would mean the loss 
of 10 military and four 
civilian jobs there. 

No changes were 
made at McConnell Air 
Force Base in Wichita or 
at Fort Leavenworth, 
ofTicials said. 



Senate Majority 
Leader Bob Dole last 
week said Fort Riley had 
already "taken a pretty 
good hit" when the Army 
in 1994 recommended a 
one-third reduction in the 
base's forces and transfer 
of the 1st infantry 
Division headquarters to 
Europe by 19%. 

Dole, R-Kan., said he 
lobbied Defense 

Secretary William Perry 
heavily to keep Fort 
Riley, Fort Leavenworth 
and McConnell Air 
Force Base from closing 
c^ being cut back. 

Dole said he told 
Perry that "military value 
should take priority over 
budget considerations." 

"Fort Riley, Fort 
Leavenworth and 

McConnell Air Force 
Base all stand above the 
crowd." Dole said. "As 
we downsize our forces, 
Kansas' military installa- 
tions are critical ele- 
ments of our long-term 
security strategy." 



p- OEOLOQY 



Professor maps county's bedrock 



Ci>lkti>" 

A K-State professor and gradu- 
ate student helped compile informa- 
tion for a new, detailed map of the 
geology of Riley County. 

The new geological map gives 
people an idea of what kind of 
bedrock is beneath the surface of 
the Riley County and is available 
from the Kansas Geological 
Survey. 

The full-color map was com- 
piled by Allen Archer, associate 
professor of geology, and Brian 
Smith, graduate student in geology 

The map shows the age and type 
of rocks and soils al the surface of 
Riley County. 

These features range from rela- 
tively recent soils atop hills, to 
sands and gravels along rivers, to 



bedrock in southeastern Riley 
County deposited during the 
Pennsylvanian period of geologic 
history about 300 million years ago. 

Because geologic maps provide 
basic information about an area's 
geology, they are useful in con- 
struction, city and county planning, 
and environmental activities. 

"Since being introduced to the 
Riley County Planning Commission 
in January '95, the map has been 
very useful," Archer said. 

"The map gives construction 
companies a good idea of what kind 
of bedrock is below the surface," 
Archer said. "The type of bedrock 
must be known before a construc- 
tion company can start to build a 
foundation" 

The map shows the location of a 
dozen kimberlites, or pipes of 



igneous rock, that exploded to the 
surface in western Riley County 
during the Cretaceous period about 
100 million years ago. 

"Flooding in 1993 exposed rock 
formations in the Tuttle Creek spill- 
way, greatly increasing the interest 
in geology in Riley County," 
Archer said. "This map also pro- 
vides additional information on the 
geology of all of Riley County." 

Copies of the map ore available 
for SIS plus $2 for postage and 
handling from the Kansas 
Geological Survey. West Campus, 
University of Kansas, Lawrence, 
KS 66047. 

"The map is a little expensive 
right now because we arc making 
etch map on a computer one by 
one." Rex Buchanan, assistant 
director of public relation, said. 



WOII i:S.^7'" ANMAI, !)()(; SM.i; 






c;\\^ COMPUTER 

' ■ SALE ' 



MULTIMEDIA COMPUTER 



486 With 

420MB 

Hard Drive 



1 






.")■ 



$999 

Only $36/Mo.* 

Packard Bell 

Executive 4010 

with color monitor 




SOFTWARE $OAA 
WORTH OVV 



* Double Speed CD-ROM drive 

* 486 SX2 processor with 50MHz speed 

* 420MB hard drive 

* 4 MB of RAM 

* Packed with 27 software titles 

* Fax/Modem 



I (nvKSTPRU i:r Aiu 
ON CD-ROM PC 

Willi (OLORMOMIOK 





SUPER KIT 

Same computer with 8MB of RAM 
installed, upgraded Super VGA monitor 
and color printer. 



$1399 



Only $50/Mo. 



Printer may not be identical to illustration 



AO.Il SIS H>( I S 
\! rOMATK ALIA 



SPECIAL PURCHASE 




99 



sT *149 

8X22 MINOLTA 

AUTOFOCUS 
BINOCULARS 

* Multi-coated optics and 

* BaK-4 prisms 

* Continuous autofocusing. 
even on moving subjects 

for your protect Son, >our new 
Minolta equipment from Wolfe's 
comes with ihe Manufaiturer's 
USA limited ujrianty. 



LOWEST PRICE EVER 



$ 



799 




Only $29/Mo.* 

Factory Refurbished 

COMPAQ 

486 Computer 
with color monitor ^ 

* Fast 486SX25 processor with 25MH2 processing speed 

* 200MB hard drive with 4MB of RAM 

* Built-in phone answering machine and FAX modem 

* Modem, compact design, excellent for study room or dorm 



I ml lid es K\ tensive Software 



FLOOR SAMPLE CLEARANCE 
Apple* Macintosh* 475 $ 999 

Apple* Macintosh* Performa* 630 $ 1 299 



INK JET PRINTER 




*159 

Orig. ReUil $295 

EPSON 

Stylus 300 

Factory Renewed 

* 48-nozzle ink jet printer 

delivers crisp 360 X360 
dpi print quality 

* Drop-in ink cartridges 

* Fast priming - up to 1 32 
characters per second in 
letter quality mode 

* Built-in paper feeder 




COMPUTER PRINTERS 



$ 



YOUR 
CHOICE 



FOR PC COMPATIBLES 

Epson 2250 

Dot Matrix Printer 
Factory Demos 

* Operates in horizontal or 
upright position 

* 50 sheet paper tray 

* Smooth, quiet operation 




FOR APPLE' MACINTOSIP 

Laser 192A 

Dot Matrix Printer 

* Near letter quality mode 

* Touch operated front panel 

* Continuous form or single 
sheet feed 



LOWEST 
PRICE EVER 




BRAND NEW 
$ 2J9 99 

Canon BJ-200e 
Bubble Jet Printer 

* Faster and better graphics 
than BJ-200 

* 100 sheet feeder, 
letter or legal size 

* High quality print, 
near laser quality 




'm 



CaniemSfCtunconlers&CJoniputers w^kd«y,^B^3o.s:30p 

635 Kansas Avmm DoumtoimTbpeha, KS (913)235-1386 saiLitayi 8:3o^s:30pm 



il4 W«dn««day, March 1, 1985 



KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN 



WOW! IT'S WOLFE'S FABULOUS 37'" ANNUAL 



T 






STARTS 8 A.M. THURSDAY, MARCH 2 

Huge savings on new and used cameras, video, and computers, accessories, demonstrators, trade-ins 
and discontinued items. Bring cash, MasterCard, Visa, Discover or your SankMate, interlink or Via 
ATM cards, but hurry to Wolfe s Cameras, Camcorders & Computers for the most dynamic sate ever. 
Open 8 a.m. to 8 p.m. Thursday, 830-5:30 Friday and Saturday. Financing available. 



All Mrmv Vub|p(t to hio* Salp 




99 

Save $50 

Vivitar V50 

35mm SLR Camera 
Includes: SOmni fl.S lens 
and eveready camera case 

* Aperture preferred AE 

* Manual override tol/IOOO 

* Compact and lightweight 

* Minolta MD lens mount 

ZOOM OUTFIT ^299^ 

Includes; above set with 
80'200mm zoom lens and 
49mm polarizing filter. 



35minSLR'S 



IFrifEW 
RETAIL 

MS.M 
f95.W 



AE-1 »/nj««) 

A-l «/!«■) 
CHwnAV.lv/n.Dui 
C«wi FO (Hi 
CdoM* I3TMA K/IS-TO VuhlntHl 

MliKi<liXG-Tw/45Rlii) 
NHian F-l PT^tu) 
NikMi F-JHP(y) 
Nikon FG */n JCdi) 
holu A50W w/It-tWii I 
PJN v/2»-t0(iil 



Ht.OB 
f9SM 
IHKM 

3«s.oa 

4M.M 
Pniu SufH Prot •/l»«Ku) 7VS.M 



EOS-I 
CMMBOSAJt 

Canon EOS ELAN dtit 
CmMiIUMXSdab 

RrM XS m/iH» EF 
Canui ICTMT 

RTS IN 
CwHultX 

SI 

ST 

MkuiwiWMdatt 
Nikon N90 tSM ntlMt 
Rkoti KR.tlll 
Vuhld Dcnul E}( IJ Ul 



SALE 

IW.9» 

m.9» 

IW.99 

IM.W 
IIWM 

7».W 

IN.W 

>w,« 

III.W 4M.M 
IIMOO 

m.no 

II«»<W 
J»9.» 



UI0.M 
1IM.M 



»t.M 



IIM.M 
SM.M 
lllOiM 



11».M Km.M 



JUNK 'N 
STUM 



< uinr Immsi-. i iinim,i:.;i 
;iikI (lit: lliiiiii:h ;ill kiiicK nt 

|>holli'JI;ij>|liv llt'lHS. laHHTll 

Mi|»|»(iiv. fiisrs. iimssidit's 
and iliirkinniii i^i'IMn. 



I»()IM \ SIIOOI 


55inin( VMKUAS 


IF NEW 


SALE 


RETAIL 




Chlnon Auto Pro JW-MA(iH 


1I«.W 


9.M 


MInvtto FimkMi IKu) 


IV9.W 


14.W 


KankiA-«(ii) 


IM.OO 


»«.«♦ 


Mtnsllo FmdsB ItSMal 


JM.dO 


I49.W 


Mlmi )SAF o/nuMu) 


Mt.oe 


I09.W 


Olfmpuv tnflnitytm 


IM.tO 


.W.W 


tHympui KHu] 


49f.M 


13».9» 


Mnh AF-«<a) 


m.H 


M.W 


VtMei AF-Tta) 


19SM 


».*» 


CMmb 39 CLil 


M.M 


».« 


CklHM FX-TM Itk 


llf.H 


«*.** 


Fuji tOt nfurti 


IW.M 


40.W 


Kodlk Camtu kulc .» 


S1.»S 


19.W 


Konk* Htur Jioiili tl 


IIM.OO 


J94.W 


MlnolM Zwm ID5EX 


417 .«0 


21V,W 


MliHh* ZMm 1 j!BX dilt U< 


SM.M 


3S»,W 


Mksn 3ST] JSinm nj puis 


1120.00 


7W,» 


Nikon LKiToiKh Uflini kll 


1I9.M 


ll«.«« 


Nikon LliiTooch toom kU 


U»M 


tM.9* 


Nikon McrTiHichlVil 


«».« 


4».» 


Nikon loom 470 dalt kM 


IIS.OO 


1T».« 


Nikon uam *T* Ul 


111.00 


I4f,9« 


Olyn|Mt3»m3f-11B(Ult 


910.00 


3M.W 


(Hr«ip» Stjlm iktr 


I»».»S 


IW.W 


rmm uaot l U <lolr pam 


S71,»J 


).1«.W 


Mnh LXll iluMrcofntn 


IM.H 


6«.W 


Ricok Rt\ 1 AF HiilliTrpt kit 


l».M 


W.99 


lUcoti team ttl >«f* dale 


4T9,«S 


IW.W 


lUnh Myporl Supit Zoent dote -rtrnotr | 




4W.«« 


IM.M 


Ricoh Ziuni III OMt 


ist.eo 


imw 


■jamfuni £( X It-l'IU data 


nv.oo 


M».» 


Sr* & !>t> MXIO 


4IS.0O 


M«.» 


Ntat S«i MX 10 kit 


M9,*J 


4)f.«» 


SptiHlKri M<r pononoilc 


»f.» 


»».*» 


VlrltarTLIUAFttli 


I3»,»S 


•t.» 


V«kkaEZia«niTII 


M»,»5 


JM.9* 



MMTARBINOCIIAIULOSKOIT 



Wolfe*s bought out Vivitar*s stock of Brand New 
discontinued Binoculars. Now priced to sell for 
pennies on the dollar. ^ ^^ ^^-v ^ ^ 

$J099 

Orig. Retail $59.99 




7X35 

WIDE ANGLE 



Popular 7 power with 
wide view. Excellent for sports, travel and general purpose. 



69 



99 



Zoom Binocular $ 

7-15X35 Zoom Orig. Retail $149.95 
laXSO High Power Binocular Orig Retail $99.95 *39^ 
7X50 High Brightness Binocular Orig. $89.95 $44^ 
8X21 Armored Pocket Size Binocular Orig. $139.95 *49'^ 



RETAIL SALE. 



TX41 Zdn Armarad 
TXSO Nikon 11 Wln^^ii 
TXH Mlnolu WtoUwnnuJi 
SX21 Minolta AutofodH 
BbiocumounI V" hw 
10XU Minolta noipwi 
10X19 Nikon MotinlilnHr 
IXZOPrnlat iupitrf 
7X19 Buihntll t:nii|[n 
^\19 Jajon focui fr*t 
■ XU Nikon TravfUti III 

vxioi 



II91.W 
.W*.«9 
419.00 

U.W 
37A.00 
37«M 

1 10 DO 
IJ».»9 
71.00 
19100 
194.00 



xw.oo 
»»,♦» 

IM.W 
140.W 

3V.W 



lOX 19 BiuhmH Enaltn I f«.99 

10X19 Virtra porkrt I4i«.*9 

tOX40B 7.fii> Armorrd 13M.0O 

lOX.MAdkrMIck MC 44«.W 

10X90 BAl. l.rfac} dtna 201.99 

10X50 CtkOnn Ptomaitir I-M.99 
10X90 KC Ha^al Biuhnill I3«.*9 

IIXMBaUKll A LotnbAiIro 719.00 
I70.99 
70.99 

uv.oo 

l9t.»S 
IM.9S 



7X35 <i 

7X35 Buthmll Kakon lOditt. 
I0X19W Minolta 
7.I9X.15BAL Emplrr 
7.11X40 EiultntdrniD) 



40.9* 

H.O* 

•OO.M 

149.91 
79.9i 
99.99 
49.91 

149.99 
79.99 
19.9t 

119.9) 
49.99 



TELE EXTENDER 
for MAXXUM 



$ 



39 



99 




Orig. $149.95 
Multiplies the power of 
your Maxxum AF zoom 
lens by 1 .4X. Not for Si or 
Xi models. 



IJ'ASKSONSALi: 



$9 



99 



UP 



Yes! $10 10 $50 will buy a 
lens. Over 100 SLR camera 
len.ses Sale Priced under 
$50. plus lots of other Sale 
lenses. New and Used 
Canon, Nikon. Promaster, 
Olympus, Sigma, Minolta, 
Vivitar and more. Choose 
manual focus and autofocus. 
Hurry! Many 1 of a kind. 




SALE 

75-300mm AF Promasier 239.99 

SOOinm f2.8 TamrarKdeiiio) 1599.00 
75 • 200mni used for 01 y mpu s 19.99 
70- 200mm Tokina for Canon 1 19.99 
Pair 2R.70 & 70-2 10mm AF 299.99 
Tamron for MaxxunVNikon AF 




SAVE 

50% 



VIDEO 
& CAMERA BAGS 



$099 



9 



UP 



Big selection of hard & soft 
cases for cameras, camcord- 
ers and all the accessories. 
Priced to sell out fast 



COMPUTER TABLES & 
ROLLING AA^ CARTS 

MOST 

99 




59 



Oris- Retails 

to $220 



Choose from hardwood 
computer desks in a variety 
of finishes. Fully assembled 
floor samples, metal and 
PVC carts for TV, projection 
and shop. 




Great close out of floor 
samples and discontinued 
models. Low prices on 
Sony, Mitsubishi, Quasar 
and more. 




^^7*269'^'' 

Ricoh Myport 105 

* With Case 

* With Wireless Remote 

* 38-105mm zoom lens 

* Switchable panorama 

* Multibeam autofocus picks 
out off-center subjects 

* Date back 

* Auto flash with red-eye 
reduction mode 



*1>ickard Bell it a tcfliMfcd mOoMril of pKkard Bell Bcctniiin. lac 

™Thr Intel liuiOe and Penttum fttHnaof Lo|o« arc imdeniarki of liael Corpofatton. 

*TBM 1* a regiitered tmOernark vid Aptjva n ■ trademark of InirmatiGna} Buiinnf Machiiwi Cofporacjoii. 

^ Sman Krafy S)74rm Snt^mr hrww «vl Ripd Rfnanr mv tiadmwiu t^i IBM 

OthCf pmdtKtt afld hfiuid iwnet may be ff|nigred rradctnaiti or tradgniartti of theif feipectivT tntaen. 



Ror youc protection, yoiu new cimen from Woifc'i comti with ihc Madufkcturer'j USA luruled wamivy. 




Outfit 



CANON EOS EF-M 

with 35<80mni Zoom 
and 200M Canon Flash 

♦ Manual exposure and 
focus camera using EOS 
lenses - great for school 

• Shutter speeds 2-1/1000 

* Multi-mode auto exposure 
including program AE 

* Automatic film loading, 
advance and rewind 



( WUORDIkS 



GE cr.tU Imn 
Nikon VN5M liani 
Shvp VLEJni Mnan It 
CaimAI Marklt«(art>1 
Caii«i LCTS; HU 
Sharp VLHiMOl Hit 
Sony CCDTRMO HIS 
QuuarVMIMVHS 
QuuarVMMSVHS.C 
RCA cent VHS-C 
RCA CCfXI \HS-C 
CmHB EJM laiB 
Caaan eSM ImB 
Canoo E-tl IniMniHal) 
Vmnon E7Mtiiiin 
Hitachi VMH57A Hit 
Rlnh RIT Hll <4taH) 
Mmnmt SCF7U VH.<i 
Shtrp 611' VHSimHal) 
Sharp VLLAJU VHS 



IF NEW 
RETAIL 

ntM 

ISWM 
unlMV.IM 
111 1«««.M 

I9HM 

19)5.00 
tJ99 0(l 
9W.M 

ns.M 

IDK.H 
WM 

999. M 
IIWOO 

iits.w 

IMS.M 
M«.M 

TMM 
lt5.M 



SALE 

4M.49 

7W.« 
749.W 
7W.« 
MW.OO 

vw.oo 

TM.WI 
TW.dO 

sw.oo 

ftW.V9 
T».9» 
TW.M 
.U9.W 

3M.*f 



FULL SIZE VHS 
CAMCORDER 




GOLDSTAR VHS 

* Autofocus 8X Zoom lens 

* High speed shutter 



ZOOM CAMERAS 
AUTOFOCUS 
EASY TO USE 




Origlnai $QQ99 
Retail $195 O^ 

FUJI ZOOM 185 

Factory Renewed 

* Autofocus & autoexposure 

* 35-55mm zoom lens 

* Fuji Drop-in leading 

Brand $-| y|099 
New X*t:7 

Original Retail $2S9.00 

OLYMPUS ZOOM 76 

* 38-76nmv AF zoom 

* Red-eye reduction flash 

* Full information LCD panel 



Lowest Price Ever 

Sony Camcorder 

*539 




Only 

$20/Mo.* 



SONY FX430 Snim Camcorder 

* 4 mode program auio exposure dial 

* Multi-angle sportsfinder * Optical 12X zoom lens 

* AFM HiFi sound * Flying erase head 

* Auto date, date/time recording 



OUTFIT ON SALE 

Includes: Sony FX430 camcorder $ 

with video light. 2nd video battery 
and telephoto lens 



639 



Only $24/Mo. 



[UiiiniuiiyiMi 



99^ and up 

SI ill iin-M Tor pIctiiiTs. 
12(1, 35nun, Pokiroid 
ami luoiT. 

.SANK Stt-mVc 



WALL FRAMES 

1''to19'" 

Values to $60 

From 5X7 to 24X36. All 
with glass or plexiglass. Big 
selection of natural woods 
and designs frames. 



PHOTO ALBUM 
CLOSE OUT 

$^99 ^ $^99 

Originally up to $12 

4X6, 3X5 and Magnetic 
albums. Large selection 
of colors and designs. 



KODAK FILM SALE 




Great Fresh Date Kodak film for 
culnr pictures, slides or black and 
white ai our Lnwesi Price in years 
All USA Ktidak product. 

RcUil 
lWKpd««oh>r (;a135-I2 3,«5 

GAI3S-.M tM 

2(Ht Kudicolor GB1J5-11 . *30 

4pirk GBIlJ-24 It.OO 

400 KMlicolor OCI3S-I1 4.66 
Ipmck GCIJ9-24 UJI 

GCt35-J6 8.00 
400 Vtritolor VPH 1 10 

VPHIZO 
160 Vcricolar VPS 120 

VPSIJO 
$0 Kklochmmt 135-.% 
40«X KklRchromc-X 120 
200 Eklachroin« IJS-24 
200 Kktachromt 135-36 



S.79 
>1.5§ 
4.98 
4.% 
1(120 
9.J0 
S.70 
IIM 



SALE 

im 

4J9 
2.99 
I0,9« 
4.99 
2,99 
ft.99 
4.49 
2.49 
3.9a 
2.99 
6.49 
4,99 
3.99 
S,99 
7.99 



Black & White Kodak Film 

P!u5-X. Tn-X.T-Man 100, T-Max 400. 

Your choice al same low price. 
120 • 2.49; 13S-M - 11.99; l)S-36 - 53.99 
j^mmXIOC bulk film ■ S37.99 



U FIX IT 

\s usual \M- limr ;i rolk'i- 
lioi! ul .t.^|||||| SI.K lainciMs, 
lioiiit \ shoots, knst'v, |(it»- 
]( t lois ,iti<l suili al i'ra/> 
priu's. I jiid onl ttluil niakis 



lim an SLR f'oroiilv 



CALCULATOR 
CLOSEOUT 

^2^' UP 

Hewlett Packard Palmtop 
computers, calculators. 
Canon Desktop calculator. 
Sharp hand held. Closeout 
entire stock. Priced below 
cost. 



ISKDCWKOkDKRS 



STUDIO LIGHTING 
1/2 PI^CE 

Big selection 
of reflectors, 
mounting 
devices, .stands, 
lights, strobes. 
All priced to 
close out. 
SAVE 20% to 50% 





Choose from 25 



149 



99 



vo $ 



399 



Choose GE, Minolta, RCA, 
Sharp, Kodak and more 




90 DAYS NO INTEREST - Instant Credit to QuaUfled Customers 

■with approved credit on a minimum purthuc of $300 or mot«. Btttil on 1 8% A.P.R with 10% (town and 36 
monthly payments. Salei Tkx of 6. 1 5% included. Other terms ind down piymeni options available. 



CamemStCjommrders&Conipiaers ??'^*^^^^'" 



63SKanaasAtKmte Downtawnlbpeka^KS (913)235-1386 



ThuruLty. 8:30-S:00pm 
Saturday: 8:30-S:30pm 



... .Jj 




IVERSIONS 



15 




TODAY'S MEDITATION 

by Newton MePtitnon, phltotopher and cat owner 

Snow. Snow an my head. Sunshine. Sunshine on my shouider. it malces me happy. I want 
to tie happy very soon, if I go tociass, do my homewofV and spend time with friends on tfw 
WMkeral, I Cffi) attain happiness. But swshine wouM definttefy help. 



T3a 



trATECOUfOUN 



JUROjIilMS 



► CROSSWORD 



ACROSS 

1 '— tor the 

miHion...' 
4 Fat tarm 
7 Post- 

Ctirtstmas 

event 
a Rlr>o- 

shaped 

reel 
10 Heart 

Chanitwrs 
llOneot 

theEarp 

brothers 
13 Do an 

autumnal 

chore 

16 Small shot 

17 Legal 
wrongs 

1i Prior night 

19 Partner in 
crime 

20 Determi- 
nation 

21 Injured 
by a bull 

23Minir>e 
cries 

25 Quarter- 
bushel 

26 Info 

27 Grass- 
hopper's 
rebuker 



ZB Recent 
Sinatra 
album 

30 Worlter's 
compensa- 
tion 

33 Becomes 
a philan- 
derer's ex? 

36 Gracefully 
slender 

37 North 
African 
capital 

38 Roof 
lealures 

39 Southern 

St. 

40 Took 
control 

41 Citric 



quenctwr 
DOWN 

1 Report 
card data 

2 Netman 
Nastase 

3 Kir>gdome 
home 

4 Chamber- 
lain com- 
parison 

5 Holes In 
the head? 

6 Plankton 
component 

7 Attempt 

8 Murphy 
Brown's 
son 

9 Senrants' 
garb 



Solution time: 22 mine 




p 

E 
A 


A 



c 
Pi 

A 


i 


B 
A 
T 




E 


eMo 

AiaiP 


u 
p 
6 


R 

J. 

0' 


1 
N 


L 


A 


M 


pfo 


O 


N^KIE 


ti 


T 


S 




Yeetarday't ■nawer 



EUGENt ^UFFEt 

10 Wall St. 
wheeler- 
dealer 

1 2 Casual 
wear 

14 Contain 

15 Prepared 

19 Clumsy 
craft 

20 Hiatus 

21 Hereditary 
factors 

22 F« (o F#, 
for 
instance 

23 This and 
that? 

24 Egyptian 
town at 
the Nile's 
nrwuth 

25 Chum 

26 "For — 
sake!' 

28 Dig 

29 You, to 
Uruguay- 
ans 

30 Soft, light 
velvet 

31 Related 

32 Absolutely 

34 Scalk)pini 
base 

35 Wished 
otherwise 





J For answers lo today's croseword, call 

^ . Pi 1-900-454-6873 1 99e per minule, touch- 

tone / rotary ptwnes (te-t only ) A King Features servica, NYC. 

CRYPIOQUIP 

"X JWXIV JC UXDD 

CKJ 1^ 1040 UCWH." LMXV 

HMN, "YKJ X UCKAV 

XJ JC VI JCC JMNXAR." 
Yesterday's Ciyptoquip: HAIR COLOR GENER- 
ALLY FALLS INTO THE CATEGORY OF HUEIT YOUR- 
SELF. 

Today's Cryptoqulp clue: J equals T 



HEW CRYPTOQUIP BOOKISend $4 50 (checWm o.) to 
CryptoClassics Book2.PO Box 64 tl.RivertonhU 06077. 



► CALVIN AND HOBBES 



BolWaiteuon 



LOOK HOBK.-S 
I WD 

K 



ACOWtBcCK' 




WEI WlRoWCt IV^ MK« 

M1W ccPtor ,_**»»«-.' 

cf OcWlMB' / ^tf* 1 




«« PMl IHtM IN ft aw IN M. 
CLOStT. MMtat m. U6W\ »ts> 




vmmi. iMKt 

Kid N AMEKtCA 



rvt QlHtR. 
to TVtM 




► NON SCOUITBR 



Wll£Y 



T* KPn-toanpN of ^ml wmu^ 




VlKKiwr *»u\«(FW*f««r 



► FOXTROT 



Bill Amend 



JteON, >bU «EK - TMKtS 
Mo SWX TMIf* AS TMt 

X- Files.' us just a 

TV SHOW.' 




THATS 3uST THE SoRT 
of TMiNCi TMiS bur SAiO 
ABOUT T>«SC MCiCNT 
bltfW iMTMt [>AKK euW 
(KiHT MR«£ THEY CAMt 
AHD OeVoueED r«M. 



CWW. 

\ 



EXAtUt 
So DoNT 
etSoQUKX 
TO Oourn 
TMlNeS 




So Mffia'pitiu 

WAR Aeon TMiS 
eUY AKtJ TMt 6o«? 




► UNKNOWN 



BUNIXW PtCXyCoLLEGIAN 




► REVIEW 




Reader tired of routine, seeks new plan 



Dear Cassle, 

i have had the same major for the 
past thi^ee years and have a good GPA. 
This semester, I have become bored 
and unhappy. I'm graduating soon and 
have a job lined up. With my restless- 
ness lately, I'm womed I'll go crazy 
after a while. My parents will kill me 
if they find out I want start something 
new so late in the game. What do ! do? 
Signed, Frank Lloyd Wright/ Andy 
Warhol Wannabe 



Dear Frank, 

I'd say you need to talk lo your 
adviser about your restlessness. It 
could be a phase, or it may mean you 
need to consider a new vocation. 

I'd ht hesitant about dropping your 
major altogether, since you are close to 
(he etrd. Consider a double major. 
Take the extra year and pursue some- 
thing else that plca.scs you. A double 
major might also please your parents. 

Caisk 



Country artist 
refreshes fans 
with '50s flare 




*•• 

•Steve Kolandef* 
River North Nashville 
Reconls 

Ratings: 
tttt MplMnM 

ttfrChMkKOUt 

tiTttlrfttwtc* 
iOitgtiitHliibiigiktbkH 



ColkflM 

Steve Kolandcr's self-titled debut album is a 
refreshing change of pace on the country-music 
scene. 

New to the record scene, Kolandcr takes a fresh 
approach to his music. Lyrics, vocals and 
Kolander's appearance are a step back to '50s love 
songs and the old fashioned country look — very 
light, meaningful and carefree. 

The Tirst single from his album, "Listen to Your 
Woman," is a slow ballad about paying attention to 
the woman in your life. 

Kolander has very fluid, smooth vocals and uses 
them to share lyrics offering advice to men, an 
excellent piece of romantic music. 

"Black Dresses" is the second release off 
Kolander's debut. 

This track has a bit of a traditional country 
twang and a strong beat behind the lyrics. Kolandcr 
tells the talc of a man who gives everything to his 
woman, who, in turn, runs around and paints the 
town — a typical country song presented in a very 
pleasing manner. 

Kolander varies the style and tempo of his music 
in each track. The upbeat "Black Dresses" changes 
to a more nwllow sound in several other tracks. 

One of those tracks is "Drowning Man." Soft 
vocals move with a light beat to carry the song. 

It is an interesting song full of the regrets of a 
man who made some poor decisions and now looks 
back on his life "... drowning in a pool of tears." It 
is a tale easy to relate to if you just take the time to 
listen to the words. 

Something really different is "She's So Bad." a 
song from the '50s that has a bit of the Stray Cats 
sound to it. 

The heavy bass line and simple phrasing keep 
lyrics about a woman that caught a man's heart 
moving right along. 

"She's So Bad" offers the car something a little 
out of the ordinary, making the album even 
stronger. 

His self-tilled debut is a refreshing change from 
the normal dance-mixed, pop-oriented sounds 
everyone has come to recognize as country music. 
Even though many of the lyrics follow the stereo- 
typical image, Kolander presents every song in a 
new light. 

I think Steve Kolander has what it takes (o be a 
success in today's mass-production music market. 
Definitely take a chance and try it out. it is worth 
the time and money. 




UPC 

Urion PregrKn Cound - ThnJ Fbor of t« K-9tUi IMen 




l^:^;^^Mi^*4Mw present #># 

■ ' Sergi Khrushchev lecturing wr 
THE CUBAN^ 

^^ieam^out'dK liiaya that ahnoet lead toWorfd War IB 

^ed^lfuct^ * 2 p.m, • Fonun Hall 

■ ■ ■ii i iiiii M ii ' iii i iai K^ i i w ifi i ii T m I'm ^ ' ffimmi 

March 6 at 9 p.m, 
K-Sute Union Art Gallery 




twi go04 miND 




vou mm HfYoriJNOw w4UIT uou4t 



UPCOttldoorRec 




THE RIO GRANDE 

Hu«h 18-25 

a 



Per Person 



Sign-up now in 

the UPC Office 

Monday thru 

Friday, 9a-4p 



Informatloiial M««tlii9 
Mareh 13, 7 p.m. Union 203 

Sign Up In th* UPC Offic*, 
Monday thru Friday, 9a-4p 



t/S^f- 



jfA't., 



GIL WHITE 

presents a lecture on: 

HOW TO TRAVEL THROUGH 
EURO PE FOR JUST 840 A DASH 

Thursday, Mar 9 • 4:00 - 5:30 p.in. 

K-State Union Forum Hall 

Sponaond by UPC latue* it. Ideas 



mm 




1Q Wednwday^ March 1, t09S 



KANSAS STATE COllEGUN 



Docent program to involve art fans 



Collciiw 

HMAmUIUtTllRBUCtt 
HUantMOFAIIT 

Although the official opening 
of the Marianna Ki^tler Beach 
Museum of Art isn't until 
March 1996, you can get 
involved this week. 

Two informational meetings 
for the recruitment of docents 
(volunteer tour guides) will be 
given from 9:30 to 1 1 a.m. and 
from 6:30 to 8 p.m. Thursday in 
room 148 of the KSU 
Foundation Building. 

Kaihrine Walker, education 
coordinator for the art museum, 
said Thursday's meetings will 
outline the goals and require- 
ments of the doccni program. 

"It's a meeting for people to 
Hnd out if they are interested or 
not," she said. 

The meetings are open to K- 
State students and Manhattan 
community members. 

Walker describes the docent 
program as a "kind of all-ages, 
all -background group." 

The docent training program 
works as a course, meeting 
throughout the academic year. 

Walker said the five classes 
planned for this spring will teach 
the language of art, 20ih-century 
American art and the collection 
of the Beach. A prior knowledge 
of art is not necessary. 

Walker's only prerequisite for 
the job is that you be a people 
person. 

Students need not be wary of 
working over the summer or dur- 
ing spring break. Walker said the 
training course will operate 
around schedules. 

There will be two times for 
training sessions, one in the 
morning and another in the 
evening. 

The job of the docents will 




mainly include working with 
incoming school groups, giving 
tours of the museum to adults 
and working in an outreach pro- 
gram for schools or senior cen- 
ters. 

Walker said docents will have 
flexible schedules because it is a 
volunteer- based job. 

The docents will receive 
museum perks in the form of 
bookstore di.<icounts, special par- 
ties, frcld trips and letters of rec- 
ommendation. 

For more information, contact 
Kathrine Walker at S32-7220. 

CHANOQALURV 

Evolution and construction 
seem to be reoccurring themes at 
the Chang Gallery this semester. 

The last exhibit to fill this 
space traced the founding and 
building of the Nelson-Atkins 
Museum of Art. 

Currently, the exhibit, "The 
Grand American Avenue" 
explores the histories and archi- 
tectural glories of six great 
avenues in American cities. 

Among the streets chronicled 
are New York City's Fifth 
Avenue, Los Angeles' Wilshire 
Boulevard and Chicago's Prairie 
Avenue. 

This exhibit harks back to the 
days when America's cities were 
virgin, before commercialism 
swept its nasty paw into their 



hearts, 

Those were the days — 
roughly the middle 19th century 
through the early 20th century 
— when oil barons and railroad 
tycoons built glorious mansions 
along wide tree-lined avenues. 

In the 20th century, thanks 
mostly to the upscale develop- 
ment of the areas and rising 
property values, many of these 
mansions felt prey to luxury 
hotels, apartments and depart- 
tnent stores. 

In concise, complete displays, 
this exhibit opens up a world of 
past splendor, which is related 
through biographies, architectur- 
al renderings and vintage pho- 
tographs. 

"The Grand American 
Avenue" is informative and 
revealing, if you don't get a 
crick in your neck after bending 
over to read some of the lower 
displays. Don't worry about sil- 
ting on the floor — the intimate 
Chang Gallery, with its mellow 
music, practically invites casual 
inspection. 

This is a fine exhibit that will 
surely incite you to head upstairs 
two flights to the Weigel Library 
of Architecture and Design and 
leani more. 

The Chang Gallery is open 8 
a.m. to S p.m, Monday through 
Friday. 

tnSCKiR OALif RY 

This Friday, the Strecker 
Gallery at 332 Poyntz Ave. will 
open its newest show featuring 
lithographs printed by Michael 
Sims at his Lawrence 
Lithography Workshop. 

There will be a reception 
from 5 to 7 p.m. open to anyone 
who is interested. Preceding the 
reception at Strecker will be 
gallery talk given by Sims at 
4:30 p.m. in Willani 202A. 

Sims will discuss the priming 



process and the relationship of 
printer to artist. 

Julie Strecker of the gallery 
said the print show will consist 
of about 30 pieces from artists 
all over the country. 

She said she suggests people 
plan to attend the gallery talk in 
order to learn more about prints, 
because this can be confusing to 
the public. 

"It will be very interesting," 
Strecker said. 

The show will feature works 
by two K -State family members, 
Margo Kren, associate professor 
of art, and Teresa Schmidt, asso- 
ciate professor of art. 

Other artists represented 
include Elizabeth "Grandma" 
Layion, Robert Sudiow, Luis 
Jimenez, Jaune Quick-to-See 
Smith and Miriam Sh^iro. 

The show runs from Friday 
though March 30. The Strecker 
Gallery is open Tuesday through 
Saturday, 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. 

AMBRY QALLERY 

A new show of ceramics, 
"Visions of Vessels." by Sonya 
Michelle Paukune will have its 
opening reception tonight from 7 
to 9 in the Ambry Gallery, locat- 
ed in West Stadium. 

The show runs through March 
18, To see the works outside of 
the reception, contact Yoshiro 
Ikeda at 532-6033 or Paukune at 
532-6613. 

UNION ART OALLIRY 

The "Student Art Show," 
sponsored by the Union Program 
Council Arts Committee, is now 
showing through March 10. 

The show features eclectic 
work by artists selected by the 
committee in an annual competi- 
tion. 

The gallery's hours are 8 a. m. 
to S p.m, Monday through 
Friday. 



► MA 



Social Services Day 
sliows route of fees 



Co(t*|iM 

Social Services Day will provide 
K-State students with an opportuni- 
ty to see how their student-fee 
money is being spent. 

The event will be from tl a.m. 
to 2 p.m. today in the K-State 
Union courtyard. 

Offices on campus that provide 
student fee-supported services will 
have displays and representatives 
present to provide information 
about programs. 

"The purpose of Social Services 
Day is to educate students about 
where their money goes and what 
services are available to them," 
Tricia Nolft, coordinator for student 
activities, said. 

Nolfi said the event is sponsored 
by the Student Affairs and Social 
Services Committee of Student 
Senate. 

"They haven't had an event like 
this for a couple of years. Aaron 
Otto, committee chair, felt it was 
the responsibility of the committee 
to bring it back. It lets the students 
know about programs they are par- 
tially or fully supporting through 
campus fees." Nolfi said. 



University Counseling Services 
is Just one of several campus 
offices that are student-supported. 

"About half of our cost comes 
out of the student health-fee- 
account." said Fred Newton, direc- 
tor of University Counseling 
Services. • ,r, 

Counseling services will have 
self-help pamphlets on topics rang- 
ing from stress management to 
depression, Newton said. .' j 

"We also hope to have informa- 
tion about our new biofeedback lab 
and a machine out to demonstrate." 
he said. 

Newton said the machine mea- 
sures physiological responses like 
blood pressure. It gives an impres- 
sion of a person's anxiety level and 
how to reduce it. 

Dianne Urban, students' attor— " 
ney, said she hopes the event will 
generate student interest in the ser- 
vices. 

"1 think that not many people, 
know about the free legal services 
I leave brochures and talk to 
groups, but most of our publicity is 
word-of-mouth. I hope students 
stop by, ask a few questions and 
tell their friends about it," she said. . 



News Digest 



► KANSAS UNfMPLOYMENT RISES; JOBS SCARCi 



TOPEKA (AP) — Kansas' 
unemployment rata rose nrtod- 
erately In January, the result of 
fewer jobs being available, the 
Departnrtent of Human 
Resources said Tuesday. 

Tbe agency said the state's 
jobless rate climbed from 4.9 
percent In December to 5.3 per- 
cent in January. 

It was 5.9 percent In January 
1994. 



There were 1,270,161 peo- 
ple working in the state In 
January, with 71 ,1 14 looking tor 

work. 

Department statistics 
showed ttiere were 23.500 
fewer jobs available in January 
than the prior month, with 4,500 
fewer jobs in construction, 
6,800 in wholesale and retail 
trade, 3.900 in services and 
6,900 in government. 



► KANSAS SENATE 



Senate gives preliminary nod 
to bill for liquor sales on Sunday 



TOPEKA — The Senate 
gave a tentative nod Tuesday to 
a bill that would allow liquor 
stores to open on Sundays. 

The measure appears to be on 
the verge of squeaking through 
the Legislature to go to Gov. 
Bill Graves' desk. 

The Senate narrowly resisted 
amendments that were designed 
to effectively kill the bill, which 
the House pa.ssed 63-61. 

The bill would allow voters 
to decide, county by county, if 
tbey want to allow liquor stores 
to be open on Sundays, [t also 
would allow liquor stores to be 
open on Labor Day, Indepen- 
dence Day and Memorial Day. 



People also would be able to 
buy liquor and beer with credit 
cards issued by banks, such as 
VISA or MasterCard. Credit 
cards issued by companies, such 
as Discover and American 
Express, couid not be used. 

The bill also spells out that 
liquor stores can only be open 
from 1 to 8 p.m. on Sunday. 

Sen. Ben Vidricksen. R- 
Salina, asked that people not 
vote for any amendments 
offered. He said another bill 
would be introduced to correct 
the problem with credit cards. 

"The will of the House is the 
wilt of the people on this issue," 
said Sen. Mike Harris, R- 
Wichita. "At some point, some 
innocent person will be killed." 



► KANSAS LEGISLATURE 



House pushes state to follow national voter act 



TOPEKA — The House is 
expected to approve two measures 
on Wednesday that would let the 
federal government know it can't 
push Kansas around. 

On Tuesday, representatives 
advanced to final action a bill arvd a 
resolution designed to show the 
federal government it will have to 
force the state to follow require- 
ments set by the National Voter 
Registration Act of 1 993. 

The resolution instructs Attorney 
General Carla Stovall to file suit 
against the federal government 
declaring the federal registration 
law unenforceable and unconstitu- 
tional. 

However, Rep. Jim Gamer. D- 
Coffeyville, said he objected to the 
lawsuit because of the money it 
would require. 



**We don't know that the attor- 
ney general even wants to get 
involved in this fight," he said. 

The bill grudgingly brings 
Kansas voter registration laws into 
compliance with the federal law. It 
moved to final vote on a count of 
81-21. 

An amendment proposed by 
Majority Leader Vince Snowbargcr, 
R-Olaihe, and adopted during 
debate, states the bill won't take 
effect until a court orders Kansas to 
implement it, making a federal law- 
suit against Kansas inevitable. 

Minority Leader Tom Sawyer. 
D- Wichita, said he objected to the 
amendment because the House 
should support laws making it easi- 
er to register to vote. 

"1 don't know why some people 
are upset about registering voters." 
he said. 

But Snowbarger said it wasn't 



easier voter registration laws he 
objected to. 

"I just don't like the federal gov- 
ernment telling us how to do it." he 
said. 

Like many of the federal law's 
opponents, he said he sees it as an 
unfunded mandate. 

The 26-page bill implements the 
administrative procedures needed to 
carry out the federal act. The 
Legislature has already been asked 
for $900,000 to fund the counties' 
initial start-up costs. 

The majority of that money 
would be used for computer soft- 
ware and other electronic equip- 
ment needed to track voter registra- 
tion. 

The rest would be for new filing 
cabinets. The cabinets currently 
hold four-by-six inch registration 
cards. Federal law requires the 
cards to be six-by -eight. 



The federal law puts many of the 
burdens of voter registration on 
government, not the citizen. It also 
makes it harder for voters to be 
removed from registration lists. 

It requires all states to offer 
voter registration to members of the 
public when they apply for a dri- 
ver's license or when they apply for 
governmental assistance at state 
agencies Voters must also be 
allowed to register by mail. 

California and South Carolina 
already have sued the federal gov- 
ernment. 

Kansas law already follows 
much of tfte federal act. 

A bill requiring voluntary reg- 
istration with a driver's license 
application was enacted last year, 
and governmental agencies have 
been asked to voluntarily pass out 
registration applications to their 
clients. 




LASSIFIEDS 



KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN 



Om tAStC RATI 

lb rwi ai Midi or Ism tor orii d^^ 
to H. to fMh Mfd owr » add 30* 
pwwert. Ml S3245SS tor conMCtitht 



CitttlAMi idi uNMl bs pliood bv 

noon Iht tebilDft ths dflbi At M 
runt. diitlM iMtHtf Mto nun b§ 



TO MY 

UnltM|WhM»» 



pliMd by 4 pm Im woridng dfyi 



orVlMM 



Call 502-6555 
to place your classified. 



000 



BULLETIN 
BOARD 



ADVANCED FLIGHT Triln- 
Ing plut ground school 
for privitA. rnfltrjrnftnl 
tnd mu1ti'Bngin« r«t- 
Ingi. K-SIIU Flying 
Club ippravad initruc- 
tor. Hugh Irvln, 

a»-3^n. 



COME FLY with ui, K-Stata 
Flying Dub hai llva alr- 
planaa. For baat pricat 
call Trov Bmcfiwav. 
TTB-«T36 aftar 6:30ti m 



AIMM lofmallv at A 
Cut Abova la now at 
Joyca't Half Tamara. 
S^a walcomaa all torm- 
ar and naw cllanta. 
U»-TAME (a263l. 



Tig^t on 
Cash? 




MANHATTAN 

BIOMEDICAL CSNTER 

It 50 Ganlanway 

776-9177 

Ms* .-Tit. * •.m.-a^M r^HL, 

Sbc. V fl.fli.-3 f,Al. 



Lo«t and Peynd 



Found sda ean ba 
plaead fra* f«r thraa 



FOUND; NEGATIVES In 
nortl> parUng lot of Jua- 
tln Hafl. Call BM- 



HELPI BRACELET loat on 
campua^ Gold tanni* 
bracalat. It found 
plaaia call S39-2334 
il3G. RaiMard. 

OMl 



Wo raqiiira • farm of 
pletyro ID (KSU, driv- 
•r'a llaanaa or sthor) 
wlion lalaotnf a por- 




TOASTMASTEflS A mu- 
tual auppon group for 
poopla wtMi want to hn- 



provo thair public 
■paaUnq ildlli. Alao, an 
Intaraating forum, Wa 
inaat twica monthlv- 
Vi»ltor» walcorna. Call 
Cttariia. 776-3302. 



wol 



Partl««Hi-Mof« 



ADO A iplaah to your nam 
baih Graal mld-tarm- 
partlaa bagln with Wat- 
N-Wild Moblla Hot Tub 
rtntala. S37-1S2S. 

ADO AN axtra touch of 
data lo your naxt pat- 
ty. Call Wayna'i Waiar 
Party (o rant • portabla 
hoi tub S37-7S87. 
S3»-75ei. 



COLDEST SEER on Watt 

aldal Qraat MlactlOn of 
apjrita. Polaon liquor 
acroaa from Food 4 
Laaa. 3 100 Andaraon. 



MALE EXOTIC dartear- 

Avallabla for parlla* 
ate. Ladlaa. smbarraaa 
har with th« funnlaat 
gift avarl Baaaonabla 
ratm. Rob, S3B-a«23. 




HOUSING/ 
REAL ESTATE 



For Rsnt- 
Apta. PiiTnl«lw<i 

AVAILABLE JUNE 1. nica 
ttudio apartmarrt wtth 
watar artd <iath paid. 
Vary naar campua on 
Ciafltn Rd. Call 
Sa7-0634. 

OUIET SURROUNDINGS 
for atudy. Campua ona 
mjla. ona-badroom, 
and atudio aoma utlll- 
tlaa paid. Short-larm 
laaaa, no pala. 

110| 

Per Rtmt' 

*|rt. 

Ufiftimlaiwd 

AVAILABLE APRIL t, ona- 
badroom naar Ag- 



glavllla and KSU cam- 
pua. tO05 aiuamont 
Saas. Watar/ traah pan! 
No pata. 776-3804. 

AVAILABLE APRIL 1, one 
badroom, ona block 
north of campua. tBM 
Claflln S375. Watar/ 
traah paid. Laundry 
facilitlaf. Allowa amall 
pan. 77«-3aCM. 

AVAILABLE FEB. 1S. two- 
iMdroom at BOS A)ltaon 
f42«. Naw carpal, diah- 
waahar. Laundry fadll- 
tlaa. Watar/ traah paid. 
77»-3BM. 



ALLIANCE 

PBOPERTY 
MANAGEMENT 

HouMS and AparlrrMntt 

tor Rant 

Ava»abt» Juno 1 

ft August 1 tor 

l2-nKXTtfi leasM 

1- to 5- Badroom UnMa 

AvaUatjia 

CAU. MOW FOR 

BEST ftELECTTONI 

53SM3S7 
Mon.-f rt. to a.m. -5 p.m. 




PARKING 

OF THE 



OPnCI HOURS: MONDAY-mOAY 8 a.in.-5 p.in. (eiccpt ImIMvH 



w■l■mcou^^wc^WfflPl,l^4MiC»■^9i«,lUdllilWllOl,llM^l^^tll^l^MHBOl 



•!;■ 



ii 



IStevlMoneApts. 
tpdlegeHetghtsApes. 
"Cambridge St). Apts. 




AVAILABLE NOW, two- 
badroom rtaar campua. 
1900 McCain Lana. 
t4W. Uundrv facJtlUaa. 
Watar/ traah paid. No 
pata.77e-.3aO*. 

AVAILABLE MAR. 1, ona 
badroom naar campu*. 
1722 Uramla $370 Wa- 
Urf iraah paid. Laundry 
tadiltlaa. No paia. 776- 
no4. 

AVAILABLE MARCH 1, 
ona-badroom, thraa 
blocfca waat of campua. 
1024 Sunaat. S366. Wa- 
tar/ traah paid. Laundry 
fadmiaa. No pat*. 776- 



AVAILABLE NOW, ona- 
badroom Thraa t}loclii 
waat of campu* 1026 
Sunaal. $360 Ramo- 
dalad unit. Watar/ traah 
paid. No pata. 
776-3804. 

AVAILABLE NOW, thraa- 
badroom, two bloeka 
aaat of KSU teoo plua 
utilltia*. 637-1940. 

AVAILABLE NOW, two- 
badroom apartmonia 
naar City f>arl<. 102S 
Oaaaa S450. Watar/ 
ttath paid. Laundry 
facilitia) Within walk. 
Ing diatanca to KSU. No 
pMl. 776-3804. 

AVAILABLE MARCH 1, 

Iwo-badroom apart- 
marrt. Part Placa Apan- 
manta. 19131684-6329. 

FOR AUGUST. Naxt lo 
KSU. daluxa two- bad - 
room apartmant, $490. 
S39-24S2 aftar 4p.m. 

FOR JUNE, larga two-bod- 
room apartmant. Wa- 
tar/ tra)h/ gat two- 
thirda paid. S430/ 
month. Alao ona-bad- 
room S310 for Aug. 
S39-2482. Aftar 4p.m. 

FOUR-eEOROOM AT 

Royil Towara. 1T0O N, 
Manhattan SS60. Avait- 
abla nam. Watar/ traah 



paid. Laundry facilitiaa^ 
aundack, hot tuba. Ntr- 
pata. 776-3804. ! 

GET A JUMP ON NEX>: 
YEAR) Chaia Manhat<. 
tan Apartmant* ia noM> 
laailng two, thraa anct 
four-badrooma (or Au> 

f|uaL Our waiting iitt la 
ong; drop by balora 
thay'ra gonat CoKaga 
and aafl'n. 776-3663 

LARGE TWO-BEDROOM, ■ 

ona-half block waat of ', 

campui. Trt-level apart- • 

mant. 1625 ColFaga ' 

Halahti, $SSO. Watar/ , 

traan paid. Two bath, ' 

walk-in cloaala. No ; 

pat*.n6^»04. • 

LARGE. TNREE-BEORDOM [ 
with larga cioial in a < 
nina-plax. Livlr>g room, | 
dining araa, ona and , 
ona-half bath, fully ■ 
aquippad kltchan. 6210 i 
aaeh. 822 Framont. ■ 
Availabia Juna 1 and ' 
Aug. 1 Call 637 7087. , 

LEASING FOR Aug '95- : 

Ona. two, throa, tour ; 
and aijc-badroom apart. ' 
mama and houtat At 
314 N. ttlh, lOtg , 
Oaaga, 1630 Houaton, ' 
800 Vottlar. 606 Vattlar, ^ 
610 Vattlar and 512 ■ 
Thuraton, 776^102. ■ 



KANSAS SIATE COLLEGIAN 



W»dw«d«y, March 1, 1g95 ^ y 



Collegian Classifieds 



NEXT TO Eimpui two, 
Ihraa-badroom «part- 

mant and houiat w4th 
waahary dryar, cantral 
air, parking trath/ pMt 
coitlrol paid No p«l«. 
Availabia now or Auo. 
1450- taeo. &37-«643. 

ONE, TWO, thfaa. femr-bad- 
room apartmantt, doaa 
to caiTvpua, no pata, 
Jun* lawa S3»-1S7G. 

ONE-BEOnOOM ALL utlll- 
tlaa paid. Naar Ag- 
glavilla 1220 Laramf*. 
$375. Avatlabia Fab. 5. 

7Te-3ao4. 

ONE-BEOROOM APART 
ME NT avallaUa now at 
WaraKam Hotal. 41B 
Poynti, S395 walar/ 
traah paid. Laundry 
facllltlaa. No pau. 
776-3804. 

ONE-BEDROOM APART- 
MENT, avallabia Fab. 
IS. 924 Framont, S300. 
Walar/ 1 rath paid. Park- 
ing avallabia. Cloaa to 
AofliaMlla. 776-38CM 

PARK PLACE APART- 
MENTS. Now prs-laaa- 
Ing or«. two and ttiraa- 
badroom apartmanta. 
1413 Cambridga tS. 
S3»'29G1. 

THREE BEDROOM AVAIL- 
ABLE now on main 
. floor of housa. 7303 Arv 
daraon $600 Wstar/ 
traah paid Singla car 
garajga. Washer/ dryar 
provided. No pati. 776- 
3804. 

TWO- BEDROOM AVAIL- 
ABLE now. Baiamant 
apartmarx. nica condi- 
tion. 3303 Andarion 
U2S. Watar/ traiti paid. 
Slngla car garaqa. 
Waahar/ dryar provid* 
ad No pata. 77S^3804. 



•2 bedroom 

oportments 
•Quiet, pork 

like setting 
•Private & 

personal 

bedroom 
•Large bath & 

closets 
•Dtstiwastier 
•Laundry 

facility 
•2 large pools 

mwu 
n 
mniunsi 

uu. 
T7B-11I8 

for on 
appointment 



TWO-BEDROOM AVAIL- 
ABLE now on Stagg 
Hill. 803- 805 Alllton. 
$3SS. Watar^ traah paid 
Laundry ftdlltlM. Olih. 
waahar 776-3804 



TWO BEDROOM AVAIL- 
ABLE now. Agglavilla 
Panthousa Apartmanta 
017 H. 12lh tSSO. Wa- 
ter/ Iraah paid. Diah. 
waaher, microwave. No 
pets, 776-3804. 



Two-badrooma, cloaa to 
earnpua In a i3-pl«)(. 
Pr*-)aaalng for fall, 
only one-half dapoait 
needed. S300- 1460. No 
pau. 639-2231. 



AvallaW* 



MALE ROOMMATE want- 
ed: Will have own 
room. Avallabia now 
until July 31 SI 80/ 
month plu« ona-fourth 
uUlltla*. S39-M76. 



For ftont- 
Oar»fl« 



GARAGES FOR rent. 1866 

Collage Hwghta *3 tSO. 
1866 Collega Heighta M 
150. Larga uniti. 776- 
3804. 



RoomnMto 
Wanted 



A NON-SMOKER, ittara 
houia, utilitiea with 
three retpontlble 
male*. Larga attic 
room, private phone, 
laundry, parking, (160. 
639-2468 Kay. 

APARTMENT FOR rant. 
Male roommate want- 
ad. Have own roorn 
and bath. S37-2894 or 
(913>S27-S821, 

FEMALE. NON SMOKING, 
roommate, threebed- 
room apartmsnt, $195/ 
month plui utilitle*. 
Call Juhe or Heather, 
537-4878 

FOR NON-SMOKER/ drink- 
er. Room mate needed, 
walk to dai». 539-1564 

NON-SMOKING, FEMALE 
roommate needed in 
June lo there Iwo-bad- 
room apartment one- 
half block watt of Old 
Stadium, Rent. 1220 
plua one-half utilitiea. 
Leave rnetaaga for Jert- 
nlfer it 539-8499 

ROOMMATE NEEDED to 
ahere houaa two blocka 
from cimput, own 
bedTW>m, mala or Nmalt, 
S150/ rr^onth plut one- 
fifth utilitin. 567-1969. 

ROOMMATE NEEDED 
Available Mar. 1. Thrae- 
badroom home, one- 
third utilititt. SISO' 
month 776-7502. 

ROOMMATES NEEDED to 

thara houte. O^wn bed- 
room, waihar/ dryer. 
t165/ month plua one- 
foorth utilitiet. """ 
776-2397. 



Call 



Subl«as* 



A VERY nice otte-bedroom 
apartment. Available 
Mar. 1 lo Aug. 1. Fur- 
nithad, cloae to cem- 
put and AgglevlMa, 
guiat and nice neigh- 
bora. Can renew leete 
In Aug. Call S39-7S00 
end leave metaage. 

FEMALE NON. SMOKER 
wanted to tubleete lar- 
pest bedroom In thrae- 
bedroom apartment. 
S195/ month negoti- 
able. 587^0521 

FOUR-BEDROOM. TWO 
bath. Cloie to camput. 
Call 7763445 1600/ 

month- 

NEW TMREE-BEDROOM, 
two bath, dlihwasher, 
S730/ month, Includai 
cable, water/ traah Mid- 
May to July 31. May 
paid. Option to laata. 
587-8303. 




MAKE ANDERSON PUCE YOUR 
HOME AWAY FROM HOME! 

Now leasing for 1995-96 

•2 bedrooms 
•'A block from campus 
•Furnished and unfurnished 
Showings every 
Monday through Friday 
3-5 p.m. 



1852 Anderson Place #4 
776-1 148 



I 



STUDIO APARTMENT. 721 

Framont, now through 
Aug. option to renew 
laaia t220 pluf utili- 
tiea. Trean paid. 
639-9312, leave mea- 



SUBLEASE AVAILABLE in 
May. Two -bedroom, 
cloaa to camput and 
Aggiewille. Furniihed 
Air conditioned, perk- 
ing, 6486/ month, call 
Sareh or J at 587-8074 

SUBLEASE ONE room In 
two-bedroom apart- 
ment 1192 50 par 
month. Available imrT>e- 
diattly. March rant free. 
No petti Nice quiat 
apsrtmentt two and 
one-half blocki from 
campua. April- through 
July 31 leata. Call 
637-2043 or 776-2003 

SUMMER SUBLEASE avall- 
abia May- Aug. May 
paid for, two bed room. 
11ih and Bluemont. 
587-8766. 

SUMMER SUBLEASE two- 
badroom t>l-level epart- 
ment. Nice, cloaa to 
camput, 6760/ montfi. 
SB7-07OI. 

SUMMER SUBLEASE 

Mala roommate need- 
ed to there Ihrea-tMd' 
room, poottide. Wood- 
way Aptrtmenls. Rant 
negotiable t^ell Jaton 
at 587-8667. 



2oe 



SERVICE 
DIRECTORY 



]iE!sa_ 



A PERFECT reaume end all 
your other word pro- 
ceaaing needt. Later 
printing. Cell Branda 
776-3290. 

NEED SOMETHING typed? 
I'll type It for St/ par 
paga. Cell 537-9480 
after S:30p.m.. but 
pleaie, no cellt eftar 
10p.m. Aak for Jackla. 



D««ktop 
PublWilna 



TYPED PAPERS, graphlct, 
charta and graph t. 900 
fontt and nine yean ex- 
perlenca to make your 
paper look great. Fenn 
Graphlct 537-0448, 
f enn e kau. keu.adu 

Automottva 



NISSAN- DATSUN Repair 
Service. 22 yaart ei- 
perierKa. Mudat, Hon- 
das and Toyolit alto. 
Auto Crtfi. 2617 Dipper 
Lena, Manhattan, Kan- 
tat. 537-5049 Ba.m- 
5p.m. Mon.- Fri. 

DONNIE'S AUTO Worka 

Foreign and Oomeitic 
Car Rapair IFormer 
Noble Auto Worki). 
Ponnia +s the winner 
of the Sporti Car Club 
of America Baal Ma- 
ohanle award. 1809 Ft. 
Riley Blvd. 539-S511 
With ad tlO off for 
labor over SIOO. 



OthM- 



CASH FOR college. 
900,000 granti evall- 
•ble. No repaymenti 
ever. Qualify Imme- 
diately. (800)243-2435. 



FINE um 

TinOO INC. 

25 jrrara mprriene*. 
flotpital tlrriUzation. 




102a W. 6tb. J.C. 

TlHm.-9«t. Ne(M-8 p.m. 

2B40S.E. MaH., 

Tofwlia 

Hfte.-Fr^. Mao»-8 p.m., 

Tm«. 'til 6 p.m. 



FREE FINANCIAL Aldt 
Over S6 billion In pri- 
vate tectof g rente and 
acholafshipi it now 
avallabia All students 
are eligible regardless 
of grades, income, or 
pa rant's if^come. Let us 
help. Call Student Fi- 
nancial Servlcet: 
1800)263-6495 axt. 
F57e82. 

PROMPT CONTRACEPTIVE 
and abortion aarvlcet. 
Dtia L. Clinton, M.D.. 
LewrerKe, 
1913)841-5718 



Make music 

Want to Icam to play the 
guitar? Check the Collegian 
classifieds to find someone to 
give you lessons. Only $5 for 
up to 20 words. You'll make 
music in no time. 



c 



KANSASSTATE 

OLLEGIAN 




Kedzie 103 (east of the Union) 532-6555 



*• • - «-fc-^-. ^„t fl, it^ ''I 



RESUME PREPARATION, 
TAX PREPARATION, 
word procaising, UPS, 
ahipping, copies and 
morel The Mail Caniar 
across trom Alco. 3110 
Anderson. 776-6246. 

WEIGHT, COMPLEXION, 
or memory dlffkultiae? 
Leave e meatage at 
587-8678 for a free con- 
tulletjon and an ell-nat- 
ural solution. 



Nutritional 



T 



AWEtOME DIETI Lota 
40 pounds in only one 
month. Proven success^ 
ful and medically safe. 
No drugs or expensive 
food. I^or entire plan 
send 17, check/ money 
order to K.T.A,. P.O. 
Box 1379, Wichita, KS 
67201 

GET REAOV for Spring 

eraakl Get rid of those 
thighs and stomach 
with the orUy Body Ton- 
ing Creem on the mar- 
ket I've actually teen 
work I I lott four inches 
off sech of rny thighs 
end thrae irches off my 
stomech. We ere en in- 
ternationil company 
with IS years of aitperi- 
enca helping people 
loae weiglil and fat and 
keeping it off. Guar- 
anteed ratultt. Call 
776-7669, or write: P.O. 
Box 1171, Manhattan, 
KS 66602. 

WANTED too students; 
Lose S- 100 poundt. 
New metabolism break 
through. I loat 15 
pounda in three waeka. 
RN assisted Guar- 
anteed results S3S 
ISaO)67»-163« 



300 



EMPIOYMENT/ 
CAREERS 



3101 



H«rp w«fn»d 



Tha Collaalan oarinat 
varlfy tha financial ps- 
tantlal of advartiaa- 
manla In the Employ- 
ma nt/Caraar clacaiflea- 
tlon. tiaedara are ed* 
wiead to approach any 
auch ampfoymant op- 
poMunlty with raaaon- 
atala caution. Tha Col- 
taglan urgaa our read- 
are to contact tha Bat- 
ter Bualnaaa Bureau, 
801 BE Jafferaon, To- 
paka, KS eeSOT-IIBO. 



BSBB Fun. hard working, 
money motivated pao- 
plft looking for an op- 
portunity to succeed. 
Parl-lime/ full-time. 
Will train. For appoint- 
mant call 539-8040 
ei(t.622. 

St750 weekly poatlbia 
mailing our circulart. 
No experience re- 
quired Begin now. For 
infor call (203)298-8933. 

ACCEPTING APPLICA- 
TIONS/ ftesumei for 
swimming pool manag- 
er. Mustlia WSI certi- 
fied. Call (913)457 336t 
City of Westmoreland 

AG BACKGROUND helpful 
to eam commission to 
15/ hour marketing 
unique egricullura pro- 
duets (800(755 -0032 

ALASKA SUMMER EM- 
PLOYMENT- Fishing 

Industry. Earn up to 
(3000- 66000 plut per 
month room and 
boerdi Transportation! 
Mala/ female. No ex- 
parianca necestaryt 
(206)545-4155 
aM.AS7684 

CAMP TACONIC- Prea- 
tlgiout ooad Maatachu- 
aetta camp hiring moti- 
vated, team-oriented 
undergrads and grads 
who love working with 
kids Generel Coun- 
selors and Instructors 
In Swimming, Waler- 
aporta. Team/ Individu- 
al Landsports, Tannit, 
Ropes/ Camping, Arts/ 



Creftt, Silvar Jewelry, 
Phologrephy. Video, 
Newspaper. Musical 
Theetre, Dance. Sci- 
ence/ Rocketry Compe- 
tlve telenet. Reward- 
ing, snioyable wforkl 
(K»)762-2820. 

CRUISE SHIP JOBS1 Attan- 
tion: Students Earn 
(2000 plus monthly. 
Part-time/ fulltlme. 
World travel. Carib- 
bean, Hawaii. All poti- 
tlont available. No ax- 
parlance. CALL: 

r602)4$3-48S1. 

CRUISE SHIPS NOW 

HIRING- Earn up to 
tlOOO plut/ month 
working on Cruiae 
Ships or LandTour 
companies. World trev- 
el (Haweii, Mexico, the 
Caribbean, etc.) See- 
aonel and full-iime em- 
ployment available. No 
experience necessary. 
For more mformstion 
call (206)634-0466 
■xt.C5T684. 

CUSTOM HARVESTER, 

needs hard working In- 
divlduala for summer 
harvest (Taxet - N Do- 
kolel and potsibly fall 
ttarvett. Four JD 9600's 
and truck drivera want- 
ed. Need COL or need 
to obtein. Preferred 
farm background Or 
harvatt expeflence, 
Strunk Herveating 
1913)582-9369 Of 
776-1321. 

CUSTOM HARVESTER. 
Need ambitious indrvid- 
uils lor wh«Bt and row 
crop harvest. Tnick driv- 
ers and comt>ine opera- 
tort needed. For Infor- 
mation phone 
1913)525-6326 or 6330. 
Naegele Combine Inc. 

EARN WHILE having funtl 
Job opanings part- 
time/ full-time. Flaxible 
fiourt. full Training. Up 
to S50' hour possible. 
For interviews call 
EfhInI 537-07B2 

EASY MONEY II Severel 
atudentt needed to 
htftd out flyera on earn- 
pua. Call "Tracy tor da- 
tailt. S32-90SS. 

EMPLOYEES NEEDED 10 
assist in family onentad 
custom harvesting op- 
eration. Salary negoti- 
able and reflective of 
employees compatibili- 
ty with employers fami- 
ly. customers and other 
employees. For more 
Infomation reply lo 
Gary at 1316)225-0079 
after 5p.m. 

ENVIRONMENTAL COOft- 
DINATQR. City of Men- 
hattan, Kansas. Ttie En- 
vironmental Coordina- 
tor is responsible for 
the (!ity s compliance 
wtth slats and ladaral 
wafer, wastewater, air, 
storm water and hat- 
ardoua waste regula- 
tions. Requires at least 
two (2) years of collage 
level and/ or technical 
school education m en- 
vironmental engfnaer- 
ing. environments! sci- 
ence or related Iteld 
plut minimum of (wo 
years in a water/ waste- 
water environmant, 
either municipal or in- 
dustrial- Must have a 
valid Driver's Licsnaa. 
Starling Salary: 

S23.374 09- 139,217.61 
IDOQI Submit a da. 
tailed msuma, cover let- 
ter, written authortia- 
tion for raference check 
and three work related 
referancas or apply at 
the Department of 
Human Resources. City 
HalL 1 101 Poyntz. Man- 
hattan, KS 66502, by 
Mon., Marcl) 30. 1995. 
EOE-UTF/O 

FAST FUNDRAISER- raise 
SSOO in rive deyt- 
greeks. groups, clubs, 
motivated individuals. 
Fast, easy- no financial 
obligation 
1800)776-3851 EXT ,33. 

FUNDRAISER- EXCLU- 
SIVELY for fraternities, 
tororiiiet, and student 
organiztlions Earn 
money without spend- 
ing a dime Just 3- 5 
days of your time. A lit- 
tle work a lot of mon- 
ey. Call for information. 
No obligation. 

1800)933-0528, flxt.65. 

HARVEST HELP needed. 
JD9600 end truck driv- 
ers wanted Must ob- 
tain a CDL and will help 
Obtain, Call for very 



good aalary options. 
May to Nov. ClydaKMa 
Harvesting and Truck- 
ing. Call Rendy 
539-5333 

INTERNATIONAL EM- 
PLOYMENT- Earn up 
to S25- S4S/ hour taa«h- 
Ing baak convertallon- 
al Englith in Japan. Twi- 
wan, or S. Korea No 
teaching ttackgrourtd or 
Allan Isnguaaat re- 
quired. For information 
call ll0etB32-114« 
aKt.JB78B2). 

LIVE-IN GRADUATE asait- 
tent ship avail able in Oe- 
partmeni of Housing 
and Dining Services tie- 
qtnning immediately. 
Contaci Family Hous- 
ing OHica at 539 2097 
for information 

LIVE-IN NANNY needed 
for eati coast couple. 
Two children: good 
pay, benefits. Must pro- 
vide references. Celt 
537-9745, after 6pm 

NEEDED TRUCK drivera 
for wheat harvest from 
Texas to North Dakota 
May through Aug. De- 
Ian* Raimar 
14051367-3367 

NEEDED: 38 people lo lose 
weight now, all natural, 
guaranteed, doctor rec- 
ommandad, works es- 
pecially wall lor wom- 
en. Call 537-6693. 

NEW ENGLAND Brother- 
Sitter Camps- Mas- 
sachusetts. Mah-Kee- 
Nac for Boys/ Danbae 
for Girls. Counselor po- 
sitione for program 
Spacialitit: Ail Team 
Sporti. eapeciatly Bate- 
ball, Batketball. Golf. 
Field Hockey. Roller 
Hockey, Soccer, Voltey- 
ball: 30 Tennis open- 
ings: also Archery, Ri- 
fiery. Pioneering/ (Over- 
night Camping, 
Weij)hta/ Fitness and 
Cycilina; other openings 
include Performing 
Arts, Fine Arts, Pottery, 
Figure Skating, Gym- 
nastics, Newspaper 
Photography, Yeer- 
book. Radio Station, 
Rocketry. Ropes and 
Rock Climbing, All Wa- 
terfront Activiliet 
(Swimminf), Skiing, 
Sailing. Windsurfing, 
Canoeing/ Kayaking!. 
Great sslary, room. 
board and travel June 
18- Aug. 18. Inquire: 
Mah-Kae-Nac (Boys) 
190 Linden Avenue, 
Glen RIdge. NJ 07038. 
Cell 1800)753-9118 QlUL- 
tm,<Gir!t) 17 Westmin- 
tter Drive, Monivilla, 
NJ 0704S. Call 
(800)392-3752. 

PART-TIME RESIDENTIAL 
conslruction experi- 
ence necessary, will 
work around class 
tchedules. 776-49S4. 

STUDENT REPRESENTA- 
TIVE needed lo run 
marketing project on 
campus. pert-tima, 
great earning potential 
1-<aO0M59-VISA 
x35. 

SUCCESS MINOED indl 
viduals needed for 
sales and management 
poaitiona in eNplosive 
(growth company full- 
tlme preferred, part- 
time also. Serious inqui- 
riat only Call Patrick 
587-9700 axt 934 

SUMMER HARVEST help 
needed- Run John 
Deere 9500' s and 9600 
and drive truck. CDL 
preferred Parker Her- 
vesting Call 

(913)363-3527. 

SUMMER HARVEST help 
and run 3168 Catie IH 
combinas and three au- 
tomatic trucks. Wanted 
expar*enca: CDL for 
truck drivers and com- 
bine operators. Payroll 
S1500/ month for ex. 
periarKe Will alto work 
with other to get COL. 
Prefer non smokert. 
non-drinkers and non 
drug utert. Call 
<9t 3)689-4660. 

TUTORS NEEDED gradu 
ale level students need 
ed in tha areaa of chem 
iatry. physics and mod- 
em languages for tutor- 
lt*g iwo- three nights a 
week Pay negotiable 
depending on qualifica- 
tiont Call Debi or 
Sandy 539-7571 

WAITERS/ WAITRESSES. 
Apply at 1313 Moro, 



Manhattan, KS. S«« 
Rutty. 

WANTED: HARVEST Help. 
Combine operatort for 
four new SSOO't JD't. 
Semi drivart, mutt 
have COL, will help ob- 
tain. Circle C Farms 
Call Susan at 587-8833 
or Stave at (318)872- 
3399 or 5633 

WANTED: WOMAN for 

Bhoto tata for Genati* 
lagaiine. Read the 
magazine before call- 
ing. (800(613-3932. 

SM| 

Business 
OpportMtiItt— 

The Collegian cannot 
verify ttia financial po- 
tential of advartlae- 
menta In the Employ- 
mant/Career claaalflca- 
tlon. Raadara ara ad- 
vieed to approach any 
euch bualnaaa oppor- 
tunity with reaeonabla 
caution. Tha Collaf Ian 
urgaa our raadara to 
contact the Batter Buel- 
naaa Bureau. SQt SE 
Jaffaraon. Topaka, KS 

ssao7-i ISO. 
isiattaa-^MM. 



4^ 



OPEN 
MARKET 



4t0| 



ttams for Sal* 



BEGINNERS SAXOPHONE 
newly padded. Conn 
Trumpet. Crste amplifi- 
er Soloflex. 386 com- 
&u(er. BOM harddrive. 
lark 539-1035 unlil 
11:30pm. 

CARVER HOME CO player 
(retail S7S0) asking 
$150. GE VMS VCR S50, 
Panasonic four-head 
stereo VCR and Cam- 
t^rder 190, TAG Hoaer 
Swiss Sport watch (re- 
tail S350) asking S100. 
Call Matt at 776-3303, 
leave mettaga. 

WORD PROCESSOR- like 
new. with monitor. 
Smith Corona , store in- 
formation on disk or 
use as a typewriter. 
$150 or best offer. Call 
(913)^6-3046. 

41B| 

Pumlturs ta 
■uy/Sril 

FOR SALE toft and love 
aeat earth tones, great 
condition, S200, must 
784-4116 Best after 

ip.m. 



Sp.r 



43a I 



AitMqys 



TIME MACHINE Antique 
Msul and Geeb Empori- 
um. 6000 square leet, 
antiques, collecttblea, 
estate jewelry, furni- 
ture, 4910 Skyway Or 
lour blocks east of Man- 
hattan Airport. Open 
Tues- Sat. 12- 5p.m. 
539-4684 



Ctwnputf 



COMPLETE AMIGA com- 
puter tyttem. Two disk 
drives, mouse, color 
tlareo monitor, tont of 
Mftware. Five ioyttickt. 
much mora S130 (or 
bad offerl 395-2017 

COMPLETE IBM personal 
system two Of a new 
hard drive, mouse, 
printer and lott Of soft- 
wars included. t50O. 
537-3535 

FOR SALE: 486 computer 
VGA monitor 85MB 
harddrive. Wmdows. 
MS Works, lax modam, 
$700 Of best offer. 24- 
pin color printer. SJOO 
or bast offer. 784-6116 



MACINTOSH Computer. 
Complete system In- 
cluding printer only 
S599. Cell Chrii at 
|800)»»-66S5. 

SEGA GENESIS System 
plus mortal Kombat II 
and other games $135. 
IBM harddrive 5 25-inch 
floppy drive. S25. Key 
boards S each, KT 8088 
CGA monitor, printer 
and mora 486 SX33 
CPU chip, 539-4643 
leave meatage 



PERFECT DORM room 
patt. Two adult Boat 
about live feet. One Cai- 
man, about TWO feet 
S50, caget available. 
Call Jeff. 776-3501. 



TIekatato 



WANTED: MEN S baakat- 
ball Tourney tickatt. 
Call 1913)384-6944 or 
(900(397-6944. 



SOD 



TRANS- 
PORTATION 



AiftoinebllM 



1976 DATSUN truck, runa 
good. 1971 Dodge truck 
runs good, 1963 Audi, 
needs work. 539-6578. 

1976 FORD three-quarter 
ton. 390 VS lour speed 
Good solid truck. tSOO 
In new tires. SI 000 nm' 
gotiebie 539-2453. 

1983 BMW 330: Fiva- 
tpaed, two-door, air, 

tport seals, many new 
pgrit. starts right up. 
i2750, 587-9374. ask for 
Rob. 

1984 FORD T-Blrd. Runa 
batter than good, nice 
interior, many naw 
paita. Pretty car. 61200, 
negotiable. 539-1583. 

1985 DODGE Daylona 
tport, aulomatic, two- 
door, new tirat, 109K, 
runs good, asking $950, 
negotiable. 776-0013 
after 6p-m. or weekend. 



1985 HONDA Accord. Two 
door, automatic, ^ood 
engine, great condrtlon. 
good for long distance 
iiaoo negotiable 
537-6336. 

1987 VW GTI, fiva-tpeed. 
AM/FM casiette, runs 
strong, naw tires and 
shocks, security sy> 
tern. sherp. Call 
537-1446, KOOO or bast 



1994 ISUZU Amigo. blue, 
loaded, 9,000 mites new 
$17,600 Btkino $14,500 
or best offer. 539-4643, 
leave maaaage, serious 
inquiries. 



BIcyci— 



SCHWINN MOUNTAIN 
Bike- High plains, riden 
twice brand new (paid 
$429) Asking $375 or 
best offer Call 
776-3303, ask for Matt, 
leave massage 




YAMAHA 1974 TXSOO 
14,000 miles, new bat- 
tery good tires. $600. 
39!^-»43, Jamie. 



600 



TRAVEL/ 
TRIPS 



ToMP P»efcAfl» 



SPRING BREAK- Two 
spols left for Cencun 
eight day/ eaven nighta 
beach front $499 In- 
dudas airfare from K.C. 
537-7546 thrae condO* 
left for Keystone/ Brack, 
enridge. Great location. 
537-7546 



Ski Colorado 



Discount Lifl Tickets 



SklAraa Hara 

Keystone/ 

Breckefifidge/*42 *33 

A-Basin 

Copper Mm, '39 "33 

WintfirPark *39 *32 

• Lin tickets rmst be ortStntS 
m advance to ensure 
avaiUbilily 

•ItOi^enngfoiSpiingBrMk 

pl»M»» order bafore Ma/tft 6. 

S37-7S46 

or 1-800-842'1S70 

Classic 

Travel & Tours 

1212 



8201 



Alrptaw Ttefc»t» 

SPRING BREAK In Colora- 
do. One round trip tick- 
et To Denver. Colorado. 
Call Danny at 539-1149 
for mora dauili. 





Classified Directory 




010 Announo8(Tisnk 

OtO LaM and Found 
OM Panonait 
040 UB8tings€ventt 
000 Paftefr/i-Mora 




1M FbrRiM- 
I- ApLFunWiM) 

110 FofflBrt-^ 



1» RoomsAvaMbto 

IM For Rant -Houses 

iU For Sato -Houses 

190 For Rent- 
Motide Homes 

IM ForSale- 

MoUlBHomee 

140 ForRenI— Gafio* 
140 Roommate Wanted 
110 Sublease 
19B SttUa/Putin 
100 Office St»oe 
1W Land for Sale 



M 



SERVICE 

DIRECTORY 



Mt Tutor 



S10 Resumanyping 
SIS Destttop Publishing 
lao Sewin^Alteratona 
SSB Prognancy Testing 
8M Lawn Care 
U8 CtilldCars 
t40 Musidsf«OJs 
340 PetServicss 
aSO Automotive Repair 
210 OtttsrServk^s 




EMPLOVMENTi 
CAREERS 



aio HeipWuitsd 

«» VohifilMnNeadMl 

no BushasB 
QppOftufines 




OPEN 
MARKET 



400 WtntedtoBuy 

410 Items for Sals 

410 Furniture Id Buy/Sol 

420 Garaoe/Yaid Sales 

421 Auction 
490 Antiques 
4M Cornpulers 
440 FoodSpeeiali 
448 MualclnstrumenU 
410 Pets and Supptet 
400 Sporting EqufpffW* 
400 Stereo EfiuipfTien 
4iS Ikfcsli to Buy/Sal 




TRANS- 
PORTATION 



010 Autofmbites 
SM B(;yc»es 
OM Motofcydea 
040 CarPool 




010 Tout RKhBg* 
OM AkpianaTichad 
090 Train TiGhett 
040 BMTkMt 



CATEGORIES 

To help you fir>d livtial yau ate 
looMr>g fix, the dassifiecl ads tiave 
txten arranged by category ami 
sub-calegory. AU categories ate 
marked t>y one of ttw large 
Ifttagee, arM) suti-categorles are 
pre<;eded by a numtier 
deslgnallon. 

TIPS FOR 
WRITING A 
CLASSIFIED AD 

Always put what Hem or servfce 
you are advertising firat. This helps 
potential buyers firtd iiirhat (tiey are 
looking for. 

Don't Lise abbreviations. Many 
buyers are confused by 
abbreviations. 

Consider includir>g Ihe price. 
This tells buyers if ttiey are ktokmQ 
al soTiethlno in their price rariQe. 

WE DO NOT USE PHONE 
NUMBERS on LAST NAMES IN 
PERSONALS. 



18 Wednesday, Maroh 1, 19^5 



KANSAS STATE COLLECjAN 




This is a Paid Advertisement 



Recreational Services, Kansas State University, Chester E. Peters Recreation Complex 




Watch for our full page ad on the 1st day of each month for program information and monthly calendar of Recreational Services Bventsl 



'^iiii. 




Wildcat Workout Spring Training 

Make March the month to spring Into shape with aerobic exercise. Regular exerd»e 
Increases your energy level, decreases stress. Increases cardiovascular endurance, decreases 
weight gain. Increases self-esteem and decreases your risk of Illness. Choose convenient 
times to work out from the 30 exercise sessions offiered per week. Let your March exercise 
regimen make the difference for you this spring. Then plan to celebrate your exercise 
achievements with this months special event. THE SPRJNG TRAINING WORKOUT, Tuesday. 
March 14, at S:30 p.m. All afternoon sessions will be combined for this spedal event. 

If you are interested In becoming an Exercise Leader, attend the Saturday. March 4. 9:30 a.m. 
workout and stay after for applying, orientation. arKl training. Tryouts will be Tuesday. March 
14. at 3: 1 5 p.m. Come to the Saturday training for more Infornnatlon or call $32-4960. 



Pool Action 

Swimmers exercise to a different beat. Voui liCiirt is .« l>uilt tiv inoiituii tnr iioiolitc ('><t*ruv.^. M>tliUtilntit(; your ttiiiMlit^ Iv.tt 
i.iif k)i 30 iuiiiu(t">- tliK'f [inits pft wct-k incic.isci okvR"'!' itoiwtid bmns Mt ,uiil improve* ciriliov.i'wuUr endurance To 
liiid your Training He.irt Riile (THRK sublr.KI your .igp Iron* 2/0 iituxiiimili Itc.iit t.ilfi .tnd i?Hilti[jlv bv ?5 Hawi'vt?t, II 
swimming (5, youi hrmiis oI .u-iobit i-xert iM^ vt'u must MtbtMi i tho .ivfi.w.i' ' 3 i^'Md pff iiiiphkc cliHi>n>mf (herr- is between 
swiinitiers .iiid runneis Subif.iLt ynui .igf (iliis I 3 tioii) Z/O.tiul nnilii|.ilv I'v 75 A swlFiniifrs lir.iii t.iti- in,)y bo lowt-i 
i)i-(.iu*>t^ lit ihf (>rHly s )iiMi;(ttti.tl positiitn ihe (iiol*it«> .ii)i-i r ol the w>itei ni ihe Iumii not h.iviii)^ tu work •)*> iMici ctgalnst 
jiji.wily ^wiiii to .1 tlifteirnt IhmI and achii'vc tlH> Mmc itjimI .icn-vlm vvu isc licnclltv 

In Febtu.iry All Rec Servict-s tiiegu.vrtK sjtteisrullv tonijili'tcil ,i IS Itiiur tr,\ititiij!, utKUif U\ Ltlcgu.iid fj. lining, first Aid i\fn] 
CPR. Students Pinployed as lileguiUds Itjf Ret Services, woil* .vppioiiinMiely ih houtv'week .(s vvell m iitiend nu«nhiy 

niriMiniis ,)(id iii-sen,(fe rr.tiiiinp. A|i[ili< ,iiii>ri\ liir titt'j'.ii.itd [i.isiiuins .ire hein^ ulieii nin\ Fnr F.iil I'>1S 



1 r 



.Wtid's .Who at ReiK^ Services 






)oc Nasi, a rtatlve of And ale, Kansas, has been an Intramural supervisor 
for Recreational Services lor over three years. BlasI, senior In 
elementary education, worked as an Intramural offldai for two years 
before tjecoming a supervisor Btasi said that his |ob duties are similar 
in nature to what his resp>onslbllltles will be as a teacher. "I help train 
and evaluate the officials and deal directly with people as situations 
arise both during the Intramural games and on the sideline,' he said. 
His respon Sibil I ties also Include the safety of the participants. BlasI will 
graduate In December, 1995, and said f>e hopes to find a job that will 
allow him to leach arKl coach. He feels his experiences as an 
Intramural supervisor will help him In his Future endeavors. 



Manha Stephenson, narive of Bucklln, Kansas, has worked at 
Recreational Services for over a year. Stephenson, senior In kinesiology, 
said her duties as a building manager mostly pertain to the supervision of 
the facilities. She said she vfUues her exfjerien^ working for 
Recreational Services because It gives her a chance to Interact with 
people. "My Job has given me the opportunity to work with a diverse 
group of people." she said. Stephenson will graduate In May and wishes 
to continue her education In a physical therapy assistant program or find 
work that relates to the health field. Stephenson spends her free time 
planning her wedding, which will be this August. 



My Favorite Workout 



_.„„..„, 

communication, has been exercising at the Rec Complex since he 
came to K-State In September. When he is not busy coaching the 
debate team, he wort« out seven days a week, Hernandei said he Is 
exercising now more than ever because he has a different mind set 
about his time spent at the Rec Complex. "I don't think of my workout 
as work, I think of It as fun," f>e said. His workout consists of many 
different exercises. "I do a variety of things so I don't get bored with any or>e activity," 
Hernandez said He said one of his favorite activities Is aerobics. "Many of the instructors are 
very motlvaring, ' he said. Hernandei Is looking forward to the completion of the expansion 
because of the new fitness equipment and new aerobics facilities that will be provided. 




CONSreUCTION UPDATE 



m 



We have opened In the new gymnasium 

^ Opening of the new front entryway, service area, and offices should be during tfw first part of March. 

O Construction will continue In the west half of the building and renovarion will start in the existing ^m. 

CO" We should see the new track sur^ice go down, as well as the completion of the new flooring In tf>e tower 
levd handball/racquetball courts In the latter part of March. 



Job OppOftlinity- -Weight/Fitness Room Supervisor. Assistant Building Managers. 

and Facility Malntance 
Positions begin Fall '95. Application forms are available In the Recreational Services office. The 
application deadline is Friday. April 7. For nnore Information contact Derek Walters at 532-6980. 




JJVTI^ykAJ^L/Ji^Z A^^JVIA. 



March Dates to Remember 

6 Entries t>egln for Softball & Ind. Sports 

9 Entiy deadline for Softball &, Ind. Sports 

1 3 Softball Offlclals' Meeting 

1 4 Softball Offlciais' Meeting 

15 Captains'/Managers' Meeting 

1 6 Ind Sport brackets posted 
27 Entries tjegin for Free Throw and Team Handball 

Softball games begin 
30 Entry deadline for Free ITirow and Team Mandball 

Round i deadline for Ind Sports 



Softbair 

As spring approaches, we ail look forwaid 'O 
movirig our reopatlonat activJri^ outdoors. 
One way to do thb Is piaytng orv an Intramural 
Softball te«n. Entries will be accepted March 
6-9 In the Rec Services offk* and games 
begin after Spring Break. Irtformition sheets 
are available In the Rec S«tvl«4c>fnce, Get 
your frterfds together and organize a team I 



Event 


HHK LficadfiD 


8 a.m. 


Rec Services office 


5 p.m. 


Rec Services office 


6:30 p.m. 


Union. Room ZU 


Sp.m. 


Rec Complex 


5 p.m. 


Union. Forum Hail 


Sp.m. 


Rec Complex 


Mil 8 a.m. 


Rec Services office 


4:30 p.m. 


IM Playfleids 


ibali 5 p.m. 


Rec Services office 


midnight 


Rec Complex 


Softball Officials Wanted 



Reaeatlonai Services will be hiring a»»d training 
Softball Officials for the upcoming season. 
Training sessions will be held Mon,. KAvch 13, 
at 6.30 p,m. In the Union, Room 212, and 
Tues., March t4. at 5 p,m. at the Rec Complex 
You do not fuive to be experiericed In Softball 
officiating. We will train and prepare you to be 
the best official you can be. 



Fitness Facts 

Favoring one sport can cause 

problems c^ you are likely to 

strengttven certain muscles at 

tt>e expense of others. This 

leaves tendons and ligaments 

unisalanced and thus 

vulnerable. Vatylngyour 

activities Is one way to prevent 

(his. as well as strengthening 

the muscle groups you 

urKleruse, and stretching all muscles involved In 

your workout. 

The WWlnni EncyckipKll*- UnlvwVty o( Cillhimto. Befkeky. 




Free Blood 



-by Lafene Health Cent— ' 
■Tuesday, March 26 
-5 p.m,-7 p.m. a 




Outdoor Rental 

The Outdoor Rental Center Is 
open I Hours of operation are 
Sunday through Friday. 4-6 
1 « xm'L i\, p m,, and Saturday, i 1 a.m. 
^ffida^Wf '° noon. We have a 
"' "^i^rUEA complete line of camping 
equipment Including 
canoes, tents, sleeping 
bags, stoves, lanterns, back 
packs. arKl ice cfiests . If 
you are planning a Spring 
Break camping trip, please 
check with us for your equipment needs. 
Reservations may be made two weeks in advartce. 
Make your plans now for a great spring tripl 




RC - Rec Complex 

P • Pool* 

DRC - OuldoDf Rental Center 



March 1995 



RECREATIONAL SERVICES ACTIVITY CALENDAR 



Sunday 



h/londay 



Tuesday 



--SPfUNG TRANNG WORKOUT 
Ragular 3:1S, 4:20 and S;30 
pm exercise sessions will be 
combined on IMarch 14 for 
this siMctat Wildcat Wurtcoutt 



FOR I NFOpMATlOr^ C ftl,l, 

Rec Check S92400a 

Rec Compl*" S32-48S0 

Outdoor Rental CIt . . S324t94 

Business Office S32-C9aO 

(Open Monday -Friday, 8 am • 
S pm. ItKtudIng noon hour) 



Wednesday 



RCeCXWM- MIDNIGHT 
P 6CX3AM - 7 XAM 
i1:3aAM-2 30PM 
73CIPM-10(MPM 
lORC 4 00PM. 6 00PM 



RC NOON - MIDNIGHT 
P 1 00PM - 5:00PM 
7 00PM -lOOOPM 
bRC 4:00PM -eOOPM 



RC NOON ■ MIDNIG)-rT 
P 1 00PM - 5 OOPM 
7 00PM - 1000PM 
lORC 400PM - eOOPM 




Rec Check 

Rec Check provides program 
and facility Information 24 
hours a day by dialing 532- 
6000. Call Rec Check for Rec 
Complex and Pool hours, 
exercise sessions. Intramural 
deadlines and morel 



Entiy Policies 



• Facility users must be affiliated with KSU • 
student, faculty/staff or Alumni Association 
memtwr 

• Cards aik not sold to the general publk:. 

• Call tt>e Recreational Services office at 
532-69B0 for details. 



RCeOOAM -MIDNIGHT 
P 6 00AM - 7 30AM 
11 30AM ■ 230PM 
7:3QPM • lOOOPM 
|ORC4 00PM-eOOPM 
M Enirm B^lnrSonfaiil « 
Indaport* 



IT 



r? 

RC 1 OOPM ■ 1000PM 
Pool Ck»ed tor 

Superchtorlnrtion 
bRC 4 OOPM - 6.00PM 



RC 8 IXLAM - MIDNIGHT 
P 6 00AM -7 30AM 
11 3DAM- 230PM 
50aPM-6 00PM" 
7 30PM-10(X)PM 
ORC 4 OOPM - e«)PM 



II 

RC 600AM ■ MIDNIGHT 
P 6.00AM - 7 30AM 
1 1 30AM - 2:30PM 
7:30PM • lOOOPM 
ORC 400PM • S OOPM 
Softball Officials' Mtg, 
6:30 pnt. Union 212 



55 

RC 6:0QAM - 10:OOPM 
P 11:30AM -1 30PM 
7 30PM - tOOOPM 
lORC 4:00PM ■ 6.00PM 



a 

RC 600AM -MIDNIGHT 
P 6 00AM-7 3aAM 
11 30AM -230PM 
7 30PM -lOOOPM 
ORC 4 OOPM - eOOPM 



IT 



RC 6 OOAM- MIDNIGHT 
P BQOAM - 7 3<MM 

ii IIMM 2 30PM 
i OOPM B OOMir' 
7 10PM 10 OOPM 
ORCl DDPM .SOQPM 
•vflkall OffHtali' MIt,* rnvNH 
— SPRINO raiuNINO Wild- 
cat Workaul, S:3« ptn 



RC 6:00AM • 10:00PM 
P 11 30AM- 1 30PM 
5 OOPM -6 OOPM" 
7:30PM - 1000PM 
ORC 400PM - 6 OOPM 



Thursday 



RC 6:00AM - MIDNIGHT 
P aOOAM - 7 30AM 
11.30AM -230PM 
5:00PM -6 OOPM" 
7:30PM - 10 OOPM 
lORC 4:00PM - 6:00PM 



RC 6 00AM - MIDNIGHT 
P e.OQAM - 7.30AM 
n:}aAM-Z:3W>W 

5:00PM ■ 6 OOPM" 

7 30PM -10 OOPM 

0«C ■< OOPM . 6 OOPM 



15 

RC 6:00AM - MIDNIGHT 

P eOOAM . 7 30AM 
11:3QAM- 2:30PM 
7 30PM - lOOOPM 

ORC 4aOPM - 6 OOPM 

Cpl/Mgr Mtg,Forun Hall, 
Sptn 



12 

RC eoOAM - lOtXIPM 
P 11:30AM- 1:30PM 
7:30PM - 10:00PM 
ORC 4:00PM - 600PM 



:?r 



RC NOON • MIDNIGHT 
P 1 OOPM- 500PM 
700PM -1000PM 
ORC 4:00PM - 6 OOPM 



ir 



RC 6 OOAM - MIDNIGHT 
P S OOAM 7 MAM 

H:3aAM.2:30PM 

7 30PM. 10 OOPM 
DRC 4 OOPM -GOOPM 
Apr* Cwi4 SaAM S*f In 

DIM Ititrtas BtglnJ faam 
HandbttI A FrM Throw 



] 



SPRING BREAK • NO AQUATIC f AEROBIC EXEBCISESESaONS '^yyf EKl 



^W 



nc B OOAM ■ MIDNIGHT 

P 6:00AM - 7 MAM 
\\ 3QAM.2:MPM 
SDOPM - e OOPM" 
T:3aPM . to OOPM 

SRC 4 OOPM .« OOPM 



V- 



Fn» Blood Pnssun 



29 

RC etSQAM - MIDNIGHT 

? 6:00AM - 7:30AM 
11 30AM-230PM 
7 30PM -1000PM 

bRC 4 OOPM • 6 OOPM 



Friday 



RC a OOAM - MIDNIGHT 
P 6:00AM - 7:30AM 
11;30AM-230PM 
7:30PM -1000PM 
ORC 400PM • eOOPM 



IT) 

RC 6.00AM . MIDNIGHT 
P 6.00AM - 7:30AM 
11:30AM- 2:30PM 
7.30PM - 1000PM 
bRC 400PM - 6:aOPM 



IM Entry OMdlltwrSolltell t 
Ind Sports, 9 pm 



Ji 

RC 6:00AM - MIDNIGHT 
P eOOAM - 7:30AM 
11 :30AM -2 30PM 
S:0OPM • 6:00PM** 
.7:30PM- 10:00PM 
ORC 4 OOPM - B OOPM 



^ 

RC6D0AM- lOOOPM 

P 11;30AM-1;30PM 
5:00PM - 6:00PM" 
7:30PM -10:00PM 

DRC 4f]0PM - 6:00PM 



Saturday 



RC 9:00AM -iOOQPM 
P 1 :00PM -S«)PM 
7:00PM - 1O:00PM 
bRC 11 :00AM -NOON 



n 

RC eOOAM- 10:00PM 
P 1:00PM -5 OOPM 
7:00PM -lOOOPM 
ORC 11 OOAM -NOON 



T7 

RC 6:D0AM - 10:00PM 
P 6:00AM - 7:30AM 
11 :30AM -2:30PM 
7:30PM . 1000PM 
bRC 4:00PM - 6.00PM 



Mo nntmoon M^t^vK 



5? 

RC eOQAM - 10:00PM 

P 11 :30AM -1:30PM 
7:30PM - lOOOPM 
ORC 400PM - 6:00PM 



Ti 

RC 8:00AM -10:00PM 
P 1 OOPM - 4:00PM 
7:0CPM - 9XI0PM 
ORC 11 OOAM - NOON 



7B — 

RC 9:00AM - 10:00PM 

P 1 OOPM - 400PM 
7:00PM ■ 9 OOPM 
lORCI 1:00AM -NOON 



JIT 



RC 6:0aAM - MIDNIGHT 
P B;Oa*M - T:»*M 

IVIOUU-JSOPM 

SDCPM-eoOPM" 

T30PM-10:DOPM 
ORC 4:00PM - S OOPM 



M In^ OMdUn*/ T*wn 
■Isndtoll K fn» Jhnm, Bpm 



Jl 

RC 6:0aAM - MIDNIGHT 
P 6:0QAM - 7:30AM 
1 1 :30AM - 2 30PM 
7:30PM - lOOOPM 
ORC 400PM • 6:00PM 



:) 



** Tuesday and 
Thursday pool us* 
from $-€ pm is for 
aduK, fKness and 
lap swimmifig only. 



WILDCAT WORKOUT EXERCISE SCHEDULE 



X 



AEROBICS 

6:30am . . . M.W.F 

5:30pm . . M.W.F 

9:30 am Sal, Mar 4 

I 9:30 am Sat, Mar 18 



STEP AEROBICS 
6:30am., T.Th 
11:45am. M,W,F 
4:20pm . T,Th 

9:10 am Sat, Mar 11 

9:J0 am Sat. Mar 28 



CrRCUIT TRAINING 
11:45am.. T.Th 
3:15pm .. M,W,F 
5:30pm . . T,Th 



CROSS TRAINING 
3:15pm .. T,Th 
4:20pm .. M,W,F 



BODY SCULPTING 
7:30pm ... T,Th 
8:30pm ... T,Th 



WATER EXERCISE 
11:30am.. MJ.Th 
7:30pm . . M,T,Th 
8:30pm . . M,T,Th 

(At Nalalorlum) 



11:30am W 

7:30pm W 



|A1 WataloTtum> 



WORDS OF WELLNESS- 



'The quality of a person's life is in direct proportion to their commitment to 
excellence, regardless of their chosen field of endeavor/*-Vince Lombardi 



* * ' « 



^ .^ V f * t 



I 



Ekp. Date «/*» 
Kansas State Historical Society 
Newspaper Section 



120 N li)th 

Kcm sas btatc 

OLLEGIAN 



WEDDINC 
STRESS 

Ule iGOitt at shideftt cofiing wNh 




WILDCAT 
VICTORY 

K-State beat Nebraska 75-73 
W^nrtln nUM h Bra/nlage 

MQi6 





- lat-CBM UmtMni - n3-WM 



MMM wmii—inr ' ""~*""i ""*" 




Plants aid in tiierapy, reliaiiiiitatinn 




MAMt LVPtNOWmLUCollegmn 

Kevin Holmaflf Slg Uik«» Developmen- 
tal Center Inc., lookt over eome of the 
plante he has been taking care of ae part 
ol the Horticulture Therapy program. 



Colleiiui 

Planting a flower may not seem 
especially therapeutic, but research 
has proven that horticulture therapy 
can help people heal and relax. 

Increasing social interaction and 
psychological improvement of peo- 
ple with special needs is just a 
glimpse of what horticultural therapy 
is about, said Richard Mattson, pro- 
fessor of horticultural therapy. 

"A lot of times, the physically 
and mentally handicapped and the 
elderly have real low self-esteems. 
This is a chance for them to be suc- 
cessful at something and receive 
praise for it," he said. 

The therapy is accomplished by 
using plants to provide people with 
social, psychological, physical and 
educational benefits under the direc- 
tion of a horticultural therapist, 
Mattson said. 

A horticultural therapist is a pro- 
fessional who uses activities with 
horticulture, nature and plant-related 
activities to assist in the therapy and 
rehabilitation of special population 
groups or individuals. 

Horticultural therapy began at K- 
State in 1971, when the Department 



of Horticulture established the first 
bachelor of science degree in the 
field in the United States. Mattson 
said. 

Mattson said the curriculum is 
preparing students for a rapidly 
changing job Tield while combining 
education and family studies. 

"Almost all occupational thera- 
pists in England are horticultural 
therapists and recognize that plants 
are valuable," Mattson said. 

To prepare senior students 
majoring in horticultural therapy, 
they participate in a pre-interning 
program where they coordinate 
activities in six different sites, 
Mattson said. 

The program began as a way to 
improve their professional skills and 
receive hands-on experience, he 
said. 

"The site visiutions began in the 
early '70s with a visitation to St 
Joseph Senior Community," he said. 

The visitations now include St, 
Joseph, Wharton Manor Nursing 
Home, Amanda Arnold Elementary 
School, Manhattan Middle School, 
Lee School and Big Lakes 
Developmental Center, Inc. 

"We have more requests for the 



program than we are able to fill," 
Matt.son said. 

Gabriela Harvey, senior in horti- 
culture therapy, said the students 
design their own activities, and they 
reflect their different personalities. 

Harvey works with a group of 
boys at Amanda Arnold who have 
attention deficit disorder. 

"1 get so annoyed with labels. 
They seem to me as perfectly normal 
boys — they just get a little distract- 
ed," Harvey said. 

"This is a chance for the children 
to realize that we do share this world 
with other critters." Harvey said. 

She said one of the activities they 
have completed was creating a topi- 
ary, a living sculpture made from 
wire frames and vines. 

Although Harvey works with a 
special -education cla.ss, she said she 
believes that you don't need to be 
different to benefit from horticultural 
therapy. 

"We are so sties.sed every minute. 
Our lives are full of stress and a lot 
of pressure. Gardening slows us 
down but is still physically demand- 
ing and makes us aware of nature 

■ See GARDENING Page 8 



THURSDAY 

WON LOW 

23 14 



MUrHCM— fA(W3 




FIrtt copy Ftm AddttlMil etplat I 



► HOUSfMQ 



Haymaker 
unlocks 
front doors 



e«x 



CoDcgiui 

Haymaker Hall residents discovered their 
front doors unlocked Wednesday morning after 
a decision made by the Haymaker Hall 
Governing Board Tuesday night. 

George Eisele, Haymaker HGB president. 
said Haymaker HGB passed a motion allowing 
the front doors of the residence hall to be locked 
from midnight to 6 a.m., with the back door 
remaining locked 24 hours. 

Until Wednesday, all doors at Haymaker 
were being locked 24 hours because of a deci- 
sion made in September. 

"We believe this is what the majority of 
Haymaker residents want. We know a lot of 
people will be happy with this decision," Eisele. 
senior in sociology and criminology, said. 

Eisele said the suggestion to unlock the doors 
permanently came after an idea to open the 
doors for a hall dance. 

"A motion was made to open the doors from 
8 p.m. to 12 a.m. on the night of the dance, and 
it passed unanimously. Then a motion was made 
to unlock the doors permanently. It was second- 
ed, and we limited discussion to 10 minutes," 
Eisele said. "But I'd say the discussion took less 
than five minutes." 

The motion to open the doors was passed 7-0 
with three abstaining votes. 

Brad RatlifT. Haymaker HGB vice president, 
said he voted for the motion because he feels 
this is what Haymaker residents want. 

"I'd say the majority of residents were upset 
when we decided to lock the doors 24 hours. I 



I See RESIDENT Page 8 



► urnmNATiONAL students 

students report 
being harassed 
over the phone 

MM^UTANK 

CdllcgfHl 

International students have been the target of 
some harassing phone calls. 

Motaz Hourani. program coordinator at the 
foreign student office, said several students have 
reported the calls to his office. 

"We've had maybe three or four actually 
report it. but there may have been more that 
weren't reported," he said 

The caller, whom one victim identified as a 
male with an American accent, told the victims 
he was from Immigration and Naturalization 
Services and told them they were living in this 
country illegally. Motaz said. 

Investigator Richard Herrman of the K-State 
Police said there was also sexual content in the 
messages. 

"This is different than the normal harassing 
phone calls, but it was not life-threatening," he 
said. 

■ See SOURCE Page 8 



► RILIY COUNTY 



Law board finds crime rate 
increasing in Riley County 



CAnraii 



Colleiiu 

The occurrence of some crimes 
increased, and traffic accidents 
decreased in Riley County in 1994. 

The Riley County law board met 
last week to discuss incidence of 
crime within the county last year. 

"The bad news is that overall, 
the most frequently occurring of 
crimes have gone up 1 1 percent," 
Captun Allen Raynor said. 

Raynor said this includes such 
crimes as aggravated assault and 
burglary. He said burglary has 
become a serious problem. 

He said one-third of the people 
arrested by the police department 
are younger 18 years old. 

Raynor said that figure was con- 
sistent with the national average for 
the pen:enuge of teenagers arrested. 

In addition to burglary, the num- 
ber of assaults has increased over 
the past year. 

"We've been having a real prob- 
lem down in Aggie ville with people 
getting beat up pretty bad, " Raynor 



said. 

He said the assaults could be 
partly attributed to alcohol con- 
sumption. 

Furthermore, domestic battery 
has also increased. 

Raynor said the police intend to 
make more arrests on offenses like 
domestic battery. 

However, Capt, Steve French 
said there was a 5.6-percent 
decrease in all accidents, and the 
number of fatalities due to traffic 
accidents decreased SO percent. 

French said there were 75 fewer 
accidents countywide in 1994 than 
in 1993. This dropped the number 
to 1,569 from the 1993 figure of 
1.644. 

There has been an increase in 
enforcement in trouble areas, and 
this has aided the decrease in acci- 
dcnu, French said. 

Outride of traffic accidents, 
French addressed the issue of 
drunken driving, 

■ See DUI Page 8 



Telefund callers surpass goal, earn prizes 



Colkilu 

Despite the rain, snow, sleet, 
wind and sometimes tropical 
weather, K-State students showed 
up to go beyond the 1 995 goal for 
the Telefund. 

For the past 16 years, students 
and faculty have been showing up 
to call K-State alunuii and ask for 
donations. 

The total amount raised by the 
20 nights of volunteer effort this 
year was $826,083. 

Gordon Dowell. KSU 
Foundation and director of the 
Telefund, said the total money 
raised from the past 1 5 years is in 
the neighboiiiood of 6.9 million. 

This year's Telefund had the 
theme "Free Willie." 

Dowell said the staff had tried 
to think of a theme but came up 
empty-handed. Then one day the 
theme just hit him. 

Dowell said he attributes the 
success of the Telefund to the fact 
that most of the alumni who are 
giving now once sat at the tele- 
phones and volunteered when they 



were in college. 

Another reason the Telefund is 
so successful is the prizes that are 
awarded, Dowell said. 

"We have $15,000 worth of 
prizes donated to us from busi- 
nesses in the Manhattan, Junction 
City, Topeka, Wichita and Clay 
Center areas," Dowell said. 

One prize was a coupon for a 
free Big Mac from McDonald's 
for receiving a $100 pledge. 

"We figured it all up, and we 
have two tons of food to give 
away," Dowell said. 

Paul Fisher, K-Statc alumnus, 
donated 200 of the space pens he 
invented. The space pen is what 
astronauts use in space. Instead of 
using gravity to push the ink 
down, ^ pen is pressurized, and 
no air is put back into the pen. It 
has a shelf life of 100 years and 
can write underwater and upside- 
down. 

McDonald's donated 1,000 Big 
Macs. Nike donated five certifi- 
cates for $100 each to go to the 
caller getting the donation that 
puts the total amount donated over 



a 100.000 mark for each 100.000 
increment. Pizza Hut also helped 
finance the mugs that were given 
to each caller who stayed the 
entire time. 

This year's grand prize was a 
1973 Plymouth Satellite. 

Some colleges, such as the 



College of Engineering, gave 
sweatshirts to each student who 
helped out. "It is kind of a tradi- 
tion," said Donald Rathbone, dean 
of the College of Engineering. 
Students who helped out with 

■ See CALLERS Page 8 



TELEFUND BREAKDOWN 
BY COLLEGES 



Arts and Sciences 
Business Adminislratton 
Engineering 

ArchlBdum and tMon 
Education 

Human Ecology 
Veterinary Metfdra 
Grand Totil 



$202,202 
189,947 

$155,958 
S33i5S 
$95,151 

$113,223 
$80,468 
$44,180 

$826,083 




Source: D»wvw Williar 



ANDRtA CORtY/ Cotl^)lwf 



g Thursday Uterch a, 1—8 



KANSAS SIXTECOLLEGUN 




News briefs 



► SCHOOL BOARD WILL ASK VOTERS FOR AN INCRIASE rN OPTION TAX 



The Manhattan -Ogden USD 383 
School Board approved a recom- 
mendation to propoM to voters an 
increage In local property taxes. 

In a unanlmoua vote Wednes- 
day, llie board agreed to request 
permlsalon from the voters to gtve 
the board authority to add as much 
as 1 2 percent to the current 3- per- 
cent local optlort tax that is applied 
to property taxes. 

The additional money will go to 
fill funding shortages In the current 
bud()«l, for a salary lr>creaso of 3 
percent to Iteep up with ttie cost of 
IMng tor employees. ar)d for techno- 
loglcaJ improvement. 

At 15 percent, the owners of a 
(70.000 house could expect the 
local option tax to go up from $25.55 
to $175.17. 



The district Is facing budget diffi- 
culties for several reasons, 
Superinlendent Dan Yunk sakl. 

One need tor extra money Is to 
compensate tor a lack of an 
Increase In the base per-pupN funda 
from the state. 

Ttw State has failed to raise its 
per-pupll funding for three years. 
altfx)ugh current bills in the Kansas 
Legislature mighl irtcreasa lundirtg. 

Artother reason the district's gen- 
eral fur>d will be facing mora hur- 
dles, Vunk said, has to do wtth the 
additional cost of opening the new 
Frank Bergman Elementary School 
next fall and the upcoming openings 
ol two new middle schools. 

A final reason Yunk cited for the 
rteed for addltlonal income has lo do 
with (laws In the currant state 



finance law that Qivt inequitable 
finariclai weight to smaller sctKiols. 

Yunk sakl the amount of money 
the district spends per student Is 
S3.905, placing the district 19th to 
the bottom in the state. 

1 don't think we can continue ttw 
quality with those kinds of odds.' 
Yunk sakl. 

However, even after voter 
approval, tfie district is not required 
to Implement the 1 2-percent 
Increase. This is only the maximum 
amount the district woukJ be attowed 
to levy for tfw neirt two years. 

Joleen Hill, txiard member, tohl 
the txMrd sFw voted for the recom- 
mendation with every Intention not 
to levy trie full amount. 



► RESIDENCE HALL WITH HISTORT OF ARSON REPORTS BURNED POSTINGS 



An aggravated arson waa report- 
ed In Haymaker Hall Tuesday night. 

"tt was found by one of our staff 
memt>ers.' Mateo Remsburg. assis- 
tant director of Haymaker, said. 

About (150 damage was dona to 
the central stairwell door when a 
posting hanging on the door was 
bumed. 

"I tielleve II was one of our no- 
smoking-in-the-stairweils signs,' 
Remsburg sakl 

Fourth-floor staff member Dave 
Hasemann reported the incident to 
K-Siate Police at 9:28 p.m. Of(k»r 
Oavkl Springer responded. 

1 was lold t>y a resident that fie 



could smell smoke,' Hasemann 
said. 

The resident notk:ed Itie burrted 
posting wtien he went from his itx>m 
to teH Hasemann about ttw smell. 

Hasemann sakl he coukl rtot tell 
wfwt the posting was because It was 
almost completsiy destroyed. 

'The police came and took a 
statement and the posting,' 
Remsburg sakl. 

Sprir>oer sakl the Manhattan Fire 
Department was not called because 
the fire was not notlcad until after it 
had gone out. 

"it apparently went out on Its 
own.' he said. 



Haymaker f>as had trouble In the 
past with fires, irtcluding a fire In the 
ninth-floor lobby In February 1994. 
Another fire was reported In the 
trash chute, and the tmSH was evacu- 
ated later the same week. 

Another fire In the ninth-floor 
bbby occurred In September 1993. 

"They apparently had some at 
the beginning of the semester,' 
Springer sakl. 

Other instances of postings 
tieing set on fire while hanging on 
the walls were reported earlier this 
semester. 

USAIUJOTf 



►BOARD CONSIDERS PUBLIC'S NEEDS IN ADA SELF-EVALUATION PLAN 



The Human Rights and Services 
Board received public comments 
Tuesday night in regard lo the city's 
Americans with Disabilities Act Sell- 
Evaluatktn Plan. 

Lewis 'Tobie' Tyler said the 
audk> iwordlngs f>e received of pre- 
vious city meetings were not ade- 
quate tor him to hear, and there 
were parts of the meetings missing 
from the tapes. 

Tyler is not able to read or write 
because of an injury He listens lo 
recordings of city meetings 

■| thought wrong, but I thought 
we were going to tape all tliat was 



said Not part of it, but all,' Tyler 
said. 

Ron Fehr, assistant city manag- 
er, sakl f>e duplk:aied the tapes him- 
self and was able to hear I hem with- 
out any problem. 

Other recommendations from 
Manhattan residents included mak- 
ing a city potkry requiring five-minute 
breaks during city meetings, and 
also to allow people attending city 
meetings to have adequate lime to 
voice their opinions 

Individuals with disabilities 
require breaks, and many also need 
mora time to say wtuit they want to 



say, Oetesa Rhodenwn, Manftattan 
resident, said. 

'Forgetting about the Indlvklual 
public's needs is insensitive, and 
this board is supposed lo make 
things better for people with disabili- 
ties,' Rfwderrvan said. 

Mary Butler, Human Rights and 
Services Board member, said the 
comments would be noted, and ttie 
board would reconvene on March 16 
and deckle what complaints to rec- 
ommend to the city commiGSkm for 
action. 






SPECIAL 

1 PAY ONLY 



THURSPAY MARCH 2 
MEDIUM PEFPERONI PIZZA 

CARRYOUT OR DELIVERY 

$3-99 plus tax 



EVERYPAYl 2 for KSU 
$5.99 plus tax 

GET TWO 10" CHEESE PIZZA6I 

fOK JUST 

$5.99 PLUS TAX 

ADDPmONAL TOPPINGS 

FOR $1 AND THAT 

COVERS BOTH PIZZAS 



SUNDAY INSANITY 

GET 15** PIZZA FOR THE 

PRICE 
OF AN EQUILVALENT 

10" PIZZA 

VALIP SUNPAYS ONLY 



WEDNESDAY SPECIAL 

$5.99 PLUS TAX 

GET ONE LARGE 

1-TOPPING 

PIZZA 

FOR JUST $5.99 PLUS TAX 

VALID WEDNESDAYS ONLY 



PARTY 

NO COUPON SPECIAL 

10-10" PIZZA=7a5 SQUARE INCHES. 

5-15" FIZZA=S75 SQUARE INCHES. 

3 DOMINATORS=900 SQUARE INCHES. 

YOUR CHOICEONE TOPPING 

$30.00 PLUS TAX. 



NO COUFON SFBCIAL6 EXFIKB 5/iO/95 



WE DELIVER TO ALL OF MANHATTAN 

NEW HOURS: 11:A.M.-1:A.M. SUN.- TUES. 11:A.M-2:A.M. WED.-5AT. 

OPEN FOR LUNCH 

TO ORPER, CALL: 776-770© 



NO COUPON 
SPECIALS 



NO COUPON 
SPECIALS 



<^ Police REPORTS ^Bulletin board 



M ttHM SNC^f WM M fl^f Hft tf BS 



AMNOUNCBMINTS I 



> lie iviiliMt In Urn 



K^ATEPOUCE 



AppModMM rw Am >i 

dun' I offKTc Applicsrioni vr due ii 3 p.m Mtirti 16 

IVtklwIt Nkj will Ottrnd iKr dactvnl dlwrutiM tilled "Mtntbcn of 
the Hesimcnt Army Otlken' Wivo on Uk Wcsleni Pronticr. IM5-IIW M 
2:15 p.n. mdtf la Unhm lOt, 



TUUMY, raBRUAHV 28 



BULLBTIHS 



At 9: 16 p.m.. ui aKnvMed tnoo 
wu reported by Divid HtMininn. 



Hiynitker retidcui. A paua on (Ik 
fourtli (kxir hid Ixefi id on (tre 



WIONBSOAY. MARCH 1 



Al I2:M p.m.. > milKtiiiie fire 

wu refXMIed by Hiynukcr itilT. The 



fire wu citiafiiiilicd, tod Uwra wo 



RILEY COUNTTPOUCE 



TUISOAY, raBRUARV 28 



A(T:4I t.in, « vthkulv biujLvy 
wu rtporttd •< ih« 20OO block at 
Collefi Vieti tlcMd. Tli* vicum «u 
Kttly Murriy, U* N IJih St. A 
Jnvealb detemkw report wu Tiled on 
Juon R. Allen. 3706 Plyraoulli 
Circle, utd Jolin Stuert for veiiicuUr 
boriliry end criminil ditaige to 
property. Telien end rvcovered vere 
tome cuiene tipes md i hood onii- 
meiH. 

At 9:38 Lm., a veluculer Ixuslvy 
wu reported by Peukia Mickey. 344 
North [>etiw>R Ave. Taken were » 
RCA portable compact diu player 



and ii> CD« Low wu t22i. 

M 10:14 a-m., Con Stroenidir, 
1 101 Bettrand St.. rcponed a cement 
donkey wu taken from h«r yard. 
Lou wu 123.130. 

At 3:28 p.m.. Elvrilt McNeil. SIO 
Gnni Ave., lunctioa Oty, wu ancM- 
ed on wunni for failurt to pay and 
confined on S34S bond. 

At T 4R pm , Neil E. Scttnim, 
720 Midland Ave , wu ineiled for 
DUI Ke wu charted with le*vlii| 
titc Kene ot an acctdeni and ftiJuK to 
report a non-injniy iccMent 



■ Tlii Office of Sladttil 
AcHftUu u4 ScrrlMi U condwl. 
ini an InFormaiional meeting on 
le«deiihip opportunitiei in itudeni 
lovemment from 7 lo 8 30 loni|hl 
in Union 209. 

■ VaUti Mtthodlal Cwpw 
nilililij I 111 mnt from 11:30 a.m. 
to 1:30 p.nk. today in Union 
Slalcn»ni 2. 

■ AI-Ams will meet fiom S.OS 
ID 6 tonight in Union Stateroom I . 

■ Utbcru Caupw MitMrj 
will meet at 6 tonight at the Pint 
LiMherAA OHuch. 

■ The geology department ia 
conducting a lecture titled "Dh tan 



•Bd Oiia «f Arc Voltanica: 
Sedlueu Raerclli^ •* Stabdactiaa 
Tnnaa** at 4 p.m. today in Tlumpaon 
213. 

■ Agrlealtnnl Csuuaal- 
cntore of Tomorrow will meet al 
7:l}tonightinWaten 137 

■ Tbc S«cicly sf HtapaBic 
PnfuaUaial Eaglaenm will meet al 
6: 30 lonight in Durland 274 

■ Claupai ""-f---*- fu CkrIM 
will meet al 7 toBifhl at 1517 
McCain l^ane. 

■ Uutlkac Tkiam will be M 
11:30 am today at ibe Purple 
Maique Theatn. 




DID WE MAKE A MISTAKE? 

■ If we make a mistake or are not quite clear 
on something, ptease call and telt us. We are 
only human. Our number is 532-6556. 



The Karess State Collegtan 


dass postage is paid al 


(USPS 291 020). a MixJenl 


Manhattan. Kan.. 66502. 


newspaper al Kansas Stale 


POSTMASTER; Sflod 


Univw^, IS publtsfied by 
Student Publicabons Inc., 


•ddmss changes to Kansas 


SWa Coliegian, circulation 


Ke(lzwHain03.MwMtar. 


desl(.Kedzi« 103. Manhattan, 


Kar. 66506. nwColegiine 


Kan.66&0&7167. 


published weeltiteys during tfw 




sdKXjl year and once a week 




ttinxj^ ttie summef Sficond- 


eKanHi5lMCdto0lw,lMS 



Weather 



YESTERDArS HIGHS AND LOWS 




• DENVER 
19/ 14 



• TULSA 
28/23 



> OMAHA 
22/11 



• ST LOUIS 
30/19 



Stxte Outlook 

Periods of snow. Additional 
accumulations ot one lo two inches 
eest and four to five Inches southwest 
Highs in the 20s. Snow erxjing in ttie 
evening. Low in the teens. 

Manhattan Outlook 

TODAY a^HI^^^^ 

~ Snow likely. Total 
accumulation of orw to 
three inches possible. 
High in the mld-20s. 



Cloudy and wamner. 
Highs from 35 to 40. 









Only A Stones Throw Aiy 




ursda 

$1.50 16oz. Coors Light jfottles" 




p^i 



V 



^ 



BwMouthsl 

^ $1 Old Milwaukee LfgRt ^otl^ 

Pounders! * " * 




V 



\. t25 Burgers 5-8 p.m 





KANSAS STATE COLLEfilAN 



Thursday, March 2, 1 998 ^ 




jM M^ miii(^ ®m^ 




House hunting should be started soon 



ar you think rentiiig an 
apartment or house is 
easy, think twice. But 
you better hurry. 
March is prime time to 
start planning for your liv- 
log arrangement next fall. 

"You should start looking (he 
twginiiing of March and have an 
apartment by spring break — 
unless you don't want to have a 
selection." Sandy LarMns, senior 
in finance, said. 

There are several questions you 
need to answer before you even 
start looking. 

To begin your search, there is a 
bulletin board that lists available 
rental units on the first floor of the 
K-State Union. 

You can also check with the 
Office of Student Activities and 
Services for a list of larger apart- 
ment complexes, property-man- 



agement companies and real- 
estate companies that handle 
rental properties. 

"I talked lo some friends and 
asked them about where they live 
when I was looking," Larkins 
said. 

The next step is to son through 
your options. 

Decide what size of apartment 
or house you are looking for, 
whether you would like it fur- 
nished or unfurnished and how 
long you would like your lease to 
run. 

Be aware of restrictions, such 
as no pets, no smoking, no chil- 
dren, no waierbeds or no subleas- 
ing. 

When you have found a place 
you are interested in, check the 
owner or manager's track record. 
You can talk to present or former 
tenants. K-Slate's Consumer 
Relations Board or the Manhattan 
Department of Human Resources. 

For safely purposes, be sure to 



ask how frequently the unit is 
inspected. Check to see there are 
smoke detectors, a fire extinguish- 
er, the proper number of windows 
and exits for fire safety, and a 
place where you can seek shelter 
in the event of a tornado. 

"Each year we have a fire 
inspection," said Charlie Busch, 
Manhattan properties supervisor 
for McCullough Development. 
"Students should look for issues 
of life safety, such as a good 
means of security." 

In addition, check the locks on 
the doors and windows. A peep- 
hole in the door also provides 
added security. 

"Our philosophy is that we 
want to provide safe housing," 
Busch said. 

When you have decided on a 
location, the next step is lo read 
and sign the lease. 

"Read the lease carefully. 
Leases are so long that many peo- 
ple don't lead them." said Marisa 



Brown, director of Student 
Activities and Services consumer 
relations board. 

Students can take their leases 
into the Office of Student 
Activities and Services, and they 
will check them over. 

"If you don't bring it into the 
office, at least take it home and 
look at it," Brown said. 

You should be sure lo get the 
lease in writing. Do not agree to 
oral terms. Once you have agreed 
to the terms of the lease, the sig- 
natures of the owner or manager 
and every roommate are necessary 
for the lease to be valid. 

Within five days of moving in, 
tenants should do an inventory 
with the owner or manager to 
determine what damage exists in 
the apartment and what repairs 
need to be done. 

"Doing a good inventory check 
with the landlord is the best way 
to make sure you retain your 
deposit." Brown said. 



HELP AVAILABLE FOR RENTERS 

Both K-Stat8 and the dty of Manhattan have several ottices ttiat can help answer 
studertis' rental questions. 

Contumer Reli^iont Board 

Office of Studet^ Adivittes and Services 

K-State Union 

532'«541 




StudMiti' ASOfwy 

Office of Student Activities and Services 

S32-6S41 

Code InipKtkxt Offlot 
City Hal 
11th and Poyntz 

537-0056 

Ospartment of Human RMOufcet 

City Hal 

IllhandPgyntz 

537-0056 




S*'£>!ri(iii3 - Sil!^$>lj^[naii* 3t^S''liIniK£>diJ 



Sirsi'|)!h^'i: - jtl'&u'lJfSf irIlf£)0!lUj")gdrs!/oryj 



nVtt want to 
maka atudanta 
awara that thay 
flaw* a right to 
aak for an 
Inapactlon." 

PatBau 
OOda Inspection otflcar 



Student Senate promotes 
safe housing for students 



r " h here are about 

^ P* 15,000 K-State 
I students living tn 
i 1 off-campus hous- 
ing. 

Student Senate organized Safe 
Housing Week to promote safe 
housing. 

Senate has a responsibility to 
protect the health, safety and wel- 
fare of all students, David Winkler, 
human ecology senator, said. 

"I felt it was important to have 
this week t^ecause many apartments 
and houses that are rented out are 
not up to code." he said. 

Senate encourages students to 



take advantage of the services pro- 
vided by the city of Manhattan to 
renters. This is why the Code 
Inspection Office and the Landlords 
of Manhattan Inc. were asked to set 
up a table in the K-Staie Union this 
week. 

"Our biggest hope is that stu- 
dents will realize the help is here, 
and it's free," Mac Campbell, build- 
ing official for the city of 
Manhattan, said. 

The Code Inspection Office will 
come to a house or an apartment at 
the request of either individual stu- 
dents or landlords for an inspecuon. 

Code Inspection Officers also 
walk the neighborhoods in 
Manhattan to look for properties 



they think might have problems. 

"We especially look at buildings 
that look like they have basement 
apartments," Brad Claussen, code 
inspection officer, said. 

Before an inspection, the owners 
or managers of the properties are 
contacted to let them know an 
inspection is going to be done. 

If problems are found, a notice lo 
repair is sent to the owner or man- 
ager, who has five days to respond 
with a plan of action and timetable. 

"We can accept their time frame 
or impose our own," Claussen said. 
"Then we follow up with another 
inspection." 

A typical inspection by the Code 
Inspection Office is looking at the 



inside and outside of the house as 
well as the area around the house. 

"We look to make sure that there 
are smoke detectors, every room 
has two outlets, a working fire 
extinguisher and a safe venting sys- 
tem on the furnace," Pat Ball, code 
insipeciion officer, said. 

The Manhattan guidelines stale 
that housing must be safe, clean, in 
good repair and not overcrowded. 

"We want to make students 
aware that they have a right lo ask 
for an inspection," Ball said. 

"We are especially concerned 
with students having two indepen- 
dent means of getting out of an 
apartment in a fire," she said. 

The only mandatory inspection 
on rental properties is a fire inspec- 
tion for buildings larger than 
triplexes. 

"Some years ago, the issue of 
community-wide rental inspection 
was brought up." Edith Stunkel. city 
commissioner, said. 

However, Stunkel said, this was 




For more infomiation on Safe Housing 
Week, there wfl be a information taUe 
from 11;15a.m. to 1 p,m, today in the 



not popular with some landlords. 

She said the political compro- 
mise was that the Code Inspection 
Office would make free inspections. 

To be sure an apartment is safe, 
you can look for compliance stick- 
en, which arc displayed on rental 
units that are in compliance with 
housing codes. 

"We want students to look for 
safe housing and know that you 
don't have to have a problem to 
have your apartment or house 
inspected," Claussen said. 

The Safe Housing Week table 
will be in the Union today from 
II; 15 to 1:00 p.m. 



<l 



Earn up to $90 
before Spring Break 

Receive up to $30 
a week when you 
donate plasma. 

MANHATTA 

BIOMEDICAL 

CENTER 

1130 GARDENWAY 776-9177 
romi Biomedical Centkh 




No Coupon" Specials 



{HO coupon lU'i'di-'ct, 
NONE accc-picd) 



Everyday 
Two-fers 

2 - PIZZAS with 
2 - TOPPINGS each 
2 - COKES With ice 



Everyday 
Three-fers 

3 - PIZZAS with 
1- TOPPING each 
4 . COKES with ice 



$8.45 



PilCMdooot 
Indudt sales laxM. 



3^ 0.34 



Pizza Shuttle 776-5577 




nNDERBILTS45l%Voo 



DOWNTOWN WAMEGO 

.y-N tht i h 1 2-5 Sii ii da v 



Visit The Columbian, 

Wamego's Historic Theater 

& Art Center! 



MEN'S & WOMEN'S JUSTIN 
ROPERS 





Pull on Roperst 

Only the Orginal 

Justin Boot can 

ojjer you 1st 

^ Quality features such 

as genuine Kipskin leather 

from shtift to foot, full 

leather lining & leather 

sole! 



Group 




WRANGLER 13 
MWZ COWBOY 
CUT* 

8ALB! 




Wrangler Cowboy Cut 
jeans are the one basic 
equipment for a west- 
lifestyle. 

ancfer 




PINION 




, K. Slewin Aodeaca 
. . . Ctiitiai JuDiey 
...RotaKkUiaefer 
..HatLeffiMwcU 
. . . .ClKUtjr Little 
. . . Stirtnit Pnqiii 



liMICHt,HtB 



SenLllaak; 

Ut/nATUmt IStTOII. . . Amy Ziegter 

IMIITI mrON f^ill Spikcr 

tMMMt BHTOA ..... Tnsha BenDJoga 

com CMP Dave Olsoa 

CTTV-Mft IMTOfl Mike Mvlett 

. , Jeretny Crabtree 



m 

Mft 



AB 



. . . . Rj^dl Wk 

JiQ DttBw 

.... AanwQnlun 

• • ( fuliojfv Rsu 

, ... Ron lohom 

. . Gbrii Freeltad 



AA^MHv vlAlw WvUKIHI^H 



In Our Opinion 



By the Collegian Editorial Board 



K-State votes could mean a lot in Manhattan 



CoDgratulations are in order for 43 sftidents who 
live on campus. 

We commend you for taking time out of your 
schedules Tuesday to vote. 

Unfortunately, there are 292 registered voters on 
campus who didn't think their vote mattered, and 
there are countless other students who live on 
campus who didn't bother to get registered to vote. 

Undoubtedly, there were many students who live 
off-campus who voted, and we commend you, too. 
But the problem of a majority of students on this 
campus being apathetic continues. 

They just don't care what the city commission 
does, how our tax money collected at the K-State 
Union is spent or whether the streets surrounding 
camfHis are safe to walk home on. 

If they cared, they would have voted. 

If alt 18,660 students voted, we would have the 



power to accomplish anything in the city of 
Manhattan. 

So those of you who voted, grab a couple of 
friends, lake them to the Union and show ihcm how 
to register to vote in the Student Governing 
Association office. 

Those of you who are staff in the residence halls: 
Have a floor function where the whole floor goes 
and registers to vote. 

Leaders in greek houses: Make it a contest to see 
how many of your members can get registered in 
Riley County. 

And for those who live off campus, take a few 
moments in between classes to get registered. 

The deadline to register for the general elation is 
March 20. 

Let's stop the apathetic attitude that pervades this 
campus and try to make a difference. 




Sdiool LuncK New5 



Keta^up is a vagetatk 







NeWt Gingrich 

filKk grants are a ve9ttal>l« 



'^ 







Back to Back 



Today's topic: cultuval reUitivism 



"Back to Back" l« ■ proa-and-coiw column by John Hart and Din Lawarenz that I* taaturwl tihwMkly on tha Coilaglan opinion page. Tht future represants tlie opinions of th« cotumnltts only. 

Objective morality appiies to aii cultures Morality relative to each culture 



W 



hat do 

multicultural ism, 
diversity and 
tolerance have in 
common? 



j 



Tney all stem from the same source, cultural 
lelaiivism — the mother lode from which various 
veins of contemporary liberai ideas flow. 

In fact, this debate has raged for thousands of 
years. The idea of relativism has been a 
prominent force in western thought since the 
Gieeks began to discuss it about 2,400 years ago. 

Cultural relativism is the opposite of the belief 
that moral truth is 



N wra accept 
cultural 
ralathrism, w% 
can no longar 
say that th« 
praetlcas off a 
cun^ra ara 
wrong, bacauso 
oaeh culturft 
dafinas truth 
forltsalf. 



objective and 

universal. There is no 
such thing as absolute 
right and wrong; right 
and wrong are merely 
defined by the moral 
code of each society. 
Since there is no 
objective moral truth 
that applies to all 
people at all times, 
one societal code is 
not any better than 
another. Therefore, 
we should not impose 
our values on other 
cultures but instead 
tolerate differences. 

Cultural relativism 
is a fancy way of saying that morality is a matter 
of opinion. 

In this case, mass opinion, or culture, defines 
what is right and wrong. 

The theory of cultural relativism might sound 
appealing at first glance, but further examination 
shows it 10 be implausible. 

The first problem is that the argument for 
cultural relativism doesn't make sense logically. 
Relativists claim that because different cultures 
disagree about morality, then objective truth must 
not exist. 

In doing so, they ignore the much more likely 
possibility that one of the parties is simply 
mistaken. 

According to the cultural-relativist argument, 
if culture A says it is wrong to torture innocent 
people, but culture B says it is right to torture 
innocent people, then there can be no objective 
tnith in the matter because the cultures disagree. 
The person who believes in objective truth has no 
problem condemning culture B. The cultural- 
relativist alternative is utter nonsense. 

The consequences of taking cultural relativism 
seriously further undermines whatever credibility 
it might have left. 

If we accept cultural relativism, we can no 
longer say the practices of a culture are wrong 
because each culture defines mith for itself. 
Nor could we say one culture is superior to 
another. 

This becomes a serious problem when we 
want to condemn the culture of Nazi Germany 
for killing millions of Jews. 

We also wouldn't want to impose our values 
on China by criticizing them for crushing the 
skulls of pro-democracy demonstrators with 
tanks in Tiananmen Square. 

Nor would we want to point our finger at 
S^iuth Africa during the years of apartheid. 

The only way to condemn the actions of these 
cultures is to argue that they have violated an 
objective standanl of moral truth that transcends 
ctiltuie. 




Cultural relativism does 
not allow us that option, 
for if the majority of South 
Africans thought apartheid 
was right then it was right 
for that culture, and who 
ate we to judge them? 

Accepting cultural 
relativism would not only 
prevent us from critiquing 
other cultures, it also 
prevents us from critiquing 
our own culture. 

If t were a plantation 
owner in Alabama during 
the 1830s, and I wondered 
if slavery was right or 
wrong, I would obviously 
conclude it was right because my culture said it 
was right. 

The issue would be resolved — my culture 
had spoken. 

The final consequence of taking cultural 
relativism seriously is that the idea of social 
progress is called into doubt. 

If truth is nothing more than what a culture 
says it is, then why sliould we improve anything? 

The basic impetus for social reform is that our 
culture is somehow failing according to an 
objective moral standard and should be 
improved. 

With slavery, for example, people were 
committed to ending it because it was objectively 
evil. Martin Luther King Jr. was committed to 
fighting racism because he believed it was 
objectively evil as well. 

The idea of relativism is very old, but it is also 
very wrong. Instead of blindly accepting a 
popular idea, relativists should be honest about 
the fact that their standard of morality just 
doesn't make sense. 

Dan's response 



Truth can I>e kind of like a social disease. 
We hear about It when we grow up. We know 
the effects It can have. 

At some point, most people think they have 
It (and some actually do). 

But eventually, most come to realize that 
it's not quite what they had thought 

It'ii the people who keep on thinking they 
have something they don't who continually 
cause problems. 

Condemning the Nazis does not require 
some objective moral standard. It can quite 
easily be done by demonstrating 
Inconsistencies within the twilefs that spurred 
the Holocaust 

The Jews were made into scapegoats. 
Victims of religious oppression for centuries, 
they made easy targets for a regime looking 
for enemies. Once Jews were blamed for losing 
World War I, Nazi "scientists" proceeded to 
"prove" that Jews were genetically Inferior, 
thus worth removing from society. 

Although this played on the prejudices of 
the German people, leading many to accept 
what was being done, such cannot t>e linked to 
the morality of German culture. Rather, it was 
the result of lie upon lie perpetuated by a 
regime painting pictures. 

Pictures in black and white. 

Pictures which established an "objective" 
morality the world should adhere to. 

Dan Lcwerenz Is a setdor In philosophy. 



A 



merica has a problem, and 
it's one that we probably 
won't ever fact up to. 



It's not unique to Americans, so I suppose 
we're not any worse off than anyone else. But we 
do have a responsibility to deal with it. 

Americans always think they're right. 

And in Western thought with its tendency to 
place things within a dichotomous framework, that 
idea has a counterpart — everyone else is always 
wrong. 

There are those who question these 
assumptions. They ask whether things must 
always be right or wrong, or if there might be 
shades of gray. They question whether being the 
most powerful nation on earth gives us moral 
authority. They wonder whether their belief in a 
God and a religion and a moral code necessarily 
imply universality. 

And ihey are a threat to those who fail to ask. 

We exist within a culture that says right and 
wrong are absolutes. We have a predominant 
religion and a predominant political ideology 
within this culture, and we grant those institutions 
moral authority. 

But that doesn't mean we are right. 

This is the question raised in the debate over 
cultural relativism and objective morality. 

For example, a cultural relativist might believe 
that infanticide is not necessarily a bad thing. 

How can this be? Children are the most 
precious mcmbefs of our society. No one 
questions their right to live and play and love like 
everyone else. 

But our society has the means to provide for 
our children (though unfortunately we don't 
always come through). Others aren't so fortunate. 

Among many 



But If soma 
modom-day 
Mosas camo 
down from tha 
mountain today 
with nows that 
Qod prafors 
aoclalism ovor 
capttallam and 
doaant aat rad 
moat, how 
many 

Amaricans 
would llatant 



"primitive" cultures, 
the material means 
(food, shelter, etc.) to 
sustain population 
growth might not exist. 
To prevent the entire 
village (or tribe or 
culture or whatever) 
from starving, 
unwanted pregnancies 
are terminated, and 
children that cannot be 
supported luc allowed 
tO(Ue. 

Is this wrong? In 
Manhattan, Kansas, 
yes. In the heart of the 
Amazon rain forest, 
maybe not. 

But suppose for a 
minute that there is an 
•^'objective" moral truth, 
one that ^plies to all people in all cultures. 

Who's to say that it isn't Yanomami morality 
that's correct? Or Muslim morality? Or some 
standard that no one has discovered and everyone 
is violating every day of their lives? 

Claiming that there is an objective moral 
standard is fine, as long as it's the one you 
subscribe to. But if some modem-day Moses came 
down from the mountain today with news that God 
prefers socialism over capitalism and doesn't eat 
red meat how many Americans would listen? 

The idea that there may not be an objective 
morality, or that such morality might not be what 
our culture thinks it is, is dangerous to some. 
There arc people who are empowered by their 
setise of righteousness, and any challenge to the 



"right" part of that notion is 
an affront to their entire 
conceptual framework. 

And so we are stuck in a 
world where almost 
everyone has their own 
"objective" moral standard. 
And we all know that we are 
right and everyone else is 
wrong. 

In this world, how are we 
to interact? Do we tell 
everyone else that they're 
wrong and try to change 
them? Or do we just 
patronize them, let them 
think they're right and talk 
with our friends about how 
they'll bum in hell? 

We don't live in the Kalahari Desert and can't 
fully understand the circumstances surrounding 
the lives of the people who do live there. So we 
can't impose our standard of morality on them. 

In a worid of differing opinions, the idea that 
others might have a legitimate basis for their 
beliefs is a must Not only to ensure tranquility 
among disputing parties, but to afford the respect 
that all people deserve. 

And if there is one moral standard that we may 
apply to all, it would consist of two statements. 
"Ito unto others as you would have them do unto 
you." and "Mean people suck." 




John's response 



A common mistake relativists make, 
espectaily politically correct relativists, is that 
people who believe in objective truth believe 
America is always right. 'This is simply not the 
case. America is often wrong and should be 
corrected in light of the objective moral 
standard we're violating, as In the cases of 
slavery and racism. It's Important to note that 
since objective truth transcends culture, no 
single culture can have a monopoly on truth. 

Who's to say thai It isn't the Yanomami 
morality that's correct? Or Muslim morality? 
Or Nazi Germany morality? Or South African 
apartheid morality? Or Rwandan morality? 

Well, some of these cultures are more wrong 
than others because It's wrong to kill several 
million Jews, for example. The point relativists 
won't face is that they can't say the Holocaust 
was wrong, for to do so would appeal to 
objective morality and contradict their position. 

There are gray areas in life, but some issues 
are much darker and lighter than others. For 
example, w he re's the gray area when asking If 
It's OK to rape and sexually abuse a 5-year-old 
l^rl? What If an entire culture practiced this? 
Would that make it right? 

We can call a moral choice objectively right 
when the weight of reason Is behind It. For 
example, the weight of reason is much more 
l>ehind the belief that the earth Is round than 
that it is flat. Therefore, It Is objectively true 
that the earth Is round. 

Similarly, the weight of reason is much more 
behind objective morality than relativism. The 
underdeveloped, random, and contradictory 
arguments of relativists attest to this fact. 
Universal, objective statements like "Do unto to 
others as you would have them do unto you" — 
spoken by Jesus, and "Mean people suck" 
contradict relativism, but are, nonetheless, good 
places to start in discerning objective truth, 

John Hart b a senior In political science. 




. .' '^-'L .L'.'il ■■-V«-i*V* •' -^ji-ll. 



G^ 



lanning 



a wedding 



while 



MAKING THE GRADE 




Finding time is a challenging effort 
for students who plan weddings 
while attending school 



A 



ttending school, job Interviews, student 
teaching and planning a wedding ail at the 
same time could bring stress to anyone's life. 



"Every extra minute I get, 1 think about things that need to be done 
for the wedding," Sheila Jeffers, senior in elementary education, said. 

Jeffcrs and her fianci. Lee Mueller, a 1994 K-Statc graduate, are 
planning their wedding while they are more than two hours apart. 

"Lee has been very supportive of our wedding plans while I am 
away at college," she said. 

Mueller is working as a travel agent in Hiawatha where the two will 
be married in July. 

Jeffers is student leaching at Ogden. 

'Time is scarce when you have commitments of student teaching, 
interviewing for jobs, being in a sorority and in various organizations 
such as Education Council," she said. 

Jeffers said her fianc^ is also helping out with the plans. 
"He called the DJ and photographer and booked the church and 
reception hall for me," Jeffcrs said. "We decided together, and he made 
the arrangements. 

"I go home every week possible." Jeffers said. "We try to make the 
most of the weekends by spending quality time together making 
wedding plans." 

Like Jeffers, Kathy Kippes. senior in elementary education, is 
planning her wedding while going to school, student teaching and with 
her fianc^ away. 

"I wouldn't suggest planning your wedding with your fianci more 
than 1. 000 miles away," she said. 

Kippes rianc<S, Mike Ricke, a 1994 graduate in civil engineering, is 
working in Louisiana, 

Kippes sister, Tammi, is also getting married this year. 
"You have to manage your time effectively," Tammi Kippes, senior 
in elementary education, said. "It is hectic and hard," 

The Kippescs are from Victoria, which is a little more than two 
hours from Manhattan. 

u letfi to make good use of your breaks." Tantmi said. "I did a 

lot of planning over the summer 
and plan to do more over spring 
break." 

Her roommate. Holly 
Marr. a senior in elementary 
education, is also getting married 
this sununer. 

"It is easier for Holly 
because she is getting married in 
Manhattan and is from 
Manhattan." Tanuni said. 

Tim Kessen, senior in 
animal science and industry, said 
he thought it would be easier on 
his flancde. Shelly Foglc, junior 
in agricultural joumalism, if she 
were not going to school. 

"I go with what she 
wants," Kessen said. "1 am really 
easy to get along with." 

Like Fogle, T.A. Hays, 
sophomore in animal science and industry, and his fiancee, Jennifer 
Baugher. sophomore in special education, will continue to attend K- 
State after they are married. 

"I think it will be easier being married," Hays said. "I'll be settled 
down more — I'll have more tinw to study." 

Hays and Baugher have been engaged for more than a year. 
"Don't stretch it out, " Hays said. "It can be done quick. 
"I have friends that got engaged and were married in four months." 
Michelle Lcseberg, sophomore in early childhood education, is also 
getting married this summer. 

"The hardest pari of planning the wedding is finding time lo go 
home on weekends," Leseberg said. 

Leseberg and her fiancd got an early start on planning their welding. 
"I couldn't imagine waiting till the last couple of months and try to 
plan," she said. 'That would be very strcssfiil." 

Krisla Keever, senior in elementary education, is making plans for 
her wedding this summer also. 

Keever is planning to be married in Topeka. 
"It is hard getting together in Topeka and planning." she said. "My 
parents have moved and are no longer in the Topeka area." 

Student brides-to-be spend a lot of time trying to find that perfect 
place to have the reception, hiring the florists with the best deal and 
booking the perfect photographer. 

"You have to be flexible," Keever said. "Don't be set on one thing. 
And the farther in advance you plan, the better off you arc." 

Some find it helpful to include a bridal consultant in the planning of 
their wedding. 

Jolana Montgomery- Matney is a bridal consultant in the Junction 
City-Manhattan area. 

Montgomery-Matney said there are ways to facilitate planning a 



ffsiday don't 
have time to cut 
througii the red 
tape. 



11 



Jolana Montgomery-Matney 

Bridal consultant In the 
Junction City -Manhattan area 




Students who plan weddings and attend aohod fac* tha hardships ot elaaaaa and homeworlL In addition to class, finalizing details 
of a wadding day can males sxtra strsss for studsnts. 



wedding. 

"Girls today don't have time to cut through the red tape." she said. 

Wedding consultants specialize in reference services or total 
coordinat ionofeveryaspectofthe wedding . 

"After setting your wedding budget, it is smart to save time and 
money by finding someone that can help you." she said. 

"By getting a bridal consultant, you can save a whole bunch of 
headache." she said. 

Karen Miller is Manhattan's Dillard's Department Store's bridal 
consultant. 

"I register brides for wedding gifts." Miller said. "I work with them 
and help them pick out their gift items." 

Their preferences arc listed in a nationwide database available at 
more than 230 Dillard's stores. 

Miller said couples should register at least three months before the 



wedding. 

"Brides should have a wedding planner and plan ahead of time." 
Miller said. "If they wail till the last minute, they are shortchanging 
themselves." 

The I Q90s have brought a different af^roach to wedding planning, 
and today, students don't have a lot of extra lime to plan their special 
day. 

"Everything has been put on hold till I graduate." Kathy Kipper 
said. "Student teaching has to come first." 



rhi)(<i lliiislr.ilicins bv Mike WVEilih.ins 



6 




PORTS 




INTRAMURAL lASKETBALL 



HtoTiMnlll 


(5^ 


&MilaQoitM (40) 


I^PK^pi ^pjlcn 


(5^)) 


7.UiTibd8CN/^)ha m 


3LeigD09i 


m 


8.S)gn«A|«iaEpslOfi(SO) 


'4.0etaUpsilon 


(W)} 


9 Purple Reign 96 (5K)) 


S,FhinindM 


(M) 


10.M»taR3 (M)) 




imcHa,iw8 



MNtMirAnCOUiQttN 



► MEN'S BASKETBALL 



March brings long-awaited 
Cats victory over Nebraska 



KSlatti ?S 



Huskers 73 




*^« w«ra 
for Fabruary, 
•o maybtt 
March I* 
going to bo 
a ftttio bit 
bottor for 
us." 

Tom Asburv 

K-State 

baskettelJ coach 



raoosnwART^ 

Asanew 
page on the 
calendar 
was turned 
over Wednesday, the 
K-State basketball 
team decided to make 
a fresh start. 



"Wc were for February, 
so maybe March is going to 
go a little bit better for us," 
Wildcat coach Tom Asbury 
said. 

Tlic 75-73 victory over the 
Nebraska Cornhuskers in 
Bramlage Coliseum ended a 
six-game losing streak for the 
Cats (hat dated back to Jan. 
25. 

The Wildcats also got 
revenge after an earlier 22- 
poini loss to the Cornhuskers 
in Lincoln. Neb. 

Behind a career-high 31- 
point outburst from senior 
forward Belvis Noland, the 
Cats improved their record to 
12-13 on the year, 3-10 in the 
Big Eight. 

Nebra.ska dropped to 17- 
1 1 and 4-9 in Big Eight play. 

Comhusker coach Danny 
Nee said the Cats' shooting 
from three- point range was 
the difference. 

"They shot 56 percent. 
That's a great percentage," 
Nee said. "The three-point 
shot was the difference in the 
ballgame." 

For the game, the Cats 



made nine of their 16 
attempts from behind the arc, 
including six of nine by 
Noland. 

Noland, who has been 
inserted into the starting line- 
up because of an injury to 
senior forward Demond 
Davis, started his scoring 
early and often. 

In the first five minutes of 
the game, Noland scored all 
13 of the Cats* poinu. 

After the early run by 
Noland, Nebraska came right 
back and had the Cats down 
26-17 until a three-point 
bomb by junior guard Elliot 
Hatcher at the 6:04 mark. 

Hatcher's three-pointer 
resurrected the slumping 
Cats, and the Cornhuskers' 
1 1 -point lead was down to 
three by halftimc. 

A.sbuiy said making a dent 
in the Nebraska lead by half- 
time was a big momentum- 
builder for the Cats. 

"That was huge because 
we kind of got our compo- 
sure back," Asbury said. 

The teams battled back 
and forth for the first 12 min- 
utes of the second half before 
the Cats tied the game up at 
57. 

Nee said K-State's zone 
defense caused his team 
problems during that stretch. 

"That was the first zone 
defense we've seen all sea- 
son," Nee said. "Wc weren't 
comfortable against it all 
night because we haven't 
seen it." 

Asbury agreed that 
Nebraska's unfamiliarily 
with the zone defense was 



key. 

"Sometimes teams that 
have great perimeter shoot- 
ing, everyone's afraid to 
zone, so they don't ever see 
zone," Asbury said. "So 
sometimes those are the 
kinds of teams that every 
now and then you just ought 
to go in there and see if it'll 
work," 

With the Cat defense 
working well against the 
Comhusker offense. Hatcher 
and junior forward Tyrone 
Davis stepped up on the 
offensive end to help the hot- 
shooting Noland. 

Davis scored 12 in the 
second half, and Hatcher 
added 1 1 of his own. 

It was Hatcher's three- 
pointer at the 7:24 mark that 
gave the Cats their first lead 
of the second half. 

K-Staie would never trait 
again. 

Hatcher's four free throws 
in the final 35 seconds of the 
game sealed the Cat victory. 

Comhusker junior guard 
Jaron Boone lead the 
Nebraska cause with 26 
points. 

Up next for the Cats is a 
Saturday afternoon battle 
with the Colorado Buffaloes. 

The winner will stay out 
of the conference cellar. 

With the upcoming Big 
Eight Tournament and 
Colorado this weekend, 
Asbury said this victory was 
a necessity. 

"We certainly needed a 
win," he said. 

"Wc need another one on 
Saturday." 




HARK LKPFINaWILL/Collaglan 

K-Statt tanlor forward Stanlay Hamilton puiit down ■ rtbound during the cats' 75-73 

victory over the Nvbrsaks Cornt>UBkers In Bnmlag* Collwum W«dn«sday night. K-State wlil play 
th« list gam* of tha t994-9S ragular aaaaon Saturday agalnat tha Colorado Burfaloaa. 




Noland explodes against NU 



I KHVaaKCollegiBn 

K-State forward Behrli Noland goea up 

for two of hla carear-high 31 polnta In tha 
Cats' 75-73 victory at Bramlage Coliseum 
Wadrtasday night. 



JIMMY cmarnBB 

Colkgivi 

Belvis Notand finally got to 
smile. 

After suffering through an 
11-13 season, the 6-foot 3-inch 
senior exploded for a career- 
high 3 1 points in K-State's 75- 
73 victory over Nebraska 
Wednesday. 

"Yeah, for the first time in 
a long time," Noland said, "I 
had a little fun tonight — just 
u little bit." 

Sounds like Noland had 
more than just a little fun with 
the Nebra.ska defense, and his 
stats reflect that 

Twelve out of 20 from the 
field, six of nine from three- 



point range, three steals and 
four rebounds, 

"I think they did a pretty 
job trying at least," Noland 
said about how the Huskers 
defended him. 

"I'm not saying that they 
didn't. 1 just haid one of those 
games." 

It didn't take long for 
Noland to catch ftre from the 
field; he jumped right out of 
the gate and scored the 
Wildcats' first 13 points. 

"I felt pretty good tonight 
coming into the game," 
Noland said. "1 just felt like 
tonight is going to be one of 
those nights. I hit my first cou- 
ple of shots, and I just wanted 



die ball more." 

Included in NoUnd's 13- 
point tear was a four-point 
play, which occurred when 
Nebraska's Terrance Badgeti 
fouled him after he sank a 
three-pointer. The following 
free throw capped the four- 
point play. 

Noland didn't stop from 
there. By the end of the first 
half, he had tallied 20 points. 
In fact, at the half, Noland had 
out-scored the rest of the K- 
State team 20-14. 

"I think tonight I used my 
screens really well tonight," 
Noland said. 

Even with Noland's hot- 
shooting hand, the Cats were 



W? 



GAME AT A GLANCE 

WILDCATS HUSKERS 



Nhm 


FO 


rr 




« 


TO 


T» 


HOM'' ' 


•' tM» 


' M 




t 




M 


0*m.T 


ST 


19 




1 




14 


M . 


. <. M 


M 




1 






Htkfm 


S'lO 


i-e 




7 




10 


Wing 


»•' 


f4 




s 




-a^ 


MvTi«on 


J-7 


(M) 











^^ 


M 


»e 











StncWVK) 


0-3 


»4 






1 






TOT»LS 


XT-B7 


tM* 


K 


u 




79 



it<^ 


3* M 


Bnx*a 


1-3 0-0 


Mm* 


.. »7 44 


Sitctdwid 


».1S (K) 


Sm**' 


' a-ia 44 


3aMH 

MM 


2-3 2-3 


SurtH 

Toraia 


1-3 OKI 



rr « • TO t» 



■ m 

1 B 



down by as many as eight points 
with 10 minutes left in the second 
half 

Enter Noland again. 

As (he Cats needed a spark to 
comeback, he stepped up and 
canned two three-pointers and 
nailed a leaning jumper. This gave 
K-State a lead that it would never 
give up. 

"I didn't come out in the sec- 



ond half looking for a shot," 
Noland said. "It ju.st came to me." 

Noland's hoi .shooting 
impressed Nebraska's Erick 
Strickland. 

"There's not much we can do. 
We did a pretty good job," 
Strickland said. 

"It seems like everybody wants 
to have a career day against 
Nebraska." 



► VOLLEYBALL 



K-State signs 3 high-school recruits 



PMmapwMa 



Colleiiu 

K-State has three new spikers. 

The K-State volleyball team has 
signed three recruits to next fall's 
squad. 

Signing letters of intent were 
Valeric Wieck and Linsey Luther, 
both of Grand Island. Neb., and 
Kim Zschau of Duncdin, Ra. 

K-State coach Jim Moore said 
Wieck is the big catch. 

"She was the primary one wc 
were after." Moore said. 

"We're excited she has signed 
with us." 

Wicck's high-school career is 
the reason for this excitement. 

She has been on the Grand 
bland Central Catholic high-school 
varsity volleyball team since the 
halfway point of her freshman year. 

She has school records in ace 
blocks in a match (23). blocks in a 
season (201) and ace blocks in a 
season (81). 

The 6-foot, 1-inch middle block- 
er's performances haven't gone 
unnoticed. 

Wieck, who picked K-Sutc over 
die University of Illinois, is listed 
in the Midwest Recruiting Report 
Magazine and is a member of the 
first-tearn all-state squad during her 



"W* Kard to 
jiidga. Thay 
hava traman- 
doua potantlal 
— but its up to 
tham what la 
dona with (t" 

Jim Moore 

K-state 

volleyball coach 



junior 

and 

senior 

years of 

high 

school. 

Moore 
said 
Wieck 
has a lot 
of poten- 
tial. 

"She's 
quick. She's 
fast, and 
she's 
strong," Moore said. 

"She may be one of the top mid- 
dle blockers in the country." 

Moore said he is considering 
redshirting Luther, who is a team- 
mate of Wieck, next year. 

"Nothing is set in stone, but thai 
is our plan right now," Moore said. 

Moore said he is redshirting 
Luther because she has been- a mid- 
dle blocker for most of her volley- 
ball career, and he plans on making 
her a setter. 

"She has tremendous ability in 
being a setter," he said. "She has a 
huge amount of untapped ability." 

Moore said the process of 
changing an individual's position 



lakes some time. 

"It's like bringing in a defensive 
back and making him a quarter- 
back," he said. 

Moore said Zschau, a 6' 2" mid- 
dle setter ftom Clearwater Centnd 
Catholic High School, wasn't 
recruited by too many other 
schools. 

"She's a kid that has been over- 
looked by other schools," Moore 
said. 

Even though Zschau wasn't cov- 
eted by many schools, Moore said 
he thinks she could help the Cats as 
soon as next year. 

"I diink she could be a potential 
starter for us," Moore said. 

The 1994 Class B State Player 
of the Year picked K-State over 
Florida State, Furman and South 
Florida. 

After only signing one player 
last signing period due to the late 
hiring of a volleyball coach, Moore 
said this class is one that helps die 
Cats in some areas, but there are 
still things that need to be 
addressed. 

"It's hard to judge. We still have 
a ways to go. They have tremen- 
dous potential — but it's up to 
them what is done with it," Moon 
sud. 



Campus Sports Cupboard 



► SNYDER ANNOUNCES PROMOTIONS ON THE FOOTBALL STAFF 



K-Stata football coach Bill Snydsr 

announced the promotion of Bob 
Stoops to assistant head coach and 
Bruce Van De Velde to associate ath- 
letic director lor football operations. 

Stoops, who lust completed his 
sixth year on the K-Slate staH. will con- 
tinue In Ns current capacity as co- 
defensive coofdtnatof and secondary 
coach while assuming the increased 
role as assistant head coach. 

"Bob has been w<th us since we 
arrived at K-State In 1989 and has con- 
tributed heavily to ttie success and 
development of this program,' Snyder 
sakl. 



"Obviously, he's very desen^ing of 
this promotion- 
Van De Velde is completing his third 
year on the K-Stato stafl. where ha 
oversees the daily administrative func- 
tions of the football program, including 
the budget, team travel, housing, train- 
ing table, financial aid and facilities. He 
will continue in that capacity under the 
new title of associate athietic director. 

'Bruce is a diligent administrator 
who has t>een an important part of this 
program's development," Snyder said. 
'His attention to detail in our day-to- 
day operations have made him very 
deserving of this promotion." 







Stoopi 




Van 0« Valds 



► ELLIOT NAMED TO NCU ETHICS COMMITTEE 

K-Stat« golf coach Mark Elliott has been chosen to serve as a Regton V 
representative on the NCAA Ethics Committee for golf. 



►WICHITA STATE BASEBALL GAMES POSTPONED 

K-Stata announced that because of cold weather, tioth baseball games 
against Wichita State have been postponed. Wednesday's game has been 
rescheduled tor 7 p.m. April 13 In Salina. 

Today's game has been rescheduled for 7 p.m. May 1 In Wichita. 




IVERSIONS 



rar 



INDIGO GIRLS 



Bt Indgo Gtils wiH perform at 8 p.m. Saturday, April 1 at the Lied 
Gmhr al Itw UniverBity o< K«eas. Tickets 90 or sale to the general 
(wMc Saturday tor $23 «ch. 



RMIAtilllieounMIN 



imtcwa,! 



► CROSSWORD 



EuconSHimt 



ACROSS 
1 Rumbte 
reminder 
5 Incensed 

8 Roughly 

12 Carry 

13 Put to 
work 

14 Noggin 

15 Grand- 
scale tale 

16 Poucti 

17 Numerical 
prefix 

IBEIk 
20 "Damn 

Yankeee' 

role 
22 Pungent 

relish 
26 Star's bit 

part 
26 Stashed 

30 Franken- 
stein's 
workplace 

31 *Sad to 
tell,..* 

32 Kipling lad 

33 Big rig 

34 Average 

35 Vinegar 
partner 

36 Loses 
brightness 

37 Entertain- 
^^ent 
center in 
London 



40 Un- 
yielding 

41 Bailey or 
Belli 

45 Elevator 

man 
47 Pitching 

Stat 

49 George- 
town 
athlete 

50 Basketball 
tactic 

51 Piratk: 
potable 

52 Paradise 

53 Mayon- 
naise base 

54 The Red 
or the 
Black 

55 Creator ol 
(he GOP 
elephant 

Solution 



DOWN 
1 State of 
urwasl- 



11 



16 



nees 

2 Nightclub 
name, for 
short 

3 Take — 
from me" 

4 Cookbook 
data 

5 Manclnl's 
field 

6 Simile 
center 

7 Orate 
6 Greek 

decigrams 32 
9Sum- 
rrioned 33 
back to the 



21 
23 

24 

25 

26 



27 
28 



factory 
10 Used an 
easy cfmir 

23 mint. 



HM l,SH 

IsAiiiK 

A' T n 1 ! aM\ 

R A K E T H ~! 
B B s|Ht f 

iPBlA L L > 

■oqn E Dj 
p E cUMlf 

A N tMd U f 
L E A V E S 1 


V T L LlH 

M R Q 1 Tm 


= L E A V E S 
\ T sUe V E 

r]|||piQ|n 1 T 
[b r An^Jl 

- "^ ^MF a y 

r H E R A K E 

[■t u nj s 
iWr E N nM 

■ AOEtaM 


■ S V £ L T { 
■0 A V E ! 



35 
36 

38 
38 

42 

43 



45 



48 



Lennon's 

lady 

Acapukxi 

unde 

Antk]ualed 

"Bowl of 

red" 

Weak, as 

an excuse 

Wadirvg 

bird 

Dog- 

patcti's 

"foun<ler" 

Jal 

foltower 

On parade 

Ttrey'ro 

only joking 

Pourer's 

directive 

Scull need 

Peninsula 

St. 

Big barrels 

Camel's 

kin 

Luke's 

mentor 

Polato 

buds 

Carry on 

Praiseful 



Yesterday's snawef 



Hart>or 
boat 

Actress ' 
Mc- 
Ctanahan 



i 


i 


i 


4 


1 


s 


S 


7 


1 


i 


6 


16 


11 


» 








\i 






14 








\i 








tA 






1^ 








ti 








«■ 


W 






^H 




Z2 






23 










24 


» 




27 


is 






■ 


» 






■ 


30 






31 






w 




_■" 








i* 






p 


as 






P 


sa 










if 






















{■I 


46 








■ 


41 








43 


44 


45 


46 






1 


*7 






1 


46 








sA 








di 






S2 








53 








&4 






sa 








VVl lUDE A7 For answers to loda/s cross wofd. call 
wlllMr Clli 1^9(K>-4S4-«873l99cperminute.touch- 
lone/fOlary phonas. (18+only ) AKing Foalures Mrvica. NYC. 



CRYPTOQUIP 

D MEWFF GUW CQEYJ- 

DVM CRGUWNF QC QEN 

PQEYGNZ URJ URNJZ 

PQYFGDGEGDQYF. 
Yesterday's Cryptoquip: "I TREED TO FILL OUT A 
1040 FORM," SAID MAX, "BUT I FOUND IT TO BE 
TOO TAXING." 

Today's Cryptoquip due: J equals D 



► CALVIN AND HOBBU 



BtLLWumuoN 



If I MAO ^ COMMltB, 
m a*t ID GtT 
BETltR W^tVS OW 
HI BOOK RtFWPrS 







«WD 5T1U. MMC TQ RO^D TOE. 
Boot AMDTtU. 
Wt (J)«PUTC.R 

TO 5M. Wt 
KNOM. 

V 




r. 
^ 



tUSS hBOJT CQKWIOtS*' 




► NON SEQUITER 



WHEV 




► FOXTROT 



fhuAUEND 



I TH006HT OF TET 

ANOTHER REASON 

WHY I'D BE A WHtCH 

Perfect aooiTion is? 

tblHCX-FtUS / 



A«HT MULDER'S First 

NAME IS THE 5Ar« AS r*r 

LAST r4AME, THAT MEANS 
TWAT IF A6EHT SCUUt 
VflRE oi TRWJB4.E, SMt'O 
ONLT HAVE To TELL "FOU" 

To HAVE US Both come 

I^UNNl^6. 



TtAM, BUT (F SHE SA-^B, 
'Fox, Itn) Pil«<AO, T*U 
SCREWEI* UP AGAIN, - 
TMt W»o«6 B» MieMT 
TAKtOfflNSt. 

I* ^ 

I 




AT LEAST TbWO 

BE WoWCiMfe WiTH 

?fftM, HiUStomB 

NO. I lb THE UNREAL. 

WOOIDN'T. I ^ 



► UNKNOWN 



BlANDON PEOC/CMilGUN 



a 

I ( 
TP 

w 
E 
R 








Reader needs to study more history 



Dear Cassie, 

We hiive Black History Month, 
when wc celebrate sucfi criminals and 
terrorists as Malcolm X who supported 
the genocide of all whites. 

Why don't we have a White History 
Month, when we can celebrate such 
great Americans as Robert E. Lee, 
Jefferson Davis, John Wilkes Booth 
and David Duke? 
Signed, 
E^ual Time 



Dear Equal Time, 

Whoever you are, you arc an igno- 
rant and ridiculous human being if you 
don't see how stupid, insensitive and 
feeble-minded that question was. 

I want you to understand the only 
reason I gave ink to a crack like you is 
so I can show all of my readers what 
the work of a person who is a com- 
plete waste of skin sounds like. 
Signed, 
Cassandra 




► COLUMN 

K-State needs 
more liberals, 
more hep-cats 

Because this campus is so 
conservative and uptight 
(remember the Farrcll 
Library wall scandal? 
Shocking!), I feel this col- 
umn will aid in turning this 
into a real live liticrat univer- 
sity. 

There are many ways of 
going about becoming an 
artsy, underground-poetic 
beatnik, but our school obvi- 
ously hasn't picked up on 
them. 

So, for all you squares 
who yearn to be the cat's 
meow, let's talk. 

First of all, no more inside-out sweatshirts. It 
wasn't cool in 1986, and it sure as hell isn't cool 
now. That goes doubly for the "I-wanna-be-prep- 
py" tie, suit and logo outfit. 

Second, if I sec another Joey Lawrence- inspired 
coat and/or sweater tied around your waist or neck, 
I will throw things at you. 

Now, that brings us to ways of making ourselves 
hep-catish. Learn about coffee. Drink espresso, 
cappuccino and caffe latte/mocha etc., until your 
roommate is Juan Valdez. This instantly makes you 
a swinger, or at least misunderstood. 

It also helps to be an artist. Try collage witi) 
your old magazines. It's cheap and easy to get start- 
ed, and hey, you're an artist. 

If you can write (if you can't, that's nunus 2S 
hip points), try getting your own column in the 
Collegian or a magazine of literary value. 

When in doubt, stick to non-colors for your 
wardrobe. I consider non-colors to be shades of 
brown, khaki, white and the ultimate chic color, 
black. If you can shop at the Gap, please do so. But 
don't tell anyone you bought your clothes there. 
Say you picked them up in a vintage clothing shop 
that is mn by a couple of drunken writers. 

If you really want all the attention and glory that 
comes with being tragic, explain that you have very 
recently considered moving to Prague, 
Czechoslovakia, in order to fulfill your inner soul's 
desires of being a gypsy (this always works for 
me). Just don' I tell them the reason you can't go is 
because your parents in Wichita are mailing you 
mow lawns all summer to pay for your trip to 
Grandma's in Boise, Idaho. 

You don't necessarily have to smoke to be mis- 
understood. A good mustache (men only) or a 
Ethan Hawke-ish pair of sunglasses can make a 
statement just as well. Try body piercing. Though 
not in your ear. silly. 

Oh, and one more thing, be careful what you 
talk about. Sure, anyone can talk about poetry 
(which a distinguished source has told me is pro- 
nouiKcd "poultry"). 

If you at least attempt one of these suggestions, I 
wilt be so proud. 

Just imagine — someday the hallowed halls will 
be filled to the brim with sandals, lurtlervecks, 
berets and lots of twenty-somethings spouting off 
about how damned liberal this campus is. 






11th & Mora - Aggieville 
537-1616 



rv 



Buy One, Get One Free! 

Buy one cup or cone and receive one of 
equal value FREE with this coupon. 

New Hours: 7 am, - 11 p m Daily 

10 a.m. - 11 p.m. Sunday 



Stressed about grades? 

find out "How to get better grades' 

with Charlie Qrtffln 
professor of speech 

Thursday, March 2, 7 p.m. 

KAe House 

Sponsored by Campus Crusade for Christ 

Open to ail KSU Students 




Burgers & Beer 



Everyone can enjoy any 6 or. Burger 

& Fries in the House 

and a Frosty Mug of Beer or Coke for. 

Shop & Compare: 
Bobby Ts: $2.99 

Burger King: $3.52 
Hardees: $4.43 

•Bobby TVCandlewood Shopping Center 
Featuring Dally Drink & Food Specials 




Joyce's Hair Tamers 



We tame the tough ones 




539-TAME 



Sculptured Malls 
Set $30 Fills $17 

Perms Reg. i*o-t4i 

Style & Haircut 

On Sale Nowl 

Haircuts 
Shampoo & Style 

Gals •12.50 Guye •6.50 

2026 Tuttic Creek Blvd. 




INTMnUCIIH: 



1*800*9COIfN€IL 

1*S00«9ft6*86S4 




rhe tfiwf i( Student Fares 




WILVCAT 

Pet Resort 



Now taking reservations 

• Safe indoor runs 

• Climate controlled 
facility 

• Indoor/outdoor play 
area 

• Walked several times 
daily 

• Convenient drop off/pick 
up hours 

The only pet boarding 
facility In the city. 

539-1515 

Rod Franz • Herb Kalmar 

2720 Amherst 

Manhattan 






V6l 



WHEN YOUR 
FUTURE IS 
AT STAKE . . . 

look to the 
professionals 
for that 
perfect 
interview 
suit. 




Prices 

start at 

J275 



^^ 



'^^Sj^^* 



•?^S>* 



•J^^" 



BO 



MoD.-Sat 9:30 t.m.>5:30 p.m. 
Thun> 'til 8:30 p.fii. 



CK:) 

rotqerS 

Fine Meniwear . 
Westloop Shopping Center 




ft Thurwiay, March 2. tgW 



KANSAS SIATE COLLEGIAN 



Resident petition 
helped open door 



CONTINUED FROM PAGE 1 

was getting so many complaints about 
how it was such a pain and an incon- 
venience," Ratlifr. senior in social sci- 
ence, said. 

Eiselc said this is the fourth time a 
voce has been taken about whether to 
keep the doors locked 24 hours. In 
addition, a petition with 240 signa- 
tuies suggesting the doors should be 
opened was brought to a hall meeting. 

Nick Al>erie, ninth- floor president, 
said the 24-hour policy wa.<; in need of 
change, 

"The residents on my floor pretty 
much hate the doors being locked all 
the time, i voted for the change 
because I think this is what residents 
want, and it's my duty to represent 
them," AbeHe, sophomore in mechan- 
icai engineering, said. 

In addition to public opinion. 
Eiscle said the decision to change the 
cunent policy was made because of 
convenienoe. 

Eisele said the Department of 
Housing and Dining Services origi- 
nally planned to set up the Validtne 
identification system for the doors 
that were unattended. 



This would include doors in the 
basement and doors leading to Deiby 
Dining Complex. But residents are 
still waiting on the Validtne system to 
be in.siaJled. 

Eisele said he believes the original 
decision to lock the doors 24 hours 
was made too quickly. 

"We made the decision without 
thinking about the residents. We 
should have waited until the Validine 
system was already installed." Eisele 
said. 

Mark Anderson, freshman in ele- 
mentary education and Haymaker ncs- 
ident, said he likes the new open-door 
policy. 

"I think it's a lot easier for the res- 
idents. We all lock our room doors 
when we leave, so we feel safe. I 
don't think the main doors need to be 
locked too." Anderson said. 

Eisele said more people than just 
residents will be happy with the poli- 
cy. 

"! know that friends, girlfriends, 
the mailman and the pizza guy are 
thrilled about this. Not eveiyonc may 
be happy, but 1 diink the majority of 
people are," Eisele said. 



Source of calls not 



CONTINUED FROM PAGE 1 

Motaz said the calls that have 
been reported to his office have all 
been made within the last month. 
The last one was made two days ago. 
and it was reported to the police 
Monday. 

Hcmnan said he cannot make any 
connection between the calls because 
only one of them was reported. 

There is a possibility that there 
could be more harassing phone calls 



made, Motaz said. 

"We don't want to blow this out of 
prc^rtion, but we do want to make 
other students aware that they could 
get these calls, ' he said. 

Herrman said if anyone gets any 
kind of prank phone call, they should 
report it to the police immediately. 

"It is a crime. We do follow up on 
the calls if they are continuous to the 
point where we can put a tap on the 
phone line," he said. 







FACULTY MEMBERS 

WE NEED YOUR IDEAS! 

The K State Union Governing Board lUGBi is 
an orqanizalion ol Ivu sludtinlj. Dttt'e lacully 
members and one ,iliimni .ippomtft:' (usually 
a sludenl) ttie purpose ot UGB is lo servy 
as (tie general qoverrtinq and policy making 
body ot \he K Slale union The board works 
will) Ihw K Slate Union &latl lo hulp nuiKe lite 
K State Union best serve tlie Kansas State 
University student and University rommumty 
Meetings are held from 5 p rn to 7p ni on the 
tirst Itiursday ol eacti monlti It you tiave 
talent and a lew liours available each monlli 
to contribute lo betk'iing the K Slate Union 
operation consider conipli.Mmrj ,\n .ippticalion 
tOf UGB members liip 

Position available: 
One (1) two-year voting 

forms lor malving application are available in 
ttie K Slate Union Directors Oltice 
Applications close at 5 p m March 16 1995 
interviews witl begin April 6 1995 

fTI K-State Union 



DUI arrests increase 



CONTINUED PROM PAGE 1 

He said the number of DUI 
arrests has increased 24.9 percent 
since 1993. 

French said there were 477 
arrests for DUls in 1 994 and only 
382 arrests in 1993. This increase 
in arrests is a reflection of the 
police's interest in keeping 
drunken drivers off the road, 
French said. 

French gave credit to local 
businesses for their efforts in 
assisting the designated-driver 
program, noting local businesses 
that give designated drivers free 
non-alcoholic drinks. 

"All the taverns in Aggieville 
push that the designated driver 
drinks for free," be said. 

Capt. Nick Edvy said the DUIs 



resulting in arrests contribute to 
the overcrowding of the jails, 
especially on the weekends. 

"We have a significant 
increase in the total amount of 
prisoners," he said. 

Edvy said the jail may have as 
many as 44 prisoners on a given 
day. However, the maximum 
number of prisoners is supposed 
to be 19. 

Edvy said the overcrowding is 
not just a problem of space. It is 
also a problem for the staff 

The jail is not staffed with 
enough workers to handle the 
current number of people, he 
said. 

Riley County hopes to be 
building a larger jail in the 
future. 



Gardening can help 
healing process 



Callers work, have fun 



CONTINUED FIU)M PAGE 1 

the Tele hind were asked at the begin- 
ning of each night how many were 
first-time callers. 

"We have about 80 percent of the 
callers being first-time callers They 
are really nervous and act as if they 
are going lo the dentist, but by the end 
of the night, they are having fun," 
Dowell said. 

Students participating in the 
Telefund said they had a sense of 
obligation about the TeleiuDd. 

"I should be doing this, because I 
have a scholarship," Heidi 
Biclenbcrg, freshman in environmen- 
tal design, said. "It is a tot of fun. If 
someoTK else hadn'i have done this, I 
wouldn't be here. But I could really 
use the car." 

One of the main reasons for the 
Telefund is to provide student schol- 
arships. 

"There is never a surplus of schol- 



arships, so this project is incredibly 
important." Dowell said. 

Other students can receive jobs, 
internships and career tips from alum- 
ni in the job market 

Robert Wheeler, senior in land- 
scape architecture, said he got to talk 
to a friend who u.scd to go to K-Statc. 
and he was reassured thai there were 
jobs available, so his education was 
going lo be useful to him when he 
graduated. 

Etowell said they are always trying 
lo update the Telefind. 

"We used to have the Telefund in 
Union 2 1 3, but now we have 80 tele- 
phcmes," Dowell said. 

The room in the K- Stale Union 
was small and only allowed for a lim- 
ited amount of phones, Dowell said. 
The Hollis Telefund Center is also 
bigger and brighter than the Union. 

This year, the telephones were 
updated to use headsets. 



CONTINUED FROM PAGE 1 

and that there is something bigger out 
there." she said. 

There has been enough research to 
support that gardening makes blood 
pressure go down and people heal 
better, Harvey said. 

A lot of hospitals are putting in 
gardens because of the effect it has on 
the healing process, she said. 

"I strongly believe the physical 
pan of gardening is almost mysteri- 
ous — something happens," Harvey 
said. 

Luretta Filberth, activities director 
for the St Joseph Senior Community, 
said the residents arc more talkative 
since participating in the activities, 

"Before, they would only speak a 
few words, but ik)w they are talking 
about the gardens they wed to have 
and the things they used to grow," she 
said, 

St. Joseph started a garden last 
yev and plans on continuing it this 
year. 

Filbetth said at Tirst the residents 
didn't want to get their hands dirty, 
and last year she did most of the 
labor. But this year, she said she 
thinks they will become more 
involved and do more of the work. 

"They really enjoy the program, 
and I am really happy with it," 
Filberth said. 

She said she tried to start a similar 
program hei^lf but wasn't succ^sful 
at getting the residents involved. 

"Dr. Mattson ami the soidents do a 
wonderful job of getting them 
invdved," she said. 

Mattson said besides the pre- 
inteming students, student volunteers 
are also used in the programs, and 
sometimes snidents visiting K-State 
serve as assistants in the activities, 

"I believe it is important that the 
University is part of the community 



and volunteers services," Mattson 
said. 

This is an opportunity to give back 
to the community, he said. 

The children lack a lot of social 
contact atKl horticulture therapy can 
serve as a bright spot in their day, 
Mattson said. 

They know they can count on us 
to come and do something with 
them," he said. 

An additional program directed by 
the horticultural therapy students and 
Mattson is the Manhattan Communis 
Garden, located on Eighth Street and 
Riley Lane. 

The garden usually begins in late 
March and continues through 
October. Mattson said, II involves 
Manhattan children who collect all 
the produce trcHn the garden and also 
have their own individual plots. 

The garden usually involves 25 to 
30 children ranging in ages ftom S 10 
1 2, and no fee is required, he said. 



PEOPLE'S 
SGROCERY CO-OP 




Quality, 
Natural Foods 
|atCo-OpPri 

Mon.-PrJ, to i.ni,-A p.m 
Sil. 9 i.m.-S p.m. 
Qowd Suodiyi 

811 COLORADO' 




I^^CS^-^'^ 




Wednesday, March 8 

K-State Union Flint Hilis Room 

1:30 p.m. to 3:30 p.m. 

Haw a better understanding of the difference 

between contract and aelf-opcraUon food service, 

and how the brandng concept can be a part 

of either system In the K-State Union. 

l^fcWUtMr* - F»od tmrAcm Couidlwils 



m 



;<*>Ki 



Dilly'si 



m 



1/2 saiuivvith. ; 
I small .salad & diink | 

I foiM.50 I 

j with Uiis coupon [ 

I t'\(Hrcs 0-1 3-".^ \ 



THURSDAY 

1 BOHLES 
175 WELLS 
1.75ZIMA5 



NO COVER 

a 50CLVB 
£. FRENCH FRIES 






i 



KalhiMM tMif 

riMNM* Meca and AmmIiIm 

iMflawHri, C«l«r«d« 



John CMnfn »ni Jeyc. FaMne 
Cofnf n ■ 




LEATHER GIFT ITEMS 

• Purses • Waist Packs • Back 
Packs • Clutch Purses • Billfolds 



SERVICES 

• Satin Shoe Dyeing 

• Rockport re -sole service 

• Bail Glove Repair 

• Shoe Care Items 

• Spenco Comfort Cushions 

Luggage Repair j^^jjhj^jjaN SHOE REPAIR 

HOURS 
776-1 1 93 Monday • Friday 

315B-Poynt2s,i;^,^!'fp„,. 
3 doors up the alley from 
Downtown, Burger King 



EASTSIDE 
SHOE DROP 

Dillon's 
Super Store 

776-9285 

CuMoiTwr S«rvlea 
7- 10 p.m. CWly 





USSIFIEDS 



KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN 



ouniASK un 

1^ run n «md« or In* tor iMf d*T 
ta |L ta«Mh wort WW » «td Mi 
Mfd Cil S3M<aB tor wnMortiw 



DIAOUMS HOW TO MY 

MorattwMittMsi . . •— 



MrMm.C 



tht dw Iwtora ttw Ml 
ClaMlbd daptoyidi rmmUm 

«tiy 4 lun two w o fttw dayi 
tM Mi ttM td rwM. 



orVtoim 



yeuhmaiii 
MMiwMir 
CMvcfwek, 



Caii 532-6555 
to place your classified. 




OFTHi 



OFFKI HOURS! MONDAY-FRIDAY 8 a.m.-S p.m. (tiMpt holiday*) 



M Mm CflliittlJI CUttflM, K-IMi 0*^ IMdi M IN, I 



000 



BULLETIN 
BOARD 



Lo«t and Found 

Faunri ads oaii ba 
placad fraa far thfaa 



OUl 



Pvrwmala 



OlOl 



ADVANCED FLIGHT Triin- 
\nQ plui grourvd iChODi 
tor privAta. inHrumant 
■nd miilli eneina rat- 
ing*. K-Siaia Flying 
Club appro vad in (true- 
tor. Hugh Irvin, 

COME FLV wMh ui, KStal* 
Flying Clut> hai Dvt lir, 
plintt For tiait prkat 
call Troy BrocKwav, 
77«-e73& aftar B:30f>.m. 



FOUND: MARCH 1. ring In 
iwoman'i rattroom In 
Calvin Hill. Plaaaa call (o 
idemHv, S32-6180. 

FOUND: NEGATIVES in 
north parking iot of Jus- 
tin Hall. Call 532-6893. 

HELPI BRACELET l0*t on 
campua. Gold tannii 
ttracalst. If found 
piaat* call $3»-3334 
i13& nnward. 

LOST NEAR Todd' Danl- 
•on, 3.5 monlh old ft- 
mala Lab Brlit croai. 
Brown with whita 
cheat/ faal. Light graan 
collar 776-8297. 



tM* raquira a t«rfit «f 
pUlura ID (K«U, (trlw- 
ar'a llcanaa or otharl 
wKan plaelng a par- 
aonal. 

Thataa- CampouT Kalat- 
irophel Bring yoUr 
date aT 9 for irrtorM 
and fun. Becaiiaathia 
parTyi iuat beogn. 
Catl for dirfctional 



M««lln«a/ 



TOASTMASTERS A mu 
ti>al lupporl group for 

peopla wtTO want (o im- 
prova thalt public 
apMking tUlla. Alao, an 



intaratting forum, W« 
matt twica monthly. 
Vitltora walcomt. Call 
Chart)*, 774^1302. 



Partl*»-n-Moftt 



ADD A iplaih to your naxi 
baih. Graat midtarm- 
partlas begin with Wal- 
N-Wlld Mobila Hot Tub 
ramala S3^-^826. 

ADD AN antra touch ot 
ctaia lo your naxt par- 

Sf. Call Waync'i WMar 
arty lo rani a portabia 
hot tub 537-7587, 
^»-78ai. 

COLDEST BEER or> Wait 
aJtfal Graat aalaclion ol 
aplrlia. Polion liquor 
acroia from Food 4 
Laia. 3106 Andarton. 
537-0098. 




HOUSING/ 
REAL ESTATE 



laaaa, no 
537-838S. 

tio| 

Fdr Itont- 

A|»t. 

UnfumielMd 



pat*. 



AVAILABLE NOW, two- 
bad room n«*( campu*. 
1500 McCain Laria. 
$450. tjundry (actlrtiaa. 
Watar/ traah paid. No 
pao. 778-3804. 



AVAILABLE JUNE 1. nica 
•ludio apanmant with 
watar and traah paid. 
Vary naar campu* on 
Claflln Rd. Call 
S«T-0«34. 

QUIET SURROUNDINGS 
for atudy. Cam put ona 
mila, ona-badroom, 
and atudio «oma ullll< 
lla* paid. Short-tarm 



AVAILABLE APRIL 1. ont- 
badroom naar Ag- 
giavllla and KSU cam- 
pus. 1005 filuamont 
S385. Water/ trash paid. 
No pots. 776-3804. 

AVAILABLE APRIL 1,ona- 
badroocn, ona block 
north of campus. 1854 
Claflin S375. Water/ 
trash paid. Laundry 
lacilHiai. Atlowa amaM 
pau. 77ft-38(M. 

AVAILABLE FEB. IS, Iwo- 
badroom si 805 Allison 
$420. New carpal dish 
waihar Lsundry Facili 
ties. Water/ I rash paid. 
77«-3B(M. 



• SVKttoneApts. 
•OAege HelghtB Apts; 

• CairbMge Sq. Apts. 



wr-MM 

s9 ann-AXprn. 
l)0«ni,-ApA 



AVAILABLE MAR 1. ona 
bedfoom naar campus, 
1722 Laraml«S370. Wa- 
ter/ trash paid. Laundry 
facllillct No pat*. 778- 



AVAILABLE MARCH 1, 
ona-badfoom aparl- 

mant. Park Place Apart- 
manta (613)584-6329. 

AVAILABLE MARCH 1, 
one bedroam, three 
blocks west of campue. 
1024 Sunset $355 Wa- 
ter/ trash paid. Laundry 
faciiiiias. No pels. 776- 
3804, 

AVAILABLE NOW, one- 
bedroom three blocks 
west of campus. 1026 
Sunset. $360. Remo- 
deled unit. Water/ traah 
paid. No pets. 
776-3804. 

AVAILABLE NOW. thr**- 
badroom, two blocks 
east of KSU $600 plus 
uHlttiea. 537-t»40 

AVAILABLE NOW. two- 
bedroom apartmenta 
naar City Park. 1028 
Oaag* $450 Water/ 
fraah paid. Leundry 
taeilltlas. Within walk 



Ing distance to KSU. No * 
pets. 776-3804. -: 

FOR AUGUST. Naxt to 
KSU, deluxe two -bed- , 
room apartment, $480,. ^ 
539-2482 after 4p.m. ^ 

FOR JUNE, large two-bed- ^ 
room spsrtmoni. We- '- 
tar/ trash/ gas two- 
thirds paid. $430/ 
month. Also ona-t>*d* 
room $310 for Aug, •', 
539-2482. After 4p.m. I; 

FOUR BE OR 00 M AT^ 

Royal Towers. 1700 N.^ 
Manhattan $860. Avail- .^ 
able now. Water/ trash . 
paid. Lsundry tscilitiss, [• 
aundach, not tubs No*' 
pat*. 778^3804. ;, 

GET A JUMP ON next:; 

VEARt Chase Wsnhal- > 
tan /Vpartmenta is now.' 
leasing two, three and*^ 
tour-bedrooms for Au~}< 
Quit Our wsiitng liet laU 
Tong: drop by bafot^^j 



KANSAS SIATi COLLEGIAN 



Thyr»d«y, Warch 2, 1995 Q 



Collegian Classifieds 



Mt«v'r* flonti CoIIhi 

and QiifiTn, 77»-3aea. 



I UNITED 

iiVWUIHfl 



•2 bedf oom 
apartments 

•Quiet, porV 
like setting 

•Private & 
personal 
bedroom 

•Large botti & 
ctosets 

•DIshwosher 

•Laundry 
facility 

•2 large pools 




for an 
appointment 



LARGE TWO-BEDROOM, 
ona-half block watt at 
campuL Tri-lsval apart- 
man). 1825 College 
Haighti. S550. Water/ 
train paid Two bath. 
walk In cloieti. No 
pate. 77&- 3804. 

LARGE, THREE-SeOnOOM 
with large clotei in a 
nine-plan. Livlrtg room, 
dirving area, one and 
one-hall bath, fully 
•quipped kitcherr. $210 
each. S22 Fremont. 
Available June 1 and 
Aug. 1. Call »7-7W7. 

LEASING FOR Aug. '95- 
One, two. three, four 
•nd abr-bedroom apert- 
menti and houie*. At 
314 N. 11th, 1019 
Oiaoa. 1530 Houaton. 
SOO Vattier, 606 Vattier. 
610 Vattier and 512 
ThuftWn. 776-^ 10Z 

NEXT TO carrvpui two, 
three -bed roorn apart- 
ment and houisi with 
waahsr/ dryer, caniral 
•Ir. parking trattv peat 
control paid. No pati. 
Available now or Aug. 
S4e0- tat». 537-4643. 

ONE, TWa Ihree. lour-bMl- 
room apanmafM, cim* 
to ctmpui. no pelt, 
June laaaa. 533-1975. 

ONE-BEDROOM ALL utlll- 
liei paid. Near Ag- 
glavllle 1220 Laramie. 
(375. Available Feb. 5. 
776-3804. 

ONE-BEDROOM APART 
MENT available now at 
Waraham Hotel. 418 
Poynti, S39e water/ 
(reah peid. Laundry 
faeiiitie*. No pet*. 
776-3804. 

ONE-BEOROOM APART 

MENT, available Feb. 
15. 924 Fremont. $300. 
Waters traah paid. Park- 
ing available. Ooae to 
Agginrille. 776-3804. 

PARK PLACE APART 
MENTS. Now pre-leaa- 

Ing one. two and three- 
bedroom apartment*. 
1413 Cambridge iS. 
S3V-29S1. 

THREE-BEDROOM AVAIt.- 
ABLE now on main 
floor of houta 2303 An- 
darion t600 Water/ 
traih paid. Single car 
garage, Waiher/ dn^ar 
provKlad. No patt. 77A- 

TWOBEDROOM AVAIL- 
ABLE now. Baiament 
apartment, nice condi- 
tion. 2303 Andarton 
$425. Waterf trath paid. 
', Single car garage. 
Wainer/ dryer provld- 
•d. No pet*. 776-3804. 

TWO-BEDROOM AVAIL- 
ABLE now on Stagg 
Hill. 803- BOS Alliton. 
$386. Water/ trath paid. 
Laundry facDitiai. uiih- 
WMhar. 776-3804, 

TWO-BEOROOU AVAIL- 
ABLE now. AggievJIla 
Penthoute Apartmenti 
ei7N. 12th. $550. Wa- 
ter/ traah paid. Olah- 
waaher, microwave. No 
p«M, 776-^804. 

TWO-BEDROOMS, CLOSE 
to campuf in a 12-ptax. 
Pr*-la«alng for tail, 
only ona-half depoalt 



needed. S360- $450. No 
p«t*. S3»-2232. 



AyallaM* 



MALE ROOMMATE want- 
ad: Wilt have own 
room. Available now 
until July 31. $180/ 
month plut one fourth 
utilHiet. 539-6676. 

YOUNG GRANDMOTHER 
wif ha* to there quiet, 
clean. Ittrea-bedrooni 

home. No depoih. No 
bills. One tmell bed- 
room, $1 66. Leave mes- 
■age for Judy 
77MeS1. 

IMl 



FIVE ROOMS for rent In 
large, baeutlful, eo-ed. 
»van bad room houie; 
$150/ month plut one 
laventh utilitiet; kitchen 
and laundry available; 
tour block] from cam- 
put; June 1 to May 31 
leaiet avallabia: 

S37-Z497. atk for Rut* 
or small 

data^kiuvm.ktu.adu 



GARAGES FOR rent. t866 
College Heightj #2 $50, 
1866 College HeightaM 
$50 Ljrga unit). 776 
3804 



Roottii nttt# 
Wanted 



APARTMENT FOR rani. 
Mala roommate want- 
ed Have own room 
and bath. 537-2aM or 
(9131527-5821. 

FEMALE, NON-SMOKING, 
roommate, three- bed- 
room apartment. $195/ 
month plua utilltlea. 
Ceil Julie or Healhar. 
S37-4873. 

FOR NON-SMOKER/ drink- 
er. Roommate needed, 
welk 10 dais. 539-1554. 

NON-SMOKING. FEMALE 
roommate needed in 
June to ihare two -bed- 
room apartment one- 
halt block west of Old 
Stadium. Rant. $220 

flua one-half utilitiet. 
eave meaiage for Jen- 
nifer at 539-8499. 

ROOMMATE NEEDED to 
aha re houie two blocki 
from campui. own bed- 
room, male or female, 
tlSOf month ptui one- 
fifth utilitio* 587-1969 

ROOMMATE NEEDED. 
Available Mar. 1. Thiva- 
bedroom house, one- 
third utilitiet. $150/ 
month. 776-7602. 

ROOMMATES NEEDED to 
there houte. Own bed 
room, wether/ dryer 
$ies/ month plut one- 
fourth utilillaa. Call 
776-2397. 



Sublaa** 



Mai 



A VERY nice ona-b«droom 

lartment. Available 
1 to Aug. 1. Fur ■ 
nishsd, dole to cam- 
pus and Aggiavilie, 
quiet and nice neigh- 
bo rt. Can renew lease 
in Aug. Call 539-7500 
and leave meaaage. 

FEMALE NON SMOKER 
warned to tubleate one- 
bedroom in Ihree-bed- 
room apartment. Mid- 
May to July 31. Very 
close to campus. Call 
Angia S37-6iea 

FEMALE NON-SMOKER 

wanted to tubleate lir- 
aetl bedroom in three- 
bedroom tpartmeni. 
$195/ month negoli- 
Bble. 587-0521. 

FOUR BEDROOM. TWO 
bath. Clote to campus. 
Call 776-3445. $600/ 



MID-MAY TO Aug. 1. May 
paid. Own room, walk 
to campus. Call 
S37~2403, leave met- 



NEW THREE BEDROOM. 

two bath, diihwasher, 
$730/ month, includes 
ceble, water/ traah. Mid- 
May to July 31. May 
paid. Option to laata. 
M7-S303- 

STUOIO APARTMENT. 721 
Fremont, now through 
Aug. option to renew 



MAKE ANDERSON PUCE YOUR 
HOME AWAY FROM HOME! 

Now leasing for 1995-96 
•2 bedrooms 
•'A block from campus 
•Furnished and unfurnished 
Showings every 
Monday through Friday 
3-5 p.m. 



1852 Anderson Place #4 
776-1148 



I 



leeae. S220 plu* utili- 
tiet. Traah paid. 
939-9312, leave mat- 



SUBLEASE AVAILABLE In 
May. Two-bedroom. 
close to campus and 
Aggiavilie. Furniihed. 
Air conditioned, park- 
ing, $485/ month, call 
Sarah or J at 587-8074. 

SUBLEASE ONE room In 
two-bedroom epert- 
mem $182.50 per 
rtranlh. Available imrtw- 
dialaly. March rent free. 
No petit Nice quiet 
apartmenta two and 
ona-half block* from 
camput. April- through 
July 31 laate. Call 
537-2043 or 776-2003. 

SUMMER SUBLEASE at 
Wareham ApartrtMnt*. 
Great atudio available 
May to July 31. Great 
location, low utilitieB. 
$366/ momK 537-8012. 

SUMMER SUBLEASE avall- 
abia May- Aug. May 
paid for, rvvo-bedroom. 
11th and Sluamonl. 
587-8766. 

SUMMER SUBLEASE two- 
bedroom bi- level apart- 
ment. Nice, clote to 
campua, $760/ month. 
587-8702. 

SUMMER SUBLEASE 
Male roommate need 
ed 10 ihBre three bed- 
room, poo I tide, Wood- 
wey Apartmenta. Rent 
negotieble. Call Jaaon 
at 587-8567. 



209 



SERVICE 
DIRECTORY 



MB I 



Tutor 



WANTED ARCHITECTUR- 
AL Daaion tutor third 
year tludent naedi as- 
aistance with technical 
drawings, praientation 
etc- 587-8141. 



t10| 

R««unM/ 
Typing 



A PERFECT retume and all 
your other word pro- 
ceising naedi. Laier 
printing. Cell Srenda 
776-3290. 

NEED SOMETHING typed? 
I'll type it tor $1/ per 
page. Call 637-9480 
after e:30p.m., but 
please, no calls after 
10p.m. AtktatJmMh. 



S1B| 

D»aktop 
PuMtohlng 



TYPED PAPERS, graphics. 
Charts and graph*. 900 
fonts and nir>e yeart ex- 
perience to make your 
paper look great. Fenn 
Graphics 537-0448, 
fennttkau.kiu.edu 



Automotiv* 

NISSAN- OATSUN Repair 
Service. 22 yean ex- 
perience. Meidea. Hon- 
dai and Tovotai ilio 
Auto Craft, 2612 Dipper 
Line, Manhattan, Kan. 
■at. S37-6049. 8a m- 
5p.m. Mon.- Fri. 

DONNIE'S AUTO Works 
Foreign end Domailic 
Car Repair (Former 
Noble Aulo Workil. 
Donnle ia the Mrlnner 
of the Sport* Cer Club 
of America Beet Me- 
Cfianlc award 1809 Ft. 
Riley Blvd. 539-5511. 
With ad $10 off for 
labor over $100. 



2SS| 
Ottiar 



CASf^ FOR college 
900.000 grenia avail- 
able No repayments 
aver. Ouallfy imme- 
diately (8001243-2435. 

FREE FINANCIAL Aldl 
Over $6 billion in pri- 
vate lector grsnti md 
tcholarthipi is now 
available. All students 
are eligible regardless 
of grsdtt. Income, or 
parant't incoftM. Let ut 
help. Call Student Fi- 
nancial Sarvlcei: 
[800)263-6495 axt. 
F57682. 

PROMPT CONTRACEPTIVE 
and abortion lorvicei. 
Dale L. Clinton, M.D., 
Lawrenca, 
1913)841-5716. 

RESUME PREPARATION. 
TAX PREPARATION, 
word proceising, UPS. 
shipping, copies *n^ 
morel The Mail Center 
acroti from Aleo. 3110 
Anderson, 776-6246. 

WEIGHT, COMPLEXION, 
or memory dlfficultiei? 
Leave a manage at 
S87-ft578 (or * free con- 
sultation and an alt nat- 
ural solution. 



AWftOME DIET! Lose 

40 pounds in only one 
momh. Proven succeti 
fill tnd rnedicallv safe. 
No drugi or axpeniiva 
food, for entire plen 
aend $7, check/ nnoney 
order to K.T.A.. P.O. 
Box 1379. Wichita, KS 
67201 

GET READY tor Spring 
Break I Get rid of ttraee 
llilght end *iom*ch 



wAh the only Body Ton- 
ing Cream on the mar- 
ket I've actually aaen 
WOrlil I lost tour inches 
off each of my thigh* 
and three inche* off rnry 
Stomach. We are an (n- 
ternetiortel company 
wKh 16 years of experi- 
ence helping people 
kite weight and tat and 
keeping it oft- Guar- 
anteed reaultt. Call 
776-7068, or write: P.O. 
Sox 1171, Mtnhatlan, 
KS 66602. 

SPRING IS approachlngi 
Lota weight, leal great. 
Immediate rasuhi. Doc- 
tor recommenOad. all 
natural formula. 100 
percent guarantee. Call 
day or night 637-6882. 

WANTED 100 atudantt: 
Loie 8- too poundt. 
New matatMlism break 
through. I lost IS 
poundt In three weeka. 
RN aiiiited. Guar. 
anteed retuiti $35. 
I800IS79.1SM. 



30O 



EMPLOYMENT/ 
CAREERS 



ttelp WMtod 

The Cotleglen cannot 
verify the finenciel po- 
tential of adHarilee- 
menta In the Ernploy- 
ment/Career claaelftca- 
tion. Meadera are ad- 
vleed to approach any 
euch amplovmant op- 
portunilY with raaaon- 
abla caution. The Col- 
legian urgea our read- 
era to contact the Bat- 
tar Bualnaaa Bureau. 
601 SE Jefforaon, To- 

Bika. KS 66607-11SO. 
13)233-0484. 

tttt Fun. hard working, 
money motivated peo- 
ple looking for an op- 
portunity to succeed. 
Part-time/ full-time. 
Will train. For appoint- 
ment call 539-8040 
axt 622. 

S1TS0 weekly poaaible 
mailing our circulars. 
No sxpsrlence re- 
quired. Begin now. For 
infor call (202)298-8933 

AA ALASKA EMPLOY- 
MENT. Earn to $3000- 
$6000/ month- fishing 
industry. Great part/ re- 
sort jobs toot Free 
room, board, transpor- 
tation. Call SEI 1919)490- 
K29 ext. A21 

ACCEPTING APPLICA- 
TIONS/ Retume* for 
swimminn pool manag- 
er. Musi be WSI certl- 
lied. Call (913)457-3381. 
Chv of WatlmoielarKl. 

AG BACKGROUND helpful 
to eern com mission to 
15/ hour marketing 
unique agriculture pro- 
ducts (8001756-0032. 

ALASKA SUMMER EM- 
PLOYMENT- Fiahing 
indilstry. Earn up to 
$3000- $6000 plut per 
month room and 
board I Transportation! 
Mela/ temele. No ex- 
pet ience necesteryl 
(2061545-4155 
ext. AS 7684. 

CAMP TACOMIC: Pres 
tiglous coed Mesaachu- 
latla camp hiring moti- 
vated, leam-ofiented 
undergrade and greds 
wt>o love working with 
kids. Genersl Coun- 
selors and Instructors 
in Swimmina. Water- 
sports. Teem/ Individu- 
al Landsporti. Tennis. 
Ropes/ Camping, Arts/ 
Crafts. Silver Jewelry, 
Photography. Video. 
Newspaper, Mutlcel 
Theatre, Dance, Sci- 
anca/ Rocketry. Compe- 
tive lalariai. Reward- 
ing, enjoyable worki 
1800)762-2820. 

COMPLETE MUSIC, North 
Americt't largett DJ 
sen/ice, is now hiring - 
liecauie of our tremen- 
dous growlhl Do you 
want e tun weekend 
job? We provide the 
equipment, compact 
disc library, and paid 
profetiionai training. 



You provide your own 
•rantportallon and time 
on weekends. Energetic 
and enthusiastic per- 
sons call 539-7111 or 
loll free 1900)664-2687. 

CRUISE SHIP JOBS! Attan- 
tlonr Sludanii Earn 
$2000 plus monthly. 
Part-lime/ full-time. 
World travel. Carib- 
bean. Hawaii. All posi- 
tions eveilable, No ax- 
fierience. CALL: 

e02)4S3~46S1. 

CRUISE SHIPS MOW 
HIRINO- Earn up to 
$2000 plut/ month 
working on Cruiie 
Ships or Land-Tour 
companies. World trav- 
el Ifiaweii, Mexico, the 
Caribbeen. etc.). Sea- 
lonel end full-tirtte em- 
ployment available. No 
experience necessary. 
For more information 
cell 12001634-0468 
axtC57664 

CUSTOM HARVESTER, 
need! hard working in- 
dividuals for summer 
harvest (Texas - N. Oo- 
kota) and possibly fall 
harvest. Four JO 9600' s 
and truck drivers want- 
ad. Need COL or need 
to obtain. Preferred 
term background or 
harvest experience. 
Strunk Harvesting 
(913)582-6369 or 

776-1321. 

CUSTOM HARVESTER. 
Need embitious irvdhrld- 
uels for wheat and row 
crop harvett Truck driv 
art and combine opera- 
tors needed. For inlor- 
mation phone 

(9131525-6326 or 6330. 
Naegele Combine Inc. 

EARN WHILE heving fun It 
Job openings pert- 
lime/ full time. Flexible 
hours. Full TrainiT>g. Up 
to $50/ hour possible. 
For interviews call 
Ethini 537-0782. 

EASY MONEY M Several 
studenti needed to 
hand out flyers on cam- 
pus. Call Tracy for de- 
taiti, 532-9055. 

EMPLOYEES NEEDED to 
atsial in family oriented 
custom ha rva sling op- 
erilion. Salary negoti- 
able and reflective of 
employeei compaiibili- 
ly with gmpioyeri fami- 
ly, cuttomeri end othier 
employee! For more 
intomation reply lo 
Gary •! 1316)225-0079 
after 5p.m. 

ENVIRONMENTAL COOR- 
DINATOR. City of Man- 
hattan. Kama I. The En- 
vironmental Coordina- 
tor is responsible for 
the City's compliance 
with state and federal 
weter. weitewater. air. 
ttorm water and haz- 
ardous waste regule- 
lions. Requires at leaat 
two {2t yeart of collage 
level and/ or technical 
school education in en- 
vironmental engineer- 
ing, environmental aci- 
ence or related field 
plus minimum of two 
years in a water/ waste- 
water environment. 
either municipal or in- 
dustrial. Mutt have a 
valid Driver's Licenie. 
Starting Salary: 

$23,374.09- $29,217.61 
IDOO). Submit a de- 
tailed reaunw. cover let- 
ter, written author i/a- 
tlon for reference check 
and three work relateri 
references or apply at 
the Department of 
Human Resources. City 
Hatl. 1101 Poynti, Man- 
hattan. KS £6502. by 
Mon.. March 30. 1995. 
EOE-M/F/D 

FAST FUNDRAISER- raise 
SSOO in five daya- 
greekt. groupi. clubs, 
moiiviied individual!. 
FatL eety- no financial 
Dbligalion 
(800)775-3861 EXT.33. 

HARVEST HELP needed. 
J09600 and truck driv- 
ers wanted. Must ob- 
tain e COL and will help 
Obtain. Call tot very 
good lalary optiortt. 
May to Nov. Clydeadele 
Harvesting and Truck- 
ing. Call Randy 
539-6232. 

INTERNATIONAL EM- 
PLOYMENT- Earn up 
to $25- $45/ hour teach- 
ing basic conversation- 
al English in Japan. Twi- 
wan, or S. Korea. No 
teachina background or 
Asian languages re- 



quired. For information 
call (20«|SS2-11«e 
eKt.J670a». 

LIVE IN GRADUATE attlt- 
tantthip available in De- 
partment at Housing 
tnd Dining Servicei l>a- 
ginning immediately. 
Contact Fimily Hous- 
ing Office st 539-2097 
for iitformation. 

NEEDED TRUCK driven 
tor wheat harvett from 
Ttxai to North Dakota. 
May through Aug. De- 
lane Reimar 
(406)267-3367 

NEW ENGLAND Brother- 
Sister Camps- Mas- 
tichuaetli. Mah-Kee. 
Nee for Boys/ Danbee 
for GIrla. Counselor po- 
sitions for program 
Specialists: All Team 
Sports, etpacially Base- 
bail. Basketball. Golf. 
Field Hockey. Roller 
Hockey. Soccer. Volley- 
ball. 30 Tennis open- 
ingi: alto Archery, Ri- 
flery. Pioneering/ Over- 
night Camping. 
Weight*/ Filneaa and 
CycliriB: olttar openings 
include Performing 
Arts. Fine Arts. Pottery, 
Figure Skating. Gyrn- 
nastici. Newspaper 
Photography, Year- 
book. Radio Station. 
Rocketry, Ropea and 
Rock Climbing; All Wa- 
terfront Activities 
(Swimming, Skiing. 
Sailing, Windiurfinq, 
Canoeing/ Kayaking). 
Great lalary. room, 
board and travel. June 
IB Aug. IS. Inquire: 
Mah Kee Nac (Boyt) 
190 Linden Avenue, 
Glen Ridge. NJ O702S. 
Call (8001753-9118 Din; 
|iaS_|Girls) 17 Weitmin- 
tler Drive. Montville, 
NJ 07046. Call 
1800)392-3762. 

STUDENT REPRESENTA- 
TIVE needed to run 
matketing project on 
camput. perl-time, 
great earning potential. 
1-^BO W 4 W VISA 
x3S. 

SUCCESS MINDED indi- 
viduals needed for 
sales and rnanagerTwnt 
positions in explosive 
growth compeny tuli- 
lime preferred, part- 
time also. Sariout inqui- 
riei only. Call Patrick 
587-8700 exl.924 

SUMMER HARVEST help 
needed Run John 
Deere 9500 s and 9600 
and drive truck. CDL 
preferred. Parker Har- 
veiting. Call 

(913)3W-2527. 

SUMMER HARVEST help 
tnd run 2188 Catia I.H 
combines and three eu- 
tomatic trjcks Wanted 
txparience: CDL for 
truck drivart and com- 
bine operatort. Payroll 
$1500/ month for ex- 
perlenoa. Will alto iwork 
with other to get CDL- 
Prefer non-imokers, 
non-drinkers end non 
drug uteri. Call 
(913Te«9-4660. 

TUTORS NEEDED gradu 
ale levet student* need 
ed in tfte area* of chem 
ittry. pfiytia and mod- 
ern languages for tutor- 
ing two- three nrghti a 
week. Pay negotiable 
depending on quelirica- 
tioni. Call Oebi or 
Sandy $39-7571 

WAITERS/ WAITRESSES 
Apply at 1213 Moro. 
Manhattan, KS. See 
Rulty. 

WANTED: HARVEST Help. 
Combine operators for 
four new 9600' s JD'i. 
Semi drivers, must 
have COL will help ot>- 
tain. Circle C Farms 
Call Suaan at 587^23 
or Steve al (316)872- 
3299 or 5633 

WANTED: WOMAN for 
photo lets for Genesis 
Magazine. Read the 
magatina before call 
ing. (8001613-3932. 



You'll never 
know unless you 
try...adverti5ing. 



MIEGIAN 



4(K) 



OPEN 

MARKET 



4101 



ItonisforSal* 



BEGINNERS SAXOPHONE 
newly padded. Conn 
trumpet. Crete amplifi- 
er. Soloflex. 286 com- 
puter. BOM herddrive. 
Mark 539-1025 until 
11:30p.m. 

CARVER HOME CO player 
(retell $760) asking 
$150. GE VHS VCR $50. 
Panasonic four head 
stereo VCR and Cam- 
corder tW. TAG Hoaer 
Swiss Sport watch (re- 
tail $35<)) asking $100. 
Call Matt at 776-3202. 
leave meaaage. 

WORD PROCESSOR- like 
new, with monitor. 
SmHh Corona . More in- 
formation on disk or 
uie ai a typewriter. 
$150 or best offer. Call 
(913)396-3045. 

4181 



Fumltur* to 
■u y/S«ll 

FOR SALE toft and love 
seal, earth tones, great 
condition, $200. must 
DO. 784-51 16. Best after 
Sp.m. 

FURNITURE CLEARANCE 
Canter at Faith Fyrnt- 
ture. Repoiieiied 
queen sleeper, love- 
leat. cocktsfl table, two 
end tables, two lamps, 
reg. $1599. lale $798. 
Glidder rocker reg. 
$199. sale $99. door 
cocktail table reg. $90. 
ssle $45, drop leaf oak 
dinette table reg $70, 
sale $35, oak curio cabi- 
net reg. $150, sale $75. 
oak finish student detk 
re<f. $170. tale $85, oak 
6nish four-drawer chest 
reg. $170. sale $85 See 
at Faith Furniture. Eaat 
on Highway 24 next to 
icude. 



Sirloin Stock. 

SIX-FOOT PADDED leather 
bar, two padded steel 
stools, give eway price. 
Please call »2-6296. 



AtiUquss 



TIME MACHINE Antique 
Maul and Gaab Empori- 
um, eOOO (quare feet, 
antiques, collectibles, 
estate jewelry, furni- 
ture. 4910 Skyway Dr. 
four blocks east of Man- 
hattan Airport. Open 
Tues.- Sat. 12- Sp.m. 
5;»-4684 



Cowiputors 



COMPLETE IBM paraonal 
ayatem two with a new 
hard drive, mouse, 
printer and lot* of tofi 
ware included. $600. 
637-3536. 



FOR SALE: 486 computer 
VGA monitor 85MB 

herddrive. Window*, 
MS Workt, fax modem, 
$700 or best otter. 24- 
pln color printer. $200 
or ben offer. 784-51 IB. 

MACINTOSH Computer. 

Complete lyttem in- 
cluding printer only 
$699. Call Chrlt et 
(800)2^-5686. 

SEGA GENESIS Syitem 
plui mortel Kombet II 
arnl other games $125. 
IBM harddrrve 5.2S-inch 
floppy drive, $25. Kev 
boarda 6 each, XT SOBB 
CGA monitor, printer 
tnd more 486 SX33 
CPU chip. 539-4643 
leave rtteitage. 



tiMb UIIMIlto 



WELCOME TO THE MUSIC 
CO. In the Midtown Pla- 
la. 523 S. 1 7th Street. 

New and used initru- 
ment tales aiMJ lervice; 
acceiioriei for the mu- 
sician. 539-1958- 



Tlckata to 
m »if/9mU _ 



beti otter, 

(913)4»4-208a 



C«N 



1994 ISUZU Ami go, blue, 
loaded. 9,000 miles new 
t17.5O0. liking $14,500 
or be*1 offer 63»^4643. 
leave meatage. lerioui 
inquirie*. 



BIcyctos 



SCHWINN MOUNTAIN 
Bike- High plain*, riden 
twice brand new (paid 
$4291. AakIng $275 Or 
beat offer. Call 
776-3202. aak for Matt 
leave nrtetiage. 



Mctor e ycl— 

YAMAHA 1974 TX500 
14,000 mile*, new bat- 
tery good tirai. $600. 



tery goo 
39&-»43. 



:. Jamie. 



60iD 



WANTED: MEN'S baiket- 
ball Tourney ticket*. 
Call (913)384-6944 or 
(800)387-6944. 



SOD 



TRANS- 
PORTATION 



siol 



Autofnobll*B 



1976 DATSUN truck, runs 
good, 1971 Dodge truck 
runt good, 1983 Audi, 
needt work. 539-6678. 

1976 FORD three ()uarter 
ton. 390 V8 four -speed. 
Good solid truck. $500 
in new tire*. $1000. 
539-2453. 

1983 BMW 320; Five- 
speed, two-door, air. 
Sport *eats. many new 
parts, starts right up. 
^50. 587-9374. atk for 
Rob. 

1984 FORD T-Bird. fluns 
better than good, nice 
interior, many new 
pens. Pretty car. $12tXI, 
negotiable. 5S-1582. 

1985 DODGE Daytona 
Sport, automatic two- 
door, new tires. 109K. 
runt good, asking $960, 
negotiable. 776-0013 
after Sp.m. or weekend. 

1985 HONDA Accord. Two- 
door, automatic, good 
engine, great condition, 
good for long distance. 
$1800 negotiable. 
537-6225. 

1992 DODGE Dekota LE 
extended cab. 4X4. V8, 

loaded 56K. Asking 
$1&000ar best otter. Cell 
<913>4»4-2088. 

1903 Eagle Tekxi Turtx}, kMilSd 
33K, asking S15,00C or 



TRAVEL/ 
TRIPS 



Tour PRcfc»fl» 

SPRING BREAK- Two 
spots left tor Cincun 
eight day/ teven nights 
beach front. $499 in- 
cludes airfare from K.C. 
537-7546 three condo'l 
left tor Keystone/ S reck- 
on ridge. Great location. 
S37-7546. 



Ski Colorado 



Discount Lift Tickets 



Ski Area Here 

Keystone/ 

Bfeckenrtige/ M2 *33 

A-Basin 

Copper Mnt. *39 *33 

WinlerPark '39 *32 

* Lift ttcksts must Pe anivrvd 
in advtnc* to «nium 
ava/<aM(ry. 

• It oniBiing tor Spring Break 
pileose order before March B 

S37-7S4S 
or 1 •800-842-1570 

Classic 

T^avsl & Tours 

1212 Mofo Aggiavilie 



Aliylaw TIelf to 

SPRING BREAK in Colora- 
do. One round trip tick- 
et to Denver, Colorado. 
Call Danny at 539-1149 
for more detail*. 



Make music 

Want to learn to play the 
guitar? Check the Collegian 
classifieds to find someone to 
give you lessons. Only $5 for 
up to 20 words. You'll make 
music in no time. 



c 



KANSA S STATE 

OLLEGIAN 




Kedzie 103 (east of the Union) 532-6555 



-rC 



Classified Directory 



doo 



BULLETIN 
BOARD 



^ 



010 Armouncemanli 
OM LottWKlFound 



040 MMttngiCvwitt 
010 Pvti$»fvMon 




100 Fornml- 

/(pLFumWiid 

110 PorRwit- 
JIliliMitNM 



lit RoomcAvailibte 

in FofRent—HouaM 

119 For Salt -Houasc 

IM ForRant - 
MotMHonw 

IM ForS«le- 



140 For Rent -Goiaga 
14t noommeleWbnM 
1« BMtm 
IM SteUa/PaM* 
IM Ollic»8DMi 
1H ijndforStlt 




SERVICE 
DIRECTORS 



TUDT 



S10 RHutm/Typing 
»■ OoGictop PubMfig 
tW Sewmg/AtenUont 
tM Prsi^iancy T«<l^ 
tM UwnCam 
Mi ChlktCu* 
MO MiMbsnaah 
MO PMSwviOM 
MO Aulamothw Repair 
IM OHwSwvloic 




010 HilpMnHd 
MO VUrttanNMdld 



^ 



4M WtoiMtoBuy 
«10 HmvlorSalt 
410 Fun«un to Buy/Sal 
4M Ottn^t/tudSHm 
4M AueOon 

4M Campdifi 

4« Food^actak 
440 MuBiD liNlJuintnti 
4M PMttnJSuopNlt 

4M Stxslinf B|utWMiil 
4M SMwEquipmaiil 
4N TIcMiloBtfjiiiSal 




TRANS- 
PORTATION 



910 

atO BicydM 
8» Uokxcydit 
040 CwPdoI 




TRAVEL'' 
TRIPS 



010 TiforPviagm 
OM unimmvaim 

ON Train Tklato 



CATEGORIES 

To h«lp you find what you are 
looking for, the classifled ads have 
boon arranged by catsgory and 
sub-categoiy. All catagories are 
martted by one of \ho large 
Imagas. and sub-caiogorlos are 
preceded by a number 
designation. 

TIPS FOR 
WRITING A 
CLASSIFIED AD 

Alvvays put what Hem or service 
yoij are advertising flrsl. This helps 
polenfial buyers lind what they are 
looking tor 

Don't use abbreviations. Many 
buyers are confused by 
abbreviatkxts. 

Conskler including the price. 
TMs lalls buyers if they are looking 
at sometttlng in their price range. 

WE DO NOT USE PHONE 
NUMBERS OR LAST NAMES IN 
PERSONALS. 



ThursdaK Match 2, 1MB 



KANSAS SIATE COLLEGIAN 



Ad prices effective 
March 1 thru 7, 1995. 

Quantity rights reserved. 

In Manhattan: 401 E. Poyntz, 
222 N. 6th, 3011 Anderson 

I OPEN 24 MRS. DAILY! 



Food^Less 





Oscar Mayer Lunchables 

FUN 
PACK 

Assorted, 
11.2 oz. Pkg. 




78 



Oscar Mayer 

LITTLE 
SMOKIES 

16 oz. Pkg. 




^m CHICKEN 
FRY 
PATTIES 



88 





lb. 



Farmland 

SLICED 
BACON 

16oz. Pkg. 



98 



^ 



Fresh, Ripe 

RED 

TOMATOES 



69 





lb. 



Medium 

YELLOW 

ONIONS 



39 







lb. 



InlgBr^fiilgers Rilgeps 



I Sweet cokN t 





LIBBY'S 
VEGETABLES 

.15,5 to 17 oz. Cut Green Beans, Cream * 
Style or Whole Kernel Corn, Sweet Peas 



LIMITS 
PLEASE 



Our Special Touch 

GARLIC 

BREAD 

STICKS 




3 Pound 

Bowi 



PARKAY SPREAD 

MARGARINE 

99 




Hiland 
CHOCOLATE 

MILK 



1/2 Gallon 



99 



TONY'S PIZZA 
D'PRIMO 




Assorted 
Varieties 



Afo" 



BUDGET GOURMET SS 



ENTREES 




8.7 to 
10.5 oz, 
Pka_ 



■ for^ 



Nabisco 
TOASTEnES 




Assorted 
Varieties 

13oz.Box 




FLORAL SPECIAL! 

"KACTUS 
PEOPLE 

GARDEN" 




99 



in 5" 
Red 
Clay Pot 



SAVE $1.00 

ON MIRACLE 

WHIP 48 oz. 



IN-AO COUPON 



VAUD; MARCH 1 THRU 7. 1998 



I Md»miM« at |fa|nOlBI.| 

SAVE$1PS 

on ONE 48 oz. lar of any 
I MIRACL£ WNIP^ Product 

I 
I 
I 

I s'" ai.ooo"M£a?b 

■ i^H m^ mmB ^^ 



Rvmoo 




g'^yR3%sfti&2s??«'" 



111017 



CBS^^J 



^ 



Exp. Dite 00/01) 
Kansas State Historical Saifty 
Ktewspaper Section 
12(' K 10th 



CTqpeks KS i6612 

OLLEGIAN 



Sm 



THINO 
TO DO? 

Weelcend takes a look at actMties ' 
flMt can help you fight ol! the blues 
of boredom and make It until 
MoTKtay. 





MOiS 



LIBRARY 
CLOSINGS 

Farrell Libfary will be doseO and 
Ihecan^MiS maintramtandUNK 
systems wA be shu dMn because 
of construction on Saturday. The 
chemistry library in Wianj 101 will 
be open from noon to 6 p.m. for 
access to databases normally 
accessed througti Fan^l. 



35 27 

partly sunny 

WEATHER — PAQE 2 




KANSAS STAtI 



iTIWI, KANSAS 



tia 

FM Mpy Ipm. UdMioMl ««plM an 2S cMtt. 



► BOARD OF REGENTS 



► CAMPUS 



State schools may lose $6 million Haymaker 

fires spark 
search for 
evidence 



Cotefliii 

Fewer class sections, faculty 
petitions left open, higher tuition 
and less equipment may be the 
future of K-Statc and the other 
regent schoots. 

A House bill that would cut the 
Kansas Board of Regents general- 
use budget by $6 million was sent 
back to committee Wednesday 
night for further review. 

"It would be a cut to the base 
budget that we will enperiencc 
throughout the system," Stephen 
Jordan, executive director for the 



i^cnts,said. 

He said cutting (he budget could 
cause various cons^uences at the 
six regent schools. 

"Possibly, fewer class sections 
will be available," he said. "How 
it manifests will depend on the 
institution. It could cause further 
cuts in operating expenses and 
the curtailing of equipment 
expenses." 

The bill will be reviewed by the 
committee and pmbahly sent back 
to the House, Laura Howanl, of the 
legislative research department, 
said. 



If it passes in the House, it will 
go to the Senate Ways and Means 
Committee and then to the Senate 
floor. 

The regents are scheduled to 
testify at a Ways and Means 
Committee hearing on Tuesday. 

The two main sources of rev- 
enue that support hitter education 
in Kansas are tuition and state tax 
dollars. 

"If there is a signiflcant cut in 
the budget, in rcatity, it puts pies- 
sure to increase tuition." Jeff 
Peterson, studetii body president, 
said. 



"The Legislature is interested in 
cutting taxes for the public. We 
need to encourage them to invest in 
hi^icr education with tax dollars to 
help keep education affordable in 
the fiitune." 

Students can be put of deciding 
what they will be paying in tuition 
in the future and what equipment 
will be available for their use 

"There are a number of things 
students can do to help," Jordan 
said. "They can call their home- 
town legislators or talk to their par- 
ents and have them call the legisla- 
lois and tell them how tlie cuts will 



affect higher education " 

Student Governing Association 
is driifting a letter that will be sent 
to students asking them to write, 
call or visit their legislators, 
I^tcrson said. It will include statis- 
tics for diem to use in their discus- 
sions. 

"Right now is the key time to 
contact legislators," Pcteison said. 
"The message needs to be getting 
out there that students are con- 
cerned — it's rare when they hear 
from the students, so there is an 
opportunity now to make a differ- 
ence in the process " 



Sergei 

Khniihchev, 

»on of farmer 

Soviet Union 

iMder NlkHe 

KHruahchev, 

speaks at a 

praaa 

conference in 

Anderson Hall 

Thursday 

morning. 



U F F I IW OT LI. 




Russian leader's son 
focuses on relationships 



HABjnr 



Ser^ Khmshchev. sm of former 
Soviet Leader Nikita Khrushchev, 
j<nned tteJC -State fiwruliy as a visit- 
ing distinguistiBd professor of biMo- 
ry and political atfiencc ThuiDday. 

Khrushchev will lecture in vari- 
ous classes at K- State. Manhattan 
High Schiwi, Fort Riley. Fon 
LeavcnwixiJ) and Maiy&vlUe. 

Durtng his month-long visit, 
Khrashchev said he wUl focus on dw 
transformalion of Russia from a cen- 
trahied to a docentraUzed economy. 

"I came to Kansas to explun bow 
the transfonnaiion of "Russia is pro- 
giessing ," he said. "What is the reali- 
ty that (he finee-marloet economy will 
be focoeofol in Rusaia?" 

Klmisbcbcv uid ht will also dis- 
cuss the relationship between his 
fitlber and Pttatdeot Eiicnliower. 

"I want people to undentnd the 
relationship between these two men 
because \ixf made the Iirat sicps to 



pfevest « war between our Iwg 
countries," be said. 

Khrushchev is the editor of his 
father's mcmoiis and the author of 
two books discussing developments 
in liie fonner Soviet Union, He t* a 
senior researcher for the Watson 
Institute for Foreign Policy 
Devekipinent at Brown Univernty. 

Khrushchev said he also hopes lo 
malte people aware of the difftct- 
cnces between American and 
Russian attitudes. 

'1 want students to understand iha 
differences in the ways of thiikldiig 
between our oountries," he said. 

"We arc very differenl, but we 
arc also very similar. It's not dwt we 
don't (nut each other but Uuu w» 
don't undentiod each fMber." 

Kbrusbctiev taid this is his thinl 
visit to Kansas. 

'1 really tike ihts i^ace," be said. 
"My fint icactiOD when I came heit 
wtt it had the same imeil of dirt Ibat 
we have in the Uloakie," 



Winner takes Khpushchev 



One chosen 

to be Russian's 
assistant 

CAMU lCOiK ^ 

Not everyone gets the 
chance to work for ttte topic 
of their possible dis.sertation. 

But Ed Maier, graduate 
student in history, has been 
chosen to be an assistant for 
Sergei Khnishchev during his 
next few months in Kansas 
while gathering information 
to receive his doctorate. 

Maier was ctiosen from a 
field of 12 people who 
applied hoping to l>ecome 
Khrushchev's personal assis- 
tant while at K-State. The 
applicants were selected by a 
panel of three profcs.sors who 
have Russian-related experi- 
ence. 

"It's an incredible oppor- 
tunity to work with Khrush- 
chev. This kind of opportuni- 
ty wouldn't be possible at 



another university," Maier 
said. 

During Khrushchev's stay, 
Maier will be a.ssisting him in 
various ways. 

"Mainly. I am here to help 
him around campus, organize 
his meetings, plan .speech tt^ 
ics and make sure he is in the 
right place at the right time," 
Maier said. 

Along with these duties, 
Maier said he will also be a 
personal assistant for 
Khrushchev and his wife. 
Maier said he is available to 
help the Khrushchevs find 
their way around town and 
Tmd a supcmiarket for gro- 
cery shopping. 

Maier said he thinks these 
arc the little ways he will get 
lo know Khiushchev better. 

"By dealing with him on a 
day-to-day basis, I will be 
able to know him so much 
better. Just by listening to him 
and the stories he tells, I'd 
ncva be able to learn diat in a 
history book." 



Richard Martin, director of 
McCain Auditorium and one 
of the paj>el members, .said K- 
Staie decided to choose an 
assistant so the Khrushchevs 
could have someone avail^Ie 
for them at any time. 

Dale Herspring, head of 
the political science depart- 
ment, said he knows die benc- 
fits from being a personal 
assistant to Khrushchev are 
overwtie lining. 

"It's very hard for some- 
one to come into another 
country and immediately 
understand everything with- 
out assistance. This is a fan- 
tastic opportunity for a stu- 
dent to take advantage of." 
Herspring said. 

Maier said he was shocked 
to find out he was chosen for 
die job and knows it will be 
challenging. 

"Dr Khrushchev falls in 
so well with what 1 am study- 
ing, and I want to make his 
experience at K-State as posi- 
tive as pos.sible," Maier said. 



^ SCHOOL BOARD 



USD 383 authorizes 12-percent tax increase to meet budget demands 



The Manhaitan-Odgen USD 
383 school board wants to raise 
local property taxes to rescue the 
district from its finaix;ial crunch^. 

The six board members present 
at Wednesday's meeting voted to 
authorize a 12-percent c^ion-tax 
increase. The district's current 
option tax is 3 percent The board's 
action could raise die option tax to 
IS percent 

The board authorised an 
increase cS IS pemttt for the next 
two years. However, if the board 
finds it does not need the full 
increase, it does not have to impose 



the tax rate at that level. 

Superintendent Dan Yunk said 
under a provision of the state 
fmance law, a district can levy an 
option tax of up to 25 percent when 
opening new schools. 

This money will be used to fill 
in dtc deficits present in the project- 
ed budget for the next two ywu^, to 
provide a 3-perceni increase in 
salaries to keep up with the cost of 
living, and for technological 
improvements. 

The board also discussed, but 
did not vote on, implementing 
more user fees in the district 

These fees, on top of current 
book-rental costs, could be charged 



for students to partidpaie in activi- 
ties, for towel rental, to pay for 
consumable materials in special- 
ized cla.s.se.s, or for dnver's-edix:a- 
don classes. 

County Ocrk Ilene Colbcn said 
Thursday once the district publish- 
es a legal notice b the paper, then 
citizens have 30 days to file a peti- 
tioii to put die tax to a vote. 

If a petition is filed, Colbert 
said, then ^ district would want to 
have a special election within 60 
days so they could figure its results 
into tlie budget 

Colbert said July 1 1 is when the 
district hopes to have die election. 

When a ^lecial election is non- 



applicable to the entire county, 
Colbert said, die group having die 
election is responsible for the costs. 

Colbert said it would cost the 
district an estimated $12,000 - 
15,000 to conduct die election. 

Jon Brake, editor of the 
Manhattan Free Press, spoke to die 
board at the time for public com- 
ment on die tax. He asked die booid 
to put o^ making its decision. 

"It's too quick," tie said 

Brake said Thurmiay he will help 
draw up a petition agaiasi die tax. 

The board was asked to make 
this decision during uncertain 
times. 

Yunk said Wednesday dial die 



district is at the meiry of many 
variables. 

The Kansas Legislature is 
det>ating about whether to raise the 
base pcr-pupil funds. The pcr-pupil 
rate is $3,600 and has not changnl 
for three years. 

Although recent reports have 
indicated Fort Riley wUl not close 
this year, it is still uncertain how 
many students will be removed 
from die district because of down- 
sizing. 

The district, like many other 
larger districts, is facing tlnancial 
prc^lems because of its stale classi- 

■ See USD Page 8 



COW COR WIUSOW ___^ 

Collcgin 

Recent fires in Haymaker Hall have residents, 
staff members and the Manhattan Fire 
Department concerned and searching for 
answers, 

A trash-chute fire, the most recent fire in 
Haymaker, occurred at 12:56 p.m. Wednesday. 

The fire wasn't reported until an hour and a 
half after it occurred, and by that time the evi- 
dence had been removed. Chuck Tannehill, 
assistant director at the Manhattan Fire 
Department, said. 

"At this point, we haven't been able to say 
that it was an arson," he said. 

Carl in Kennedy, Haymaker resident, said the 
hallway still smells like smoke from the trash- 
chute fire. 

"1 think it's dumb," he said, "I don't think our 
parents back home would let us set our houses 
on fire." 

Most people don't die from fire itself, but 
from smoke, Tannehill said. 

He said a tire gives off heavy, thick smoke 
and is very dangerous, especially with all of the 
material in a structure. 

Kennedy said he doesn't think a large number 
of people are responsible for the fires but that 
it's a small group that finds it humorous. 

An aggravated ersoa was reported Tuesday 
night in Haymaker Two tires wen; reported in 
Haymaker in spring 1994. and anottier one was 
reported in September 1993 

The trash-chute fire is under investigation, 
along with the other fires that occurred in 
Haymaker. 

"We're looking for anyone who has any 
information on any past fires," Tannehill said, 

Mateo Remsburg, assistant director of 
Haymaker, said a few weeks ago Haymaker 
organized a floor- to- floor presentation about 
arson conducted by the fire and police depart- 
ments. 

The presentation was conducted in the hope 
the fires would stop, he said. 

"I think it did help a little bit because they 
showed pictures of previous fires in the hall," 
Kennedy said. 

► STUDENT SENATE 

Equipment 
fee lowered 
to $1.90 

AMVWMON .^ 

Ctil legion 

Students will be paying $1.90 for equip- 
ment next semester for the Collegian and 
Royal Purple 

Student Senate voted on this figure 
Thursday night after three separate considera- 
tions of the fee bill. 

The Student Publications Equipment Fee is 
currently $3.90 per semester. 'This fee was to 
purchase a new computer system in 1991. 

The Privileged Fee Committee recom- 
mended that this fee be reduced to $1.60 for 
maintenance and upgrade of computer equip- 
ment. This recommendation was raised to 
SI. 90 in committee. 

Senate voted to set the fee at $1.90. Bill 
Muir, faculty representative, moved to recon- 
sider the bill, and the motion passed. 

Aaron Otto, arts and sciences senator, then 
introduced an amendment to raise the fee to 
S2. This amendment failed 27-28, with the 
chair casting the deciding vote. 

Bulk of the discussion on the issue came 
later, when Muir made a motion to amend the 
bill already passed. This amendment brought 
the full-lime fee back to $2. 

Dan Lewerenz, ads and sciences senator, 
said the additional $7,000 would allow 
Student Publications Inc. to put out the best 
paper possible 

Mike Zamrzla. chief of staff, said Senate 
must draw the line with funding. 

"The Collegian will be a good paper with 
the funds we have allocated, and it could be a 
great paper." Zamrzla said, "but many groups 
can make this claim, and we have a limited 
amount of funds." 

Patrick Carney, arts and sciences senator, 

■ Sec SENATE Page 8 



g Friday^ March 3. IttM 



KANSAS SIATE COLLEGIAN 




News briefs 



► STUDENT ORGANIZATION TO PROMOTE INDIAN FOOD, ASIAN CULTURE 



TTm Manhattan commuolty Ma a 
chanc* to axpwienc* Aakn culbra 
from 5:30 to 8 p.m. Saturday al 

IrianKattan Mlddto Scttoot. 

Thos« attendkvg will first sxpwl* 
enca the looc) ol trvHan culture wtth 
a dinnar from 5:30 lo 7:30 p m 

TTw meal Includes IrxMan sptoad 
chlcfcan. herb rice arxJ tried lortHlas. 
said Poonacha Macftalah, preitdenl 
of the India Students Atsoclatlor^. 
Several types of Indian vegetal^lea 
and desserts are also on >he menu. 

The meal ts fwe to mem6era of 
the India Students Assoclallon, 
Machalah said. The cost Is U lor 
non-members. 

Outing tha dinner, Indian music 
will ba playing. An axhiblllon of 



Indian art will also be displayed. 

Entertainment wUI begin at 7:30 
p.m. wNh performviOM of bsdWonal 
Indian dancea, Mac hal a h taid. 

This Includas Indian classical 
and folk dances. 

'There wMI be a total ot nine 
dances from all regions ol India,' 
Macfulah said. 

This event gives Indian students 
a chance to shaie their culture wtth 
other members of the Manhattan 
oommunNy. 

Members of the India Students 
Association prepare the food, and 
Indian students perform tile dances, 
Machaiahsald 

The group organizes two Indian 
cultural nights each semester, 



► 2 KILLED IN FORT ► RNAL U.N. FORCES 
RILEY SHOOTING LEAVE MOGADISHU 



Two mate Fort Riley soldiers 
were killed and another soldier 
was wounded In a shooting Inci- 
dent Thursday evening. 

The shooting occurred about 
5:30 p.m. In 0>e barradcs area on 
Custer Hill. 

Greg BInford, media relations 
officer, said one ol the dead sol- 
diers is believed to be ^e suspect 
In tha irK:kient. 

'We can't release any details. 
The Infomiatlon is sketchy at ttils 
time,' Btnford saM. 

No military weapon wu used 
in Ihe incident, he said. The mili- 
tary poik^e and criminal Investiga- 
tion divlsnn are investlganrtg. 

The injured soldier was trans- 
ported to Irwin Army Community 
Hoaplta) for treatment. His cortdl- 
tlon was stable Thursday night. 
Identification of the soldiers Is 
being withheld until Iheir next ol 
kin have been nottfled. 

TAimvAnwvr 



MOGADISHU. Somalia (AP) 
~ Guns trained lo the rear, US 
Marines backed out of Somalia 
Thursday with the remnants of a 
mulUnath)r>al force thai fed starv- 
ing thousands but failed to con- 
quer chaos. 

The Marines escorted the final 
U.N. forces from Mogadishu's 
sttores. a quiet end to a two-year 
inlerventlon that cost $2 billion 
and the lives ol more than 100 
peacekeepers 

The move of 1 ,500 American 
and 350 Italian marinas from a 
small beach cove back to their 
ships was expected lo take most 
of Ifie night. 

American Marines landed 
Mortday lo protect the evacuatkin 
of 2,400 Pakistani and 
Barvgladeshi peacekeepers. 

These are the last in a multina- 
tional force that once totaled 
36,000 troops from 21 countries. 



Machaiah said. 

The spring event Is tfte iargest, 
with 600 people expected to atiand 
this weekend. 

Approximately half the people 
expected to attend are from India, 
Machalah said. Because of this, 
many of tr>e peopte will experience a 
different culture. 

The purpose of this event Is to 
promote culturai diversity artd trtdla's 
rich heritage,' Machaiah said. 

Machaiah also points out that 
mis evsnirH) is a bargain compared 
to a trip to India. 

'If you go to indta. you wtl pay at 
leut S2,000,' he said. 



► GERMAN POUCE 
CATCH TRADER 

FRANKFURT. Germany (AP) 
— The gambles of a British trader 
that led to the collapse ol Britijn'B 
oldest investment banit caugM up 
with him Thursday. 

Nick Leeeon was escorted oft 
a flight from Malaysia and 
detained by German poltee while 
authorities waited for an extradi- 
tion request and arrest warrant 
accusing him ol mishandling 
money and other charges. 

Leeson repeatedly tokJ police 
he wanted to return to Britain, 
where his employer. Baring 
Brothers & Co., was trying to fig- 
ure out how one man coukl lose 
an estimated $1 billion and bring 
down the 232-year-oid bank in a 
matter of weefts. 

In Its first comment on the 
case, Singapora'a fraud squad 
sakj Thureday it was Invaaligating 
a comptaN by Baring Futures that 
the 2B-y ear-old Leeson 'commit- 
ted offenses of 'orgery.'' 



»^ INTERACTIVE MEDU PROGRAM SERIES TO PREPARE STUDENTS FOR JOBS 



students at K-Slate have the 
opportunity to gain firsthand knowl- 
edge about visual- rrtsdium computer 
programs today 

Studenis can hear the president 
of The Digital Village, an Instnjaor 
at tha Kansas City Art Institute and 
other students speatt starting at 
10:10 a.m. in the Willard Art Gallery. 

Bob Hower. associate professor 



in art, said it is important to be 
aware of happenings In industry and 
art. 

'We have to prepare students for 
jobs,* Hower said. 

The series wilt start with a stu- 
dent presentation of an interactive 
media compact-disc program. 

The students have been working 
on the Mesa Verde National Park 



Educational Program's The Fossil 
Life of the Natkjnal Parks' CD. 

The program is an interactive 
media program for fourth-grade stu- 
dents, Hower sakj. 

Other speakers will be dit- 
cussing interactive projects for tfte 
trtdustry. 



<^ Police REPORTS ^Bulletin board 



K-SIAHPOUa 



ANNOUNOMIMTS 

*p»Mf«Ho«l tar Arte MM SdtMM I 

dcui'i offkc ApfilicukKU *r: diie ti 5 p ri. Much 16. 

App6citiow tor I 
Oak. in Juuin Hall. They m due Miidi 17 M dia i 



«R tftaiMc i« ilii 



IHURSDAY. MAHOH 2 

Al lO^n (.m.. David Wad. 1919 
PtMt S(., RporlB) 1 Ihcn o( I bicycle 
iKXtll of Ac K-Slitc Untoa. Lou wii 
S43a 

RILEV COUNTY POUCE 



BULUnM 



At t:3J pm., the •pMdi dtpan- 
mcM Rponad diat t bottle at Tylowl 
wai uolen. Lou via $25. 



WIDNUDAY, MARCH 1 



Al 1:15 a.in., Kevin D Winkle, 
2421 Woodway Ave., wai ifniied 
fw mjl 1 Ac jMcnection ol Kaniai 
Ki|h«ay 177 «ad lohntoii Road. 
Bond wai $500, 



Al t:S7i.ia., and A.I 
431 BliwflwM Av«.. ■ 
R Sublette, 1419 Hairy Road, wan 
arreited for battery al A|fieville 
PlmllZTMoniSl. 



laltr Vanity Cbriiliss 

I wj9 meet m 7:30 tani|Ju 
In TtnekniOfton I0J4. The lofiic Tor 
the night ii "Ranance in the '90a. " 

■ The EdKaaonaJ SuppartlTr 
Strrlcei wBrkak«p rof today hai 
been canceled. 

m K-suu Aikta* will DiMi 

from 7:30 to V p.m Saturday in 
toaa 301 of Ifae Dance Studio. 

iMllMrj 



Wsnblp will meal al 7:IS p.*. 
Sunday in Oasrafth Chapel. 

■ TW BInnal and Cay tai 
Liirtlaii SadMy meetu^ for StMdiy 
Ml been canceled. 

■ SeassI A(iaell/Ksft 
Ssrvtvon Sappwt Crvap laaau 
rrmn 3:30 la 5 p.in. on Thnidayi ■ 
the Ecumenical Campsi Minuliy 





CORRECTIONS 



■ In the Justin Kastner story in Wednesday's 
Collegian, the date ot ttw general election was ssid 
to be April 3. The election Is April 4. 

■ In the art rtews story In Wednesda/s 
Collegian, the "Student Art Show" was said to be 
selected by the Union Program Council Arts 
CommlttBe. The art for the show is selected by 
outside artists. 

The Collegian regrets the errors. 



DIP WE MAKE A MISTAKEt 

■ if we make a mistake or are rrat quite 
ctear on BOfnettiing. please call and ten ua. 
We are only human. Our number Is 
S32-6556. 



TTw Kansas State Colegian 
(USPS29t020).astudefii 
iWMplpar at Kansas Stats 
Unmnity, is publiehed by 
Studerrt Pubicalions Inc . 
KedziBHalilOS.Manhanan. 
Kan., 6^06. Tbe Collegian Is 
published vnakdays durmg the 
school yaar ind once a wm4( 
through the sumrrwr. Second- 



class postage is paid a! 
Manhanan, Kan., 66502. 
POSTMASTER: Sand 
address chongst to Kimtt 
Stale Collegian, dRuMon 
desi(,Ke(^03,[~ 
Kan 66506-7167. 



Kmu Slait Colqpw. <HS 



Weather 



State Outlook 

Mostty cloudy. Highs tram 30 to 40. 
Lows from 25 to 30. 



YESTERDAY'S HIGHS AMD LOWS 




"^^ Manhattan Outlook 
/IS TODAY 



^^ 



PaiHy sunny. High in 
themid-30s. Lowinthe 
upper 208, 



• DENVER 
22/9 



• TULSA 
25/22 



• OMAHA 

29/B 



• 8T.L0UB 

28/20 



TONOfUlOW 

A 30-percent chance 
for rain Warmer with 
high from 45 to SO. 




!?5 



^^^^^.\ 



m 



Dilly'si 



1/2 satulwich, 
small salad & tit ink 



I io.M.50 

with this am poll 
I 

Ag^ievilli; • 5J7-5I 1 } 




Pizza Shuttle 776-5577 



LIVE MUSIC FRIDAY & SATURDAY NIGHT 




J^_C^ 



thm 'n Blues 



Don't forget - Friday night - $1 Bottles, $1 Wells 





People on campus may stack their outdated 

campus telephone books and other old 

directories beside the recycling containers 

currently used by K-State facilities. 

Building locations Includa: 

Ackert, Anderson, Bluemont, Cardwell, Nichols. 
Seaton, Umberger and Willard halls and the Power Plant. 



Thank you for recycling! 



Sponsored by Student Publications Inc. 



DVERTISE 

In the 



Ertjav Ttv BanefUs And S^ The Savlng^f 
• Join T>» 20/20 Club" • 

In The Mldtoum ftesa 

S23S. trthSirmei 
ManhatUitt, KS 66S02 

N*w St UMd IrHtTunicnt Solas & Repair 
VIdecM. Books, St Acccwodei 



Doufjon**, Proprittor 



9IS S39-t9Sa 



I ' ('Mil 



STREET SCENE 



Mti MM tV I nii (,.<.-Ri 



^ 



v! 



•r'<? 



^« 



M\U( II «M) 

M< ( \l\ 



S (>,ni. 



KAKSASSTXTECOLLEfilAN 



Friday. Marah 3, 1996 



Vk 



► CAMPUS 



1st Big 12 conference 
opens communication 



UUmJOTT 



Callijtn 

The first Big Twelve Student 
Leadership Conference will be at 
K-State today, Saturday and Sunday. 

"It's vcty exciting," said Michael 
Henry, arts and sciences senator and 
co-director of the conference. 

The Big Twelve Conference 
schools include Texas Tech, Texas 
AAM, Baylor, Texas and the Big 
Eight Conference schools. 

It is the first time anyone has been 
able to bring the student body presi- 
dents from the Big Twelve schools 
together, he said. 

Aubrey Abbot, senate intern, said 
Henry and Brandon Clark, former 
arts and sciences senate, each put in 
a bid for the conference last year. 

Each school was allowed to bring 
four delegates, including the student 
body presidents, vice presidents, sen- 
ate chairs, vice-chairs, finance offi- 
cen and other officers from c«;h of 
the Big Twelve schools. 

Henry said one of the main pur- 
poses of the conference is to talk 
about important issues on the cam- 
puses and how the schools' student 
governments are addressing those 
issues. 

"One of the big pushes of the stu- 
dent body presidents is to discuss the 
cuts being made in Washington," 
Henry said. 

Henry said the student body presi- 
dents would be drafting a tetter to the 
congressional leaders from each state 
to ask for proposed cuts in federal 



scholarship money to be reverted to 
the Pell Grant program for students 
with need. 

Among the other topics are multi- 
cultural involvement in student activ- 
ities, relations between student gov- 
ernment and administration, ethical 
decision-making, student effects on 
national and state legislatures, and 
changes in leadership. 

A special time is set aside each day 
for student body presidents to meet 
and discuss issues, and the other offi- 
cers also get the same opportunity. 
Students with the same campus office 
will therefote be given three opportu- 
nities to discuss ideas and campus 
issues in small groups. Abbot said. 

The state delegations, such as the 
four Texas schools, will also be able 
to talk about issues facing them in 
their state legislatures, Henry said. 

The delegates will also attend the 
K -State vs. Colorado game and a din- 
ner Saturday evening with 
Congressman Sam Brownback. 

"This is pretty much the first 
event, student-wise, in the Big 
Twelve Conference," Henry said. 

He said he hoped the leadership 
conference would help build a strong 
student-to-student tie in the Big 
Twelve. 

Henry said some critics thought 
the athletics would be the strongest 
aspect of tfie conference, but some of 
the schools in the new conference 
have had more scholars individually 
than other conferences have had as a 
whole. 



► ASIAN AMERICAN MONTH 

Stress relieved 
through aikido 



Aikido is a martial art that 
stresses relaxation instead of 
confrontation. 

The K-Slatc Aikido Club 
gave a demonstration at the K- 
State Union Courtyard 
Thursday as part of Asian 
American Awareness Mondi. 

Aikido is a classical 
Japanese martial art developed 
in the early pan of this century. 

"Aikido is not a technique 
to fight with or defeat the 
enemy. It is the way to recon- 
cile the world and make human 
beings one family," Morihei 
Ueshiba, founder of K-State's 
Aikido Club, said. 

Scott Sowers, graduate stu- 
dent in math and member of 
the club, said he uses aikido to 
relax. 

"It is a good chance to clear 
everything out and exercise for 
purposes beyond that of just 
getting a workout," he said. 

Jack Hayes, K-Staie aikido 
instructor, said it helps his spir- 
itual life, too. 

"For me, aikido is the high- 
est level of ethics that repre- 
sents a good mental and spiri- 
tual model for everyday life," 



he said. 

Jayne Thompson. K-State 
aikido instnictor, said aikido is 
a way of life for her. 

"It enhances my life physi- 
cally and mentally. It ties in 
with all of the fearri and hesita- 
tions [ have, and these conflicts 
come out on the mat," she said. 

Hayes explained more about 
aikido during the demonstra- 
tion. 

"In aikido, we never clash 
with an attacker head-on. 
Instead, we use evasive, circu- 
lar movements that we blend 
with the attack, leading the 
attacker into a variety of 
throws or joint-locking tech- 
niques." he said. 

Thompson said aikido is 
about conflict and resolution. 

"Whether it is physical or 
verbal, it allows you to think 
clearly when tempers and 
anger are involved," she said. 

Sowers said aikido cla.ss is a 
great stress reliever. 

"I may go to class in a bad 
mood, but 1 always come out in 
a good mood." he said. 

Aikido can be practiced by 
anyone because it uses the 
attacker's size and strength 
against them. 




MIKI WILCHHANS/Coll«gwn 

While visiting K-State, Scott Thompson gats a fraa alMdo laason 
from Instructor Jayns Thompson of ths KSU Aikido Ctub Thuraday 
afterfioon at the Union Courtyard. Ths alktdo club was givlns damoii- 
stratfons tor Asian American Awareness Month. 



► U.S. SENATE 



65-35 vote 
defeats 
balanced- 
budget bill 



WASHINGTON — The Senate defeat- 
ed the balanced- budget amendment to the 
Constitution Thursday. 

The luncndment is the cornerstone of a 
broader Republican drive to cut spending 
and shrink government. 

Both sides sought instant political 
advantage. 

The 65-35 vote that left the amendment 
just shy of the needed two- thirds majority 
followed Democratic accusations ttiat the 
Republicans were threatening Social 
Security, a charge Senate Majority Leader 
Bob Dote denied. 

At the White House, President Clinton 
challenged GOP leaders in Congress to 
detail how they are going to keep the 
promises of tfwir Contact With America 
on balancing the budget and paying for 
their tax cuts. 



Fifty-one Republicans and 14 
Democrats voted for the amendment, 
while 33 I>emocraLs and two Republicans, 
Mark Hatfield of Oregon and Dole, voted 
no. 

Dole is a fiim supporter, and his vote, 
after one final, futile attempt to sway 
Hatneld, was a parliamentary maneuver 
that kept the measure alive for another 
possible vote during the 1 9% election sea- 
son. To bring up the amendment again. 
Dole had to vote with the prevailing side 
this time. 

"Let 'cm uy," Democratic leader Tom 
Daschle said defiantly a few hours before 
the vote. 

By opposing the amendment, Daschle 
said. Democrats were saving Social 
Security trust fijnds from deficit cutters. 

The amendment is designed to slow the 
increase of the national debt, which is 
approaching $5 trillton. 



It calls for a balanced budget beginning 
in the year 2002, unless three-fifths of both 
houses vote otherwise 

The amendment cleared the GOP-con- 
trolled House in January on a vote of 300- 
132. Republicans had looked to the mea- 
sure to provide discipline for votes atwad. 

"It might moke getting what we want to 
do harder," said Sen. Pete V. Domenici, 
R-N.M. and chairman of the Budget 
Committee, shortly after the vote. "For 
some senators, it might be easier to avoid 
the tough votes." 

Moments before the vote. Dole accused 
Democrats of playing blatant politics. 

Dole said Republicans would soon pro- 
pose a five-year plan to put the budget on 
a path toward balaiKe by 2002. 

"Our plan will not raise taxes," he said. 
"Our plan will not touch Social Security." 

Daschle said Democrats would gladly 
join in the deficiKutting cfTori. 



"It's the Republicans who are in the 
leadership here," he said. "We want to see 
what they've got" 

When the roll call finally occurred after 
a month of debate, it was dramatic, yet 
scripted, because every senator's position 
was known in advance. 

They voted in alphabetical order, rising 
at their desks by turn to answer die roll. 

Aides and House members lined the 
back of the chamber, and all eyes turned to 
Hatfield when lie rose from his seat on the 
center aisle to utter the "no" that sealed the 
measure's fate. Dole and other Repub- 
licans sharply attacked six Democrats for 
voting against the measure after support- 
ing a virtually identical one last year. 

In an indication of the measure's popu- 
larity, five other senatois who face re-elec- 
tion next year — three DemocraLs and two 
Republicans — abandoned past opposition 
to vote in favor. 



Earn up to $90 
before Spring Break 

Receive up to $30 
a week when you 
donate plasma. 

MANHATTA 

BIOMEDICAL 

CENTER 

1130 GARDENWAY 776-9177 
r^i Biomedical Centbr 



I 




City Farmers "* 
Surplus Flea Market 

Open: 
'nies. • Fri. 10 a.m. • 6 p,m. 
Sat, & Sun, 10 a,in. - 5 p.m. 

Appliances, fumiiure, iiouschotd iiems, 
jewutry and clulhing, sporting goods, 
lools, nKiIicul supplies, lawn cquipn^cnt, 
;iniiqucs, home mainienance items, 
knick knacks and A LOT MORE (A 
little t>ii of everything ricw and used at 
arTonlabic prices.) 

We Buy Used 501 Levis 

201 S. 4th St., 

Manhattan, Kansas 

Ohe old Sears building) 

539-8579 



ACOUSTIC JAM 
SESSION 

FRI,9P.M.-1A.M. 

NO COVER 

MARK. BROTHER JEB AND 

FRIENDS 

KARAOKE PARTY 

SAT.9P.M-1A.M. 

NO COVER 



PRIIES 




523 S. 17TH'537-14a4 



llrents 







®^^ac 



Aulhentic Clil»e«e FcmxI Prepwd i-'rom Seratcli 
By Our Stclllect Oricnial (Jief* 



Save 

$1.00 

Your I 

*Appetlzer *Any 3 Entrees *Frled Rice 



Avilliitilr Only al nurthlncM Klti-hpiii ai 
Ihr toltowing localloni In Wichita: 

'Z4H(iliway<iTulllrrnckBlvd. 



I'rlceagood March 1-7. 1995 





Vienna Academy'-i-- 
Martin Haselbdck, director 

Sunday, March 12, 3 p.m. 

From lis home in the historic Musi levers in, this period inslrumenl 
ensemble brings a program featuring trumpet concertos by Telemann, 
a [tute concero by Vivaldi, Bach's Brandenburg Concerto No. 3, and 
Orchestral Suite No 3. 

Chaucer's Canterbury Tales* 
Starring New Vic TKeatre of London 
Friday, April 7, 8 p.m. 

Join the lively, bawdy pilgrims on the local vicarage lawn lor the finals 
of the annual Geoffrey Ctiaucer Slory telling Competition. Tales are told 
ol love, ol lust, and of laughler. Some are traditional and visual; others 
are, in the funniest and mosl good humored way, a little less delicate. 



Awadagin Pratt, piano* ■«- 
Thursday, April 27, S p.m. 



The musical lorle of this Naumberg Prize-winner Is Ihe three B's, with 
forays into Ihe Romanlic repertory. A graduate of the Peabody Conser- 
vatory. Pratt is Ihe only student in that institution's history to earn 
performer's certificates in piano, violin and conducting. 

Fof tickets call 532-6428 or como to trie McCarn box olfico Box oltice houra: 
noon \o 5 p.m. weekdays; from I p.m. belore weekend matinees; and from 5 
p.m. belore weekertd eveninQs. Tickets ore also available at Manhattan Town 
Center customer service desk, K-Stale Union BooKslore. and tTR (Fort Riley). 

n Persons with disabilities call 532-6428. 

Free bus service to series events for patrons SS years or oldef isavailat>l«. 
For details call Marie Dellen at 567-4000. 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. weekdays. 

'presented in pari by (he Kantat Arts CknvntSKm. a slate agency, and the Nallonal 
EnckMvtTiant toi Ihe Arts. ■ tadtral soency. Events In tho McCain Peilormance Series are 
supports d by IfwK- State Fine Arts Fm tSupponed by the Friends ol McCain -Corporate 
support provided by Merrxin^l Ho&pMal 





PINION 



■ fti*t4a««4*< 



^ = 

SmtlUt MMUUMR .... Rynkil Utile 

N.SiewMAodenan UamAVUm UrrM. . . AJSy ZiMlci MIt HUUMR .......... f 01 DttBoii 

. . CrMliu iMaey mmtaniNI. Pbill SiHlter llllfllil AaruOt^iain 

>.. Robin KicUaeftr tftMIM IMTM * . . * . Triiht Besmap lUMMtrtMII Nauuyo Kcms 

t Mad Lelfi«|«ell COPY CMP ...DiwOItoa MM MVIMI Ron Johiuue 

. * « Qsity Uttle CfTMPH IMTM Mi1n Mvletl » Unm Gloria Frceluui 

SttfihttieFaqat UKtmomtumn JtamyCoMm 

»««UniU IMTM MikeBuocb »lC.HIBJil .UWI I W I....Mfe«WMwi _. 




^tt' BHfWwi''fc iI^H p 



UMtu tTATI COIIJHIIAIf 



In Our Opinion 



fy^Coikgian EdUwiaJ Board 



H-'T-J.'- 



Don't miss K-State's last basketball game 



■vwntlraiigh 
thaaMwonls 
pratty mudi 
oimr, K-State 
tansn««4to 
contlniMto 
ahowlhalr 
support. 



Saturday afternoon, K-State will close 
QUI the 1994-95 regular season against 
Cbtorado. 

Although it has been a tough season, we 
think it has been an exciting one under 
first-year coach Tom Asbury. 

Whether it was the wins against the 
Oklahoma schools or Coach Asbury call- 
ing another coach a turd, this season has 
been one to remember. 

But this might be just the beginning. 
Asbury has brought fire and spirit to the 
K-State basketball prognun. It's almost as 
ftin going to a game to see him rant and 



rave on the sidelines as it is to win. 

But it's not just that. He has brought an 
exciting style of play to the Cats' program. 
Sure, there are times when the K-State 
team looks like something the cat dragged 
in. But there were also games in which the 
Cats looked unbeatable. Even though the 
season is pretty much over. K-State fans 
need to continue to show their support. So 
grab your purple, bundle up and drive out 
to Brunlage Coliseum to support the Cats 
Saturday. 

Who knows, maybe Belvis Noland 
could score 63 points. 



Small-scale composting 
produces big-time results 




Your diet may be 
good for you, 
but it may be 
better for the 
earth. Out of your own 
backyard, you can spoon- 
feed the earth from your 
table scraps and leftovers. 



Composting is the natural 
process of the biodegradation of 
organic wastes that produce an 
ideal soil conditioner rich in min- 
erals from the decomposition of 
food and yard wastes, 

A compost can be as simple and 
effortless as just piling leaves, 
grass and weeds into a comer ot 
your yard or just scraping your 
plates into the garden after dinner 
instead of into the garbage disposal 
or trash. 

With 60 to 70 percent of the 
compilation of trash at Kramer and 
Derby food centers consisting 
exclusively of food waste, both 
send their production waste to 
swine farmers, while other efforts 
have been less supported. 

At Van Zile Hall alone, which 
docs not have a composting sys- 
tem, the average student produces 
340 pounds of trash a semester just 
from food waste — the largest 
component of trash in all of the 
dining halls. 

The Department of Hotel 
Restaurant Institution Management 
and Dietetics is involved in a waste 
stream analysis ascertaining the 
weight and volume of both produc- 
tion food waste and service waste. 

The company's focus is now on 
alternative methods of incorporat- 
ing wastes through dehydration 
and combining proteins to produce 
a viable film garbage bag. 

They are currently looking into 
modifying both methods. 



Outside the residence halls, the 
average American produces about 
t .200 pounds of solid waste every 
year. 

What is sad is thai about 70 per- 
cent of the garbage Americans 
send to landnils is compostablc 
material, including paper and 
wood as well as food and yard 
waste. 

That's 35 billion tons of trash 
that could be used to replenish the 
earth that is suffocating in land- 
fills. 

Composting makes it easier to 
separate recyclable wastes as well. 
One town in California reduced 
garbage by SO percent through 
composting and curbside collec- 
tion. 

Maybe we don't notice on a 
daily basis how much we each 
contribute to this massive trash 
heap the worid is becoming, but if 
we began to separate our trash, we 
could see how tangible it is to 
recycle the majority of wastes we 
each produce. 

Let me throw some numbers at 
you. 

As Americans, we throw away 
enough iron and steel to supply all 
of the nation's automakers contin- 
uously. 

The average American family 
produces about 5,200 pounds of 
trash a year. 

Fourteen billion pounds of trash 
are dumped into the sea every year. 

At the rale we produce garbage, 
we need 500 new dumps a year. 

In your lifetime, you will gener- 
ate about 600 times your adult 
weight in garbage. 

A few years back, 1 heard a lot 
about the significance of the degra- 
dation of the environment. It docs- 
n't seem that much has changed 
except that environmentalism 
doesn't seem to be as trendy as ii 
was. 

As you light a Marlboro, know 



On* town In 
Calif omla 
raducwd 
gart>aga by SO 
percent through 
composting and 
curtMldo collec- 
tion. 



that 500 
million 
lighters 
will end 
up in 
landfills 
every 
year. 

As 
you dis- 
card 
your Dr 
Pepper 
can, 

know that every three months the 
United States could rebuild our 
commercial airfleet with the alu- 
minum that continues to go unre- 
cycled. And although it may have 
liken you 20 minutes to drink, that 
can be a souvenir for the next 500 
years. 

As you abandon an inconve- 
nient empty plastic bottle, know 
that it is only one of the 2.3 million 
bottles trashed every hour. 

If your "Save the Trees" T-shin 
isn't quite faddish enough for you, 
I hope that you at least consider 
recycling it for a rag or something. 

Environmental consciousness 
may be lacking in popularity these 
days, but environment pollution 
and deterioration is deHnitely still 
in style, so don't forget to stay 
"green-conscious." 

Instead of tossing those Ramen 
noodles in the trash, drop them in 
the backyard. 

Maybe a Ramen noodle tree 
will grow. 

Page Gctz is a freshman in 
Journalism and mass communi- 
cations. 

Sources: "SO Ways to Save the 
Earth", "The Green Consumer", 
and Dennis Ferris, graduate 
researcli assistant for the 
Department of Hotel Restaurant 
Institution Management and 
Dietetics 



Parking Services does 
good deeds as well 




This column is dedicated to all K- 
State students who have ever been 
blessed with that magic piece of paper 
known as a parking citation. 

For all present, past and future stu- 
dents and even unborn babies that are 
destined to receive this gift from our 
lovely University, this one is for you. 

First, I have a confession to make. I 
am not without motive in writing this 
column. 1 have received, to put it nicely, 
more than one ticket in the past month. 1 
had intended to go discover some sort of 
blatant scandal down at Parking 
Services, expose it with all its graphic 
details and then wait for my Pulitzer 
Prize for excellence in journalism. 

However, after 
making a trip to 
the office (in 
order to pay a 
ticket). I took it 
upon myself to 
speak with the 
powers-that-be 
and try to get 
them to come 
clean about the 
conspiracy to tick- 
et me all the days 
of my life. 

They came 
clean, but to my 
dismay, there is 
no conspiracy to 
report. Although 
Parking Services 

issued 19.174 tickets last semester, 1 
only received one of them. The term 
"services" isn't misleading either. 
Although they don't assist students in 
backing out of parking stalls, they will 
change tires, jump dead batteries, open 
cars with locked-in keys and call wreck- 
ers for free. The Riley County police 
will charge you. 

In an extremely unscientific poll 1 
conducted, which incidentally had about 
the same response that the parking sur- 
vey did last semester, it appeared that 
most people think that Parking Services 
is to blame tor all the parking problems 
on campus, the proposal to place the 
garage in Memorial Stadium and civil 
unrest in most Third World countries. 

However, according to the Parking 
Control Supervisor (a K-State graduate). 
Parking Services is only the enforcement 
and record-keeping branch of the policy- 
making Parking Council. Parking 
Services ha^ one vote on the Council — 
the director of Parking and Fire Safety, 
Dwain Archer. 

In an era when blame is passed out 
like coupon books from radio stations, 
don't forget the council makes the poli- 
cies. Incidentally, it is also largely com- 
posed of student senators, so if you want 
to do something, fmd one of them and 
express yourself at least half as well as 
when you discover you've been ticketed. 

This brings up the subject of how 
Parking Services operates. Ticketcrs arc 
not paid on commission but receive 
hourly pay, starting at minimum wage. 
They have no quotas and receive no spe- 
cial favors if they are ticketed. 
Applicants are given a background 
check to prevent those who have more 
tickets than they should from getting 
hired. 



Ttiis process is almost as good as pri- 
vatizing the whole system, but then 
again, this is America. 

The parking problems that this cam- 
pus must deal with have received much 
attention, especially after the powers- 
that-be proposed building a parking 
garage in Memorial Stadium. While this 
idea defies logic by placing more park- 
ing right next to one of the biggest park- 
ing lots available and locating it at an 
extreme end of campus, it is also far 
from an example of fiscal effectiveness 

According to an official with Parking 
Services, the garage is projected to cost 
between $12 million and $14 million, of 
which $4-5 million will be spent on cos- 
metics to make it match the design of the 
stadium. 

Who are we trying to kid here? Cost 
does not mean quality. Just look at 
Denver's new airport. 

Other ideas for improving the parking 
situation are raising permit prices for 
tots closer to campus, starting a shuttle 
service, reducing the number of reserved 
stalls and adding pre -fabricated second 
stories to existing parking lots. Of these, 
raising permit prices for certain lots 
would be the easiest to implement, but it 
would need some sort of system to deter- 
mine who gets the first chance to pur- 
chase these permits, which would create 
another source of conflict. 

Starting a shuttle service would pro- 
vide front-door service for those who 
wait hours, sometimes even days, for 
parking spaces to open up close to cam- 
pus. By implementing the shuttle, 
Bramlage's parking lot could be used 
not only on game days, but for easing 
the parking problem. 

A shuttle permit could also entitle the 
bolder to park in Bramtage. No one with 
a regular parking permit would be dis- 
placed. If you don't believe me, go see 
how many students park at Bramlage 
and walk to campus. 

You could count it on one hand, pos- 
sibly just using the thumb. 

KU's service is very popular and is 
supported by student-activity fees and an 
additional access fee, currently $55, a 
price I would gladly pay in place of a 
parking permit. 

There is currently a limit of 450 
reserved stalls on campus and a proposal 
to reduce this number to 200. While this 
may seem insignificant. 250 more possi- 
ble stalls would reduce the number of 
people who need food and water to walk 
in from the far comers of certain lots. 

Adding a pre-fabricated second story 
to existing parking lots would double 
parking space in those lots at a fraction 
of the cost of a garage. Yes, this would 
require some planning, but 1 think even 
the Parking Council could handle this. 

The best advice to avoid getting a 
ticket is to park legally. If everyone did 
this. Parking Services might eventually 
reduce its staff to the point that you 
could park where you wanted. 

I also recommend buying stock in 
gasoline companies, as long as people 
are content with burning up to one tank 
of gas or more per day while waiting for 
The Spot. 

Jeremy Stephens Is a sophomore In 
business. 



Readers Write 



mm 



Drop l«ttar* off at Kadtlt 11Q or Mnd ttiwn to Lattara to ttw Editor, c/o Chrtoty Uttla, Kanaaa 
Stat* Coll*glan, Kadzla 1 T6, Manhattan, KS 68S0S. Wa accapl latlara l>v a-matl alto. Our 
addraaa la totteraOsputt.kau.adu. Lattara ihould tM addruMd to tt\« adllof and includa a 
naina, addrata and pttona numbar. A ^oIq Idantlflcatlon will l>a naoaaaary tor hamHtativ- 
aradlattara. 



^ MINORinit 



Being black is a privilege 

Dear editor. 

This letter is in response to Thursday's 
letter titled, "Minorities Complain Too 
Much." 

There are many veils in the worid, and 
there are many K-State students wearing 
them. One of them happens to be the veil 
of misguided opporiunities. If a scholar- 
ship is given to a minority on this campus, 
and he or she didn't earn it, something is 
wrong. Financial aid and minority scholar- 
ships are set up around certain criteria. For 
example, you need a 2.5 to be considered 
for moiit minority scholarships and a 3.0 
to receive money because they are com- 
petitive scholarships. A great deal of 
minority scholarships are set up by minor- 
ity groups (o help them achieve upward 
mobility. For example, there's the 
National Hispanic Scholarship Fund and 
the United Negro College Fund, 

Speaking as a minority, I would have 



no problem with any other cultural group 
striving for the same upward mobility. 
Although helping other ethnic groups 
achieve higher standards should be cross- 
cultural. 

The writer also makes the comment 
that minorities get their butts kissed 
braause whites are afraid of being labeled 
racist. Well, I personally don't kiss butt, 
because I think butt stinks. If the majority 
is kissing ass, it's because he or she wants 
to. I'm sure there isn't a minority on this 
campus that goes around asking for their 
ass to be kissed. 

The writer of "Minorities Complain 
Too Much" says that you can't base the 
black experience on Snoop Dogg's music 
video, and she is right. Not only can you 
not compare the two, but you can't base 
the black experience on being married to a 
black man, living around minorities in 
Rorida or by having a bicultunU child. 

The black experience can only truly be 
seen through a black person's eyes, unless 
you are Jhon Howard Griffin or Josh 
Solomon, who turned themselves black by 



taking a derivative of the drug Psorlen 
orally and exposing themselves to ulu^vi- 
olet rays. Jhon only lasted 28 days being 
black, and Josh last^l two. So as you can 
clearly see, there have been two white 
nKn that have tried to survive or live in 
our racist world as black men and failed. 
Double consciousness isn't for everyone 
to understand. 

Blacks have to know the African 
Anterican history as well as Anrterican his- 
tory. Our roots have been buried for years, 
and now they are sprouting so the veil can 
be lifted and minorities can take advan- 
tage of their opportunities in every 
endeavor despite past struggles. 

Feeling sorry for any cultural group is 
just another way of saying I'd rather not 
get involved. Being black to me is not a 
problem, it's a privilege, and one that I 
will use. There is no way to sugarcoat 
what you are; it always becomes visible 
when in print. 

Nate Scott 

junior in secondary education 

► WOlilH 

Why do victims need months? 

Dear editor, 

I would like to comment on Erin 
Mansur-Smith's column on women's 



month. She has truly changed my thoughts 
of militant feminists, although 1 question 
her sincerity on the issue of women's suf- 
fering sin^ she spouts off many atrocities 
burdened by women that she never herself 
has faced. How does she justify feeling 
anger that men don't understand why 
women deserve to have a month dedicated 
to them (when she herself is only related 
to these women that she finds to have 
been oppressed through the years by the 
fact that she also has two X chromo- 
somes)? 

I'm sorry, but I think dut hardly gives 
her the right to stand on a platform and 
preach about the evils of a male-dominat- 
ed society. Had it been up to her, she 
would flip the culture so it be female- 
dominated, which makes her just as bad 
and oppressive as the males she feels such 
misdirected anger toward. It was midway 
through her column that I found a reason 
why I (being a white male from a middle- 
class background) found her views of the 
situation different. 

MansuT-Smith states thai the reason for 
the month is not thai women have come so 
far and accomplished so much for society, 
(because she acknowledges that based on 
what they have contributed to society, 
men also have the right to their own 
month) but on the fact that women have 
been such victims through the ages. 

If the only thing that gives women the 



right to have next month dedicated to 
them is how much they have been abused, 
I'm glad 1 can't find a month to be mine. 
It's sad that she thinks this. If I were 
African American, female, Asian or any 
other culture that has a month dedicated to 
them, 1 would be very upset that Mansur- 
Smith would have the gall to state the only 
thing that makes them special enough as a 
group to have a month dedicated to them 
is that they make good victims. 

I thought that you wanted equality. 
How is displaying the fact that you have 
been a victim for an entire month a step 
toward equality? You should really 
rethink your reasoning why women 
deserve a month more than men, because 
from what 1 heard, you sound just as bad 
as every male pig who spreads the 
unu-uihs of female inferiority. But then 
again, how would I know? I don't have to 
face the woes dut you do, even though I 
am constantly reminded of how terrible 
men are, how lazy my generation is and 
how stupid Polish people are. (Yes. I do 
know what it's like to have people tell 
jokes about your ethnicity). 

But through all that I face, I'm dam 
glad you don't think I nud a month dedi- 
cated to me. because 1 would find that 
ve^ offensive. 

MdiMlANawrocU 

, pre^vcterlnary medtdne 




i 



Hif lafy shares her redpes 
with the lunch lady crowd 

Hillary Rodham Clinton joined ibe 
firit-grftde lunch bunch at Long 
Braocb Elementary School in 
Arlington, Va.. on Wedneaday as 
Democrats fanned out to proleai GOP 
effoita to cut redenl nutrition and educa- 
tk)Q programs. 

Her cardboaid tray laden with a Sloppy 
Joe, yogiul, applesauce and an apple, hfra. 
Qktoo plamed barntf at a table of yoong- 
■tos to chat about evctytbiDg bom Socks 
(be cat to the difficulties of doable jump- 
ropmg. 

"It was a nice change from the little 
smokies I always get at home." said the 
first lady. "I'm always getting them stuck 
between my teeth." 

■I^mit like my highway 
Take a look at this!' 



plan? 



Some people might not like their elect- 
ed officials, but most of diem don't 
have to deal with the antics of 
Spencer R. Schlosnagle, the exhibitionist 
mayor of Friendsville, Md. 

Schlosnagle admitted Tuesday to expos- 
ing himself to another motorist while dri- 
ving on Interstate 68 last summer. He 
already had been convicted twice of expos- 
ing himself. 

Under a plea agreement, proaecutort 
will recommend a ]Mt .sentence of less than 
a year and dismi&s indecent-exposure 
enlarges involving a similar incident. 

Some residents soy the indecent- expo- 
sure charges are a continuing source of 
embamsimenL But Schtosnagle, who was 
re-elected to a fifth tenn in February 1994, 
continues to enjoy suppoit fiom most of the 
577 people in Friends ville, a town along 
the Youghiogbeny River in Maryland's 
westenunost county. 

Apparently, the people of Friendsvtlle 
lecm to enjoy this guy. At least his cam- 
paign matcri^s would be cnenwrable, with 
bumper stickers like "Schlosnagk — He's 
<3ot Nothing to Hide." 

lluutk you, thank you very little. 

Lose $1 billion of the 
queen^ cash, and keep 
the yacht - here^ how! 

As the financial world reverberates 
from the collapse of Britain's oldest 
investment bank, the big question 
on everybody's mind is; Where did !$• 
year-old losing trader Nick Leeson go? 

London's Baring Brothers & Co. is now 
under the control of court-appointed 
administrators who are trying to assess 
what can be salvaged after hundreds of 
millions of dollars of Leeson 's tosses in 
Asian futures markets ruined the bank. 

Leeson disappeared from his home in 
Singapore's fashicmable Orchard neighbor- 
hood as the irregularities became known. 

It is rumored he took off from 
Singapore on his yacht, and if he's smart, 
he will head straight to the home of cither 
former Democratic presidential candidate 
Walter Mondaie or "Dukes of Hazzard" 
star Tom WopaL 

Nobody has seen those guys in years. . . . 

Potholes as social drama, 
only In Davis, Calif. 

is a pothole not just a podiole, 
but a "historical resource" to be 
preserved? 

When it's in Davis, Calif., the town so 
politically correct that smoking is restricted 
even outdoors. 

Twelve residents asked the city to rcfiave 
a one-block alley, contending its potholes 
were a hazard to drivers and a breeding 
ground for mosquitoes. 

But Councilwoman Julie Partanslcy 
invoked (He California Environmental 
Quality Act last week to stop any repavjng 
based on the grmmdi diat the alley is a "his- 
loric^ resource." 

"They are the original material used 
when the neighborhood was buUt It's port 
of the fabric -ctf the neighborhood as origi- 
nally conceived," Partansky said 

"ITlc alleys have a wonderful ambience. 
To pave them would make a world of dif- 
taaxot. It's real mellow in the alley now." 

The alley behind my house could be 
need ia a 4X4 commcrciaJ. but I would hes- 
itate to call it "mellow." 

This woman is two grapes short of a fhiit 



\\/but 

T T pres 





5 



EEKEND 



KANSAS STATCCOLUEGIAN 






HANGING OUT 

Are you a minor? Of legal age but not interested in the bar scene? 

Rnding something to do on the weekends 

isnt as hard as you might think. 

by Rebecca Schuiz 



t*s Friday. A decision 
must be made. A 
weekend activity must 
be chosen. There's 
Aggieville, but for 
minors and those not 
interested In the bars, 
Aggieville isn't always 
the answer. 

The answer could be as simple 
as renting an old comedy with a 
group of friends, taking a road 
trip to a nearby town or going to 
the K-State Union. 

"I think for minors, the best 
thing to do is to hang out with 
your friends at their house," 
Pamela Lciker, sophomore in 
business, said. 

"In college you finally have a 
place of your own, a place where 
you can go and hang out," she 
said. "The funny thing is when 
you turn 21, for a couple of 
months, you go out to the bars, 
and then you're back to saying 
there's nothing to do." 

An inexpensive idea is to rent 
a movie and watch it with a group 
of friends. 

Chiquita Milter-Henry, senior 
in social work and a customer- 
service representative at 
Blockbuster Video, said groups 
like to rent action and comedy 
videos and rent warped movies 
like Dazed and Confused and 
PCU (the "Animal House" of the 
I990s>. 

Miller-Henry said lately the 
Monty I^thon and Cbeech and 
Chong videos have been popular 
weekend rentals. 

"On the weekends, they just 
love those guys," she said. 

Other popular rentals are "The 
Mask." "Speed" and "With 
Honors." Miller- Henry said these 
movies are popular because the 
action is constant and the story 
line keeps moving, which main- 
tains the attention of the audi- 
ence. 

Because hanging out at the 
same place and watching the 
same movies can get monoto- 
nous, students can also pack their 
bags and go on weekend get- 
aways. 

Leiker said when she lived in 
Kansas City, she and her friends 
would get together and take road 
trips. 

"We would just pick a place 
we've never been to," Leiker 
said. "Find somewhere on the 



map that's close and go to it. It's 
like taking a mini vacation." 

Taking road trips doesn't have 
to be expensive. It just requires a 
car that works and gas money. 

Leiker said getting out of town 
and doing a little sightseeing is a 
cure for cabin fever. 

Students can go out of town, 
but they can also find places to go 
right here in Manhattan. 

Neal Axton. senior in philos- 
phy, said students can go to 
Wamego or head out to Tuttle 
Creek Recreational Area like his 
friends. 

"1 try to do that a couple of 
weekends a month," Axton said. 

Axton and his friends spend 
time at the Spillway and the 
"rocks." 

The place called the "rocks" is 
located down Spillway Road. It's 
the first road on the left past the 
Spillway area. This windy road 
leads to a picnic area overlooking 
the Tuttle Creek Reservoir. A 
scries of terraced limestone cliffs 
line the water's edge. 

Axton said he and his friends 
like to go to Tuttle to build ftres 
on the rocks and hang out. 

For those college students who 
don't own reliable cars for long- 
distance traveling, there arc other 
activities within walking dis- 
tances on and off campus. 

The Union has a lot to offer at 
inexpensive prices. It's also with- 
in walking distance from the resi- 
dence halls and apartments sur- 
rounding campus. 

"I think it's a nice area 
because you can play pool and 
bowl and hang out," Levi Hunter, 
junior in graphic design, said. 

On the weekend, the Union 
transforms Forum Hall into a 
movie theater and the Union 
Station into a dance club. You 
can also play pool, bowl and play 
video games in the basement. 

"This is the Union 
Recreational Area — this is the 
place that everybody cheers 
about," Hunter said. 

Fofum Hall presents movies 
Friday through Sunday evenings 
for $1.75 each, and the Union 
sells a pass for six movies for $7. 

"I go to the movies there a lot 
because they're so cheap," Jill 
Astamendi, sophomore in hotel 
and resuurant management, said. 

Astamendi said she also goes 
to the Varsity and Campus the- 
aters in Aggieville because of 



Rop 



MOVIE VIDEO RENTALS 



ACSPCiwg n BNDVaW rHn.w IHWoMi, inaM in 
tMlWit 




CLASSICS 

1. "Cheech and Choog" 

2. "Eddie Murphy movies" 

3. "Ferris BueKw'sDwy Off 

4. "Monty Python artd Players" 
5. 'The Princess Bride" 



IhiibiIIsi Movft TiiMttfi' 



$1.50 admission 
eiSkManhattw 
S3»-t291 

Sedt ChW OrwMi - $5 ailnissiijii wWi student 10 
2S10FannB(ffBeiiRoad 
776^9086 

«nltyTtia*t-$l.SOa(M8sion 
t12SMon)St 
776-S668 

WeiHoopfiTlMirM- $SaMssion«#i student ID 
^AfestkHp Plaa 
539-1291 




Muihittan VUeo Rentiti 

Blocithuster video 

1150 Wes^ Drive 537-2400 

130Sart>erLam 77&^)367 
lOOOWestloop 539-7631 
Jofn'i Ice Cream A VMeo 
1123 Westtoop Plaza 537-0069, 

Prime Tiine Video 
1122Uminea 539-4467 

Video Extra 

Village Ptaza Shopping Center 
537-1115 




their inexpensive prices. 

The Union not only offers 
movies but also has theme 
nights on weekends in Union 
Station. 

On Friday and Saturday 
nights. Union Station turns up 
the music and the dance 
lights. The Station plays host 
to a variety of dance mixes, 
such as Country Night, 
Christian Rock Myx, African- 
American Ntte and Latino 
Nite. 

"There's a lot of money 
put into the dance floor and 



equipment. It's one of the 
nicest systems that I've seen 
in town," Jamey Weiss, 
junior in management infor- 
mation systems, said. 

Between the equipment 
and variety of music. Union 
Station creates a mock club 
atmosphere, offering unlead- 
ed drinks and grill items. 
Weiss said if they could get 
enough people to come to the 
Station, it could be fun. 

"People walk in here, see 
only a few people in here and 
turn and walk back out," he 



JUSTIN STAHUUMColtaglan 



said. 

Christian Dance Myx 
draws the biggest dance 
crowd. 

"When people come back 
here for Christian rock night, 
they seem to have a good 
time." Weiss said. 

Astamendi said she's t>een 
to all the dance nights. She 
said she enjoys coming to 
them all, but her favorite is 
Latino Nite. 

"I just wish people would 
try it. They know it's there, but 
they just (kin'l go," she said. 



LmI WMk'i Mlfnlac wai all to ywtf htmi, 



► ASTROLOGY FOMCAST 




PISCES (FatLiMlaKti 20) 
Things will come easy 
for you this week. Make 
sure to thank your friends 
for all their gr^ deeds this 
week. It's time to put all 
your heart into doing what 
you truly love. For the 
weekend: Be creative about 
entertainment methods. 
ARCS(Mvdi21-Apn2(l) 
It's your turn to cheer up 
everyone around you. 
Private action is going to 
get you high recognition. 
Be on the lookout for terrif- 
ic financial breakthroughs. 
For the weekend: It's OK to 
splurge. The planets are on 
your side. 

TAURUS (AprlSI-Hiv 21) 
Don't take everything so 
personally. Lighten up. You 
bulls aren't usually known 
for being uptight, but this 
week has people thinking 



ottmwise. Keep educational 
nuUtns your top priority. For 
the weekend: Try something 
new and exciting. 
GElllNI(1liy2f>Kine21) 
Stan saving your pen- 
nies for that wonderful 
adventure you've been 
longing for. It's very 
important this WMk to think 
things through carefully. 
Let that special romantic 
inter»t know you're single. 
How else will they find 
out? For the weekend: Be 
playful. 

CANCER (JuM2Muiy 23) 
Take a deep breath. You 
feel as though you've been 
on a mission with absolute- 
ly no point. Sorry, but 
Mercury's tailspin has poor 
Cancer feeling a little lost. 
Use your spue time to find 
a new source of income. 
For the weekend: Stay 



home and balance your 
checkbook. 

L£0(Jiriy2Mug.23) 
You're feeling a lot 
more peaceful this week. 
Work hard on keeping a 
slippery relationship togeth- 
er. All that hard work has 
you drained, so make major 
decisions next week. For 
die weekend: Relax. 
VIRGO (Au»2»fispL 23) 
The work load is getting 
ready to pile up again, so 
watch out A roommate or 
co-worker offers excellent 
advice, so take it. A new 
romantic possibility jumps 
out of Ute blue. It could lie 
what you're leaking for. For 
the weekend: Your treat. 
UBRA(8ifi24<Oct.23) 
Last week was a time for 
you to collect yoiu- thoughts 
and relax. Now much work 
lies ahead, so be prepared. 



Venus has you feeling 
extremely romantic. Just 
follow your heart. For the 
weekeiKl: Be your flirta- 
tious self. 

SCORPK)(OcL24^.22) 
It's time for solo Scorpio 
to team to work with oth- 
ers. Although you're not 
known for diis, it's impor- 
tant you do so this week. 
Romance is prime from 
Monday to Wednesday. 
Use your head when finan- 
cial blunders pop up this 
week. For the weekend: 
You'll be upbeat and ener- 
getic. 

$AQITTARU$(Nm.2U)K.21} 
Watch out for a sneaky 
Aquarius. Sometimes 
things aren't as simple as 
they seem. Spend some 
time working ahead this 
week. You'll be so happy 
that you did. Romance 



looks keen. Jtisl be patient 
For the wrakcnd: You take 
the lead. 

CAPfllCOfiN(Oec.22>lia1») 
This is a good week to 
wrap up a lingering project. 
It will seem as though you 
arc working twice as hard 
as usual to keep from 
falling behind. Don't worry 
— that will soon vanish. 
Your energy level is low, so 
this is a good time to be 
alone. For the weekend: 
Take it easy. 

AQUARHfi(Jin.2&fab.1S} 
You've been moving in 
every direction lately, so 
slow down. Romance is 
headng up and looks better 
than ever. Because you're 
so caught up in work, 
you're feeling bored. Start 
that new project. For the 
weekend: Cheap has never 
looked so chic. 



6 




PORTS 



WOMIN'S TOP 8 INTRUMIRA^^ TEAMS 

2. Champs (H>) \y^ \J /''^^^ 

3. Seagrams (M) <l.jLJ^ r-'^vN J >^ 
4.PiB8taPhi (4^)} < J> />^ 
5. Kappa Kappa Gamma (W>) -^~_/-*^ fv' 



' ii « 



KANSiStTATICOUIQUN 



► WOMIN'S BASKETBALL 



K-State opens tourney play against OSU 



Collctun 

I 



Vs a brand-new season, but 
this time if a team ioses, 
tlrey*re done. 



K-Stalc (14-12, 6-8 in conference play) 
will get its last shot at a possible NCAA 
tournament bid this weekend in the Big 
Eight tournament. 

The fifth-seeded Cats will open play 
against fourth-seeded Oklahoma State (16- 
10. 7-7) Saturday. 

Tip-off will be tt noon at the 



Bicentennial Center in Salina. 

The Wildcats split two regular season 
meetings with the Cowgirls, with each team 
winning on the road. 

OiUahoma State defeated the Cats 72-63 
in Bramlage, and K-Staie held off a late run 
in Stillwater to win 57-56. 

"They know us pretty well, and we feel 
like we know what they're going to do," K- 
Statc coach Brian Agler said. 

One reason for the competitiveness of 
the series may be the similarity of styles. 

Both teams stress tenacious defense, 
with the Cowgirls boasting the second-best 
scoring defense in the conference and K- 
State ranking third 



"Oklahoma State has always been really 
competitive — very competitive in terms of 
their defense," Agler said. 

Thai defensive intensity was the key to 
Oklahoma State's victory in Manhattan, 
when they stifled K -State's motion offense. 

"OSU had us standing, and that's one 
thing we can't do offensively," Wildcat 
sophomore Missy Decker said. 

But it was K-State's defense that domi- 
nated in Stillwater, allowing the Cats to 
control the tempo and set up their oH'ensc. 

K-State never trailed, winning a low- 
scoring game behind 47.7-pcrcent shooting 
from the fleld. 

Agler said the Cats need another good 



effort to win in Salina. 

"We've got to make them play at our 
tempo," Agler said. 

"We've got to make ihem play against 
our offense." 

Oklahoma State coach Dick Halterman 
said he fears K-State might have an emo- 
tional advantage over his t«am going into 
the tournament. 

"K-State came into our place and beat us 
late in the season, and 1 think they'll play 
with a lot of confidence," he said. 

"1 think we're a team that has our heads 
down right now, Tltat may be one of our 
biggest challenges," 

The Cowgirls lost three of their last four 



games in what Halterman described as a 
disaf^inting season, 

"I think our players are disappointed in 
the kind of season they've had." Halterman 
said. 

"One of our weaknesses might be our 
balance. When things aren't going well, 
most teams have a go-to player who'll 
respond and get you the win. We really 
don't have a go-to player." 

But Agler said he disagreed, noting that 
1 1 Cowgirls have played in the NCAA 
tournament, 

"Oklahoma State is a veteran team," he 
said. 

"They're very balanced." 



► BIQ EIGHT TOURNAMENT FLASHBACK 

Tigers beat the odds last year 



CotlctlH 

Anything can happen in the Big 
Eight Tournament — just ask the 
Missouri Tigers. 

After entering the tournament 
as the No, 7 seed, the Tigers swept 
through two top lO-ranked oppo- 
nents and captured the Big Eight 
title. 

The road for the Tigers was a 
bumpy one as the Tigers disman- 
tled the Kansas Jayhawks in the 
first round and the Oklahoma State 
Cowgirls in the semifinals. 

That left the Tigers a date with 
No. 2-ranked and No. 1 -seeded 
Colorado. 

After battling through 39 min- 
utes and 58 seconds of close bas- 
ketball, Colorado had a two-point 
lead. 

But the Tigers had one last 
chance to tie the game, when 
sophomore Erika Martin was 
fouled. 

With the fate of the Missouri 
squad's season on Martin's shoul- 
ders, she stepped up to the line and 
coolly swished both ends of the 
one-and-cA. 

"No pressure at all," Martin 
said. 

"I just stepped up to the line. 
and 1 made them. However, I did 
realize that I had to make them. 
My teammates told me before I 
shot that I had to make them. They 
went in, and I knew it all the way." 

With Martin's free throws, the 
game we|^ into overtime, where 
Martin continued to dominate. 

She scored four points in the 
cKtra period to lead the Tigers to 
the 79-71 upset victory over the 
Buffs. 

"This was a special win for our 



counted out 
at th« b*gln> 
ning, but w« 
WOT* In all 
tha gannaa 
thraughout 
tha aaaaon." 

JOANN RUTHEKKIRD 

Missouri 
tMSkattMM oo«ch 



seniors, 

Missouri 

coach 

Joann 

Rutherford 

said. 

"We 
were count 
ed out at 
the begin- 
ning, but 
we were in 
all of our 
games 
throughout 
the regular 
season." 

People probably had a good 
reason to overtook the Tigers, 
since they were a No. 7-sced team. 

They entered the tournament 
with only a 9-17 record, but with 
the win, the Tigers are going to the 
NCAA Tournament for the first 
time since 1986. 

It was the lowest-seeded team 
in the Big Eight Tournament histo- 
ry to win the championship. 

Missouri's Nikki Smith was 
selected as the Tournament's Most 
Valuable Player after scoring 18 
points in the championship game, 
along with a combined 36 points in 
the Tigers' two previous games, 

"It hasn't sunk in on me yet." 
Smith said. "I'm happy for the 
whole team. I guess that I'm in a 
zone now. 1 didn't even feel like I 
was shooting. 

"I hope 1 don't have to leave the 
zone," 

Colorado coach Ceal Barry 
explained the Buffaloes' loss in 
just one sentence. 

"The difference in the game 
was that we got out -re bounded," 
Barry said. 




► MEN'S BASKETBALL 



Cats look to close 
season with a win 



MARK UFVmOWBLUColtegisn 

Junior center George Hill tries to power up a shot whii« being tur- 
rounded by a t«am of Nebratka dafenders Wadneaday night. 



TOOOSnWMIT 

Cdleiiin 

Wednesday night, the Belvis 
Noland Show was center-stage at 
Bramlage Coliseum. 

With the regular season fmale 
against Colorado Saturday. K- 
State head basketball coach Tom 
Asbury is hoping that the show 
has not left town yet. 

The senior forward's career- 
high 3I-point outburst in 
Wednesday's 75-73 victory led 
the Wildcats to their first victory 
in more than a month. With one 
game left on the docket. Asbury 
said he is hoping that another win 
would serve as a confidence- 
builder going into the Big Eight 
Tournament. 

"Obviously, we needed a win 
desperately, and we need another 
one on Saturday and see if we 
can't go into the Big Eight 
Tournament with some momen- 
tum." Asbury said. 

Colorado comes to Manhatt») 
standing seventh in the Big Eight 
Conference, one place ahead of 
the cellar-dwelling Cats. 

The Buffaloes have never won 
in Bramlage Coliseum and 
haven't won in Manhattan since 
1964. 

But even with their success 
against Colorado at home and 
after Wednesday's victory over 
NCAA Tournament hopeful 
Nebraska, ihc Cats arc in no way 
looking pa.st the Buffaloes. 

Colorado thrashed the Cats in 



Boulder, Colo., earlier this season 
84-68. 

in that 16-point loss, the 
Buffaloes limited Noland to 10 
points. 

Even though Asbury contends 
this is not a one-man team, he 
said Noland s play is a gauge of 
his team's success, 

"As he's gone, we've gone," 
Asbury said. "When he's played 
well this year, we've been a 
fighter." 

In fact, after the Nebraska 
game, Asbury said Noland could 
be taking even more shots, 

"As a matter of fact, I thought 
he passed up some shots he nor- 
mally wouldn't — taking 20, 
though, he didn't pass up a whole 
lot of 'em." 

Asbury said he is not going to 
rely on Noland to carry the Cats. 

"We don't want to be a one- 
man team," Asbury said. "It's 
never been a design of ours," 

Wednesday's Noland-led vic- 
tory was a measure of redemption 
for the Cats. 

Asbury said the first Colorado 
game and the 22-point loss earlier 
this season lo Nebraska in 
Lincoln are the two low points 
for the team this season. 

"Those were both stinkers. 
They were both on the road, and 
they were both real bad games 
for us," Asbury said. "We got an 
opportunity to pay one back, and 
now we get a chance (oxlo the 
other." 



► TINNtt 



Netters look to stop losing streak 



The K-State women's tennis team 
has &nen on some hard timea. 

After going 3-1 to itart the seasoa, 
the Wildcats are now 3-4 and will try 
to break a three -game losing slfc^ 
this weekend as they travel to Des 
Moines. Iowa, to face Drake and 
Nottbcm miaoui. 

K-State a coasiag aff a diM|»^t> 
ing 6-3 ]o« lo die New MeiJeo lobai 
Saturday iftenioon ai dv ood 




IrfgralRi' 

A bright nott dia . — 
day. iboupi. 

K-State all- American Karlna 
Kuregian snapped a personal tlnrfr- 



matcb losing streak by posting a win 
in the No. 1 singles division. 

Despite the victory, Wildcat tennis 
coach Steve Bielati said Kuregtan has 
a way to go. 

"She managed to pull out her 
match in ttave sett," Bietau said. "In 
reality, she didn't piay very well." 

Kuregian also paired up with 
Martine Shrubfole to capture their 
fourth-$tt light victory, improving 
their No ! ioubleii record to ^ 1 this 
lea&oc 

{J 16 towt 
nAinfatr of 

./'■DM doublet 

»« SiMHi lald. That 

i:n ^ wdl M the Riviera last fiU " 

The Cati will lemtia in Dea 

Moiacf Sunday to meet Northern 



Bietau .^aid he believes his team's 
problems during its losing atreak are 
mental 

"It is very important that we have 
an overall better attitude on the court." 
Bietau said. 

"I am not saying that we don't do 
some things right on the court. U is 
very important that each and all of our 
players give everything they've got. 
They have lo be williog to go out and 
fight each competitor that iOBf meet** 

Following the trip to the Hawkeyc 
sute, the Cats wiU hit die toad oncc 
■gain. 

Durim ipritig break, the Cus wItt 
riad tbemielvet in New Orleem 
match -ups with TuUne, Rice ud 
Cormtl. 

K-Staie will not play at home until 
April 2. when the Cau will be host to 
conference foe Oklahoma State. 



Kansas seniors ready to battle OSU 



LAWRENCE — Kansas seniors Oieg 
Ostcrtag and Greg Gurley couldn't have picked a 
more dramatic game for their final chance to 
play at Allen Field House. 

The game Sunday between the third-ranked 
Jayhawks and No. 18 Oklahoma State will 
decide the Big Eight conference championship. 

It will also be the last game for the 7-foot, 2- 
inch Ostertag and the 6' 5" Gurley. 

The two players arc a study in contrast. Coach 
Roy Williams said. 

"Greg Ostertag has been the most talked- 



about player in the seven years 1 ' vc been here, 
either bragging on him or wondering why he's 
not doing mote," Williams said. 

Ostertag, the Big Eight's career block leader, 
has caused Williaras both joy and frustration. 

"I've gotten more frustrated in his four years 
than anybody else," Williams said. "But at the 
same time. I've enjoyed him as much or more 
than any young man I've ever coached. He's 
really a unique young man." 

Gurley came to the Jayhawks as the Kansas 
high-school player of the year. After suffering 
back injuries his freshman year, Gurley never 
returned to full strength. 



for i 



^ BASEBALL 



K-State ready for weekend homestand 



Collcllan 

If the K-State baseball 
team wants to win any games 
this week^d, it needs three 

thing'- 

Good pitching. 

Good hitting. 

Oh, and a litde help from 
Mother Namrc. 

The return of Old Man 
Winter has already denied 
the Wildcats a shot against 
Wichita State. 



K-State was scheduled to 
take on the Shockers 
Wednesday and Thursday, 
but the snowy weather forced 
those games to be resched- 
uled for April 13 in Salina 
and May 1 in Wichita. 

If the weather cooperates, 
the Cats will have an oppor- 
tunity to improve their 4-3 
record in this weekend's first 
homestand of the year. 

K-State is scheduled to 
face Orandview College at 3 



p.m. Friday and again at I 
p.m. Saturday in a double- 
header. 

The Cau are also slated to 
play the Northern Iowa 
Panthers at I p.m. Sunday. 

Last weekend was good 
for the Cats. 

They won two of three 
games in tournament action 
in Lake Charles, La, 

K-State took Oral Roberts 
to extra innings before finally 
scoring the go-ahead run on 



an Eagle error to seal the 3-2 
win. 

Saturday saw the Cats 
jump out to an early lead 
against the Creighton 
Bluejays, but they fell flat in 
the late innings of the game 
to lose. 8-6, 

The Cats salvaged their 
second victory in Sunday's 
contest against McNeese 
State, as they held off a 
ninth-inning Cowboy surge 
to secure a 12-10 victory. 



> CLUBS 



Hockey team to raise money 



JAMW CONOIIOn 



CoUcflwi 

Don't pack those ice 
skates away yet. 

The second-annual Skate 
with the Cats for diose inter- 
ested in the K-State Ice 
Hockey Club will be from 8 
to 10 p,m. Saturday at the 
City l^rk ice rink. 

The ciub members are 
raising money so they can 
compete in their last two 
tournaments of the season, 
said Scott Thorne, senior in 
marketing and captain of the 
club. 

"You can rent skates and 
have a shoot-out with the 
goalie to win prizes," said 
Chuck Downey, graduate in 
horticulture and president of 
the club. 

Downey said last year the 



club raised $200 from the 
event. This year, it hopes to 
surpass that. 

"We're hoping to make 
$300 this year." Downey 
said, 

tkiwney said he hopes as 
many people come to the 
event as possible because it is 
important to the team to raise 
as much money as possible, 

"All the money goes 
directly for the hotels, and if 
we do really good raising 
money, we are trying to have 
a tournament against 
Nebraska and Iowa State in 
Kansas City." Downey said, 

Jesse Meadows, freshman 
in wildlife biology, said 
because the rink is so small in 
Manhattan, they ate unable to 
have practices unless they go 
to Kansas City, where each 



team member has to pay for 
skating time and transporta- 
tion. 

Meadows said that besides 
doing the Skate with the Cats 
fund-raising event, the team 
also has several other 
fundraisers throughout their 
season. 

"We sell T-shirts and 
bumper stickers. We're stage 
hands at concerts, and we 
sometimes clean Bramlage," 
Meadows said. 

KMKF-FM 101.5 will be 
broadcasting live at the event. 
There will also be T-shirts 
and hocke.y jerseys for sale, 
Thome said. 

Downey said the admis- 
sion for Saturday's event will 
be SI. SO at the door, and 
skates will be available for 
rental 




IVERSIONS 



JBIIIMtililTlieOilKIWII 



-p."' 



ARTS AND ENTERTAINMENT CALENDAR 



FMiV 

/][, Acoustic Jammefs- 

9p.m. at Bleacheis 

^/l*QuizStKW-7mJ 

9:30 p.m at Union Foium Hal. 
Tickets am tl. 75. 



0/)'QuzShcw'-7p.tn, 
at Union Forum Hal. Tckett ate 
II .75. 

^/) "Stiwrfly - 9:30 pjn. 
al Union Fonm W 



J}(^ DopWlafns.clafwwt 
and Frank Sidorlsky, tasset 
hom— 3p.m.8tAIIFaWii 
Chapal. 



macHa^igM 



► CROSSWORD 



ACROSS 

1 dampen 

patriarch 

4 Contents 

Ota sock? 

8 Highway 

access 
12 Past 
13 "— Named 
Sue" 

14 Islamic 
bigwig 

15 Legit 

17 Wheels of 
lortune? 

18 Gospels' 
follow-up 



38 Button 



37 Grim 

40 "Macbeth.' 
e.g. 

41 Saharan 

42 Jackpots 

46 Fkjss 
structure 

47 "Exodus" 
autlwr 

48 Storm 
center 

49 Nosegay 

50 Bloke 

51 Morning 
moisture 



ploy 

2 I, to 
Caesar 

3 Example 

Solution tim* 



18 They often DOWN 
go out with 1 Pugilistic 
sailors 

20 Microsoft 
founder 

22 Unadorned 

24 San — 
Obispo, 
Calif. 

25 Innlteeper 

29 Simpson's 
judge 

30 Mongol 
tents 

31 Aries 
appellation 

32 Geniality 

34 Injure 
severely 

35 Jurvgfrau 
etal. 



of phUart- 
thropy 

4 Floats 
through 
ttwilr 

5 Wading 
bird 

6 Affirma- 
tive action 

7 Turn blue? 

8 Word with 
rrupor 
pitcher 

9 In the 
thick of 

10 Marceau's 
craft 

11 Paid 
players 

16 "Dead 
man's 
hand" 
features 



28 mini. 



s'c 


A 


R 


1 


M 


A 





1 


o 


R 


s 





4° 

WIA 


T 
P 


E 


U 


S 


E 


B 


E 


A 


N 


c| 


3 


A 


C 


O 


C 


T 





1^1 


|L 


O 


L 


A^H 


■MpIi 


C 


C 


A 


L 


I 


L 


L 


1 


A 


A 
L 


M 

A 


IP 


H 


M 


D 
1 


■ l 

S E 


A 

M 


B 
1 


P 


A 


R 


■ 





1 


I 


f^ 


A 0, 


E 


8 


P 


1 


C 


c 


A 





1 


Vll^^ 


^■h 


A 


R 


dHlIa 


w 


Y 


E 


R 





T 


1 


8 


1 


E 


R 


A 


m** 


& 


V 
E 


A 
N 



E 


U 
Q 


N 

b 


K 

s' 


R 
S 


E 


M 

A 


1 


E 


N 


[a. 


S 


T 



VMterday's •nawar 



EuGiNESiamK 

19 Speaker 
of baae- 
ballkKS 

20 Smooth- 
tongue 

21 Sedan, 
for one 

22 Mikhail's 
successor 

23 Chip in a 
chip 

25 Dislodge 

26 Sennas 
shrink 

27 Spring 
wind? 

28 TV trophy 
30 The yellow 

part 

33 Almost not 

34 Average 

36 ExplOSkKi 

37 Porridge 

38 Small 
combo 

39 Needs 
medical 
help 

40 Nabokov 
txxikot 
1957 

42 Computer 
protilem 

43 Galena, 
e.g. 

44 Verily 
45TerKla 

tear 



t 


2 


3 


1 


4 


5 


6 


7 


1 


8 


9 


i6 


11 


li 






ii 








14 








IS 














IT 








Bi 


18 








pa 












2G 


21 








■ 




M 








24 






, ■ 


is 












n 


M 


29 






P 


30 










P 


il 






a 






5^ 










P 












Is 








■ 












37 


3S 


3S 






pa 


40 








pa 


4t 








1 




4a 












*i 


4l 








4T 








1 


4A 






48 








50 








ii 






VVI lUDCn? '^'^' answers to today's crossword, call 
V 1 U M r E II 1 1 -90(M54«a73 < 99c per minute, touch- 
tofw/ rotary pHo«i8s. (18+ only ) A King Features sort/ice, NYC. 



CRYPTOQUIP 

DPNZSIT DBEUJ BI QOU 

NJE'L AUFE, SQ'L 

PBTSFNP QONQ IBNO 

O N A D N S J L . 

Yesterday's Cryptoquip: 1 GUESS THE FOUND- 
ING FATHERS OFOURCOUNTRY HAD HARDY CON- 
STITUTIONS. 

Today's Cryptoquip clue: D equals P 



NEWCRYPTOOUtP flOOff/Send $4 .50 (check/m.o.) to 
CryptoClassics BooK2. PO Box 64 1 1 , Rivorlon NJ 08077. 



The Cryptoquip is a substitution cipher in which one 
letter stands for another. If you think that X equals O, It 
will equal O throughout the puzzle. Single letters, short 
words and words using an apostrophe give you clues to 
locating vowels. Solution Is by trial and error. 



► CAIMN AND HOBBW 



BoiWATimoN 



WM IS \l ? 




ITS *<■ WWtRS euOCK 
f{JJ (Ml It ON TOP OF 
"WUB. OEStC WW wot 

lew ci^HT want iwRi 
tM Matte.' 





1 WST tt YEARS 

AHtw or W1 IWt. 




► NON SIQUITER 



Wnn 







► FOXTROT 



BolAmind 



IM btMHb Do**! 
mno THE BA&EH^T 
To CMltK FoS S»«R- 
NATURAl ACTIVITY. 




I 



IF AMYbNC MAKTSIb 
CpMI IPrtc V«T« Mt, 
TMrrirt Most TMAH 
WtLOOMt. 





WHY IS iT THW 
BA$U«NTS PfS. 
ALWAYS ScARiEW 

WWflTMEM 
toK? 



MoffiTHMMoSn 

it> wmrr a8owt 

*utw«T>«a 




»- UNKNOWN 



BUNDON Pboc/Collbcun 




► naviiw 



Reader chides Cassie for belittling answer 




DcarCanie, 

1 believe that you are an "ignorant 
and ridiculous human being if you 
don't see how stupid, insensitive and 
feeble-minded" your response was to 
Equal Time. 

There have been many oppressed 
nationalities throughout the years. 
There should be no legitimate reason 
why every nationality should not be 
given a month to celebrate their cul- 
ture, heritage and race. 

If you still do not agree with the 
opinion of giving all nationalities 
equal time, why don't you state your 
opinion on the matter, instead of 
falling back on the ability to put some- 
one else down because of your own 
views. It is a free country. Everyone is 



entitled to their own opinion. 

However, attacking someorw is not an 

opinion — it is a cop-out, an abuse of 

the privilege of having your own col- 

unui. 

Signed, Equal Time II 

Dear Equal Time 0, 

I stanid behind my rcspome to your 
predecessor. If you want to consider 
while supremacists David Duke and 
Michael Metzker and a murderer such 
as John Wilkes Booth as leaders of 
"White History" to be lauded for an 
entire month, do so. 

1 feel I should warn you, though — 
if you plan on having a celebration for 
them, burning a cross within city limits 
is against the law. I advise against it. 



TV quiz show 
cheated to get 
higher ratings 



MKOLAZYTKOW 




Qiiz Show will ba playing at 
Union FbnmHii at? and 9:30.. 




Colk|un 

They rehearsed heavy breathing, learned to 
stutter, bite their tips and wipe their brows, at the 
same time prostituting their intellects in front of 
millions of viewers. 

They were contestants on 'Twenty One," a 
quiz show at the peak of its popularity and 
deception in 
the late 1950s. 

The movie, 
"Quiz Show." 
portrays a 
"Jeopardy'* of 
sorts, with 
cash prizes so 
high and the 
potential for 
fame so great 
one could not help but dream of being a contes- 
tant. 

Living rooms full of children and parents 
gathered religiously around their TV sets after 
dinner to watch the show. 

"Audiences want to watch the money, not 
great displays of intellect," said Dan Enright 
(David Paymer), the show's crooked producer. 

And money flowing they did see. What they 
didn't sec was the popular contestant getting the 
answers before the show. 

Week after week, the ratings of the show were 
measured, and week after week, the popular con- 
testant would pull a seemingly flawless win. That 
is, until the ratings plateaued, as in the case of 
Herbie Stempel (John Tunurro). 

Stempel, 4 lower-class Jew from the Bronx, 
had always dreamed of fame. The power and 
money he tasted in his short residency on the 
show was enough to make him a bitter man when 
told to "take a dive." 

Charles Van Doren (Ralph Fiennes). a young 
well-to-do professor at Columbia University, was 
Stempel' s successor. Not only was Viin Doren an 
impeccably handsome fellow, but he also came 
from a intellectually superior family. All this 
made him the perfect contestant — the one but 
would surely boost ratings for the show, and rat- 
ings were what it was all about. 

It was astounding to see a man like Van Doren 
getting pulled into the web of deception in this 
extraordinary movie, which was directed and 
produced by Robert Redford. 

While sitting at the edge of their scats, view- 
ers are also faced with the lurking question of 
what they would do in the contestants' situations. 
It's an "Indecent Proposal" of sorts. Instead of 
selling their bodies, the contestants sell their 
integrity. 

Fiennes. previously seen as the vile comman- 
dant in "Schindler's List." delivers an exhilarat- 
ing performance as a man lorn between seeking 
his own fame or living in the shadow of his 
famous father. 

Turturro, previously seen as Pauly in "Jungle 
Fever," is pitifully funny when driven to hysteria, 
in his intentions of fighting the power. He is the 
epitome of a man who can be bought and sold in 
the time it takes one to say 'Twenty One." 

"Quiz Show," which was nominated for a best 
picture Oscar, is charged with psychologically 
provoking scenes, excellent camera work and 
frightening visions of a man destroyed by the 
very system that built him up to god status. 



l ^ i m<At < «»niim ' «t«T fT TT <m»t<r«'nmtnn.mimm«ni'»i»<w«tm»ti»tTr 



We specialize in bridal, 
special occasion fabric & accessories 
& tuxedos. /^SUfe^ Lt^ 

314Poyntz 776-6100 

\, l ^, ,„,, f„,M,M..,;;rTn*'"""""""""""""""""^""" 




1^ Kansas State Union jt^ 

and 

TtotterHall 





SaL 9 mjn.-lOrSOiun.aSaii.N'oaa- KHSOiun. 

Come Join us when the dorm oafeteriaa are closedl 



rinterndtionai ] 
Dance Kite 



r]Q 



Friday, 
Morcn 3 




COUNTRY 
NITE 



SI ril 



10p-1a 

Saturday, 
March 4 



UNION 

smioN 





wQre 



Great Food "^ 

Nachos W^ 
urgers ^ 
etc. 

SI Bottles THs Weekend 
Pool & Darts 

105 NOilh 3Td. 




araDs 

$5 fbr up lo 20 words 
lOGKafae 532^5555 



in Friday. March 3^ 199g 



KANSAS STATC COLLEGIAN 



I 



USD 383 discusses 
increasing user fees 



CONTINUED FROM PAGE I 

fication in the fourth category of 
schools, which arc those schools with 
the highest enrollment. 

The state Hnance law gives more 
financial assistance to smaller 
scixxiis. 

Yunk said the district is 19th from 
the bottom in the state in per-student 
spending at $3,905 per stydent. 

The Derby school district has had 
three local option-tax proposals fail, 
Yunk said, 

Derby has had to reduce iLs staff 
by 37, eliminate administrative ser- 
vices, icduce custodial services so the 
schools arc only cleaned every other 
day and install user fees for studenLs 
and activities. Yunk said. 

Yunk said students pay $71 per 
spon to compete in athletics and $46 
to be a cheerleader at Derby. 

He said without local option-tax 
dollars, the distria might be forced to 
take such steps. 

"That's the picture of what we 
might be looking at." Yunk said. 

A 12-perccnt increase would mean 
the option tax on a $70,0rX} home 
would increase from $25.55 to 
$175.17 a year. 

With a decision still to be mode, 
board members expressed some con- 
cerns on implementing the user fees. 

Board Member Deb Nuss 
expressed some concerns about fami- 
lies who cannot afTotd the fees, espe- 



cially families with several childrcn. 

Yunk said no decisioas have been 
made, btii possible ways to accommo- 
date lower-income families would be 
to provide a payment schedule or cap 
the chai:ges to a cenain number of Stu- 
denLs in one family. 

Mary Nichols, board member, also 
expressed a concern that she would 
not want to .sec children not able to 
participate in activities. 

The recommendations presented 
to the board included a $5 increase in 
textbook-ienlal fees for all but kinder- 
garten students, a materials fee of $20 
to pay for consumable malcriais and a 
S3 towel rental fee for secondary stu- 
dents in physical-education classes 
arxJ athletics. 

High-school students could face 
increases in optional cosLs, including 
a S3 increase in the cost of student- 
activity tickets, the implemenlalion of 
a $20 charge for driver' s-fducation 
elates and a S9 increase in parking. 

Manhattan High School juniors 
and seniors could sec the price of 
their parking permits escalate ftum $1 
to $10. 

Bcv Evcrsmeyer, board member, 
said additional funding is important 
because teachers are taking money 
out of iheir own pockets to fiind pro- 
jects for their classrooms. 

"I wLsh we had enough money to 
provide diesc things hee to students, 
but we can't," Eversmeyer said. 



APARTAAENT gc 




Alliance 
Property Management 

Houses and apartments (or rent 

Available June 1 & August 1 

for 12-month leases. 

1- to 6-b^droom units available. 

Call now for best selection I 
539^357 

I Mon.-Fri., 10 a.m. -5 p.m. ■ 



WINSTON PLACE 
APARTMENTS 

• Roomy 1 & 2 bedroom 

• Fully Carpeted 

• Central Heat &Air 

• Fireplace & Balconies 

• Pool & Laundry FaciUtira 

• Water & TVasti Paid 

• Small Pets Accepted 

3108 Winttoii PUot 
S39-9»9 



MAKE ANDERSON PLACE your home 

AWAY FROM HOME! 

Now leasing for 1995-96 

•2 bedrooms •Vi block from campus 

•Furnished and unfurnished 

Showings every Monday through Friday 3-5 p.m. 



1852 Anderson Place #4 
776-1 148 



Senate changes internal 
allocation process 



CONTINUED FROM PAGE 1 

said the importance of the 
Collegian as a student service can 
be shown during an ice sloirm last 
semester. 

"The Collegian staff had to put 
together a smaller paper with the 
resources they had available," 
Carney said. 

"Many groups complained, 
and this was possibly because 
their news was not published." 

Bryndon Meinhardt. Privileged 
Fee Committee chair, said his com- 
mittee chose to set the fee after 
consulting all parties and carefully 
researching the problem. 

The amendment to the bill 



required a two-thirds vote. It was 
voted down 33-21-1. The Student 
Publications Activity Fee will be 
$1 .90 next semester. 

Money saved by reduction of 
the Student Publication 
Equipment Fee will be put in the 
Student Activity Fee. This will 
include an increase in funds 
available for academic competi- 
tion teams and other student 
groups. 

Student Governing Association 
also changed the way it allocated 
money for itself. The Office of 
Student Activities and Services 
will now receive money from a 
separate account. 




VERTISE 

intlK 

QOlffli 



PEOPLE'S 
IGROCERY CO-OP 



nmitt-. I ).v I.. 



• Organic Produce 
I' Bulk Kansas Honey 
I* Bulk Herbs & Spices 

•Domestic 8l Importeij 

Cheeses 

Mon.-Fri. to i.iTi.-fi p.m. 

Sil. 9 I. IT). -5 p.m. 

CloKd Sundiyi 

811 COLORADO 



(colortyme) 



WHATS RIGHT FOR YOU. 

50% OFF 

1st Months Rent 

W/COUpOD 

Starting @S7.99 

per^w^ek 

We Have: 
19" TV's 
Dinettes 
Microwaves 
VCR's 

Shelf Stereos 
Dorm Refrigerators 

1235 Washington, 

Junction City 

762-7602 




Rfst Ba pl 



^E 



ist Church 



Sunday Worship 11 a.m. 
Church School 9:45 a.m. 

For free transportation within city limits, 

call the church. 

Pattors Kartfi h Aim Selig 

2121 Blue Hills Rd. 539-8691 

An Amencan Baptist Congregation 



Grace Baptist Church 

(2901 Dickens - 2 tXks. E. of Selh CNM) 

♦ Sunday ♦ 
Two Unique Worship Opportunities 

B:15 ♦ 10:45 a.m. 

Bible Classes For All Ages - 9:30 a.m. 

Body Lite or Care Cells 6 p.m. 

77&4M24 



Manhattan Mennonite 
Church 

SuTKtey Sdnot 9:30 a.m., Wor^ 10:45 a.m. 

OavkJ Jones, Interim Pastor 
10th end Fremont UMQTS 

CttlU Care Avaiiatile 




vtsrvttv coMHUwn 
cmiQCK 

Welcome Back, Students 

Morning Worship 8:30 & 10:45 a.m. 

Sunday School 9:45 a.m. 
Sunciay Evening Worship 6 p.m. 

1st, 3rd & 5lti Sundays 

CARE CEU.S (Small Groups) 

6 p.m. 2nd & 4th Sundays 

3001 FL Riley Blvd. 537-7173 



Sr. Isidore's 
Cathoiic Student C0nt$r 

Masses Sat 5 p.tn. 

Sun. 9:30, lU.m tSpm 

CoolMsions: Sal. 3:30 p.m 

711 DenleMi 539-7496 

duplak): Fimer KtWi Wetwr 



|f7^iUnitarlan-Unlversalitl 
^i>' Fellowship 

leuvi BW •Mad (H^t tTTV Mm M 
gn IwMHl M. (Hull. tlK Vn *g«t ■ » MM. 

•l-fTfrrmrrr nm i >«r>f i in hi i mnaaiii' 

Sunday School and SaivlCM 

FOR WFORHATION CAU. S3MM< n SST-MIS. 



SEVEN DOLORS 
CATHOLIC CHURCH 

•SUNDAY MASSES* 

7:30 a.m.-9 a.m.-r0:30 a.m.-Noon 

SATURDAY MASS 6 p.m. 

■HOLY DAr MASSES 

7:15 a.m.-5:15 p.m. or 7 p.m. 

•SATURDAY CONFESSIONS' 

4:30 p,m.-5:30 p.m. 

CORNER OF JUUEHE A PIERRE 

731 Plerrt 77M115 




St. Francis 
Canterbury 
Episcopal 
Campus Ministry 

Eucharist & Guitar 

in Danforth Chapel 

Eveiy Sunday at 5 p.m. 

Rev. Cathy Chittendtn-Batctfm 

532-9099 

Joint Fellowship Time 

in between worship 

services 




Lutheran 

Campus 

Ministry 

New Wor»lup Time 

Sunday 7:15 p.m. 
Danforth Chapel 
"Now tht Feast and CeUbration" 
College Liturgy & 
Holy Communion 
Pastor Jayne Thompson 
539-4451 
— Open to AM — 



First Lutheran 

10th & Poyntz 537^32 

Worship at 8:30 and 11 a.m. 

Sunday Sctiool for all ages at 9:40 a.m. 



FIRST UNITED 

METHODIST CHURCH 

8:30 & 11 a.m. Worship 
9:45 a.m. Church School 

Nursery provt(ied for all servicts 
Omer G. Tittle. Pastor 

612 Poyntz 776-8821 

DIAL-A-PRAYER 776-9569 



ST LUKE'S 
LUTHERAN CHURCH 

(LCMS) 
Campus Pastor James Gau 

Sun. Sand 10:45 a.m. 

Sat. Worship 6 p.m. 

Bible Class Sunday 9:30 a.m. 

330 N. Sunset Ave. 539-2604 



Christian Science Church 

$11 WMtvttwDMv* 
10 a.m. Sunday Service & School 
f 7;30p.rrL Ttitimofw Mseting 
«ngRoaffl-ia6N.4m 



7mm 



-Lour 
Church 
Could be 
Here. 




FIRST CHRISTIAN CHURCH 

DtSCIPUS OF CHRIST 

Worship & Praise B;30 a.m 

Tradittonal Worship 10:55 a.m 

Christian Education 



? 



WseMy College Programs 

LJv« Bioadcaal 11:30 i.m 95 3 FM 

W»d. Eva BOie Study A Youth PiDgwTK 

PASTOR Oft. DONALD E BREZAVAR 

COIXEQE MINISTER REV. KARL J. 6UNJES 

SthI HunteMl TTH7W 



Rrst Congregational Church 

700 Poyntz (Poyntz and JulJelte) S37-7006 

Sunday School 9:30 a.m. 

Worship 10:45 a.ni. 

Sennon: 

'Cau^tlnARipTKie' 

Sunday, March 5 

Rev. Donald Longbonom 





AMERICAN BAPTIST 

CAMPUS MINISTRY 

1001 Anderson Avenue 
539-3051 

Kathy Donlay, campus minister, is 

available tor counseling, 

conversation and ottier stuff. Call 

[he office or drop by the Baptist 

Campus Center on the romer of 

Anderson and Denison. 




CRESTVIEW 

CHRISTIAN 

CHURCH 

English Worship 10:30 a.m. & 6:30 p.m. 

Sunday School 9:15 a.m. 

Chinese Worship 1 p.m. 

4761 TuttleCrwk Blvd. 

(3 iriiK north of Kimtwl Av«.) 

77M798 




i 



A 




LASSIFIEDS 



KANSAS STATE COLLEGLVN 



OUR BASIC RATE 

To run 10 imrii or li«« tor ont djy 
ii IS. ta weh worI owr 10 MM lOt 
B*r flOfd. CiM S334US tor cMMcutlv* 



DEADLINBS 

Cluilftwl Kit mud bt pttMd b* 
noon tht dw bttort Hw dil* Ow M 
rurw. CIMSIM dipliridc muMbt 
pwCw by * p.m. two vrarMnQ vvyi 
Mfon tm dal* lh« id runt. 



HOW TO MY 

JUl dK iWidi iwMrt bi |wld in 

•^ngp iMltta you htvi m ^ 

mbdhmo ifioourtt wnn 8tudiM 

orVtetara 



Call 532-6555 
to place your classified. 




BULLETIN 
BOARD 



Announcwnants 



ADVANCED FLIGHT Train 
tng plus ground ftchoot 
fof private, initrumenr 
and multi-engins rat 
ingi K-State Flying 
Club spprovad instruc- 
tor. Hugh Irvin, 



COME FLV Witt) ui, KStala 
Ryiog Club has ^vb air- 
planat. For b«ii pricas 
call Troy Broclcway. 
776-8736 after 5;30p.m. 



VOYEURS. Wa look out 
n>r itudwita battar than 
any othar cradit card 
Call 1-SOOCITISANK 
to apply. Mo freak*. 



Tight on 
Cash? 




MANHATTAN 

BIOMF-mCAL CENTER 

mo Cardan wmy 

776-9 !77 



0201 



Lo«t and Found 



Faun4 ■#■ •■•• b* 
placed fr«a tar thra* 



FOUfgD: LADIES gold 
watch In the partdng lot 
northaait of Bluamont 
on Merch 3. Cell 
776-467610 IdentiV 

FOUND: MARCH 1. ring in 
woman'i ratlroom In 
Calvin Hall. Plaaae call 
to Identify, 633-6180. 

FOUND: NEGATIVES In 
north perking lot of Ju*- 
(In Hefl. Cell 532-6993. 

0301 



Panonals 



Wo require a farm «f 
picture ID IKtU, 4tlv 
ar'e licenae or othar) 
when piecing e par- 



thing I Jutt Do 111 Beit 
WItfia*. 



COREY, HAPPV one year 
annlver«arvl Hope wa 
Mlabrete many moral I 
love Vou I Tracy 

00 OO mOYCATSI You 

beat KU once, lo lat'a 
•tart with Oklahoma 
•nd win the whole 




TOASTMASTERS A mu- 
tual aupport group for 
people who went to Im- 
prove their public 
apaaUrvfl akille. Alao, en 
Inlaraatlng forum. We 
meet twice monthly, 
Vititon welcome. Call 
Charlie. 77S-3302. 



Partt»a-n>Mef« 



ADD A aplaeh to your naxi 
baah. Great mid-term- 
pertiea begin with Wot- 
N-WIld Mobile Hot Tub 
rantala. 837-1626. 



ADD AN extra touch of 
claai 10 your next par- 
ty. Call Wayne 'I Water 
Party to rent a ponable 
hoi tub 637-7687, 
539-7661. 

COLDEST BEER on We«t 
aldal Oraai (election of 
aplrlta. Folaon liquor 
acroaa from Food 4 
Lata. 31<16 Andarion. 
637-0006. 



10D 



MOUSING/ 
REAL ESTATE 



Por flMrt- 



AVAILABLE IMMEDIATE- 
LY, tummer and fall. 
Very nice one, two. 
Ihraa and four-bed- 
room apartmanta. 
Cloie to campua with 
great pricea. 637-1666, 
637-2919. 

AVAILABLE 1*1 Mey. 

LarQB one-bedrocirn. 
two blocks lOuth of 
campuf, 1620 Fairchild, 
S380. Waters Iraih paid. 
Laundry facilitiat. 
587-8M7. 

AVAILABLE JUNE 1, nice 
studio apertmant with 
weter end trath paid. 
Very near cempua on 
Cla/lln Rd, Cell 
687-004. 

QUIET SURROUNOINGS 

for ttudy. Campua one 
mile, one-bedroom. 
and Studio some utili- 
llaa paid. Shorl-term 



leese, no pets. 
537-8389. 



Apt. 

UnfumlstMd 



APARTMENTS AVAIL- 
ABLE Aug. I, June T 
and immsdiatsly. On^ 
two-bfldrooms, fur- 
nished or unfurnished. 
Ail apsriments less 
than ttirea blocks from 
campua- AgglavKle. 
Call Wildcat incorporat- 
ed 9a.m-- noon, Mon- 
day- Fridey, 637-2333. 

AVAILABLE APRIL 1, one- 
bedroom near Ag- 
gteviils and KSU cam- 
pus. 1005 Bluamont 
1385 Water/ trash paid. 
No pets, 776-3804. 

AVAILABLE APRIL 1, one- 
bedroom, one block 
north of campus. 1854 
Cleliin S37S. Water/ 
trath paid Laundry 
facilities. Allowa small 
pata. 776-3804. 

AVAILABLE FEB. 15. two- 
bedroom at 806 Allison 

$470 New carpat diih- 
washar Laundry facill- 
lias. Water/ traih paid. 
776-3804. 

AVAILABLE IMMEDIATE- 
LY, aummar and fail. 
Very nlc« one, two, 
three and four-bad- 
room epartmenta. 




PARKING 

OPTHI 



OFFICi HOURS: MONOAY-FniDAV 8 ajn.-8 p.m. (aiMpt hoUdsyi) 



I in, 



fan MM 



Cloia to campus with 
great prices. 637-1866, 
537-2919 

AVAILABLE NOW, two- 
bedroom near campus. 
1500 McCain Lane. 
t450. Laundry facilities. 
Water/ trash paid. No 
pets. 776-3804. 

AVAILABLE MAR. 1, one 
bedroom near campua. 
172J Laramie S370. Wa- 
tar/ (rash paid. Laundry 
facllitiss. No pats. 776- 
3804 

AVAILABLE MARCH 1, 
one-bedroom epert- 
manL Patfc Race Apart- 
manta. (9131684^6329. 

AVAILABLE MARCH 1, 
one-bedroom, three 
Wocka watt of campua. 
1024 Sunset S355 Wa- 
ter/ traah paid. Laundry 
facilitlaa No pata. 776- 
3804. 

AVAILABLE NOW, one- 
bedroom three blocki 
west of cempus. 1016 
Sunaat $360 Remo- 
dklad unit. Water/ trath 
paid. No peta. 
776^3804. 

AVAILABLE NOW, three- 
bedroom, two blocki 
aatt or KSU seoo plua 
uUlitiaa. 637-1940. 

AVAILABLE NOW, two- 
bedroom apartmanti 
near City Park. 1026 
Oaape 1460. Water/ 
Ireah paid Laundry 



facililiei. Within walk- 
ing diatance lo KSU, No 
pata. 776-3804 

FOR AUGUST Nam to 
KSU, deluxe two-bed- 
room apartment. S480. 
539 2483 after 4p.m. 

FOR JUNE, large two -bed- 
room apartment. Wa- 
ter/ trash/ gas two- 
thirds paid. S430/ 
month, Alao one-bed- 
room 1310 for Aug. 
539-2481 Altar 4p.m. 

FOUR-BEDROOM AT 

Royal Towers 1700 N. 
Manhattan S860. Avail- 
able now. Water/ trash 
paid. Laundry facillliea, 
aundack, ho) tuba. No 
pata 776-3804. 

GET A JUMP ON NEXT 
YEARI Chase Manhat- 
tan Apartments is now 
leasing two. three and 
four. bedrooms (or Au- 

f|utt. Our waiting list ii 
ong; drop by before 
they're gonei College 
and ClenTn, 776-3663. 

LARGE TWO BEDROOM, 

one-half b?ock wast of 
campus Tri-laval apart 
merit. 1875 Collage 
Heighit, 6550. Water/ 
trash paid. Two bath, 
waik-in closets. No 
pats. 776-3804. 

LARGE. THREE-BEDROOM 
with large cloaet in a 
nlne-plen. Living rtMm, 
dining erae, one and 
one-half bath, fully 



equipped kitchen. SlIO^, 
eech, 813 Fremont.^ 
Aveilabie June 1 and 
Aug. I. Call 637-7087 . 

NEXT TO cemput two. 
three-bedroom apart 
meni and houses with 
weshsr/ dryer, central 
air, parting trsah/ past 
control paid. No pais. 
Available now or Aug. 
S460- 1860 537-8S43. 

ONE, TWO, three, four-bed- 
room sparirnents. close 
to campus, no peta.'i 
June lease. 539-1976 i 

ONE -BEDROOM ALL ulili- i 
ties peid. Near Ag- • 
gievllle 1330 Laramie ' 
1375. Ayeiiable Feb. 6. t 
776-»04. j 

ONE-BEDROOM APART- I 
MENT available now at ' 
Wareham Hotel, 418 ' 
Poyntt, 1395 water/ « 
trsah paid. Laundry I 
facilities No pets. I 
776^3804 I 



•FiimortApk. 

•SanMoneApts. 

•Otiage hJetghtsApb. 
* Cambridge Sq. Apts, 

MfMM 

WW «^ 6Am-430pjTV 



KANSAS SIAH COLLEGIAN 



Friday^ Maroh 3, 1»98 Q 



LOLLEGIAN CLASSIFIEDS 



ONE-BEDROOM APART- 
MENT, aytlltbl* F«b. 
IS. 914 Fr«m«nt 1300. 
Wttorf tTMh |mM. Plit- 
Ing avallabl*. CtoM to 
AMl^)l^77«^3aM. 

PARK PLACE APART- 
MENTS. Now pr»-l«M- 
Ing on*, lyM> tnd thrM- 
b«droorn ipinmanK. 
1413 Cambrldg* CB. 
53»-I96t 

THREE-BEDROOM AVAIL- 
ABLE now onrnaln 
floor o1 bouaa. 2303 An- 
darion SSOD. Watar/ 
(rath paid, Slnola car 
garaga. Waahar/ drvar 
wmdad. No pata, TTtt- 

TWO-BEOHOOM AVAIL- 
ABLE now Batamant 
apartmant, nica condi- 
tion. 1303 Andarion 
$42$. Water/ traiD paid. 
Singia car garaqa, 
Waahar/ dryar provld- 
•d. No poM. 770-3004. 

TWO-SEOHOOM AVAIL- 
ABLE now on Stagg 
Hill. 803- BOS Alllton. 
S38e. Watar/ Mah paid. 
Laundry fadlltlaa. blah- 
MMahw. 776-3804. 



•2bedrtxjm 
apartments 

•Quiet, park 
like setting 

•Private & 
pefsonal 
bedroom 

•Large bath & 
closets 

•Dishwasher 

•Laundry 
facility 

•2 large pools 



T7t-lll8 

fofon 
ap>polntment 



TWO-BEDROOM AVAIL- 
ABLE now. Agglavllla 
PanthcHjM Apartmanta 
ei7 N tZtti S5S0. Wa- 
tar/ traih paid Oiih- 
WMtwr, mtcrowava. No 
patt, 77B-3804. 

TWO-eEOROOMS, CLOSE 
•0 etmput In a 12-p4a)t. 
Pt* laaali>9 tot fall, 
only ont-half dapoail 
OMdad. S360- »^ No 
pMt. 63B-2232. 



AvailBbto 



YOUNG GRANDMOTHER 

wlahaa to ahara quiat, 
claan, I h rat- bad room 
ho ma. No dapodt. No 
bill*. Ona imdl bad- 
foom, STBS. Laava n>a«- 
for Judv 



•■ga 
77ft<l851. 




FIVE ROOMS lor rant In 
larga, baautlful. co-ad. 
Mvan-b«droom houaa; 
1160/ rnonth plui one- 
••vanth utilltiaa; Icltch- 
•rt and laundry avall- 
abl*: (our blocka from 
campua: Juna ! to May 
31 laaaaa availabia; 
537-1487, tak for Ruaa 
or amall 

data#lEauvin.fcau.adu 



Por Itont- 



1806 



GARAGES FOfl rant. 

ColtaM Haighta 43 KO, 
18BeCOII*oaHal«litaM 
MO. L4rga unit*. 779- 




FEMALE, NON-SMOKEH 
naadad to ahara hottta. 
Own room, ahara bath 
with ona psraon, cIoh 
to campua. waahar/ dry- 
ar, rani $22S/ month 
nlua ona-foarlh ulill- 
tiaa. Muat tlgo laaat by 
Mar 23, avallaW* Aug. 
1. Call S3T-1259 or 
S39-43Se. 



FOR NON-SMOKEfl/ drlnk- 
•r. Roommata naadad. 
walk to data. S^1S64. 

ROOMMATE NEEDED to 
^ham houaa two Mocfca 
frwn carrput, own bad- 
room, mala or famala, 
tISO/ month plui ono- 
fHth jUIWaa. 587-1900. 

ROOMMATES NEEDED to 
ahara houia. Own bad- 
room, waahar/ dryar. 
fIBS/ month ptui ona- 
fourth uilllirat. Call 
776-2397. 

1H| 



FEMALE NON-SMOKER 
wanrtad to lubtoaaa ono- 
badroom in thraa-bad- 
room apartmsnt Mid- 
May to July 31 Vary 
cloaa to campui. Call 
Angla 537^1 «. 

FEMALE NON-SMOKER 
wanted to lutiluH lar- 
gaat bad room in thraa- 
Dodroom apartmant. 
t)9S/ month nagotl- 
abte. S87-OS21. 

FOURBEDnOOM, TWO 
bath. Doaa to carnput. 
Call 770-3446. teOO/ 
ntontfi. 

MID-MAV TO Aug 1 May 
paid. Own room, walK 
10 camput. Call 
537-2403, laava mat- 



NEW THREE-BEOROOM, 

two bath, dlihwathar, 
8730/ month, indudai 
catila, watar/ traah. Mid- 
May 10 July 31. May 
paid. Option to laat*. 
IS7-a303. 

NICE, SPACIOUS ona-bad- 
room availabia May 10- 
July 31, aero** from 
campu*. laundry fadll- 
tiai, naw kitchsn ap- 
pitanca*, pat* allowad. 
Can ranaw laa*a In 
Aug dapoail raquirad, 
cair587-9791 aftar 6. 

STUDIO APARTMENT. 721 
Fremont, now througlt 
Aug. option to ranaw 
laa**. {220 plu* utill- 
tiaa. Tratn paid. 
639-9312, laava maa- 
■aga. 

SUBLEASE ONE room In 
iwo-badroom apart- 
mant t19Z.S0 par 
month. Availabia Imma- 
diately. Man:h rant Irae. 
No patti Nica quial 
apartmanta iwo and 
ona-half falocka from 
campui. /Vprit^ through 
July 31 laaaa. Call 
537-20*3 or 776-1003. 

SUMMER SUBLEASE at 
Wareham Apartmanta. 
Graal itudio availabia 
May to July 31 Graat 
location, tow utilitiei 
SSSS/ month. 537-9612. 

SUMMER SUBLEASE two- 
badroom bi-l«v«l apan- 
manl. Nica. cloia to 
campui, S7B0/ month, 
5*7-8702 

SUMMER SUBLEASE- 
Mala roommata naad- 
ad to *hara thraa-bad- 
rt>om, poolalda, Wood- 
way Apartmanta. Rant 
nogotlibla. Call Ja*on 
atSB7-«e7. 

TWO-BEDROOM FUR- 
NISHED Chaaa Manhat- 
tan Apartmant, Mid- 
May to Aug. $686/ 
month. May paid. Call 
Aaron or Ryan at 
587-8539 



2(m 



SERVICE 
DIRECTORY 



SOBl 



Tutor 



WANTED ARCHITECTUR- 
AL Datlqn tutor third 
yaar atuoant naadi aa- 
tiatanca with tachnlcal 
drawing*, praaantalion 
ate 687-8141. 



110 1 



TQlnL 



A PERFECT laauma and all 

your atttar ward pro- 
caaaing naad*. Laaar 
printing. Call Branda 
776-3290. 

NEED SOMETHING lypad7 
I'll typa It tor $1/ par 
ptga. Call 537-9480 
•flar &:30p.m., bui 
sitaaa, no calla altar 
IDpm AakforJacUa. 



D»«ktpp 



TYPED PAPERS, graphic*, 
Chan* tnd graph*. 900 
font* and nina yaar* ax- 
pariarKa to maka yoMr 
papar look graat. Fann 



Oraphica 637-0448, 

lann kau.kau ,adu 




NISSAN- DATSUN Rapak 
Sarvlca. 22 yaari ax- 
pariaftca. Maidaa, Horv 
da* and Toyota* alao. 
Auto CrafL 2612 Olppar 
La na, Manhattan. Kan- 
aaa. 537-6049 8a.m.- 
5p.m. Mon,- FrI. 

DONNIE'S AUTO Worka 
Foraign and Domaalic 
Car Rapair (Formar 
NobIa Kuto Workal. 
Donnla la tha wrinnar 
of th* Sport* C*r Club 
ol Amarlca Saat M»- 
etanle award 1809 Ft 
Rliay aivd. 639-5511. 
With ad $10 oil for 
labor ovar $100. 



CASH FOR cotlagt. 
900,000 grant* avail- 
at)la. No rapaymant* 
avar. Qualify imtna- 
diataly. (a(XI)2«3-243G. 

FREE FINANCIAL Aldl 
Ovar $6 billion in pri- 
vate aactor grant* arvd 
achoiarihipi i* now 
availabia All atudanta 
are allqibie regardtaaa 
ol grades, incama. or 
parant'* incoma. Lat u* 
ti*ip. Call Student Fi- 
nancial Sarvlca*: 
(800)263-6496 *xt. 
F57682 

PROMPT CONTRACEPTIVE 

and abortion larvica*. 
D*la L. Clinton, M.D.. 



l»13tB41'6716, 

RESUME PREPARATION. 
TAJC PREPAflATtON, 
word procaailng, UPS, 
ahlpplng, copia* and 
moral Tha Mail Canter 
acroaa from Alco. 3110 
Andareon, 776-6246. 







NUVnlOIWl 



AWEBOME DIETI Lo*a 
40 pound* in only ona 
month. Proven aucca**- 
fut and medically aafa. 
No drug* or enpanalv* 
food. For entire plan 
aartd $7. check/ money 
order to tC.T.A., P O 
Box 1379, Wichita, K5 
67201. 

GET READY for Spring 

Breakl Gat rtd of thoaa 
thigh* and *lomach 
with the only Body Ton- 
ing Craam on tha mar- 
ket I've actually aaan 
worti I loot lour inchaa 
off each ol my thigh* 
and three irtchat oil my 
Momach. Wa are an in- 
larnational company 
wTih 15 year* ol eipari- 
ence helping people 
ioia weight and lal and 
keeping it off. Gu*r- 
antaad raauiti. Call 
776-7669. or write: P.O. 
Bo« 1171, Manhattan, 
KS 66502. 

SPRING IS approachingl 
Loae weight, faai graat. 
Immediate raaulc*. Doc- 
tor raoommanded, all 
natural formula. 100 
percent guarantee. Call 
day or nigtn 537-6892. 

WANTED too iludanti; 
Lo*a 8- 100 pound*. 
New mataboliam braait 
through. I ioat 15 
pouttda In thiaa waaki. 
RN aaalatad. Guar- 
anteed raaulla S35. 
IB0D»579-1S3«. 



30O 



EMPLOYMENT/ 
CAREERS 



M>lp Wanted 

Th* C»ll«fllsn oannot 
vaHty tha llnanctlal f»o- 
tantlal af advartlaa- 
mania In iha EmalQy- 
mant/Caraar claaalflea- 
tlan. Raadara ara ad- 
vlaad la BBpraaoli any 
*ueh antpfoyMant op- 
portunity «>lth raaaen- 
abla oautlan. Tha Col- 
laglan urgaa our raarf- 
ara ta aantaet tba ••!- 
tar iHatneaa luraau, 
B01 SI Jaffa raan, Ta- 

Raha. K« BesOT-IIM. 
I1S»»-0«S4. 

•66$ Fun, hard working, 
nwnay motivated pao 
pia looking (or an op- 



ponunlty to auecaad. 
Part-tlma/ full-time. 
Will train. For appoint- 
ment call 639-8040 
aM,e22 

IITSO weakly po**lbla 
mailing out circular*. 
No axperianca re- 
quired Begin now. For 
Infor call (202)298-6933. 

AA ALABKA EMPLOV- 
MCHrr. Earn to $3000- 
$6000/ month- fiahlng 
Inductry Grsat park/ ra- 
*or1 |oba tool Fraa 
room, board. tran*por- 
tatlon. Call Sei 191 9)490- 
8629aict.A21. 

ACCEPTING APPLICA- 
TIONS/ Raauma* for 
fwlmming pool manaq- 
er Mu*t M WSI certi- 
fled. Call (913)457-3361. 
city ol Waalmoraland. 

ACCOUNTING MAJOR to 
¥vork In Finance Office. 
Sttrtlno Immediately 
through aummer, 
Applv In 121 Umbargar 
with Karen by Mar. 7. 
1906. 

AD FOR Biological Science 
Technician (Intecta). 
The USDA Agrlcuiturii 
Reaaarch Sarvjcai 
lARSI laalu Slological 
Sdanca Technician (In- 
aacta) Ibr the US. Grain 
Marketing Reaearch 
Lab, Manfiattan. KS, 
TlMf* ara aaven perma- 
nent po*itlona to ba 
filled. Dutiai include 
maintaining and rear- 
ing iniecta uiing veri- 
ati* type diota, corMluct- 
Ing axpsrlfnanti or 
anaiyae* under *upar- 
srttlon, ■•tacting inaacti 
lor axperimantation, 
gathering ail nacaaaaiy 
Buppiia* and a^uip- 
ment lor each axpari- 
mant, performing relat- 
ed t**li*, *uch ** pre- 
paring and atarlililng 
equipment, and other 
dutiat a* saaigned. Ap- 
plicant* muat have ona 
year ol speciaiiiad ax- 
perianca equlvaiant to 
the GS-4 iaval or *uc- 
ce**lui complation of 
lour yaar* of pctt-high 
•chaoi ctudy leading la 
a bachelor* dagraa 
with major liaid ot 
*tudy or 24 *ama*tar 
haur* in courae* luch 
a* biology, chemiatry, 
*tiliitlc*, aniomology, 
animal huabandry, bo- 
tany, phyaict, aqrlcul- 
tura or mathamanca. At 
laaal aix **me*ter 
hour* muat be In the 
apeciallzation of ihii 
poeitlon (tniectt) A 
combination of educa- 
tion and exparience it 
acceptable. Satarv 
range: $19,407- $25,233 
per annum. U.S. Ciliien- 
*hip i* required For ad- 
ditional information 
contact Jimmia Nail 
Oliver (913)776-2737. 
Appiicatloni muat lia 
poatmarked by March 
14, 1986; aubmtt appli- 
cation* to Donna 
Schlmmlng. USDA- 
ARS, Human Reaourc- 
a* Diviaion, 6305 ivy 
Lana, Room 318, Green- 
bail, MO 20770 1436; 
phone (3011344-3270 
ARS ia an Equal Oppor- 
tunity Employer. 



Women and minorlllaa 
*r* ancauragad lo ap- 
ply 

AG BACKGROUND helpful 

to earn commlaaion to 
19/ hour marketing 
unlqua agriculture pro- 
duct* (800)755-0032 

ALASKA SUMMER EM- 
PLOYMENT- Fiahlng 
induatrv. Earn up to 
$3000- $6000 ptua par 
month room and 
board I Tranaportatloni 
Male/ female. No ax- 

fiarlenca neca***ryi 
206)645mse 
axLAG7664. 

COMPLETE MUSIC, North 
Amarica'a iarge*t OJ 
*ervlce, I* rvow hiring • 
bacauae ol our traman- 
doua growthl Oo you 
want * lun weekend 
job? W* provide tha 
equipment, compact 
diac library, and paid 
proleiaianai training. 
You provide yaur own 
ttanaportation and tirtva 
on VMakand* Energetic 
and anlhu*ia*lLC per. 
*on* call 539-7111 or 
toll free (600)864>288f7 

CRUISE SHIP JOBSi Attan. 
tion: Student*. Earn 
$2000 plu* monthly. 
P*ri-tlma/ full-time. 
World travel. Carib- 
bean, Hawaii. All poal- 
tioiw available. No ex- 

Rarlanca. CALL; 

102)453-4661 

CKUiSE SHIPS NOW 
HIRIMQ- Earn up to 
S2000 plua/ month 
working on Cruite 
Shlpa or Land-Tour 
companie*. World trav- 
el IHawaii, Mexico, the 
Caribbean, etc ). Se*- 
aonal and full-time em- 
ployment availabia. No 
aKparignce necaiaary. 
For mora information 
call (206ie34'0468 
axt.CS7684. 

CUSTOM HARVESTER. 
neada hard working In- 
dividual* for aummer 
harvaat (Taxaa • N. Do- 
kota) and poaaibly fall 
harvaat. Four JD 9600* 
and truck driver* want- 
ad. Need CDL or need 
to obtain. Preferred 
farm background or 
harveat experience. 
Slrunk Hsrveating 
1813)582-6359 or 

776-1321. 

CUSTOM HARVESTER 

Naad ambittoua individ- 
ual* lor wheat and row 
crop ftarvait Truck driv- 
en and combine opera- 
tor* needed. For infor- 
mallon phana 

1913)525-6326 or 6330. 
Naagala Combine inc. 



WHILE having fund 
Job opaningt part- 
time/ full-time. FiaKibi* 
hour*. Full Training. Up 
to $60/ hour pa**ibia. 
For InlarviBwi call 
Eihlnl 537-0782. 

KASV MONCVII Savaral 
aludantt naadad to 

hand out ffyaia on cam- 
pu*. Call Tracy tor da- 
talK, 532-9055 

EMPLOYEES NEEDED to 
aaalti in famlh/ orlantad 
cuttom harvaatlng ap- 



Remington's 

NOW HIRING 

Country Western Entertainment 

(Opening late MafVh, eariyApnl} 

This 33,500 sq. ft. Country Western Enteftainment 

Center will feature 3,350 sq. ft. of dancefioor 

(3 dance ftoors) and 1 4 bars (4 minibars) 

plus special food service operation. 

100 wnployees needed: 



3 

4 coola 

25 waitresses 

25 bartenders 

10 securrty/escons 

10 doomrien/escorts 

8 bartacks 

8 busboys 

2 coat cJieck clerks 

2 s^oe5^i^e girls 
rnisc. backup positiorts 

Expenanoa pralerrad Rafarencas isquasM. 
UnHiyTTH rectuinsd. /^wly at lob tita, 
lOjun.j *tl^. Mon - Fri.. 
11S8 WiiiifniMf noidj TtytlMj I 



Classified Directory 




X 



aratlon. Salary negoti- 
able and reflecllva of 
employao* compattbllt- 
ty with amployara fami- 
ly, cunomara and other 
employee*. For mora 
Inlomalion reply to 
Q*ry at {316)226-0079 
aflarSp.m- 

FAST FUNDRAISER- ralaa 
ilOO in five day*- 
greek*, group*, Club*. 

malivated individual*. 
Faat. aaav* no flnandal 
otMlgatlon 
(900)775-3861 EXT.33. 

HARVEST HELP naadad. 
J 09600 and tru«k driv- 
er* wanted. Mutt ob- 
tain a COL and will help 
obtain. Call far vary 

aood aaiary option*. 
toy to Nov. Clydaadaia 
Karvealing and truck- 
ing. Call Randy 



ina. Ci 

saft-sisa 



HELP WANTED for cuatom 
harvaaling. Combine 
oparalora and truck 
drlvera, Expartance pra- 
f erred. Good eummar 
waoea. Call 

(303He»-7490 avanlnga. 

INTiHNATIONAL EM- 
nOVMEMT- Earn up 

to $26- $46/ hour teach- 
ing baalc cortvaraatlon- 
al Engliah In Japan. Twl- 
wan, or S. Korea. No 
leaching background or 
Aaian Tanguago* re- 
quired. For Information 
aall |20S)«M-114« 
a>t.JS7M3). 

LIVE-IN GRADUATE e**l*- 

tant^lp av*ll*bla in Oe- 
partmani ol Hou*lng 
and Dining Sarvkaa be- 
ginning immadlalaiy. 
Contact Family Houa- 
ing Office at 639-2097 
for information. 

NEEDED TRUCK driver* 
lor wheat harveat from 
Taxaa to North Dakota. 
May through Aug De- 
lane Ralmer 
I406)267'3367 

NEW ENGLAND Brothar- 
SUter Camp*- Mia- 
**chu*ett* Mah-Kaa- 
Nac for Boy*/ Danbaa 
lor Girt* Coun*ah)r po- 
*ition* lor pragram 
Spaelali*!*; All feem 
Sport*, aapaoiaiiy Baas- 
bail. Baakatbali, Call, 
Field Hockay. Roller 
Hockay. Soccar, Vollay- 
bali, 30 Tanni* opan- 
ingt; alao Archery. Rl- 
Dary. Pioneering/ Over- 
night Camping. 
Weight*/ Flinaaa and 
Cydlru: ottMr opwilnga 
Include Performing 
An*. Rne An». Pottery. 
Figure Skating, Gym- 
nastics. Nawapapar 
Photoqraphy, Year- 
booh. Radio Station, 
Rocketry. Rope* and 
flock Ciimbina; All Wa- 
terfront Actlvltlaa 
ISiMimming. Skiing, 
Sailing, wrndsurllng. 
Canoeing/ Kayaking). 
Graat aaiary. room. 
board end travel. June 
16- Aug. 16 inquire: 
M*h-K** Nac (Boy*) 
190 Linden Avenue, 
Glen Ridge. Hi 07028 
Call (8001763-9118 DtO: 
bMLlGirtal 17 Weetmin- 
*ler Drive. Montville. 
NJ 0704S. Call 
(800)392-3762. 

STUDENT REPRESENTA- 
TIVE neadfld lo run 
merksting project on 
c*mpu*. part-time. 
g>a*t earning potential . 

l-nooMte-vw* 

tiX. 

SUCCtM MIMDtO indl 
viduel* neaded for 
*ale* and managomanl 
poailioni in axploBive 
growth company lull- 
time prafarrad, part- 
time afao, Sarloue irxiui- 
ri*t only. Call Patrick 
687-6700 a>rLS24. 

SUMMER HARVEST help 
naadad. Run John 
Oaara 9500'* and 9600 
and drive truck. CDL 
prafarrad. Parker Har- 
v**iing. Call 

l913)3»-2527 

SUMMER HARVEST help 
and run 2188 Ca*ie I.H 
combine* and three au- 
lomatic liuck*. Wanted 
experience: CDL lor 
truck drlvera and com- 
bine operator*. Payroll 
flSOO/ monlh for ex- 
perience. Will alao work 
with olhar to gel CDL 
Preler nan-amokera, 
non-drlnkara and non 
drug u*era. Call 
t913)6B9-4e«). 

TUTORS NEEDED gradu- 
ate ievol student* rwad- 



ed In the area* of ch«m- 
Ictry, phytiea and mod- 
am languagaa far tutor- 
ing two- three night* i 
week. P*v negotiable 
depending on quaiiUca- 
tlana. Call Dsbi or 
Sandy 63»-767t. 

WAITERS/ WAITRESSES. 
Apply at 1213 Moro, 
Manhattan, KS- Saa 
RuilV. 

WANTED: HARVEST Halp- 
Cambina aperalor* lor 
lour new 9600* JD'a. 
Saml driver*, muil 
have CDL. will help ob- 
tain. Circle C Farm* 
Call Susan at 587-8623 
or Stave at (316)872- 
3299orS633. 

WANTED WOMAN for 
photo *et* for Geneai* 
M*gaiine. Read the 
magaiine before call- 
ing. (a00)et3^»32. 

YMCA SUMMER Day 
Camp Poaitlon*. Look 
ing lor mature, defwnd- 
atua. cximmitted people 
to irnplamsnt quality 
YMCA Summsr Day 
Camp* in live Topeka 
locBllona. Muat be able 
to work wall wi th and 
retateto Udaattdpffann. 
First Aid, CPR, watar 
and COL cartlflcatlona a 

tlu*. elementary 
chaol laacher* and 
col leg* students major- 
ing in Elsmantary Edu- 
cation. Child Develop- 
ment. Physical Educa- 
tion, and i^ecraation ara 
encouraged to apply. 
Camp Coordinator*- 
naad atrong adminiatra- 
tlve, supervisory, com- 
municative, organlia- 
tkHMl. and people tUII*. 

Minimum anutilMi 

manta: 12 college hour* 
In relevant courae* or 
one year experience in 
state licensed child care 
program Camp Coun- 
aeior*. Mu*t communi- 
cate and relate well to 
kida and parenti.jjiniz 
mum raouifemants: 
muat be 18, high school 
diploma, and may re- 
quire obaarvation 
hour*. Camp Coun- 
selor* Assists nta- (Vol- 
unteer position) tSiOii 

Must be t6 and apprad- 
ate working with youth. 
Apply now at tha 
YMCA's ol Topeka, 
Kuehna Branch at 1936 
N Tyiar, Topaka. 66608 
c/o bennis Reedy or 
JsrlVMIaon. 



BtMln*u 
Opportunm— 

Tha Collegian cannot 
verity the financial po- 
tential of advartlaa- 
mante In the Employ- 
ment/Caraar claealflca- 
tlon. Readera era ad- 
vlead to approach any 
auch bualneas oppor- 
tunity with raaaonabla 
caution. Tha Collagtan 
urgaa cur raadara to 
contact tha Batter Bual- 
naaa Bureau. 601 BE 
JaMaraoa, Topeka, KS 
S8a07-11«>. 
(S13)aa2-4MS4. 



4^ 



OPEN 
MARKET 



BEGINNERS SAXOPHONE 

newly padded. Conn 
trumpet. Crate amplifi- 
er. Soloflex. 286 com- 
puter, BOM harddriva- 
Mark 533-1025 until 
11:30p.m. 

CARVER HOME CO player 

Iretali $750) atking 
$150. GE VHS VCR $50, 
panaaonic four-head 
stereo VCR and Cam- 
corder $90. TAG Hoaer 
Swiss Sport watch (re- 
tail $350) saking $100 
Call Mall al 776-3202. 
leave message. 

WORD PROCESSOR- Ilka 

new. with monitor. 
Smith Corona , store in- 
formation on dlak or 
use aa a typewriter. 



$160 or t>eat offer. Call 

19131396-3045. 



Fumttyr* to 
■uy/«Bll 

FOR SALE aafa and love 
aaat. earth tone*, graat 
condition, S200, muat 
go. 784-6116. Bast after 
Sp.m. 

FURNITURE CLEARANCE 

Canter at Faith Furni- 
ture. Repo**a**ad 
queen sleeper, tov*- 
seat, cocktail taible. two 
end tsblfls. two lamps, 
reg $1699, lele $798. 
Glldder rocker rag. 
$199, sale $99. door 
cocktail table rag. $90, 
sale $45. drop- leaf oak 
dlnatla table reg. $70, 
aaie S3S, oak curio cabi- 
net rag. S150, aale $76. 
oak finish *tudent de*k 
reg $170. lala $85, oak 
finiah lour drawer cheet 
reg. $170, «ala$85. Saa 
at F*ith Furniture. East 
on Highway 24 rtaxi to 
Sirloin Slackada. 

SIX-FOOT PADDED leather 
bar. two padded ataal 
stools, give away price. 
Please call 532-6296 



AirtlqifB 



TIME MACHINE Antique 
Maui and Geab Empori- 
um, 6000 square feet, 
antiques, cotiactiblea, 
estate Jewelry, furni- 
ture, 4910 Slcyway Dr. 
four blocks east af Man- 
hattan Airport. Open 
Toes- Sat. 12- 6p.m. 
5:»-4«84. 



4301 



ComputTB 



COMPLETE IBM parsonsl 
system two wflti a new 
hard drive, mouse, 
printer and Iota ol aott- 
wara included. $500. 
537-3S3S 

FOR SALE: 486 computer 
VGA monitor 86MB 
harddrive Window*. 
MS Work*. I*x modem, 
$700 or best offer, 24* 
pin color printer, $200 
or beat offer. 784-61 16 

MACINTOSH Computer. 

Complete ayatem in- 
cluding printer only 
$599 Celt Chris at 
(800)289-5685. 



Music 
Instramants 



WELCOME TO THE MUSIC 

CO. in the Midtown Pla- 
ta, 623 S 17th Street. 

New and used initru- 
mont *alas and service; 
Accasaorie* for the mu- 
sician. 539-1966. 



TIckota to 
■uy>«tl 



WANTED: MEN S baakat- 
bali Taurnay tickets. 
Call 1913)384-6944 or 
1800)387-6944. 



5(0 



TRANS- 
PORTATION 



BtOl 



1976 OATSUN truck, run* 
good, 1971 Oodga truck 
runs good. I9S2 Audi, 
naad* wark. 539-6678. 

1976 FORD three-quarter 
ton. 390 V8 faur-apaad. 
Good solid truck. $600 
in new tire*. $1000. 
G39-2463. 

1983 BMW 320; Five- 
speed, two-door, air, 
sport seats, many new 
parta, atari* right up. 



S27S0. 587-9374. **k lor 
Rab. 

1984 FORD T-Bird. Run* 
better than good, nica 
interior, many new 
part* Pretty car. $1200, 
negotiable 639-1683. 

1986 DODGE Daytona 
*port, automatic, two- 
door, new tiras, t09K, 
run* good, asking $350, 
nagatiabia. 776-0013 
altar 6p.m. or weekend. 

1985 HONDA /Vccord. Two- 
door, automatic, good 
angina, great coridTtion, 
good for long distanca. 
SISOO negoliabla. 
637-6226. 

1992 DODGE Dakota LE 
axtanded cab. 4X4. Vt, 
loaded, S6K Asking 
S16,O00 or beet offer. 
CalH9l3)494-20e8. 

1993 EAGLE Talon Turbo, 
loaded, 33K. Atking 
$16,000 or beat offar. 

CalH813l494-20ea 

1994 ISU2U Amigo. blue, 
loaded. 9.000 ml lea new 
$17,500 sihing $14,500 
or bast oUbi 539-4643, 
laava rnaassge, serious 
inquiries. 



W eye Id 



SCHWINN MOUNTAIN 
Bike- High plain*, riden 
twice brand new (paid 
$429). Asking $275 or 
bast offer. Call 
776-3202. ask lor Matt, 
laava maosaga. 



600 



TRAVEL/ 
TRIPS 



TourPacfcaBO 



SPRING BREAK- Two 
spot* left lor Csncun 
eight day/ savsn nights 
beach front S499 in- 
cludea airfare from K.C. 
537-7546 three cotvdo's 
left for Keystone/ Breck- 
enridge. Great location. 
537-7546. 



AInrisno TIcfcots 

SPRING BREAK In Colora- 
do. One round trip tick- 
et to Denver, Colorado. 
Call Danny at 639-1149 
for mora dataila. 




You'll never 
know unless you 
try...adverH5ing. 

CtMtussim 
OLLEGIAN 

Ktdilc Ma UZ4SSJ 



Make music 

Want to team to play the 
guitar? Check the Collegian 
classifieds to find someone to 
give you lessons. Only $5 for 
up to 20 words. You'll make 
music in no time. 

C K ANSAS STAT E _ 
OLLEGIAN 

Kedzie 103 (east of the Union) 

1 




jot FbffM- 

' Mad tmmada^^^ 

t1« Forflvl- 



IIS noomAMtobii 
fM Pot Rent -H0U666 
Itt ForSHe-HouMi 
1M ForfM- 



lat ForSate- 



140 fwnin-Qaagt 
IM noommitoWtenlad 
too SiHma 
100 Gtobie/Pashn 
fOO OMIo»S|iiet 
flO l^idlarSil* 




TUIOf 



tlO PmmtftffkfQ 
Mt OaaMop PuUtMig 
SiO SmkiglMttttkn 
SM Pngiancy Totlino 
no LtwnCaii 

111 omcm 

MO VkMkm/Dh 
140 PHStntoM 



Other Sanfett 




tie Hi^WinMd 
aoe Mmtmi timM 



UppORURMS 




401 HMsdtaSuy 

410 ImttarSaia 

411 RmfeMtoBuy/Stl 

411 Audton 



Cont^Mtora 
Mifc kwinttwrtt 



4H S^Nrtng Ev^intMl 

401 T1ekfl9toBay/S8lf 




•40 CwPool 




TRAVEL/ 
TRIPS 



tlO Ibir Packigee 
9m Ai^tew T1d(8(i 
no Tminr«M8 
•40 BiaTKfctts 



CATEGORIES 

To help you find wtiat you are 
looking lor, Iho clarified ads hays 
been arranged by category and 
sub-category All categories are 
marked by one of the large 
images, and sutT-categories are 
preceded by a number 
designation. 

TIPS FOR 
VmiTING A 
CLASSIFIED AD 

Always put lAtiat Hem or seivica 
yoti are adveitlsMg Drst. This helps 
potential buyers Nnd wttat tftey are 
looking lor. 

Donl use abbreviations. Many 
buyers are contused by 
abbreviations. 

Consider Including (tie price. 
This tells buyers if tt>ey are looking 
at aometfilng in itieir price range. 

WE DO NOT USE PHONE 
NUMBERS OR LAST NAUES IN 
PERSONALS. 



Friday, MarcK 3, 199S 



KANSAS SME COLLEGIAN 



Ad prices effective 
March 1 thru 7, 1995. 

Quantity rights reserved. 

In Manhattan: 401 E. Poyntz, 
222 N. 6th. 3011 Anderson 

lOPEN 24 HRS. DAILY! 



Foob^Less 





Oscar Mayer Lunchabtes 

FUN 
PACK 

Assorted, 
1 1 .2 oz. Pkg. 




78 



Oscar Mayer 

LITTLE 
SMOKIES 

16 oz. Pkg. 




CHICKEN 

FRY 

PATTIES 



88 





lb. 



Farmland 

SLICED 
BACON 

16oz. Pkg. 



98 







Fresh, Ripe 

RED 

TOMATOES 



69 







lb. 



Medium 

YELLOW 

ONIONS 



39 







lb. 



folgepdfblders fblqers 



ISWlETCOtPf 




DUNCAN HINES 

CAKE MIX 



FOLGER'S 

COFFEE 




LIBBY'S 
VEGETABLES 

k15,5 to 17 oz. Cut Green Beans, Cream , 
Style or Whole Kernel Corn, Sweet Peas 



LIMITS 
PLEASE 




Our Special Touch 

GARLIC 

BREAD 

STICKS 



BAKERY 
DEPT. SPECIAL 



29 



Package 
of 8 





PARKAY SPREAD 

MARGARINE 



3 Pound 
Bowl 



99 




Hiland 
CHOCOLATE 

MILK 



1/2 Gallon 



99 



COCA-COLA 

A.VD 

FIEIjVTED BRAiNDI 

■^ 24 Pack 

$1^79 




5 



TONY'S PIZZA 
D'PRIMO 




Assorted 
Varieties 



Afo" 



BUDGET GOURMET 

ENTREES 




8.710 
10.5 oz. 
Pkg. 



HW1?T Assorted 
UVII!/1 Varieties 

^forlk/ 





14 02. Bag 

Assorted 
Varieties 



Nabisco 
TOASTEHES 




Assorted 
Varieties 

13oz.Box 




FLORAL SPECIAL! 

"KACTUS 

PEOPLE 

GARDEN" 




99 



in 5" 
Red 
Clay Pot 



SAVE $L00 

ON MIRACLE 

WHIP 48 oz. 



IN-AD COUPON 



VAUD; MARCH 1 THRU 7. 1995 

mraiM 



iMeemaMe at foOD-^liSS. 



SAVESlPo 

on ONE 48 oz. Jar of any 
MIRACLE WHIP^PfOduct 










13- 



CK-27 



Exp. Dst€ 'M^OO 
Kansas State Hietorical Society 
Newspaper Section 
130 W 10th 



ns ,3UTl e 



C Kans 
OLLEGIAN 



ELECTION 
ISSUES 

UbIooIis at thB issues involwdh 
ttagmnlilKtionferdty 
comtniBSlon and board o( education 
April 4' 




^*^PMIS 



CATS LOSE 
TO BUFFALOES 

K-Stats lost to Cokwado 70-51 
SalidBir. It MB ti« bat tone game 




Mue 



MONML 




WEATHER — PAQE 2 




► STUDENT SENATE 

Campus 
magazine 
is denied 
funding 



Collciian 

Student Senate denied funding to a campus 
magazine called Metazine Thursday night. 

Steve Weatherman, business senator, read a 
passage from the magazine, which talked about 
sex with a 16- year-old. Weatherman also point- 
ed out a photo of a nude male in the magazine. 

"I'm gonna vote against it. I don't think it's 
the most productive use of student funds," 
Weatherman said. 

Senators passed the magazine around and 
read the submissions during the debate. 

Some senators said they had trouble with 
funding the magazine and putting the 
University's name on it. 

"I don't think I want K-State's name on it" 
Chuck Haynes, business senator, said. 

Other senators said they thought Mctazine 
should be ftjnded because to deny funding was 
to censor the content. 

Phil Anderson, faculty representative, said 
the group was funded by the University- 
Activities-Boanl funded and that voting against 
funding them was censorship. 

Ben Clouse. Senate Allocations Committee 
chair, said the guidelines clearly state that the 
views of an organization should not be taken 
into account during the allocations process. 

Anyone can ask for money from Senate, 
Ctsyton Wheeler. Senate chair, said. 

"We're an open cash machine," Wheeler 
said. 

Three other allocations passed and will 
receive funding. 

The Society for the Advancement of 
Management was allocated $1,518 for regisba- 
tion and travel expenses to go to the national 
contest in Newport Beach, Calif., in April. 

Scott Rottinghaus, arts and sciences senator, 
said he was opposed to funding SAM because 
the Academic Competition Account was set up 
to fiind agriculture teams and Speech Unlimited. 

If Senate starts fuidng any competiti<xt team that 
asks for inoney, the leanis the account was meant for 
could get shott-changed, Rottinghaus said. 

Senate also voted to allocate money to the 
National Organization for Women for a 
Women's History Month speaker and for the 



I See STUDENTS Page 10 




BOB McMANI»Col»egian 

SIk dancera parform "Qtdda" Saturday evsnlng at India Nlta at Manhattan MIddta School. Tha evening wa« sponaorBd by the Indian Students Association. 
Students and focutty enjoyed the eulelne, slide presentation and the many dancee presented by UTSAF 95. 

(^tuhnU m9 iacultu skate tkek cultute mith (Manhattan at 







ABfraiMOM 



Indian Students Association 
gave a glimpse of India to its 
largest group of guests ever 
Saturday at India Nile. 

About 650 people gathered 
at Manhattan Middle School to 
experience Indian food, dance 
and art. 

The night began at 5:30 p.m. 
with dinner in the cafeteria. 

Indian students served guests 
rice with vegetables, potatoes 
cooked in tomato sauce, chick 
peas cooked in gravy and spicy 
Indian chicken. 

Eileen Shea, sophomore in 
geography, said she learned the 
correct way to eat Indian food 
from Indian friends. Indians eat 
their food with their Tingers, 



sometimes picking food up with 
ftjed bread. 

"I like the food because of 
the different spices they use," 
Shea said. "The food is one of 
my favorite parts of the 
evening." 

Shea came to India Nite 
because Indian friends piqued 
her interest in the culture. She is 
also taking a class In the history 
of Hinduism. 

"1 liked the people of India, 
and [ wanted to know more 
about their religions," Shea 
said. "1 am very interested in 
studying religions." 

During the dinner, people 
had the opportunity to look at 
Indian art. Sculptures, paintings 
and even an Indian chess set 
were brought to the event by 



Indian students and faculty. 

After dinner, people made 
tktir way from the cafeteria to 
fill the auditorium. Indian stu- 
dents then took the visitors on a 
pictorial visit to India. 

Two narratois used an over- 
head projector to show pictures 
while they described the differ- 
ent regions of India. After 
showing each region, other stu- 
dents would perform dances of 
the region. 

Women dressed in bright 
red, orange, blue, green and 
gold colored cloths wrapped 
around their bodies, and men in 
loosely-fitted pants, sashes and 
vests danced barefoot across the 
wooden stage. Performers 
twirled, spun and leapt on stage 
to the music of India. 



Mohan Bonala, graduate stu- 
dent in civil engineering, 
brought six friends to the event, 
some from ^S far away as 
Virginia. 

"The festival gives us a 
chance to celebrate the culture 
of India and exchange culture 
with our American friends," 
Bonala said. 

India Nite also gives Itidian 
students a chance to feel closer 
to their homeland. 

"My wife just joined me in 
America." Bonala said. "She 
comes to the festivals and for- 
gets about being homesick." 

Marietta Ryba- White, tech- 
nician in plant pathology, joined 
her husband and three sons for 
the event. She and her husband 
received tickets from a student 



in the plant pathology depart- 
ment. This was their fourth time 
attending the event. 

She said that bringing her 
sons to the event will help them 
to be more accepting of people 
of different origins. 

"1 think they will be more 
open to meeting people of new 
cultures without feeling intimi- 
dated," Ryba- White said, 

Poonacha Machaiab, presi- 
dent of Indian Students 
Association, said he was 
pleased with the festival. 

"We set out to educate stu- 
dents, and [ think everyone 
came away knowing more about 
India," Machaiah said. "1 think 
the slide presentation and the 
dances worked together to pro- 
vide a glimpse of the country." 




CARV eONOVnCoilaglwi 

Camitefl Qlllunii St. Oeorge, triee to get the attention of Bonlta, b miniature horse, during 
the trade show of the 13th annua) KSU Horsemen's Conference Saturday afternoon. The 
trade show, which conslated of about 40 booths, was one of the events In the conference. 
TTtere were also educational seeslons, as well es the KSU Consignment Horse Sale. About 
BOO people etiended the event 

Horsemen's meeting a learning event 



•TA^HAQUI 



ColkfiMI 

People from all over the 
country came to K-State to 
talk about horses this week- 
end. 

About 800 people attended 
the 13th annual KSU 
Horsemen's Conference on 
Satuiday. 

Those who attended 
included a variety of people 
with a common interest in 
horses, Mark Ams, assistant 



professor in animal sciences 
and industry, said. 

"The people attending may 
only have one to two horses, 
or as many as 50 to 100 hors- 
es," Ams said. 

The conference is an edu- 
cational event, which includes 
a trade show and morning and 
afternoon sessions. Ams said. 

The trade show included 
about 40 booths, including 
nutritional information, health 
care and miniature horses — 



basically just anything dealing 
with horses, Ams said. 

The attendance at the trade 
show and the number of par- 
ticipates was up from last 
year, he said. 

The three morning sessions 
included presentations by Dr. 
Sheila Schils, University of 
Wisconsin; Dallas Morgan, 
attending farrier at K-State: 
and Dr Jeff Van Petten, 
Meriden. 

■ SecHORSEPagcIO 



Cattle enthusiasts 
discuss issues 



AHOIIfTUI 



Collqun 

More than 700 cattlemen, 
alumni, students, faculty and 
staff attended the 82nd annual 
Cattlemen's Day Friday at 
Brandebeny Indoor Complex. 

The purpose of Cattlemen's 
Day is to discuss current issues 
in cattle research and new 
research findings and tech- 
niques. 

"It is the largest public edu- 
cational program we have on 
campus every year," said Gerry 
Kuhl, extension feedbl nutri- 
tionist and co-chairman of 
Cattlemen's Day, 

"We try to cut through the 
nuances of research and get to 
the bottom line so producers 
can take it home," Kuhl said. 
"We try to plan good and time- 
ly programs on topics that most 
of the questions are being 
asked." 

A variety of activities and 
displays, including educational 
exhibits, were scheduled for 
the annual event. 

The morning program was 
the presentation of timely top- 
ics. Various K-State specialists 
gave quick summaries of cur- 
rent research and events hap- 
pening today in the cattle 
industry. 

"The producers enjoy the 
condensation of current 




and management 
cliMgotHlM 



f -m ^Mt^ii^, 



research," Kuhl said. "The top- 
ics feature what is new and 
challenging the industry." 

The afternoon session fea- 
tured keynote speaker Jim 
Marsden, K-Sute regents dis- 
tinguished professor of meat 
science, and Jon Ferguson, 
president of the Kansas 
Livestock Association. 

"The key to success is fac- 
ing the challenges as a unified 
industxy," Marsden said. 

He said the three most criti- 
cal issues in beef industry are 
E.coli 057. H7, the need for 
reform in the meat and poultry 
regulatory agencies and the 
difference between the meat 
and poultry inspection regula- 
tions. 

Following the afternoon 
session, participants traveled to 
the Beef Research Unit for an 

■ See BULL Pa^ 10 



► cmr 



Library to help 
inform families 
about illnesses 



COLLIQUUI STAPr 



CoilegiAn 

Coping with terminally ill loved ones can be 
difficult when you have no idea what is happen- 
ing to them. A new library at the Saint Mary 
Hospital is in the works to help family members 
educate themselves about terminal illnesses. 

Teresa Rickel-McMillin lost her mother to 
pancreatic cancer in February 1994 and had no 
resources to help educate her family on what 
was happening. 

"My mother was such a generous person. She 
touched so many people," Rickel-McMillin said. 

"The resources just weren't available here, 
and we wanted information in layman terms 
about what was going on," she said. 

The Rickel family wanted to continue their 
mother's giving spirit by developing a new 
library for families of terminally patients in their 
mother's name. The Molly M. Rickel Research 
Library is scheduled to open this spring. 

"I know there are a lot of students that arc 
going through this with a family member, and 
it's csfKcially hard when they're away at school. 
The library will be open 24 hours a day for 
them," Rickel-McMillin said. 

Most of the efforts have been donated for the 
library by Manhattan businesses and residents. 
Brent Bowman, of Bowman and Associates 
Architects, has dedicated his services to the 
design of die library. 

"We wanted a comfortable, user-friendly 
place for people in search for health-care infor- 
mation." Bowman said. 

"The project is remarkable. There is a certain 
amount of magic that is putting people together 
for this kind of cause," he said. 



I See BENEFIT Page 10 



Q Monday, M«roh 6, ^99B 



KANSAS SIATE COLLEGIAN 




News briefs 



► FORT RILEY SOLDIER BOUGHT GUN AFTER A COUNSELING SESSION 



A Thursday night ahooting at 
Fort Rtiey left two men dead and 
one injured. 

One o( the men killed In the 
shooting was Pvt. James Evans, 21, 
ol Company S, 2nd Qaltalkin, 16th 
Infantry. 

StaH Sgt Stanley Ellis. 2S, of 
Company D, 2nd Battalion, 10th 
infantry, was Injured and stayed at 
Irwin Army Community Hospital until 
Saturday night, when he was 
released. 

The suspect, wtio hilled himself 
aftar the shootings, has not twen 
named, pending notificallon of the 
next of kin 



Ben Santos, public-affairs officer 
at Fort Riley, said the shootings 
stemmed from the suspect having 
an argument with a supervisor. 

The suspect had a counseling 
session in the morning, and later 
that day he purchased a l2-g«uge 
sfiotgun, Santos said. 

The incident evolved during a 
second counseling session in the 
afterrKMn In which ItM suspect was 
supposed to talk with Ms supervisor. 

During tlie session, the suspect 
pulled the gun on his supervisor, 
wtto got out of the room to warn olfv 
ers, Santos said. It was at about 
S:30 p.m. that the subject started 



randomly firing from tfie third- floor 
barracks. 

Thie unidentified supervteor wis 
not shot. But Ellis, who was In the 
pan<ir>g lot, was stiot. 

Evans was on a ledge outside 
the barracks when he was fatally 

SfKlt. 

Evans was originally from 
McGuIre Air Force Base In New 
Jersey and had been stationed at 

Port niley since Martti 1964. 

ENls is from Grtffin, Ga., and hat 
also been at Fort RUey since 1994. 



► BILL MIGHT EXPAND USE OF DEATH PENALTY TO 16-YEAR-OLDS 



TOPEKA (AP) — The House 
Judiciary Committee will hold hear- 
ings this week on a bill Ihst would 
allow the state to execute people as 
young as 16 who commit capital 
chmea. 

it will be a major focus as the 
Legislature opens its ninth week of 
the 1995 session, with first adjourn- 
ment scheduled lor March 31. 

TTie bill wouM allow tf»e state to 
execute people who commit pre- 
meditated murder In ttw course of 
an attempted kidnapping or attempt- 
ed rhurdor — such as shooting tfw 
wrong person — and killing any 
child under 16, rather tfion 14. 

Death -penalty opponents say It 
represents an expansion of the 



slate's relatively restncted death- 
penalty law, whk:h took effect last 
July 1. Presently, people who are 
younger ttun IS when tt^ey oommH 
a capital crime cannot be executed. 

Sister Theresa Bangert, a kibby- 
ist lof Kansas Coairtion Against tt«e 
Death Penalty, said stie (s alarmed 
by tfw proposal to execute juveniles 

"When we start executing juve- 
niles, we are not in good comp«ny,' 
she sakl. 

Besides the United Slates, the 
only countnes that permit juveniles 
to be executed are Iran, Iraq, 
Nigeria, Pakistan and Saudi Arabia, 
sfiesakl. 

Rep. Mike O'Neal, R- Hutchinson, 
Judk;iary Committee chairman, sakl 



he is intere«ted in making technk^ 
adjustments to the state's death- 
penalty law but does not want to 
pursue a ma^ overtUHjI. 

'I'm not reaHy loo imerested this 
year in making subatantlva 
changes,* aNMl sakl 

Hie o o mmtWee introduced the bW 
at the request of Attorney General 
Caria StovaN. 

The list of capital crimes cofi* 
lained in the present law Is fairly 
iimtted,' O'Neal sakl. 

Aitttough me compoeltton of the 
House changed considerable last 
November, the Senate, which 
p«taed the death penalty 22-18, la 
unlikely to agree to any major 
expansM>n of current low. 



► STUDENT RECEIVES FULL SCHOLARSHIP TO AIR FORCE ACADEMY 



Cadet Aaron Cooper, freshman 
in political science, has received a 
full scholarship to the Air Force 
Academy in Colorado Sphngs, Cok). 

Cooper was honored Thursday 
afternoon in Throckmorton Hall in 
front of his officers and feikiw peers. 

Col William Byms, professor of 
aerospace studies, presented the 
award to Cooper. 

Cooper was given the award 
after a series of procedures, whk:h 
began with filling out an applk:atk)n. 

In January, Cooper had an inter- 
view with Rep Pat Rot>erts, R-Kan., 
for the congressional appolntrrwnl. 
and he wrote essays on why he 
wanted to join the Air Force 



Academy. 

Cooper also had to prove him- 
self In the areas of education and 
physical fitness and had to be in 
good standing overall. 

"I had to pass a physical, have 
high academk; scores. t>e In shape 
and be in good standing,' he said. 

'The academy chooses the 
recipients from the congressional 
appointments. Each congressman 
can ctK)ose one candklate. and tfien 
the academy chooses who they 
want from tttere,' Cooper sakl. 

Cooper sak] t\e hopes to receive 
the best education he can possibly 
get and is looking forward to the 
rrtany opportunities ttial being a part 



of lt>e academy will offer him. 

"Wtien my family found out thai I 
had received this award, they went 
crazy.' he sakl. 'No one else in my 
family has ever got a Ngh horw ilka 
ttiis.' 

Cooper sakl different aapeds of 
ttw military have always been a part 
ol his life. 

'it's t»een a lamliy thing, I sup- 
pose. I have a kit of family members 
in the military. My dad wasn't, but 
my grandfather and a lot of my 
undes were Not ^1 of Ihem went to 
the Air Force, thougtt — some went 
to the Army and Navy.' Cooper sakl. 



m 



z 



^^-^^ 



M 



Dilly'si 



No Coupon" Specials 



[NO lOupOfl IK'i'tjrcl. 

NtlMt .miptfd) 



' 1/2 sandwich . 
cup oCsoLip tSi : 
drink loi 

i M.50 

I with this coupon | 

I 

cx|iiri.'s ^-27-'-}^ 
Aggieville*S37-5ll) , 



Everyday 
Two-fers 

2 - PIZZAS with 
2 -TOPPINGS each 
2 - COKES with ice 



Everyday 
Three-fers 

3 - PIZZAS with 

T - TOPPING each 

4 ' COKES with ice 



$8.45 



Prtoesdonoi 
kviud* sales taxes. 



.$10.34 



Pizza Shuttle 776-5577 



(COLORTYME. 



WHATS RIGHT FOR VOU. 

50% OFF 

1st Months Rent 

w/coupon 

Starting @$7.99 

per^w^ek 

We Have: 
IT TV's 
Dinettes 
Microwaves 
VCR's 

Shelf Stereos 
Dorm Refrigerators 

1235 Washington, 
Junction City 

762-7602 




PET HEALTH ALEK I 



Heartworm Season Begins in March 
Have Your Dog Tesledl 

Manhattan area veterinary clinic are offering special times 
sji . and days for heartworm testing. 

Call your veterinarian for an appointment. 

HOSPITAUCLINIC PHONE DATES & TIMES 

Blu^HitlsAnitnalHcspital £37-84S2 Sa^Mat 2SJ0am-lpmand 

' *^i'.s^ifapf«mmmt 
537-0537 ^'IPIease call for an appointnvei\t 
337-3719 Sat, Mar. 4, 8 a.m.-12 pm 



Candlewood \fetennaiy Clinic 
Eastside Veterinary Clinic ''-k' 



K-State Veterinary Teaching Hospital 532-5690 

Konza Veterinary Clinic 776-911 1 

U«Ie Apple Veterinary Clinic 539-0191 
Mobile wterinary Service 537-0406 
Westside Veterinai7 Clinic 539-7922 
""po^ must be at least 5 1/2 months old 



Wted-Jto. 15, 8 a.m.-53(l pm. 

Sat., Mar 4 & Sat, Mar. 18, 

$-11 a.m. 

All Saturdays in Mardi 

8 a.m. -12:30 p.m. 

Please call for an appointment 

Please call for an appointment 

PleasecaQ tot an appoinment 



'^^} 




1570 Hayes 



s your portfolio ready for your soon-to-come job interviews? 

A portfolio is the only way for architecture, art and interior 

design students to show how good they are. Make sure the 

work in your portfolio is as good as your originals. We can 

make true photographic copies of your boards, paintings, 

renderings, models, prints and sculptures. Whether you 

W§ need color or black & white prints to show in your 

^^ book or slides to mail out, you owe it to your future to 

talk to us. We're open 8:30 to 5:30 Monday-Friday. 

GRAPHICS! 

Industrial Park Plaza 539*1377 



<^ POUCE REPORTS ^BULLETIN BOARD 



HM ^^^n ^b^^^H fe^a 'I^A ^Mfe ^^M ^ ^te Ka^^^te^^ 




K-SlXrEPOUCE 



ANNOUNCHMNTS ■■■^■■■1^^ 

ApptkMthm for afu mod idHrscs unba«ad«fi are MvwklMm \n i 
dc«n**ufnH:e. Appticitkmi trcdueti 5 p.m Much 16. 

AppUcadou Ah- liunun icdap iBib—aJort m ivaiicMe « ihe fn 
dnk in Jtudn Hdl, They are due Miich 17 m the umc locnuctfi- 



PWDAV, MARCH 3 



BULLKT1N8 



At t'M ua., • up o n of > tm- 
fitly From an lutomobllt «ii 
lecctvtd. Rytn Johnion, 1803 
Unmie St. Rfoned thdt of canptct 
diici ind lungluiei from hit ctr. 
Lou wu S500 

SATURDAY, MARCH 4 

At l:(n iLm. Cntoiy Canbeiu 
mi MW«J Ml tnmintad 10 Rlliy 
Counqi Jail for DUI. 

At 1 1 :2S p<.in.. ■ fifN wh irpwt- 
ed on liic tlillh flooi of Moore Hall. 

RiLEycouNnf poua 



Al IO:M p.m., m ■utaviwd 

inoo mm repoftnt ml Haymak^ Katl. 
Miie Kfrr. Haymaker Hall, itported 
Itai an item wu bumcd and put on 
bulletin board. Manbattan Ftrc 
Depanment wai notified. 



■ Apoalolk Campiu MlaMrj 
will meel at 8 lanl(hl in Unkw 106. 

■ Chlmea will meet at 8:}0 
ioni|b( in Union 2 1 3. 

■ Alpha Z«U will meet ai 7 
tiHii|hi in Wuen 137 

■ Phi Alpha Thtto will meet al 
2 .^0 p rr uthy \n y.'ntnn 317 



■ T«i 

uudtflia win racM « 1 1 §.«. ndi; 
in BlMcmoM It I A. 

■ K-Stale/Maahalt>a ATA 
Taekwoads Clab will meat al T 
lonifht in the Eoimcnlcal Canipul 
Mimitry biiildia|. Seiinnera ata 
wfli:.""ime 



Cindy Miller, Moon Hall racepdao- 
iit. reported the incident, and the 
ttportinf officer concluded that there 
waa no fifht. Partkt ycllin| al each 
oihet wtit ococted 10 their iDoma. 



LCTTiRSTOTIIEiDITOR 




FRIDAY, MARCH 3 



At 12:39 a.m.. an arrett wai 
nada for DUI al Suniel Avenue and 

MwH" 1 ' Dttvc. Tny Erie Schell. 

JSOOTtetle Creek Blvd.. waa anmed 
and IratipDfUd lo Riley County lail 

SATURDAY, MARCH 4 

At 12:4; t-m., a vehicle bur|ltry 
in proirea area nponed in die 1000 
Mock of Nonh FoMith Sntet FMrkt 
D. Bherle, lOIS Suntei Ave . wai 
■ IMIIKl for felony theft, battery and 
millii^ arrett. Taken and recovend 
waa a Uue 1969 Chevrolet Chevelle 
valued at S600. Bond wai let at 
SI.MO. 

At 7:33 p.m.. m arr^ vru made 
for ilKiphriini «l Dillard'i in the 



At 1:10 i-ni.. an aneaiwia made 
for DUI in the 3000 block of 
Andenon Avenue. Roben D. Shuck 
Jr.. 730 Allen Road, waa aneued. wd 
bond wai ici at $S00. 



PIP WE MAKE A MISTAKE? 

■ If we make a mistake or ere not quite 
clear on eomething, please caJl and tail ua. 
We are only human. Our number is 
532-6556. 



Manhattan Town Center. Kievin L. 
Jackion and ierimichael J William 
wete both arrcited. Shoplided itcnu 
were vahied u SllS Bond Fat both 
waa lit n $300. 

At 11:17 p.m., an arraal waa 
made for DUI on Riley Lane, orte- 
quancr mile onto Rati Rtley. Richanl 
Royal III, Junction City, wai arrcMed 
for DUI. Bond waa act at SJOO 



The Kansas State Cotagian 
(USPS 29) 020). a student 
newspapet at Kansas Stale 
Urnorsity, is publtst>ed by 
Studmi Publications Inc.. 
KMzieHall 103. Manhattan, 
Kan., 6ffi06. Ttie Collegian is 
publistied weekdays during tftt 
sctxnl year and once a wdek 
through ttw ammer Second- 



class postage is paid at 
Manhattan, Kan., 6650e. 
POSTMASTER: S«nd 
address cfianges to Kansas 
Stata Coli«9ian, circUation 
desk, Ked2ie 103, Manhattan, 
Kan. 66606-7167. 



e Kansas Sate Cdtegiin, 199S 



Weather 



YESTEROArS HIGHS AND LOWS 




State Outlook 

Wi>dy arxj turning colder again. A 
chance of flurries west arxl rain likely 
east. A mixture of rain and srww 
possible central. Highs frofn around 
30 norttiwest to 55 lo 60 southeast 

Manhatian Outlook 
TODAY ^^^^^^H 

Rain liitely, possibly 
mixing with snow 
during the afternoon. 
IHigh near 40. 




• OENVIR 
52/21 



•TULSA 
44/38 



• OMAHA 
32/23 



• ST. LOUIS 
41/41 



TOMOimOW 

R Sunny but coid. High 



in the middie 308. 



I i 

MACARONI AU FROMAGE 

( EAT WITH GUSTO FOR ABOUT 5U PER SERVINC. ) 

2 ci^Js macaroni (pinwheels are tun) 1 cip milk 

1 cvp sharp Cheddar (grated) 3 tbe flour 

1/2 scick butter 1 tsp pefVer 

1 t^ Morcesterahire (if you liitm) 1 t^ salt 

Cook imcaronl in 5 <:upe salted, boilirig viater for 
15 minutes or until al dente. IJrain. In a separate 
pot , melt butter and mix in flour over low heat . 
Then, stir in milk until smooth. Add cheese, salt, 
pefiper and Vbrcesterahire. Stir well, another 
macaroni . Serves 4 . 



Note: For your nutritional convenience, 
Citibank Classic cards are accepted at 
over 12 million locations, including 
grocery stores. 





e mS CAtoiK* ($oua> Ottou). NA 



KANSAS STATE CQIIFCIAN 



Monday, March e, 1tt96 f^ 



► REVIIW 



Dancing won't stop 
for Lawrence band 



Catttfin 

People need some fniil in their diets. 
About 1 50 people sicipped (he loast and 
went straight for the deliciously sweet, tangy 
sounds of Mango Jam Thursday night at 
Snookie's Bar. 

The Minneapolis, Minn., quintet won over 
the crowd early in the show, and the dancing 
didn't stop until 2 a.m. 

Bassist/vocalist/lyricist Jason Bush, gui- 
tarist/vocalist John Herchert, drummer Bret 
Erickson, percussionist Geoff Prctnar and 
keyboardist/vocalist Brian Kopp treated fans 
to a night of btuesy, jazzy, improvisational 
S[»ce-folk rock with a touch of reggae in the 
mix. 

Mango Jam, which has begun to play reg- 
ularly in Lawrence, made its first-ever 
appearance in Manhattan en route to a Friday 
night pcrfofmance at the Bottleneck. 

The crowd members seemed to be pleased 
they made the stopover. 

"I love them," Doug Dinkle, senior in 
hotel and restaurant management, said. "This 
is the closest Manhattan wilt probably ever 
get to seeing somebody hke Phish." 

Dinkle said he enjoyed Mango Jam 
because of the musicians. 

"The thing 1 really like about them is the 
extra percussionist," Dinkie said. "I'm going 
to Kansas City to buy a set of bongos tomor- 
row." 

As the rest of the band dropped off and 
began to tune their instruments, Erickson and 
Prctnar closed the first set with a percussion 
duet. 

The last time such beating of bongos was 
heard within Manhattan city limits was on 
Oct, 22, 1993. when Domingo "Sunny" Ortiz 
and Widespread Panic shook the Wareham 
Opera House to its foundations. 

Percussion was by no means Mango 
Jam's only strength. 

The many layers of the band's music and 
the emphasis on instrumental elements rather 
than vocals are two characteristics that led to 
comparisons between Mango Jam and other 
improvLsational neo-folk bands like Phish. 

"1 never even heard of Phish until three 
years ago," Bush said. "But I can kind of see 
how people say that." 



Mango Jam, which has existed in its pre- 
sent form for more than five years, is clearly 
its own band with a unique sound and style 
and an ingratiating stage presence. The band 
has been touring steadily for more than four 
years, and its polished, profes.sional perfor- 
mance manifested the band members' expe- 
riciKe, 

As one audience member who appeared to 
be enjoying the performance said, "They're 
fun." 

Succinct as that assessment is, it really 
says a lot about the vibes emanating from 
onstage as Mango Jam performed. At times, 
the five musicians would almost face each 
other in a pseudo-sonic huddle — communi- 
cating non-verbally, each feeding off the oth- 
ers' energy. 

"We've been out east, west, Colorado, 
everywhere," Bush said. 

Mango Jam has now established a follow- 
ing in Lawrence, but Bush said it wasn't 
always that way 

"We tried to play the Bottleneck for about 
three years," Bush said. "We kept telling 
them, 'Let us play. We'll sell out your club.' 
And they were like, 'no way.' So finally they 
booked us. and there were 200 people out- 
side in line who couldn't get in." 

Despite the trouble they had convincing 
Lawrence that they were for real. Mango 
Jam is no stranger to performing with big- 
name acts. 

Besides opening for Blues Traveler in 
their hometown of Minneapolis, Mango Jam 
actually had Grammy winner Sheryl Crow 
open for them about a year back. 

"The record people knew we could draw 
1,000 people in Minneapolis, so they had 
Sheryl Crow open for us just to get her some 
exposure," Bush said. "She was so good we 
didn't know what we were going to do to fol- 
low her," 

Modesty aside, more than one person 
came up to Mango Jam and asked them to 
return to Manhattan The band seemed recep- 
tive to the idea. 

Until then, you may want to check out 
one of the band's two compact discs. 
Although it won't be the same as a live per- 
formance, it might tide you over until the 
next live serving of Mango Jam. 




Ctmt CO W O W M CotlBflten 

Michiel SilMi lithographer, talks during lh« openlrrg of th« Lawrence Lithography Workshop show Friday evening at 
the Strecker Gallery. The show consists of lithographs prlntsd by Sims and will bs at the Stracker Gallery until March 30, 

Exhibit expiains art form 



Ci>tteftan 

Confusion on the part of the public 
concerning the difference between prints 
and lithographs is part of the inspiration 
for a new exhibit at Strecker Gallery. 

Michael Sims, owner of the Lawrence 
Lithography Workshop, which he found- 
ed in 1979. brought nearly 40 examples 
of lithography from his workshc^ for the 
exhibit, which runs through March. 

Sims .said he runs one of the only pri- 
vate print shops in a four- state area. Most 
print shops are in Chicago. New York 
and Los Angeles, he said. 

Some universities run their own print- 
ing facilities, but professional artists 
aren't allowed to use them, he said. 

Sims lectured on the process of litho- 
graphy and i's differences with other 



styles of printmaking in a gallery talk 
Friday in Willard Hall. 

REVIEW 

Many people don't know a lithograph 
is the culmination of months of work by 
the artist and a lithography staff, while a 
print could be a Tine picture of an exist- 
ing work of art, sometimes sold in hun- 
dreds of editions. 

A lithograph takes a lot of lime and 
work and is very expensive, thereby lim- 
iting the number of prints it is possible to 
take, Sims said. 

He said a reproduction print is a com- 
mercial device, which is not based on 
how much labor and craft go into it. 

Sims said nothing in his shop is a 
reproduction, but rather is original art. 

The process of lithography includes 



creating the art on a fme limestone block 
with a greasy crayon, adding water, 
which adheres to the non-greasy sur- 
faces, and then placing greasy ink onto 
the greasy areas. Each color must be 
printed separately. 

Sims said it was easiest to create the 
image but hardest to get it to print cor- 
rectly. 

He said to get an edition of 100 prints, 
he might make 150 or 200 to get them 
right. 

Sims includes a 10-percent waste fac- 
tor per color per print. 

Fine art prints, such as lithographs, 
usually include the number of the print 
near the artist's signature. 

Sims said the number doesn't mean 

■ See STUDENTS Page 10 



Need Some 
Dough? 

Let us know! 



Cash, Pawn & Gun, Inc. 

1917 Ft. Rllcy Blvd. 

Manhattsn, KS. ««502 

776-3332 



LJki 



6 



FREE 
PREGNANCY TESTING 

All off our sorvicei 
are FREE & CONFIDENTIAL now open 

Problem PrmgnanesT Sat. * ■.n^Neon 

You're not alone. 

BlRTHRIGliT OF MANHATTAN 52} 8 17th 




G Kansas Stale 
3LLEGIAN 



532-6560 



JUSTIN KASTNER for City Commission 



ASTNER 



Citv ComniLssioo 



FUTURE-MINDED 



LEADERSHIP 



iM.-UHf t£t«. fnlmaxf. <^ c^hU Hci »»k ^Q\ «- 



Pa]. »dv. paid for by ICistncr for City Commissiort. 

Chiirpersoni: Terry Gl«ssct>ck i Kiren Rogers. Trcisurcr: Liny Btcnfl 




'■■■■■ ■ ' 




01 




r^s 



Auditions for four parts in this year's K-State Recruitment Video. 

Need four students, college or high school students, 

who could pass for high school seniors. Each part will pay $100 

and probably require only one day of shooting. Auditions are open 

and will run from 1 p.m. to 6 p.m., Mar. 8, at Bob Dote hall. 

Call Jim Kinser at 532-7041 , for more details. 






xzzzmx 



■■■■■■■■WTTT 




AT MANHATTAN TOWN CENTER 



Fri.-Sun. 
March 3-5 
Wed,, March 8 



Sat., March U 



Sun,, March 12 
I Wed,, March 15 

Fri., March 17 

I Sat. & Sun. 
March 18 & 19 
Wed., March 22 

Fri.-Sun. 
I March 24-26 
I Sat,, March 25 



MARCH EVENTS 

sports & Leisure Show 

K-Rock Cafe, 11:30 a.m.-l:30 p.m.. Picnic Place 

Anna Buckland, Contemporary Christian 
7 p.m., Picnic Place 

K-State Theatre excerpts from 
"Smoke on the Mountain" 
11:30 a.m.. Center Court 

Weather Amateur Radio Network 

Spring Fashion Show, 1 & 3 p.m. 
Center Court 

Spring Fashion Show, 2 p.m. 
Center Court 

The Magic of Gary Roberts, 7 p.m. 
Picnic Place 

HAPPY SAINT PATRICK'S DAY 
Blue Valley Riders Motorcycle Show 

Susan Drake & Jack Hays, Contemporary 
Music, 7 p.m., Picnic Place 
Lawn& Garden Show 






NAUTILUS 

FITNESS & AEROBIC CENTER 



1 MONTH FREE 



1100 Moro 
A^^ievilla 
776-1654 



OPereonal Trainer 
Opree Weights 
DSIide C\»wteo 
DRuctfuetball Court 



Mien you Ipuy 2 months 

M^en paid in full 

OStep & Aerobic Qaoaeo 
OLIfe«trld« Trejidmill 



ONautilus MacMne» 
OSikea and Stair Climbcr« 
OMafl9«^e Therapist 
OSauna & Whirlpool 



Breakfast with Buruiy, 9 a.m. 
Picnic Place, tickets available at Customer Service Center 
Wed., March 29 Fashions by KG Mens and Maurices 
7 p.m.. Picnic Place 

^ e4e Ae€tnt ^ it ail. 



IIIAUDS KIMNNn SI AKS SIM tl \i I \ SI lOI'S rKMCIMACl 
MONDAY I IIKOLC.n SAIL KI>A\ 10 a.m. -'J p.m. SLM)A\ \ikmi-(i p.m. 

3RD AND POYNTZ 




PINION 



imcH<,iiw 




msmimm 



t«*»I Twit JU| 

N. Skwm Mcfin UI/riATVHU IMTM. '. '. ' Any ZiMlei 

Criitiaa ImKjr aPMRS ONIttl .tm S{hW MUt 

RotwKkUtaeftf OMMMS mroil Tmlw Bauiiif* W im i M II mi 

Mat LeffiaiweU CWT CM» ............. Dm 0(k» 

ChftHjLittle cm^MV. BUM . , . . , . Uftc Mtrlett 

fnpii MRiPeiiTiamii ktmOium 



RynddiUtlk 

ItUOiAoa 

AuaaQnkm 

Ntuayo Rema 

...... Km Maim 

GMtftiOui 



• »«■•• 



KAMA! sm oouniM 



In Our Opinion 



by the CoUepan Editariai Board 



City elections have big effect on students 



R«Ol*t«ring to 
vote Is Ilk* a 



youiMvar o«t 
around to. 



Imagine propeity taxes in Manhattan 
going up 15 percent.. 

tmagitie no parking on the streets sur- 
rounding campus from 6 a.m. until 6 
p.m 

Imagine another 1-cent sales tax 
increase. 

Imagine a jail being built next to an 
elementary school. 

Imagine even more construction. 

Imagine what could happen if you 
don*t register to vote before March 20. 

Registering to vote is like a pesky 
errand you never get around to. 

And when the elections come and go, 
you chide yourself for foi^etting about 
it, but you tell yourself no harm was 



really done. 

You need to register to vote. 

You need to vote. 

You need to tell your organizations to 
vote. 

Residence hall assistants should take 
all their residents out together. Greek 
houses need to go out in droves. 

Student senators should call their 
constituents — yes, all of them — and 
remind them to vote. Departments 
should ask if their employees are regis- 
tered. 

Because if 17,000 of us forget to 
vote, you can imagine anything you 
want 

And it just might come true. 



Studies of the human body may 
find causes for homosexuaiity 



I 



s biology to blame for 
my being gay? 



h there a genetic reason for my emo- 
tional and physical attraction to men? Is 
it based on brain chemistry? Is my brain 
hardwired this way? 

As I have stated in a previous column, 
I don't pretend to be a scientific expert. I 
am just an interested layperson with 
some subjective insight into the subject 
of homosexuaiity 

But as I understand it, there is a grow- 
ing body of scientific evidence that 
seems to suggest that there IS a biologi- 
cal component tu samc-gender attraction 
and behavior. 

Here arc a few of these areas that are 
being studied now; 

BRAIN DIFFEREKCES 

Recent research has demonstrated thai 
the brains of men and women are differ- 
ent in some surprising ways. It has been 
suggested that women have greater con- 
nectivity between the two halves of their 
brain, as a result of a thicker corpus cal- 
losum — the brain tissue that links the 
two halves together. 

It is this greater connectivity that has 
been suggested as the cause of greater 
intuiliveness and creativity in women. 

This same thickening has been 
demonstrated to exist in the brains of gay 
men, suggesting that the brains of men 
like myself are probably more like 
women's brains in function than men's. 

Another brain difference has been 
found in the hypothalamus — a part of 
the brain that influences sexual behavior 
and sexual aggression. 

Males tend to have much larger cell 
structures in certain parts of the hypothal- 
amus, while females tend to have smaller 
cell structures. 

And again, studies of the hypothalami 
in homosexual men have found that the 
smaller, female-like cell structures are 
present. 

This would seem to suggest that 
homosexual behavior is, in part, influ- 




enced by biology. 
In essence, parts of 
my brain, as a 
homosexual male, 
are hardwired as if 
I were female. 

This is not to 
say that I wish to 
BE a female — 
that is the realm of 
gender identity, as 
opposed to sexual 
orientation, and a 
topic for another 
column. 

Instead, it mere- 
ly suggests that 
parts of the brain 

that delineate male and female behavior 
patterns in the brain are not so clearly 
defined in some. 

Of course, this research is by no 
means conclusive. Questions of causality 
are not answered — are brain differences 
between males and females inborn, or are 
they socially consuructed? 

Is it possible that homosexual behav- 
ior or upbringing causes the^: brain dif- 
ferences to develop? 

And do brain differences exist in the 
case of lesbians, as opposed to heterosex- 
ual women? 

This research makes it appear that 
there probably is a link between homo- 
sexuality and biology, and that further 
study is needed. 

TWMSnJCMES 

One of the more interesting recent 
studies of homosexuality and biology has 
been in the area of twin studies. 

It seems that in the case of identical 
twins, if one is homosexual, then the 
other has more than a SO-percent proba- 
bility of being homosexual. 

This is statistically significant, espe- 
cially since fiatemai twins and non-twin 
siblings have much lower probabilities of 
being homosexual. 

Since identical twins share identical 
genetic codes, the suggestion is that even 
if homosexuality isn't cau.sed exclusively 
by genetics, there's a strong possibility of 
there being a genetic component thai 
leads to the development of homosexual- 



ity. 

Of course, these studies are also not 
conclusive. One area in which they lack 
is the study of similar environmental fac- 
tors twins share. What role did environ- 
ment have in shaping the similar sexual 
orientations? 

INUTERODEVELOPMEKT 

Another area of debate that has arisen 
lately is the suggestion that hormonal 
influences on a developing fetus may 
influence sexual orientation in later life. 

It is known that during early pregnan- 
cy, certain hormones must be released at 
certain times by the mother for the fetus 
to develop properly. 

Some studies have suggested that cer- 
tain hormones, either released in excess 
or in quantities too small will affect the 
forming brain in the fetus. These devel- 
oping brain structures may very well 
influence the fetus' sexual development. 

A recent study found that when preg- 
nant mothers were given certain drug, 
they were statistically more likely to have 
daughters who grow up to be lesbian. 
Discovering whether this is so will 
require further study, but it seems to sup- 
port the suggestion that an adult's sexual 
identity may have been shaped while that 
person was still in utero. 

Whether or not biology actually 
CAUSES homosexuality is still up for 
debate, and it is a debate that will proba- 
bly go on for a long, long time. 

My personal opinion is thai there is 
probably a confluence of factors, biologi- 
cal, genetic and environmental, that come 
together to shape sexual orientation. 

In the face of this growing body of 
evidence, the continuing assertion that 
homosexuality is a chosen orientation is 
not very credible. 

Frankly, 1 think I was bora this way. 



NAMING THE NAMES 

NoUble Homosexual for the Week: 
Rep. Barney Frank (born 1940) U.S. 
Congressman, D-Mas$. 



Kevyn Jacotis Is a ^Yshman In arl 



Readers Write 



^ — " 

Orop iMtars on at Kadito tie or aMMJ tham to l.«ttM« to Dm Edttor, cto Chrlaty LttUa, Kanua 
Stat* Co4l«glan. KMtala 11C. llantMrttan. KS eesoe. W* acc*pt tatter* by •-mall also. Our 
•ddrWM ti l«ttacaaspub.k«i.*du. l«lt*rs slioukl b« addrtMcd to tha •ditor and Includ* ■ 
narna, addrMa and phona rtumtiar. A photo tdarrtlflcatlon wflt ba n»c««aary tor tMn<S-<Mlv- 
•rwdMlara. 



^ RUniHCa HALLS 



^ Mmomnis 



Why uniock doors now? 

Dear editor. 

As many of you have undoubtedly 
heard. Haymaker Hail's Hall Governing 
Board decided last semester that it was in 
the best interest of the students living in 
die hall to lock the front doors 24 hours a 
day. This decision was widely challenged 
and took up much space in letters and arti- 
cles in the Collegian. 

The reasoning for the decision was said 
to be the safety and security of the resi- 
dents. What has changed? Are the students 
no longer the concern of this governing 
body? These questions come to mind in 
light of the fact that the front doors to 
Haymaker have once again been unlocked. 
The convenience to the students was not 
enough of a reason to unlock the doors 
several months ago, so why now? 

I was told by the president of Haymaker 
HGB that the doors were unlocked so that 
the Department of Housing and Dining 
Services would install the Validine system 
on the doors between Haymaker and 
Derby, t find this argument ridiculous. 
There was a policy in place to protect the 
students that was inconvenient. Now, the 
HGB has opted to make it more conve- 
nient. Kudos. Except for the fact that the 
reason will, in the long run, make it nmre 
inconvenient than before. 

I feel that HGB should have either acted 
when the students asked for the dooi^ to be 
unlocked the first time, or kept its nose out 
later. I thank them for the fleeting conve- 
nience but hope they realize they have not 
served their constituents to the best of their 
ability. I hope SGA and all of the other 
campus bodies will learn from the mis- 
takes of Haymaker's HGB and will actual- 
ly strive to serve their members, not use 
their safety as a pawn in some game of 
chess with the departments of this 
University. 

Alex Ruth 

Haymaker resident and senior in 

biochemistry 

► PARKJNO 

Appeals Board lacks reason 

Dear editor, 

A friend of mine, Chris Hubener, 
recently went before the Parking Citations 
Appeals Board to appeal a ticket. Chris 
was charged for not properly displaying 
his parking pennit from his rearview mir- 
ror. The problem was that recently his mir- 
ror had come unattached from the wind- 
shield, and he hadn't found the time to fix 
his mirror. So, Chris laid his parking per- 
mit on the dashboard in clear si^t. 

The Appeals board denied his request, 
even though Chris had purchased a permit 
and was not parked illegally. Tta Board's 
rationale was, "A rule has been broken, 
therefore you must pay, no matter what!" 
Well, Parking Services, what if a rule you 
have made is unreasonable? What's the 
point? Who do we talk to when a valid 
argument can be made that a rule is a bad 
one? 

I urge you, the Collegian, to publicize 
the upcoming open forums with Parking 
Services again. I would like to hear a 
response to this question and a few others 
that reasonable students may have to ask. 

Thank you. 

Marc Scarbnmgh 

senior In elcctrteai engineering 



Front page needs real news 

Dear editor. 

Ok, folks. Lets get something straight. 
I'm really tired of picking up the Collegian 
every day to see a front page story of 
someone whining about how life is unfair. 
Take it elsewhere. 

If your life sucks, don't tell people and 
expect them to do something about it. Life 
is what you make of it. And on the front 
page even? Thank God I get the Kansas 
City Star; otherwise, I'd think that the only 
news concerning me was someone blaming 
the late night traffic for racism. 

We've got 14,000 Marines in Sonudia 
and K-State students with projects aboard 
a space shuttle, and the front-page story is 
about racism. I'm sorry, but I was always 
taught that the front page was for impor- 
tant news, which concerned everyone. I 
realize that while racism is not right, it can 
never be totally abolished. 

In the meantime, let's see sonw of the 
great accomplishments that are taking 
place on our campus and in our country. If 
someone not familiar with our campus 
were to read any Collegian from the past 
few weeks, they would probably think that 
K-State is just a bunch of redneck hicks 
who hate and discriminate against every- 
one. Fortunately, I believe that this is not 
the case. 

Patrick Armstrong 

sophomore In computer engineering 

^ UNION 

Don't forget Union catering 

Dear editor, 

I doubt many people read the article in 
the Collegian on Tuesday, Feb. 28, on 
catering and banquet services available in 
the area, but to those of you who did read 
it, I'd like to point out a major oversight on 
the part of the Collegian reporter. What 
about the K-StaK Union? 

As many already know, the Union food 
service is under a serious threat of contract 
management. This lack of information 
about their services is one of the causes for 
their lack of revenue. The K-State Union is 
not allowed to advertise off campus and 
must rely on word -of- mouth and publicity 
for their advertising. 

Many people don't know about the 
Union's catering services or the fact that 
they are open to alt people. The K-State 
Union has developed a reputation for cus- 
tomized service and menus and decorating 
and offers the largest room capacities. Tlie 
largest function it can handle in one room 
is 1,100 people. Ask the College of 
Journalism and Mass Conmiuni cations to 
verify that — it has the largest annual 
event for Kansas Scholastic l^ss in that 
very room, consistently maxing it out 
every year. 

Did anyone know that the K-State 
Union Food Service catered the B rami age 
Coliseum Gala for 2,000 on the concourse 
of Bramlage? Did you know they annually 
cater the Friends of the Library with a cus- 
tom menu on fiill china in Farrell Library? 

It's no wonder the Union Food Service 
is in trouble. How can they be expected to 
support the students and be competitive 
when the students won't support them? 

Katy Vinson 

senior In secondary education and 

foimer catering manager of the K-State 

Union 



Double standard used to define life before birth 




I am constantly amazed by the con- 
tradictory messages sent by multiple 
groups and the government. During 
this session of the iCansas Legislature, 
there will be several bills regarding 
the definition of life before birth. 
Among them is Senate Bill 16. 

This bill reads, "Injury to a preg- 
nant woman is injury to a pregnant 
woman by a person other than the 
pregnant woman in the commission of 
a felony causing the pregnant woman 
to suffer a miscarriage as a result of 
that injury." 

It also reads, "Injury to a pregnant 
woman is a severity level 4, persona! 
felony." 

A translation of diis mumbo-jumbo 
would be if someone harms a pregnant 
woman and causes her to have a mis- 
carriage, criminal charges could be 
filed against that person. 

The inconsistency of this is that a 
woman still has the legal option to 



have an abortion. 

The definitions of abortion and 
miscarriage from Webster's 
Dictionary are, "The premature expul- 
sion of a fetus from the womb," 

Why does a woman have the right 
to abort her unborn child, but it is a 
crime for someone else to cause a mis- 
carriage? 

If the fetus is a human being in an 
automobile accident, then it should be 
treated as such when a woman choos- 
es to have an abortion, as well. 

Why are there so many double 
standards within the abortion issue? 

Another example of the same 
insane rhetoric surrounding the abor- 
tion issue is the fact that legally men 
have no role in the decision to have an 
abortion. 

I wouldn't find this illogical, if a 
man were not then held responsible 
for supporting that child for the next 
18 years. 



Maybe 

we should 
develop a 
system 
through 
which a 
man can 
terminate 
his respon- 
sibility to a 
child. This 
system 
would 
allow a 
man the 
same 
"RIGHT 
BODY 



How«v«r, 
l»*caua« w* 
taka privacy 
and personal 
rights so aari- 
ousIk wa oftan 
forgat Uioaa 
who cannot 
apaak for 
thamaahraa. 



TO CONTROL HIS 
as is currently given to 
women throughout the United States. 

This legal process for a man would 
cost about $300 to $400. roughly the 
same amount as an abortion. This 
would provide for equal protection to 
both men and women in the decision 



to have a child. 

Currently, we expect men to con- 
trol their bodies if they don't want 
children. 

The bill before the Kansas 
Legislature suggests that attackers 
should control their actions in regard 
to pregnant wonten. 

Why is it that we expect so little 
control from women? 

Are we incapable of controlling our 
bodies before we get pregnant? 

Some might say that these are 
unwanted pregnancies that people 
tried to avoid, but shoplifters who get 
caught aren't allowed special latitude 
if they tried to avoid getting caught. 

If you're willing to talte the risk, 
then you should be willing to take 
responsibility for the action. 

When I was in high school, 1 would 
sneak out after curfew and go to a 
friend's house, but when I was caught, 
I didn't look at my parents and say, 



"but I tried not to get caught." 

Had I said that, my parents proba- 
bly would have laughed hysterically. 
That thought process is so irrational it 
isn't funny. 

However, because we take privacy 
and personal rights so seriously, we 
often forget those who cannot speak 
for themselves. 

We only see people who can say 
that their rights are being violated. 

Isn't it time we see the irrational 
rhetoric produced by leftist groups and 
the government? 

Speak for those who cannot be 
heard. 

Higher standards are hard to find in 
the good old U.S.A. these days, but it 
is time we look past the "double 
^)eak" and see how lives are affected 
every day. 

Kathleen Mastto is a sophomore In 
pre-vcterinary ntedkine. 



Campus \m 



WWH^WJ w li^l M %wPMM^WIWBBqB 



Thel 




Manhattan city 



commissiM eleclfon 

Why you should 



I Campus 
Safety 



I Annexation 
&Taxes ^^^ 




nha 

>ly to' ,^^^^^ 
ampusOTBBIWn city 
Under the annexation agreement with K-State, money 
raised on campus is to be spent for projects that benefit both 
the I ''I'i/'jpibi' iiMi^WWpBMBliii^ im iiiiiiihukI ideas 
for th€ yii^ects, but th^^ommission 
decisi >n Wnow U^moH|^^)ent. 

T '^ bottom ^Bis tH^Hity ^^Dissio 
say in sd||ding more than alffrarte^^Bmitllo 
mone^ P^Bd on thi 



le final 

the final 
liars of tax 




I Student "'"^^ commission has some control over building codesr--. 
„ • Inspections of rental property are not mandatory in ^ "^ 
Housing Manhattan. The renter or landlord must request an ins 
The commission could change this. 

Transportation 

If you are interested in a public-transportation system, the city 
commission would be the group that could create one. The 
commission also controls parking ordinances. 

Where can students register 

to vote? Last day to register is March 20th. 

General election will be on April 4th. 

To register in Manhattan, you need to be 18 years old or older 
and have been a resident for six months. You can register at 
any one of these locations: 

Dilfons Stores, Manhattan High School, Manhattan Public Library, Riley County 
Health Department, SGA Office In the K-State Union. 




The candidates 

Who are these 
guys 

The following six candidates will compete 
for the three available city cominission 
seats in the April 4 general election. There 
are two seats open for four-year terms, and 
one seat is open for a two-year term. 



Steve Hall 



li 




5 53 

Occupation: Co-owner cS (Mem 
WorW 

OmIs: *I support ar>d wilt oonHmje to 
support open government, 
accountability and citizer) 
partk;ipation in iocal government.* 



Edward Home 

Occupation: Attorney at Kansas 
Fann Bureau 

Ooalt: "I am concerned atxxil 
maintaining our local economy, 
especially witt) ttie downsizing o( Fort 
Riley, tt will affect everytiody, 
including students with part-time 

jobe." I'm very interested in ttie Manhattan Public Ubnuy 
expansion project. I'd like to see ttiat come to a 
completion for the community and students to use (t* '"* 




Justin 


Kastner 




Ago: 19 

Occupation: K-State Student 

OoiIk "1 want to get a four-year tonn. 
When offli^vi change April 18, 1 
would make a quick transition so 1 
coutd t>e a contributing memtier at 
soon as possible. 1 am welMnformed, 
can make decisions and 




communicate to itie pubitc.' 



Mike Manning 



43 



Occupatlom Branch manager at 
Houeehoki Finance 



^^^^^^L Boate To provide participatory 

^^^^^^^^^ representation of the city and dtizens 
^^^B^fl^B at large. To perpetuate quality 
^^^^b^^H growth, tower taxation, improve 
^^^^^^^^^ relations with neighboring 
communities and perpetuate ttw quality of life for the 
citizens of Manhattan. 



Lex Pearson 




Ago: 32 

Occupation: House painter 



1 ptH want to try and use 
common sense, wfoilc for the peoplo 
arKl bring businesses to Manhattan. I 
want everything.* 



Bruce Snead 







Age: 43 

Occupation: state Extenston 
specialist at K-State 

Qoalt: "Wortt for poNOos and prefects 
that create rraximuni economic 
quality of Hta btnattls tor Msnhatttn. 
Seek oommon-eense solutions to 
problems that will tepreaent (he 

interests at\6 Input of our dtizene.* 



6 




PORTS 



^r^n 



■33311:1 



SIX FOOT AND UNDER TOI 



I.GoChidtenQo 


(M) 


2. EndoSmoke 


(M) 


3. Total Package 


(2-0) 


4. Runners N' Gunners 


(M) 


5. SAE [nd 


(M) 




Urii/jpU^il taf Si«nl of BifMb^ 



Poor 2nd-half shooting loses game; 
Cats finish last in the Big Eight 



PHHi. 



Colletiui 



K 



•State ended the 
regular season the 
same way it started 
it — with a loss. 



Ciilurado 70 



K Stale 51 



The Cats closed out the 1994-95 reg- 
ular season with a 70-51 loss to the 
Colorado Buffaloes Saturday afternoon 
in Bramlage Coliseum. 

The Colorado 
victory guaranteed 
the Cats eighth place 
in the confeience — 
a place the Cats 
haven't been in since 
the 1990-91 season. 

The loss also snapped the BufTatoes' 
30-gamc losing streak in Manhattan. 
The Buffs hadn't won a game in 
Manhattan since 1964. 

Colorado senior guard Donnie Boyce 
said finally breaking the streak wasn't 
all that important to him. 

"Everywhere we go it's like 20 years 
or something," Boyce said. "Any victo- 
ry is a big victory for us." 

Even though breaking a 50-year-old 
streak wasn't important to Boyce. K- 
State coach Tom Asbury said Boyce 
was an important factor when it came to 
rebounding. 

"We didn't have anybody that 
matched up real well with keeping 
Donnie Boyce off the boards," Asbury 
said. 

"He kind of did to us what Winfleld 
of Missouri did to us — he really hurt 
us on the offensive boards." 

Boyce did hurt the Cats on the 
boards, pulling down a career-high 18 
rebounds. 

But it wasn't just Boyce. Asbury said 
Colorado Just did an all-around good 
Job of rebounding against the Cats. 

"We defended pretty well. Wc Just 
didn't keep them off the boards," 



Asbury said. 

"They would take shots and ntiss and 
go get the rebound for big spurts in the 
second half." 

In the first half, the Cats Jumped out 
to a 5-0 lead, but Colorado Jumped back 
to tie the game at five when Boyce 
grabbed a rebound and put it back in for 
two at the 17:21 mark. 

K- State and Colorado would switch 
leads until the Cats went on a 13-0 run 
that extended their lead 26- 19. The Cats 
would lead by a much as nine when 
Belvis Noland connected on a trey from 
the right side at the 3:42 mark. But the 
Buffs would close the half, going on a 
7-2 run that pulled them within four 
points at the intemiission. 

"We let them back into it. We made 
some bad decisions," Asbury said. 

Tile Cats had a chance to extend the 
lead, but a Belvis Noland finger-roll 
layup rimmed off at the buzzer. 

This gave the Bramlage crowd a hint 
of what was in store for the Cats in the 
second half. 

At the beginning of the second half. 
Colorado Junior guard Keith Higgins 
connected on two consecutive three- 
point bombs, which put the Buffs in the 
lead until Noland drained one of his 
four treys to put the Cats up 36-35. 

The Cats led the game only once 
more. 

Colorado went on an 18-3 run that 
started at the 4:36 mark to put the game 
out of reach. 

Despite the larger losing margin, 
Asbury said the game in Manhattan was 
completely different than the one in 
Boulder. 

"It was a completely different game 
than in Boulder because we played hard 
— we Just played very, very poorly in 
particular in the second half," Asbury 
said. 

"The difference in the game was wc 
absolutely couldn't buy a basket." 

Freshman guard Mark Young said 
once the shots stopped falling, he staned 



thinking that it was going to be one of 
those games. 

"Once wc started missing a couple of 
times, we got to thinking in the back of 
our heads that this is one of those nights 
where wc might not be hitting nothing," 
Young said. 

"Wc took good shots. They just 
wouldn't go in." 

Colorado was led by Mack Tuck's 17 
points. Boyce poured in 16, and Keith 
Higgins had 12 

Noland led the Cats with 20 points 
on 7-of-24 shooting. Tyrone Davis had 
13. 

Junior guard Elliot Hatcher had one 
of his poorest shooting performances 
while at K-State. Hatcher only managed 
two points on O-for-12 shooting from 
the field. 

Asbury said Hatcher's poor shooting 
was hard to explain. 

"He was sick, but 1 don't think that 
explains it," Asbury said. "I don't imag- 
ine he's had too many games when his 
goes for 12." 

Senior forward Demond Davis 
returned to action but only played seven 
minutes. 

"I think he will be ready by next 
week. He won't be 100 percent by the 
Big Eight Tournament, but he might 
play some substantial minutes for us," 
Asbury said. 

"I'm guessing maybe he may play 20 
minutes," he said. 

Davis said his condition improves 
daily. 

"I'm Just taking it day by day. I can 
tell it's getting better every day." 

Despite losing by 19 at home, 
Asbury said the Cats' effort was good. 

"I wasn't disappointed with our 
effort. It's just tough going out with a 
loss like that at home." 

Even though the Buffs broke their 
30-game losing streak in Manhattan. 
Young said this game isn't the low point 
in the season. 

"The low point may be next week," 




■HAMi KIVMII/Collaaiarv 

K-$tlt0 Junior guard Elliot Hatcher aRcmptt to drlv* around Colorado center Tad 
Allen during the Cala' TO-SI lose to trie Buffs Saturday In Bramlage Coliseum. The lOM 
guaranteed the Ceta a last-place finish in the Big Eight 



Cats' poor shooting does them in again 



TODDamvAirr 



'mv* couMnt 
throw on* in tho 
oeoan. W« woro In 
a comploto coma 
oftanaivoly.'* 

Tom AiBURV 

KStato men's basketball 
coacb 



CoMr|i«n 

The movers have left, the renova- 
tions are complete, and Willie Wildcat 
has taken residence in his new Purple 
Palace — the Big Eight Conference 
cellar. 

K-Statc's 70-51 loss to Colorado 
on Saturday guaranteed the Cats a 
spot in the Big Eight basement — a 
place they haven't visited since the 
1990-91 season. 

A win on Saturday against 
Colorado could have pushed the Cats 
as high as sixth place in the confer- 
ence, but a horrendous second half 
against the Buffaloes put K-State out 
of contention. 

The Cats took a four-point halfiime 
lead into the locker room before they 
fell apart after intermisston. 



In the second half, K-State missed 
36 of its 42 field-goal attempts, 15 of 
its 17 three-point tries and seven of 1 1 
from the free-throw line. 

Cat coach Tom Asbury joked after 
the game about his team's poor sec- 
ond-half shooting. 

"We couldn't throw one in the 
ocean," Asbury said. "We were in a 
complete coma offensively." 

The offensive shooting woes were 
led by junior guard Elliot Hatcher, 
who missed all 12 of his shots from 
the Ticld. 

Asbury was not disappointed with 
Hatcher's shot selection. 

"He probably had 1 1 good shots," 
Asbury said. 

Asbury blamed the poor shooting 
on talent. 

"Any of you that have followed us 



know that we're not blessed with the 
world's greatest shooters," he said. 

He said recruiting is key in over- 
coming this poor shooting. 

"We've just got to find people that 
can shoot the ball." 

Asbury said effon had nothing to 
do with the 14-percent shooting half. 

"We played hard. We Just played 
very, very poorly," he said. 

Junior forward Belvis Noland, who 
was coming off a career 3 1 -point per- 
formance on Wednesday, led the Cats 
with 20 points, but even he was not 
immune to the poor shooting that 
plagued the team. 

Noland missed 17 of 24 from the 
field, including missing 1 1 of 15 from 
three-point range. 

The team's 26.4-pcrccni shooting 
on the game established a new season 



«? 



GAME AT A GLANCE 

WILDCATS BUFFALOES 



FT n * TO T* Mmw 



Omlk.D. 

Noluxl 


t-1 

714 


t-1 
1-3 






4 




2 


9 

20 


»IM*»«I 


IM 


M 













Hitcnv 


0-11 


22 




4 





2 


HAHVton 


»« 


«■( 




t 


t 


• 


CUVK.T 


S-10 


»e 






1 


3 
4 


t3 


mm 


14 


a 


urn 


3-t 


i-« 










s 


OMh 


04 


M 







« 





TOTALS 


t»-Tl 


t-M 


41 


to 


to 


11 



Tuek 



2-3 

23 



3S 



0-1 

f-1 



H 4 t 

}.« 4 

14 • 

4-t * 

M IS » 

B'B a 3 

M 1 

(Ml 

a* I I 



TOTALS 



J1.«T JI.» 4» 1» H 



low. 

More than that, the Cau' night- 
marish shooting ended the longest 
current losing streak in the Big 
Eight. 

Saturday's win snapped 
Colorado's 30-gamc drought in 
Manhattan, and now every Big 
Eight team has won at Bramlage 
Coliseum. 

Asbury said it wasn't what 



Colorado did to disrupt the Cats, 
but it was his team that beat itself. 

"We couldn't have beat anyone 
the way we shot it," Asbury said. 

Freshman guard Mark Young 
said he was very disappointed 
about finishing lasL 

"It hurts a lot because every- 
body picked us to finish last," 
Young said, "and that's what hap- 
pened." 




I WHrfLar/CoHagian 

K-Sllta coach tri«n Aglw and trie cats* bench hold their heeds In 
dlelMlief during K>State'a SS-SQ loss to Oklahoms State Saturday at 
the Women's Big Eight Tournament In Sallna. 



► WOIHEN'8 BASKETBALL 

OSU knocks Cats 
out of tourney 



SALINA — Stacy Coffey scored 16 points, 
including three baskets from three-point range, 
as Oklahoma State defeated K-State 69-59 
Saturday in the Big Eight Women's Basketball 
toumament. F^^^^^^^SSI 

Oklahoma Stale (17-10) liKlRnaHn 
held K-State (14-13) with- [ MJiiiMiMl l 
out a field goal early in the MVMHVH^I I 
game as part of a 17-4 run l^!l^Q^^| I 

that gave the Cowgirls a I 1 

25- 10 lead with 6: 1 7 to go in the half. 

During the run, Coffey scored nine of her 
1 3 first-half points, and Gina Shaterkina added 
four. 

Oklahoma State, the tournament's fourth 
seed, built a 35-16 halftimc lead, but Brit 
Jacobson led a second-half K-State comeback. 

Jacobson scored nine of her 24 points in a 
19-8 run that cut Oklahoma State's lead to 
seven. Shanele Stires threw in eight of the 
Wildcats' first 10 points and finished with 24. 



► BASEBALL 



Cats spanked by Northern Iowa 



TOOosmvAiir 



Colteitiii 

The Northern Iowa 
Panthers scored early and 
often. 

The K-State WildcaU did 
not. 

Behind 
a 16-run. 
l6-hit per- 
formance, 
the 
Panthers 



l\l. Iowa 16 



K Stale 5 



thrashed the Cats 16-5 in a 
bitterly cold baseball game 
Sunday at Frank Myers Field. 

Wildcat coach Mike Clark, 
whose team fell to 4-4. said 
his team was unprepared for 
Northern Iowa. 

"I was just disappointed 
that we didn't show up ready 
to play," Clark said. 

The Panthers started the 
scoring with a two spot in the 
top of the second inning, fol- 
lowed by three more runs in 



the third. 

By the third lime the 
Wildcats stepped to the plate 
for an inning, they were 
already down five runs. 

The Cats were able to cut 
the Panther lead to two with a 
mini-rally in the fourth 
inning, but three more 
Northern Iowa runs in the 
sixth and five more in the sev- 
enth put the Cats down and 
out. 

K-State ace starter sopho- 
more Eric Yanz was knocked 
out of the game after five 
innings, in which he gave up 
eight runs and walked five 
Panther batters. 

Yanz's relief, junior Marc 
Lowery, didn't fare much bel- 
ter, giving up five earned runs 
in le.ss than two innings. 

Clark said his team's pitch- 
ing problems boiled down to 
fundamentals. 

"Wc didn't throw strikes." 



Clark said. "Wc had very poor 
execution." 

That tack of execution car- 
ried over onto the offensive 
side, as the Cats could only 
manage five hits off Panther 
staner junior Steve Beard. 

Senior relief pitcher Jon 
Goerish came in for Beard in 
the seventh inning and pitched 
diree hitless innings of relief 
for his first save. 

Clark said his team was 
not mentally ready to play 
Northern Iowa Sunday. 

"They had something on 
their minds other than base- 
ball," Clark said. 

Clark said he is hoping his 
team can learn from their mis- 
takes against Northern Iowa 
and be better prepared for 
Benedictine College on 
Wednesday. 

"Maybe you've got to get 
your ears burned one time in 
order to nuke iu" Clark said. 



KANSAS STXIt COLLEGIAN 



Monday, Mareh 6. 1896 y 




TfW Iwt of 9 ItttBT off nilW) thiB puppy slaeps peacefutty after being visited by several people looking to adopt a new pet. The vlslta 
took place during ttw Adopt-A-Pet Day Sunday afternoon at the Manhattan Animal Shelter. 

► CAMPUS 

Animal shelter gets helping hand 



ColkfiM 

Three little girls and their par- 
ents walk down the row of 
cages Riled with dogs at the 
Manhattan Animal Shelter in 
search of a new family pet. 

Mitzi Schulte. holding her youngest daugh- 
ter by the hand, tries to mediate a discussion 
on which of the dogs lo choose. 

"Which one do you want?" she asks, as the 
girls poke their hands through a pen of six pup- 
pies. 

Schulte said her daughters have been want- 
ing a pet for a little mure than a year, but they 
wantol to wail until after they moved. 

They came to the shelter in the hope tbey 
could adopt an animal that would otherwise be 
put to sleep. 

The Schulte family came to the shelter on 



Adopi-A-Pet Day, sponsored by the K-State 
Pre Vet Club. 

Renee Rankin, community service chair for 
the Pre Vet Club, said the club decided to spon- 
sor this activity to help both the Manhattan 
Animal Shelter and the animals there. 

"We wanted to advertise the animal shelter 
and the animals they have there," Rankin, 
senior in pre- veterinary medicine, said. "We 
also wanted to help get the animals adopted, 
because there are so many that have to be put 
to sleep." 

The Manhattan Animal Shelter received 
1 .253 dogs last year, 24 percent of which were 
euthanized. 

The shelter received 777 cats, and 47 per- 
cent of those were euthanized. 

The Pre- Vei Club arranged for several spe- 
cial perks for people who adopted a dog or cat 
Sunday, Rankin said. 

Four local veterinary clinics offered 23-per- 
cent discounts for vaccinations and health 
tests. A local grooming shop offered free pet 



grooming and 25 percent off pet supplies. 
Subway restaurants offered free sandwiches to 
people who adopted pets Sunday. 

Rankin said there is a S15 adoption fee. 
There is also a $25 refundable deposit for 
spaying and neutering the animal, and a SIO 
refundable deposit for rabies vaccination for 
animals older than four months old. Rankin 
said. 

Three cats and 10 dogs were adapted yes- 
terday, Rankin said. This is the Tirst year for 
Adopt-A Pet, but the PreVet Club hopes to 
make it an annual event 

The Schulte family adopted the eighth dog 
of the day. After much deliberation, they 
picked out a 5 -week-old, black, l^brador-mix 
puppy. 

One of the little girls smiled as she swung a 
bag of dog food by her side 

"This is what we get to feed the puppy," she 
said. 

Arguing over who was going to get to hold 
the puppy, the family filed out of the building 



► LECTURE 



Speaker urges students to get on information highway 



Twenty- three years of experience 
in the digital highway industry was 
brought to K-State students in a 
Kansas Communications Arts 
Alliance lecture Friday in the WiUard 
Art Gallery. 

Greg Carlile, president of 
Spinnaker Communications, talked 
to students about not becoming road- 
Idll on the digital highway. 

"I renumber my first experience 
with this type of communications, I 
was to years oki. and when I went to 
school, there was a television in the 
CRmt of the room," Carlile said, 

Carlile said his teacher had 
bioughi her own television to school 
so her students could watch history 
in the making. 



"The country stopped when we 
watched John Glenn in his funny- 
looking space suit get into his cq>- 
sule and blast into space," Carlile 
said. 

This was the Tirsl exposure for 
Carlile in the technology tiKlustry, 

"I have seen the changes in the 
industry," Carlile said. "The commu- 
nications industry has gone through 
an electronic metamorphosis." 

Carlile said the industry and the 
information available are changing 
business, social and economic values. 

"Information is changing the very 
root of how we think," he said. 

The fundamental information 
trends in management are becoming 
important. Carlile said. 

"There are six important funda- 
mental trends: content, decentraliza- 



tion, disintermediation, inneroper- 
abilily. conversion and globaliza- 
tion." he said. 

Content of the information that 
you have the ability to provide to 
your employers makes them more 
powerful and makes you iikxc mar- 
ketable. Cariile said. 

"Access to the mainframes of 
computers used to be kept under the 
lock and key of men in white coats, 
but the PC ha.s made it able to gain 
the same access as the men in the 
white coats," Carlile said. 

Globalization has made all of this 
possible, and the Internet is the 
essence of it all, he said. 

"It is fast becoming the way of 
life," Carlile said, 

Carlile said students should have 
access to a computer. 



"1 recommend you get a computer 
or just have good access to one, iusi 
make it second nature. Get on 
Internet and start cruising," he said, 

Carlile compared the computer 
and information industry with the 
automobile industry at the turn of the 
century. 

"Designers of cars worked with 
designers of highways and petroga- 
soline miners and developed the 
infrastructure that is in existence 
today." Carlile said. "We are the 
designers of the computer industry. 

"We have to make it so people 
can move large amounts of informa- 
tion around." he said. 

"If you are a user or a consumer. 
you will eventually become a user of 
a computer just as people have 
become users of the automobile." 



► SAFETY 



Car workshops 
will cover basics 



Cot1e|Ma 

Student Governing Association 
and the student group Fearless are 
taking an active rote in helping stu 
dents to be safer and less dependent 
on the kindness of strangers. 

Car maintenance workshops will 
be at 6 p.m. Tuesday and Thursday 
at Manhattan Vocational Technical 
School, 

The workshops will 
cover the basics of car 
maintenarKe, such as 
checking and adding 
oil, jump starts, tire 
changes and general 
automobile mainte- 
nance. 

Ashley Weekly, freshman in 
public relations, said the workshops 
were scheduled before spring break 
to help prepare people who would 
be driving somewhere for break, 
especially women, 

"If a woman was driving on 1- 
70, got a flat tire, and didn't know 
how to change it, she would have to 
depend on someone nice to come 
along and help her," Weekly said, 
"Knowing even a little about how 
to take care of your car will make 
you more independent and help 
with personal safety, too, 

"Basically, we're trying to teach 
awareness so that someone won't 
take advantage of you in a situa- 
tion," Weekly said. 



StudeniW 

SEmi 



The SGA Parking and Campus 
Safety Committee worked in con- 
junction with Fearless to organize 
the workshops, A table in the Union 
on Tuesday and Thursday will have 
general information about highway, 
car and personal safety. Weekly 
said, 

Philip Mudd, fifth-year architec- 
tural engineering student, said 
group members felt there 
was a definite need for 
the workshops, 
"It's amazing 
how many people don't 
even have spare tires. My 
girlfriend's dad showed 
her how to check the oil 
on her car, but, when it got low, she 
had no idea how to put more in," he 
said. 

Mike Clausner, fifth-year stu- 
dent in architectural engineering 
and workshop coordinator, said stu- 
dents could attend either one of the 
sessions because the format would 
be similar each day. 

"The two instructors are state- 
certified auto mechanics from 
Manhattan Vo-Tech, They have 
things they want to go over for sure 
and then will answer any questions 
that people might have," he said. 

Weekly said it was the first time 
for such an event on campus. 

"If we get a gcxxJ turnout and it's 
successful, we'll try to offer it 
again," she said. 



»- NATION 



'Bloody Sunday' remembered 
by 2,000 marchers in Selma 



ASSOCU'raD 



SELMA. Ala, — Led by four 
black members of Congress, about 
2,000 marchers retraced a historic 
path across a bridge to mark the Wth 
anniversary of the "Bloody Sunday " 
voting- rights march. 

The marchers included Jesse 
Jackson, Coteita Scott King, Martin 
Luther King III and Rep, John Lewis, 
who was beaten bloody by troopers 
during the first march. 

On March 7, l%5, white lawmen 
beat and gas.sed hundreds of marchers 
trying to crofi'i Edmund Pettus Bridge. 
Footage of the beatings ran on nation- 
al television, sparking outrage and 
leading to passage of the landmark 
Voting Rights Act, which outlawed 
liter^y tesLs in many Southern states. 

Two weeks later, Martin Luther 
King Jr. led an even bigger march all 
the way to the steps of the stale 
Capitol in Montgomery, 

On Sunday, a cold rain fell on 



marchers gathering outside the 
National Voting Rights Institute to 
walk once again across the bridge 
named for a Confederate general. The 
group also planned lo make the 54-mile 
journey to Montgomery for a rally on 
SalunJay, About 100 wiU walk. 

"It's gratifying lo see all the 
changes that have occurred and to sec 
the number of black registered voters 
and black elected officials in the slate 
of Alabama," Lewis, a Georgia 
Democrat, said. 

Still, there was little icmc that the 
battle has been won, 

"Once again, we're having to fighl 
fot our voting rights," said the Rev, 
Joseph Lowery, president of the 
Southern Christian Leadership 
Conferctjcc. 

"The courts are invalidating con- 
gressional districts ostensibly because 
of the shape of the district, but it's 
really the shade of the representative 
they're concerned about," Lowery 
said. 




// 



Tinft/ 



fda^^^ 



FOR HfllR 



Introducing • 

Vicky" .., with 
18 years experience 
now offering a 
introductory special... 

50% Off 

AH Services thru March 18 
Wednesdays & Fridays Only 

776-8830 

Candlewood 



STREET SCENE 



I I tl I 11 1 n 



Uiti<i>L)' 






n '♦"^ 













h ■ ■'•■ 



M \R( It >> 1) Hp.ni. 

M( ( \|N \1 IHIOUH M 



Ml vM iiv ki lu ui n 1 
(tidi \iiv I tv,«H>sii(<,Hi\ 

I, .1,1- M, 1 .,11 |i 't I tin, , \,i..iit,i 'v>" •"•M ■ <'i • 



ONE HOUR PHOTO 
& PORTRAIT STUDIO 



Blacit and White 8x10 only! 




with coupon 

(From black and white negatives only] 

Print ready In 2qIx 3 dayal 



lAcroH fintHnWeftlopg _ J2§:2Q9fi_ __ JllL%itffliAMlJ 



1134 Gardtn Way 



Mon,-Frl. a.m.-e p.m 



I 
I 



MEDIUM 
ROUNDS 

PLUS TAX 
Valid M«ndaya only a1 parttclpatlng Uttt« CacMra*. 

Extra Mpplngi tvaliM « additknal cent "Exdudet nlra clweM. 

Explras 3/20/05 




^^ •1993 Unle Comw Enitfpritti, he, 

■■ Bi leST VALUi COUPON IB ■ 

LOCATED IN MANHATTAN 
WESTLOOP CENTER 




ft Monday^ liarah 6. t>W 



KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN 



► MVIIW 



Artwork 
inspired 
by Greek 
goddess 



ColktUB 



T 



he Ambry Gallery, locat- 
ed In West Stadium, isn't 
a conventiomil gallery. 



You duck under a massive concrete 
beam, which neatly dissects the doorway, 
and head into a small, wann, white space. 

You could say almost the same thing 
about artist Sonya Michelle Paukune's 
work, which is now on display by 
appointment at the Ambry. 

Paukune, graduate student in art with 
an emphasis in ceramics, creates teapots 
and oversized vases with immense textur- 
al qualities and varied glazings. 

The teapots, her newest work, stem 
from a conglomeration of creative ideas, 
principles and artistic techniques. 

The teapots are inspired by the Greek 
goddess Artemis. 

Paukune discussed her work at the 
Wednesday night opening reception of 
her new exhibit, "Visions of Vessels." 

"I saw a special on PBS about 
Artemis, and she had all these orbs hang- 
ing on her body," Paukune said. 

Orbs are sphere-like objects, which 
Artemis hung around her neck. Artemis is 
ihe virgin goddess of the hunt and the 
moon. 

Paukune represents the goddess in her 
teapots by constructing them of orbs. 

"If you look closely, you'll see full 
circles or half-circles that imitate the 
cycles of the moon." she said. 

Paukune said she got most of her 





Sonyi Paukuna, graduat* sludftnt Irt art •mphasWng In nramlcs, dlteusMS h«r 
c*ramle* axhibit currently on display In ths Ambry a«ll«fy, which la locat*d In Watt 
Stadium. Paukuna'a show runa throygh March 18. 



inspiration from the shrine to Artemis at 
Corfu, Greece. The whole exhibit is a 
symbolic representation of the temple. 

The vases represent corner columns of 
the temple, and the teapots are represen- 
tations of Artemis, which is indicative of 
the statues found at the temple. 

There is an organic look to the teapots, 
but this is not accidental. 

Paukune said she wanted the teapots 
and vases to appear as if they had come 
from the earth or had grown from some- 
thing. 

The teapots look very much like a 
clump of young buibs ready to sprout. 

The eye-catching texture of Paukune's 
work is created through a scraping 
process. 

While still working with the clay, she 
will take the different pieces of the orbs 
and scrape them with a metal tool, creat- 
ing flowing, expressive lines. 

Paukune said her favorite pot was the 
"Teapot From the Temple of Corfu," the 
extraordinary metallic-blue and purplish 



mass of orbs bordering the far wall. 

Most of the teapots are done in a tradi- 
tional Japanese raku style. 

"Raku is a low-fired pot in which you 
glaze a pot. let it sit for 24 hours, heal it 
up to about 1,800 degrees until it is glow- 
ing hot. 

"Then it kind of has a transparency to 
it, and you pick it up out of the kiln and 
put it in a combustible material, such as 
sawdust or pine needles," Paukune said. 

The smoke from the burning of the 
sawdust seeps into the cracks of the pot 
and creates a black look in parts of the 
piece, she said. 











( VkA 



G)llegian 



csdays 



Three New Flavors. One Great Sale. 

CHOCOUTE ALMOND PECAN CRUNCH WALNUT FUDGE 

We're introducing three great new Blizzard® flavors and to 
celebrate, all flavors are on sale for a limited time. Try the 
breathtaking Chocolate Almond. The awesome Pecan Crunch. 
And tantalizing Walnut Fudge. Huny to your participating 

Daily Queen® store and get 
yours, because at this price 
these treats have never been 



cooler. 




$ I*1t sale 



MONDAY, MARCH 6 
FRIDAY, MARCH 1 7 



li.iiai 



MUOQCaptM OilFyaiHn*iK>«n|irau4i«aini<<*i(CliMin'iMM(iiNMMit.<iift)ib 






In the Stateroom 

March 6-10 
10:30a-1:30p 

chickeN 
/dAck 



MENU 



RiedCNdien 

2pcdark... 

SEKiy Chicken 

2pciiiiihite.,. 

2pcdark.... 

Qblets 

ori 



J 



$2,19 

.$139 

$1B9 

andGaw $0.75 

VWdflteBtend 10.75 

Bread DTKsiig ;a75 

Seasoned &een Beens 10.75 



K-Stat0 Union 



FoodServIc* 



MEAL DEAL $3^ 
Cttolcd of One Entrw 

2 Pieces of Chicken 

Fried or Savory 

-or- 

Gblets 

QioictofTWoStdet 

Mashed Potatoes 

Wild Rice Blend 

Bread Dnessing 

Sdasor\dd Green Beans 



J^^^^ »»»■<»» tTfW«-W<-ITTtTf twill 111 IMl 'l V\ 'l^'t<<V \^^r<lTt<<T-tTT'fTT>CtTTTfTtTTV'rTTTT 









^7^>^Q^ 



CO' 



,tcv? 



,e^^ 



Great Comedy Is Back! 

Tues. March 7 • 8:30 p.m. 

Brain Burgess 

(Letterman, A & E, Carolines) 
$6 couples 



'0y 




Ksrsm''^^ \ 



^i^mm. 






4': 



ALOON— ^1 



DAVID NASTER 
TOMBURGOON 



JThisWi 
Fri. & Sat 

!Nlid-nite Rurn 



531 N. Manhattan Ave.'Aggieville 

Open Tue.-Sat. S p.m. to 2 a.m. 

539-0229 




SOFTBALL AND INTRAMURAL SPORTS 

INTRAMURAL ENTRY DEADUNE 

Thursday, March 9, 5 p.m. 
at the Rec Complex-Rec Services Office 



MANDATORY 

SOFTBALL 



Captain's /Manager's Meeting 
Wednesday, March 15, 5 p.m. 
Union Forum Hall 





SOFTBALL UMPIRES WANTED 

Must attend both clinics: 

Monday March 13, 6:30 p.m. 
K-State Union, Room 212 

Tliesday, March 14, 5 p.m. 

Rec Complex 
MAKE EXTRA CASHII! 



Ttf'ff" ""'"'"'"' """'^'^^" "''•'"•*•"•*"'""""""""" """"""■"•"" 



llCall Rec Services Office for details 532- 



► MUSIC 



Big-band jazz returns; 
special guest musicians 
to perform at concert 



Colic giw 

Jazz lovers will gel yet another 
chance to enjoy the sounds of big- 
band music. 

K-Siaie's Concert Jazz 
Ensemble will present a concert 
titled "C.J.E. & Friends" at 8 p.m. 
tonight at Union Foram Hall. 

The concert will include a wide 
selection of big-band Jazz music. 

Dennis Wilson, director of jazz 
studies, will direct the concert, 
which will include new arrange- 
ments of American songs and sev- 
eral original compositions com- 
posed by Wilson. 

There wilt be several guest 
appearances at the concert, Wilson 
said. 

Bill Lee of Ihe International 
Association of Jazz Educators will 
be one of the guest pianists per- 
forming at the conceri. 

"Jazz is truly an American 
music," Lee said. 

"I hope it is an esthetic experi- 
ence for everyone." 

Wilson said Bill McFarlin, trum- 
peter and n»ted band leader, will be 
playing a blues number with him. 

A new arrangement of "The 
Band is Hot," a number played at 
K -State football games, will feature 
two great alto saxophone players 
from K-Sutc, Wilson said. 



Lucas Munce and Tim 
Orindgreff, senior in journalism and 
mass communications, will perform 
the funk version of the arrange- 
ment. Wilson said. 

Scth Galiizer, junior in music 
education, will play his clarinet in 
the American premier of an 
arrangement written by Wilson for 
Eji Kitamura. one of Japan's fore- 
most clarinet players, Wilson said. 

Another highlight of the evening 
is the presentation of the 
Outstanding Soloist Award to the 
two student winners at the recent 
Kansas State University Jazz 
Festival, Wilson said. 

Pianist Albert Smith of 
Wyandotte High School and bassist 
Sean Jackson, Manhattan High 
School senior, will perform an 
arrangement by Frank Foster tilled 
"On the Road to Kansas Slate" with 
the Concert Jazz Ensemble. Foster 
is a Count Basie Orchestra leader 
and Grammy Award winner. 

Jackson said he is excite to play 
with the band and is looking for- 
ward to his freshman year at K- 
State in the fall. 

"Before Dennis Wilson came to 
K-State, the jazz program wasn't 
viewed as one of the better pro- 
grams in the state," Jackson said. "I 
think it will take off with the help 
of Wilson." 




C Kansas StaU 
OLLEGIAN 

118 Kedzie HaU • 532-6560 

r advertising buck 



LUCKY ^ 
BREWGRILLE 



s'K \t,(. 



DAIIA LUNCH SPLCIALS 

( hirkcn lUii I iln IM.il«' 



I <nij;v S.iin <' ( ,it/oiir PI. 

VVl DNI SOW 

I .is.ii'n.i Pl.ilc 



I HI ki'\ ( .ii/(>iM> ruiit* 

UJllKVI »i\i 
KlU) llrri S.iiulwii h I'lair 



J HIDW 



M< km I tii'd sti'.ik PIhIc 
aliitit Saiisii^',r ( iil^QlK' 

710 N Manhattan Ave 

776 - 9090 



Asian- American Awareness Month 

March 1995 
"A DxffmrBnt Pmrspmctlva" 

I Hgiitlpy, Mttth 6 ' _. 

7-g 30 p m Lilll« ThMlu / , 

Gucil Sp«iktr: Quo<fNBlij'M a' , ■-. \ 

SapbomorclnJaumallimindMaiiCoinmuniulloni / 

'Memoin nftht VittHam Wv" 



8 10-1000 pm LiUltThMtn^ /'^y l' 
itiiku Poetry Reiding '/ / \ ; 



\ 



Wrdntidiy. M«nb I 

Noon- 1 }D p m Cottonwood Room 
Luncheon 



\. 



\ \ 



Guul Sprskcr: Jinti Bfiutra 

"Rice ond Hetf: Oromng Vp Atian-American in Southirett'Kitiiuu" 

7.00 pm Union Siwion .•*' 

Krynolc AUniclian ; Judc Naril* 

"Coming Into Fnuion: Song for « Sanut" ' 

A proinintiil prcforrotr who porlni)'! ■ numlwr of Atlan women with lire ga*l 

uff rati idling racial anil iciuat tttnolyptt 

S atur^jay. M ^fch 1 1 ' ' / " i 

7 00 p m liCM Building 

Cullural Nigbt: Poliuck with Entertainment 



Tueida*. March 14 

7 00 p in Liille Theaicr 
Movie; "fl*mtn anr/ Eartk" 
Vn* Admiiiion 



TkttnAn. Marrh li 
7:00 p.m UiileThetiei 
Movie: "TkeJoflMekOih" 
Vttt AdmiuioD 



ConlacI t)Rk« of Mtilikullural AlTaln For More Inre/matien: Sdl-64J« 




'9 



IVERSIONS 



ARTS AND ENTERTAINMENT CALENDAR 



TonnM 

J3 f^ K-State Concert Jazz Ensemble wi 
perfomi at 8 p.m. at Union Forum Hall. 



/3 C The student perctissionists recital will be 
from 7 to 6 p.m. ai Ail Faiths Chapel. 



BMBfti fUKti ffti I miftii 






T •je r ^ '' 



.1 .jjji. ,k 



M^WCifftillM 



► CROSSWORD 



EUGINtSKtFFEK 



ACROSS 

1 Rudely 

abrupt 
S Grate 
8 Rooster's 

topp«r 
12Ho«e 

14 Slate 

15 Glows 
with icy 

18 "Ship o( 
Foots* ship 

17 Cut rrom 
tt>estatf 

18 Eric's 
sobriquet 

20 Tex-Mex 

treat 
23l.outish 

sort 

24 Track 
trans- 
actions 

25 Creamy- 



38 Polyphonic 
composi- 
tion 

37 Pennsyi- 3 
vania, once 4 

40 Rowing 5 



41 QuHs dry 

42 Refine 

47 Wtle E. 
Coyote's 
supplier 

48 Mean 
figures 

49 Entries in 
Baby's 
agenda 

50 X rating 

51 Frost, 
(or one 

DOWN 

1 Train com- 



9 
10 

11 
13 

19 

20 



ponent 

'—lazy 

liver...' 

Flushed 

Ordeals 

Fitjer tor 

34 Down 

Exist 

Puts back 

Whereto 

excavate 

lor a mirw 

Finished 

Unem- 

belllstwd 

Small nail 

NYC-based 

sitoom 

One Cart 

wright 

Bather's 

network 



34 



root 
vegetable 

28 Guide- — 

29 Ice, often 

30 Actress 
Arthur 

32 Puts into 
words 

34 Titanic's 
downfall 

35 Greet the 
villain 





SolutkHi tlma: 


25 mln. 




J 


E 





P 


1 

a 


ol 


D| 


H 


A 


M 


P 


A 


Q 





r 


1 


E 


M 


1 


R 


B 





N 


A 


F 


1 


D 


E 


L 


1 


M 





Pl 


A 


C 


t 


ft 


||Ht 


1 





E 


S 


Qi 


A 


T 


E 


S 


1 


B 


A 


n 


E 


^^^H 


L 

i 




T 


i;s 


v IT 





H 


1 


f A 


C 



E 
M 





I 


£■ 


N 


B 


Oi 


H 


H 


ou 


1 


E 


■ 


M 


A 


1 
I 


M 
Y 


P 


■ ■a 


i'' 


9 


■a 


E 


L 


S 

A 

M 
P 


T 


A 


n 


Kll 


p 


LA 


Y 


^ta 


R 
1 



1 

L 
S 


D 
L 

V 


1 


B 
U 




R 


JN 
1 


A 

's 


i 


Z 

e 


A 

V 
J. 


1 

W 


Q 


E\N 


T 


■ 


o\ 



36 
37 

38 

39 

40 

43 



Jalopy 
Yearning 
Sometimes 
they're up 
in arms 
Owl's love 
■ — your 
pardon* 
Uma's 
land 
IMildred 
Pierce" 
author 
Candle 
count 
Scholar- 
ship 
eponym 
Rough 
rrkateiial 
Equitable 
"Brian's 
Song' star 
Killer 
wfiale 
Flaccid 
It lakes 
the cake 
•—Got a 
Secret" 
•Sut- on 
forever* 
{Tennyson) 
Concluding 
character? 
SuperlaUve 
ending 



^ i 3 t Mi i t Hi g \b H 

J2~ ■ -W Hi4 


Hi* 

■■is - w ^^H 


■■«2 ™ ™™™ 

Hw '- ■■ 


^no W^^ 



ISTUMPED? 



For answers to todiy's i 
i l-«)0-<S44S73 199c permtrtule, touch- 
tone/ rotary pfrones. (1 ft* only.) A King Featurw Mrvtoe. NYC. 



CRYPTOQUIP 
OSNABVCIU QXF SUFX 
CIUR OSQAFN GR CISFSUQ 
ASN OVSBUHN. 

Yesterday's Cryptoqulp: POTTER'S ROUND VES- 
SELS WERE SO SUPERB WE WERE BOWLED OVER. 

Today's Cryptoqulp clue: Q equals G 



► CALVIN AND HOBBES 



BOlWATntSON 



fc 9a* Of HEW CRMONS; 
Mow THEfW *a. P««n. 
LmtD UP IH ORBtR. 
BRIGWt AND PtRna.' 




S00« rwtXVL BE Ik BUUOt 
or GtoJW KMH, BWJMOtO 
D«DlSTIHek|tSM*SV.t ST\)MPS, 
WSStHS IKW WWffOO W 
. SWDOD Mm OTWR COLoes. 








SCMETIMES V\rt ^ttft 







► HON SEOumn 



Tiun 




f^TH VACMUbf'^ ^04^ »|gl< T^P » OO^^JP 



\/my 



► FOXTROT 

nMULSCm 



Bill Amend 




► UNKNOWN 



IhtANDON PeOC/CoLUCUN 



V 

li. 

ti 

I 









'7^ yaKf 




► REVIEW 







1 dm 

1 CASSIE. 


Disturbed reader should chill out 

Dear Imposler, To the true Cassandra, wc miss your 

Fake! Shyster! Foul Abductor! Who spark, 
arc you? You are obviously not the Signed, Life Without Joy 
Cassandra wc have always known and 
come to read in huddled groups (hat Dear Life. 

have far too many other things lo be First, you all take riK way too scri- 
serious about. ousiy. Drink, dance, have wild, pas- 

1 don't know what planet you come sionate orgies on the president's front 
from to abduct our callous, callow and porch, but chill out. 
sometimes caring Cassandra, but we Second, I am as ) always have been: 
will have our revenge if you don't callous, callow and sometimes caring, 
bring her back. but 1 don't take kindly to threats 


1 iw 

I Cassandra 
1 Dtivaaux 



Grand Openirig! 
CHOPSYICKS' 



• Oriental Food (Korean Japanese Chinese) f 

• Dine In or Carry Out 

• Delicious 

«< Fast and Friendly Serving 
8 Reasonat)te Prices 



CHOPSTICKS'i 



10% off 
Jftaljy Special 




» 776-0030 

1200 Mora, AgfliMlIt 



■ V . ' ' ■ ' 1 ;j :;i i.e i. ina . > .M . 1 *. -I ii x,\M('.a^) I.& ■ ; 'na :; :;■ : L i" >s i . > -^ 1. 1 •>; . . ; 


TUs WMk's SiMdais 


Taco Burgers 2 for $1.70 no. «» u. 


Burrito OInnar $3.05 ng. h 


BMd Uuotigll S-ll-M 


NEWI Ctatckan Fajltas ^^ 


•TACO ^VTE 



.It-:. . 

Sun Tliut_. )1n(n lOpm Wlieic guod tncidtlt. qt.'l 1(.k]*.'IIh.'p ^j 

Ffi S.il 1 1 ,1 m Midixgid O^feflookintj V'>slloo[) \^\ 

2809 Claflin 539-2091 % 



~ -;U):w(.acii;c-.:iiD(.> ;i.i«.t mjAmms^iix-.^iio,:: 



'iC l,> -■!H,|-/I . 



Earn up to $90 
before Spring Break 

Receive up to $30 
a week when you 
donate plasma. 

MANHATTA 

BIOMEDICAL 

CENTER 

1130 GARDENWAY 776-9177 

^1 BloBfePlCALCKOTTO 




I 
I 
I 
I 
I 
I 
I 
I 
I 
I 
I 
I 
I 
I 
I 
I 
J 



GET 
THE 



HHB!5^*=^ 




SECOND SET OF PRINTS EVERY TUESDAY! 

Receive a seccxid set of 3* prints FREE with any 
exposure noil of 35nim, disc, 1 1 or 1 26 cobr print 
film left for devebping and printing at our everyday 
prKes! C-41 process only. Excludes larger 4" size 
prints, photo galaxy or kcxjalux finishes. 

Dally 9 a.m. to 9 p.m., Sunday 11 a.m. to 6 p.m. 
3007 Anderson Ave., Village Plaza Shopping Center 




Local band's 
first release has 
passion, bite 



E^'?%i^^^HIS 


*** 


B-" *:' ^^^^^V 


unimate Fake Book 


l^lT^E^^^^^^I 


■Visitors From the Sk^ 


Ratings: 


|E8^kt''' ^^^P 


t*** sm piMiM 


ndli^^B^^^H 


**lCtlNllllOUl 


I-.- -^^^^^Bl 


**JtMHtk» 


lfe!^;i^, .:..:■ . --ff. 


tCigtiiiilNktbtriinNM 


PAOtom 





CnUcfuti 

Local band Ultimate Fake Book's first release, 
"Visitors from ihc Sky," is now available at The 
Wild Side and Bonepile Records and Discs. 

If you like ii hard, heavy and unpredictable, be 
ready lu invest. UPB has an edge and a bite that is 
confrontational and alluring. 

Bassist Nick Colby, guitarist Bill McShane and 
guitarist and vocalisi Jeremy Pontow invaded 
Manhattan about three years ago as a band and as 
students, although school remained secondary to 
music. 

Although the t>and had no formal lessons and its 
preference is just to rock and wing it, the band takes 
its music very seriously. 

"We're really anal retentive about our music," 
Colby said. "It's eat. sleep and rock 'n' roll every 
day." 

Recently they were joined by Brian O'Toole. a 
drummer fr\tm Iowa. His approach to music makes 
him well-bred for the band 

"I'd need some kind of music methadone clinic if 
I had lo give up music," OToolc said. "There must 
be some kind of defective gene in us that makes us 
love it more." 

Their music reflects their passion. Pontow's 
vocals, although at times are distract ingly screechy, 
elevate the music to what would be defmed as a 
heavier medium than what they consider themselves. 

"Some people say we're heavy, but it throws us 
for a loop." McShane said. "We want (o evoke some 
emotion or response. We're definitely not a mosh 
band." 

The band's philosophy is evident in its unconcen- 
trated and real style. 

"We just try to be ourselves," Colby said. "Every 
band wants to be different, but we won't resort to 
gimmicks. If we turn out to be like everyone else, 
that's OK, just as long as we we get there on our 
own." 

The grinding blend of the mingling guitars and 
the uniegimented thump dementia of the rhythm sec- 
tion weave a compelling texture to the music, espe- 
cially in the title track, "Visitors from the Sky." 

"We don'i have any tattoos or much facial hair." 
Colby said. "If you try to be loo progressive or 
weird, it doesn't get me off. 

"We try to cut through all the bullshit," he said. 
"So much of it is image this and that. The whole 
thing for us is music." 

Ultimate Fake Book has played at the Warehouse, 
opened for Mule at Snookie's Bar and Kill Creek at 
Beriin. 






WHEN YOUR 
FUTURE IS 
AT STAKE . . . 
look to the 
professionals 
for that 
perfect 
interview 
suit. 




Prices 

start at 

$275 









♦¥?.o^ 



BORC 



Moi).-Sat 9:30 ■.bl-S:3(I p.in. 
Thun. 'til 8:30 p.m. 




rotijerS 

Fine Mentwear . 
Westloop Shopping Center 



^Q Wonday, March g, IWS 



KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN 



► ANIMAL SCIENCE 



Livestock sale gives 
students experience 



sneivtuaM 

Collegiin 

This semester's livestock sales 
and management class came to a 
close with the 18th annual 
Special "K" Edition Bull Sale on 
Friday night. 

The sale included 58 bulls and 
six heifers that were raised on 
University farms and are pan of 
the K-State teaching herd, said 
Dave Nichols, associate professor 
in animal science and industry. 

The class, which includes 70 
students, is responsible for the 
planning and production of the 
sale, Nichols said. 

"The students do everything 
from clipping the cattle to the 
sale catalog to taking the pictures 
of the bulls," he said. 

Students are assigned to vari- 
ous committees at the beginning 
of the semester, and they take 
hold and get things done. Miles 
McKee, professor in animal sci- 
ence and industry, said. 

"Dave and I just stay out of 



the way and let the students do 
all the work," McKce said. 

Nichols said the students are 
learning how to work together. 
They learn that everybody is 
impoHant, from the refreshment 
committee to the photographers. 

"We are fortunate to have the 
advantage of having the stu- 
dents," he said. 

"If we didn't have their help, 
we would have to hire someone 
to do the job," 

Line Lunsway. junior in ani- 
mal science and industry, said he 
didn't realize how much work 
was involved in getting ready for 
the sale. 

"I learned that there is a heck 
of a lot of preparation that goes 
into a sale," he said. 

ieff Slcichter, senior in ani- 
mal science and industry, said 
class members put in a lot of 
time outside the scheduled class 
period that the department does 
not see. 

The class serves as a vital 



merchandising tool for the stu- 
dents, but the sale is also a bene- 
fit to them because the money 
goes back into the department, 
Nichols said. 

"All the money from the sales 
goes right b«;k to the animal sci- 
ence department to be used for 
computers and other things for 
the students," he said. 

The sale total for this year was 
higher than last year, grossing 
$119,100, McKee said. 

The overall average was 
$1,861 per head. The average on 
the 58 bulls was $1,759 per head, 
and the six heifers averaged 
$2,142 per head. 

The highest-selling individual 
in a Special "K" sale was a 
Hereford bull in 1981. The bull 
sold for $1 2,500, McKee said. 

Mike Hoyd, senior in animal 
science and industry, said the 
sale provides excellent exposure 
to K-State and a chance to get 
quality cattle out into the beef 
industry. 



Benefit helps fund library 



Garage decision to be made soon; 
bill would lower meter-fee increase 



CONTINUED FROM PAGE I 

purchase of a notebook computer 
for the Senate Chair. 

NOW received $1,039 for 
advertising, printing and an hono- 
rarium for Sarah Wcddington, one 
of the attorneys who tried Roe v. 
Wade before the Supreme Court. 

A total of $1,920 was allocated 
for a notebook computer to be 
used by the Senate chair, vice 
chair and the secretary. 

The Student Activities and 
Social Services Committee with- 
drew its bill requiring a student 
plebiscite vote on the parking 
garage in Memorial Stadium. 

The bill was withdrawn 
because the decision will be made 
by the administration by April I in 
order for the proposal to be intro- 
duced to the Kansas Board of 
Regents. 

Brad Finkcldei. student body 
vice president, said Senate wanted 
to know what the students thought, 
but there was no way to put 
together a campus election before 
the general election April 1 1 and 
12. 

In new business, a commenda- 
tion for Rep. Sam Brownback, R- 
Kan., was approved. Brownback 
was visiting K-Siate for the Big 
Twelve Leadership Conference on 
Saturday. The commendation 
passed on a voice vote. 

A resolution supporting a less- 
radical increase in parking meter 
cost was introduced by John 



Riedel, business senator. Riedel 
and several other senators pro- 
posed increasing the cost from 25 
cents per hour to 50 cents per hour 
instead of the Parking Council fig- 
ure of 75 cents per hour. 

Riedel said one reason the 
increase was needed was to make 
more money. 

"I think people will be willing 
and able to pay 50 cents per hour," 
Riedel said. 

The only meters that will be 
exempted from the increase will 
be the meters in the Chester E. 
Peters Recreation Complex park- 
ing lot, he said, 

Twelve new meters will be 
installed immediately at the Rec 
Complex, Riedel said. 

Michele Meier, business sena- 
tor, said it costs about $1,000 to 
install a parking meter, and meters 
pay for themselves in two to three 
years. 

Parking Council's intention is 
to greatly reduce the number of 
reserved stalls, Anderson said. 

In 1988, Parking Services put 
in the meters and promised none 
of the stalls would be reserved 
parking, Brenda Halinski, gradu- 
ate senator, said. 

The Allocations Committee 
introduced a bill closing all the 
accounts that had money left in 
them at the end of last semester. 
Organizations cannot hold money 
over from one semester to the next 
without filing an appeal with the 



Allocations Committee. 

Twenty- nine campus organiza- 
tions will lose the money left in 
their accounts. 

A letter was sent out, and three 
to four weeks were allowed for 
appeals to be filed and heard, 
Clouse said. Nine appeals were 
filed. 

Amnesty International, the 
Multicultural Student Council and 
Native American Student Body 
were allowed to keep a portion or 
all of their money because speak- 
ers canceled and were rescheduled 
for this semester, Clouse said. 

The money from the closed 
accounts will go into the reserves 
for contingencies account, bring- 
ing the total in that account to 
$24,000. 

Two other bills received first 
readings. 

The first bill simply combines 
all the changes made in the 
Educational Opportunity Fund 
Allocation Procedures into one 
bill. 

The second bill changes the 
structure of Senate committees, so 
legislation must be brought out of 
committee whether the committee 
has taken any action on it or not. 
This bill would keep committees 
from being able to hold legislation 
and keep it from being debated 
and voted on by the whole Senate. 

Final votes will be taken on this 
legislation at the next Senate 
meeting. 



CONTINUED FROM PAGE I 

Dr. Keith Wright, medical director 
for Hospice in Manhattan, said the 
biggest challenge is educating the 
families of the terminally ill. 

'The family usually feels left out 
in the cold, and they feel so over- 
whelmed by the terminology," he 
said. 

"People come to me with so 
many questions, and now I will be 
able to dir^l them to literature and 
a better understanding. The library 
will solve so many problems." 
Wright said. 

Manhattan residents came togeth- 
er on Saturday night at the 
Warcham Opera House for a dinner 



benefiting the library. The benefit 
dinner was $50 a ticket, and all the 
money was donated to the library. 
Manhattan restaurants catered the 
event, and many students dedicated 
their time to help out. 

'This is such a good cause, and 1 
was very touched how the commu- 
nity has come together to support 
such a worthy project," said James 
Punohu, senior in hotel and restau- 
rant management. 

Punohu and other students helped 
lend bar and serve food at the benefit 

Rickel-McMillin said the library 
will have books, cassette tapes, 
videos and several computers. 

The information will be in lay- 



man terms so the families won't 
feel like they're in a medical 
library. The information will be 
very easy to read and understand. 
Developers are working at getting 
the computer information on-line 
with K-State, 

The library will be located on 
the second floor of the Saint Mary 
Hospital, and it will be open 24 
hours a day. It will be staffed with 
one full-time librarian and other 
volunteers 

"When you arc going through 
this type of situation, you have no 
concept of time, so we want it to be 
available to everyone all of the 
time," Rickel-McMillin said. 



Horse trainers' dedication 
pays off at conference saie 



CONTINUED PROM PAGE 1 

Pour afternoon .sessions were 
included in the conference. The 
•etsions Included such topics as 
equine dentistry, uses of cooled 
semen tod K-State' s equine 
emergency room. 

The conclusion of the confer- 
ence was the KSU Consignment 
Horse Sate. Tlui was the second 
yetr the sale wai conducted in 
ctioR with the conference. 

"^K-Siatc's horsci u»ed to be 
■old ia conjunction with the 
Special K Edition Bull Sale. 
However, due to the few munbcrs 
ol bones, we decided to open the 
sale to gaatt consigners and to 
highlight the horaes from our 
training program during 
Horsemen's Conference," Amg 



This year's sate included eight 
bot^s that were bora and raised 
at K-State and an additional 19 
head from consigners, he said 

Russ Mueller, sophomore in 
animal sctcrwcs and indu.stry, said 
other schools were also invited to 
the sale. 

"We attract other schools to 
come here and sell their horses 
because we have the faciJilies." 
he said. 

Randel Raub, assistant profes- 
sor in animal sciences and indus- 
try, iiaid the horses representing 
K-State are a result of student's 
dedication and cnlhu.stasn) in the 
horse training and management 
class. 

Matt Shackelford, junior in 
animal sciences and industry, 
said class members are assigned 



a horse they are responsible for 
training and riding throughout 
the semester during the sale, 

'The class is pretty intensive. 
We spend four nights a week widi 
our horsea," Shackelford said. 

Jimmy White, senior in antmat 
sciences and induitiy. s«d they 
team from the best iastnictora — 
the horses. 

"If you are not doing it right, 
they'll let you know," White 
said. 

Raub said the events leading 
up to this sale provide the stu- 
dents with an excellent learning 
oCTXJitunity 

"It is an opportunity that they 
have taken full advantage of and 
done so with great success." he 
said 



Students see products 
of lithography firsthand 



CONTINUED FROM PAGE 3 

the order in which the work has 
been printed, but they are sii]i)>l> 
a curatorial device that printers 
employ to keep the prints in 
order. 

After the lecture, attendees 
saw the firsthand products from 
Sims' workshop. 

Among the artists were K- 
Slate locals Margo Kxen, associ- 
ate professor of art, Teresa 
Schmidt, assistant professor of 
art, Elizabeth "Grandma" 
Layton, Miriam Schapiro, Luis 
Jimenez, Roger Shimomura and 
Juane "Quick-To-See" Smith. 

The work of Schapiro, 
splashy and color-filled; Layton, 
witty and fresh; and Smith, 
Southwest-inspired conglomer- 
ates of images; are not-to-miss 
highlights of the exhibit. 

Each of these artists, with the 
exception of Layton. worked 




TTw Lawrena Ulfiography 

Workshop exhibit runs throughout 
Mardi at the SIrecker Gallery, 332 
Poyntz An. StHBdcer's hours an 




with Sims for nearly a week to 
create their prints. 

The first part of the process 
involves getting acquainted with 
the artist. 

"There's a lot of psychology 
involved in this process," Sims 
said. 

"It can be intimidating for 
artists to leave their studios, so 
the work situation must be com- 
fortable." he said. 



Bull sale wraps 
up conferencei 
features best 
K-State cattle 

CONTINUED FROM PAGE I 

open house with demonstrations 
and exhibits of current research on 
beef production, forage utilization 
and cattle-management topics. 

"I enjoyed interacting with 
interesting people in the meat 
industry," said Brent Green, senior 
in animal sciences and industry. "I 
am a pork person, and the beef peo- 
ple are our allies, so we should 
leara to work together." 

The fmal event of thciJay was the 
Annual Special K Bull Sale in 
Weber Arena. The sale, which was 
organized and facilitated by students 
in the sales management class, fea- 
tured cattle bied at K-State. 

"It is an educational opportunity 
for students, an opportunity to 
highlight K-State cattle and to sell 
animals to the producer," Kuhl 
said. "It puts an exclamation point 
to the end of the day's events." 



Mft 




LASSIFIEDS 



KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN 



OUR BASIC RATI 

% n« ao M)tf( or Hm Ite om d^r 
■ Iv. For Men wora o^mt 30 Kid Jot 
ptrwort. Mt S324S$S tor oonMcutfw 
d^fwlM. 



HOW TO MY 

ClMaifMadimwMbtpiKwlbY AMcUMMMamMtbapMki 
[WoritwdwtMtonitwdMttMad i«nnctuntMt«MtMMan 
rufw.Clinlbddtaplayadirnuitbt MtiMlihtd account «Mi8lw 
pl«e*dtiy1p.m.tN0Narldngday* PutalcalleM. CMh, ■ 
MtofttlwikltllwadnaM. orVlMKtaecMM 



Call 532-6555 
to place your classified. 



000 



BULLETIN 
BOARD 



AniMNmeMiwnta 



ADVANCED FLIGHT Train- 
ing plui ground ichool 
lor privit*, I nit rum ant 
• nd multi-angfriB rit- 
Ingi. K-Stlt* Flying 
Ctub ■pprovad IntlruG- 
tor. Hugh Irvin, 
63S-3128. 

■ALOIMO MALE wtllt 

b*4 MMtl found ■ Cit|. 
bank Pholoeard. Can't 
u>a It bacauM It looli* 
nothlna lilt* ma, Nama 
on card I* Dava Wllaon. 
Nl«alwlr. 

GOME av with ui, K-Slita 
Rvlng Club ha* fiva aif 
pianaa. For baal pricia 



call Troy Brockwty, 
77*-e735 aftar 5;3t)p.m. 

NEED SOME dough? Let 
ua Itnowt Cain Pawn 
arxl Gun, Inc Can *up- 

fily vou with that antra 
ittit bit for Spring 
1817 



Braak 778-3332 
Ft. Ril«v Bhrd. 



no I 



Lort and Found 

Pound ada can ba 
plasad fraa tor thra* 



FOUND: LADIES gold 
watch in ttia parting lot 
northaiat of Bluamont 
on March 2. Call 
TTe-9e75 to idantify 

FOUND: MARCH 1, ring In 
woman'* raalroom in 
Calvin Hall. Plaaaa call 

to klantl^, uj^iao. 

FOUND: PRESCRIPTION 
glaaaa* In a brown 
cava. Found on aacond 
floor of Eltanhowar. 
Claim in Elttnliowat 
Room 108. 



M«»tiii9s/ 



TOASTMASTERS A mg- 

tual (upport group tor 
paopla who want to Im- 
prova thair public 
apaakinQ ikillt A)ao. an 
Ifttareiting forum. Wa 
maai twica monthly. 
Vial tor I watcoma. Call 
Charila, 779-3302. 



Partlas<n -Mor* 



ADD A apiaah to your naxt 
t>aah. Graat mld-tarm- 
partlai bagin with Wat- 
Kl-Wlld Mobila Hot Tub 
ranlala S37-iaSS. 

ADO AN antra touch of 
claaa to your nart par- 
^. Call Wavna'i Walar 
Party to rant a ponal>la 
hot tub S37-7587, 
S39-7MI. 



COLDEST BEER on Waat 

ifdai Graal lalaction of 
tpirlta. Polaon liquor 
acroaa from Food 4 
Laia. 3106 Andaraon. 




HOUSING/ 
REAL ESTATE 



For R«nt- 
Apta. Pumlah^d 

AVAILABLE IMMEDIATE- 
LY, aummar and fall. 
Vary nica ona. two, 
Ihraa and four-bad- 
room apartmanta 
Cioia to campui wtlh 

traai pricaa. &37-teM, 
)7-2919. 

AVAIL*«LI IN May. 

Larga ona-badroorn, 
two blocka aouth of 
campua, 1620 FaiichiM. 



$3B0. Wmatf traah paid. 
Laundry facllltlaa. 
587'«47. 

QUIET SURROUNDINGS 

for atudy Camptia on* 
milt, ona-badroom, 
•nd atudio aoma uttii- 
liat paid. Short-tarm 
laata, no pata. 
B3T-438S. 

1101 

For llMrt' 

Apt. 

UnfuifilAlwd 

815 RATONE. Ona-bod- 
(oom walkout baaa- 
mant Privata antranca/ 
parking. Carpal, tp- 
pilancaa, bllndt. No 
pala/ watarbad*. >3B0 
plua atactrldty. Juna 1. 
776-8648. 

AVAILABLE APRIL 1. ona- 
badroom naar Ag- 
glavllia and KSU cam - 
put. lOOS Bluamont 
S386. Walar/ traah paid 
No pata 776-38CM 

AVAILABLE APRIL 1. ona 
badroom, ona block 
ttorth of campua. 1864 
Claflln »75. Witar/ 




PARKING 

OF THE 
UNION 



OmCI HOURS; liOMDAV-PMDAV 8 MII.-8 p.ni. («e«pl holidiyal 



OR nnt COUIQtU CUmi, K4Mi Cdtofin, IM* IM 101, 



traah paid Laundry 
facilitiai. AUowt imall 
pata. 776-3804 

AVAILABLE AUG. 1. Two, 
fhraa, four-badroom 
apartmant. Clot* to 
campua. No pala. 
U9-«51 

AVAILABLE FEB. 15, two- 
bad ri>om at 805 Alllion 
$420 New carpat, diati- 
waahar. Laundry laclli* 
IJaa. Walar/ traah paid. 
776-3804. 

AVAILABLE IMMEDIATE- 
LY, aummar and fall. 
Vary nica ona. two, 
throa and fourbad- 
room apartmanta. 
Cioaa to campua with 
□raal prica*. 537-1666, 
537-2919. 

AVAILABLE NOW, two 
badroom naar campua 
1500 Mi:Caln Lana 
t4S0. Laundry facilitiai. 
Walar/ traah paid. No 
pate. 776-3804. 

AVAILABLE MAR 1. on* 
badroom naar campui. 
1722 Laramla $370. Wa- 
tar/ traah paid Laundry 
facilitiai. No pata. 776- 



AVAILABLE MARCH 1. 
ona-badroom apart. 
mant. Park Placa Apart* 
mania. (913)584-6328. 

AVAILABLE MARCH 1, 
ona-badroom, thraa 
blocka wai! of campua. 
1024 Suniat $356 Wa- 
lar/ trash paid. Laundry 
faciiitiaa. No pat*. 776- 
3S04. 

AVAILABLE NOW. ona- 
badroom tttraa block* 
waal of campui. 1026 
Suntat $360. Ramo- 
daiad unit. Walar/ tr«*h 
paid. No pata. 
776-3804. 



• SmMone Apts. 

• CDfege Heights AptS. 
•CamtxxJgeSq.Apte. 

til 



»7-ioe4 

WM c lm i 9 am-*3}pjn. 
itOam-apiiL 



AVAILABLE NOW. thraa- 
badroom, two block* 
a»*t of KSU $600 plua 
utiiltiat. S37-1940. 

AVAILABLE NOW, two- 
badroom apartmanta 

naar City Park. 1026 
Oiaga $450. Walar/ 
train paid. Laundry 
facilitiai. Within walk- 
ing diaianca to KSU. No 
pat*. 776.^804. 

FOR AUGUST Naxt to 
KSU, daiuxa two-bad- 
room apartmant, 1490. 
539-2482 iftar 4p.m. 

FOR JUNE, larga iwo-bad- 
room apartmant. Wa- 
tar/ traih/ gaa two- 
thirda paid. $430/ 
month. Alio ona-bad- 
room $310 lor Aug. 
539-2482 Aftar 4p.m. 

FOUR-BEOflOOM AT 

Royal Towara. 1700 N. 
Manhenan $860 Avail- 
ibl* now Walar/ Iraah 
paid. Laundry faciiitiaa, 
lundack, hot tub*. No 
p«tt 776^3804 

GET A JUMP ON NEXT 
YEAR I Chaaa Manhai. 
tan Apartmanta ia now 



iaating two. thro* and 
four-badroomi lor Au* 

fjUM. Our waiting iitt l« 
ong; drop by bafor* 
thay'ra gone! Collaga 
and Oanin, 776-3063. 

LARGE TWO-BEDROOM, 
ona-half block wait of 
campui. Tri-laval ipart- 
manl. 1825 CoMaga 
Haighii, tSSO. Walar/ 
trian paid. Two bath, 
walk-in cloaat*. No 
pala 776-3804. 

NEXT TO campui two, 
thraa-badroom apart- 
mant and houtai with 
waahar/ dryar, cantral 
air. parking traih/ pail 
control paid. No pata. 
Availabia now or Aug. 
$450- $860. 537-8543. 

ONE, TWO, thraa, Ibur-bad. 
room apartmanta, ckiaa 
to campua, no pata, 
Juna laaaa. S3>-1B76. 

ONE-BEDROOM ALL utlii- 
liai paid. Naar Ag- 
giavilla 1220 Laramla. 
$375. Available Fab. S. 
776-3804 

ONE BEDROOM APART. 
MENT availabia now at 
Wtraham Hotai. 41S 



KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN 



Monday, March 6, 1995 4 4 



Collegian Classifieds 



Povnu, S3 as wtHrl 
Irath p*ld. Ltundrv 
facllht**. No p«l*. 
7TS^»04 

ONE BEDROOM APART- 
MENT, avillabi* Fab. 
15. 924 Framont. S300. 
Watar/ traah paM. Park- 
ins avatlabla. Cloaa to 
AgaiavlllB. 77S-3804. 



•2 bedroom 
apartments 

•Qutet. park 
like setting 

•Private & 
personal 
bedroom 

•Large batti & 
closets 

•Distiwasher 

•Laundry 
facility 

•2 large pools 



7TB-111S 

for an 
appointment 



PAHK PLACE APART- 
MENTS. Now pra-laai- 
Ino ona, tvMO and tt\n»- 
badroom apanmanis 
1413 Cambridaa «8. 
U9-3961 

SUBLEASE ONE-SED 
ROOM tparlmant for 
$300 par month. Excel- 
lant location, two 
block* from camput. 
Avattabia Apr. t- Juna 
30. Option to ranaw 
iaaaa. Call 637-2141 




THREE ROOMS tor rant In 

larga, bsautiful, co-ad, 
tavan-tMdrootn houaa; 
StSO/ monlti plua ona- 
■avarvlti ullllHaa; kllch- 
an and laundry avail- 
abla: four btocka from 
carnput; Juna 1 to May 
31 laaaaa avaiiabia; 
537-2497, aak (or Ru»a 
or amail 

data S tiuvm, kiu.adu 

1401 



OARAGES FOR rant ISM 
Collaaa Halgttta «2 S60. 
1 MO Collaga Halgbta W 
tSO. Larga unlta. 775 
3804 



W«nt*d 



FEMALE ROOMMATE 

(150/ month plui ona- 
third utititial. Apart- 
mant cloia to campui. 
SST-BSZI . 

FEMALE, NON-SMOKER 
naadad lo thara houia. 
Own room, stiara balK 
w^th ona paraon, cloaa 
to campua, iHMheil dry- 
ar, rant %22bl monili 
plui one fourth utili 
tiat. Musi fli^n leaaa by 
Mar 23, avaiiabia Aug 
1. Call 537-1 IS9 or 
539-43S6 

FOR NON-SMOKER/ drink- 
ar. Roommats na«dad. 
walk to daaa 539-1554 

ROOMMATE NEEDED to 

ihara houaa ^wo btocka 
ttom camput, own bad- 
room . mala or famala, 
S\W month plua ona- 
fifth utlitla*. 587-1 989. 

ROOMMATE NEEDED, to 
itart immadiataiy, two 
block! from campua, 
larga, clean houia, ofiF- 
atraat parking, waahar/ 
dryar,watarf traah paid 
1200' plui ona-foufth 
ulllitiat. S39-6314. 

WANTED: ROOMMATE for 
baiamanl apartmant 
nvt minutaa ivonhwaal 
of campui. $175/ 
month plua phona. Call 
Mo at 77(MflO. 



MAKE 

ANDERSON 

ma 

YOUR HOME 

AWAY FROM 

HOME 

Now Icjulng 

for 1999-96 

•3 bedroomf 

*'A block frotn 

campus 
•Furnished 
and 

unhimUKcd 
Showing! 

every 

Monday 

through Friday 

3-5 p.m. 



1852 #4 

Anderson 

Place 

1776-1 148 



THREEBEDROOM AVAIL- 
ABLE now on matt* 
floor of houaa. 2303 An- 
darion S600. Watar/ 
traah paid, SIngIa car 
garaga. Waahar/ drvar 
provfdad, No pata. 776- 
3804. 

TWO, THREE, four-bad- 
room, ona and orw-hilf 
batha, cantral air, naar 
campua. Avallabia Jun« 
or Aug. 537-6M0. 

TWO-BEDROOM AVAIL- 
ABLE now. Baaamant 
apartmant, nica condi- 
tion. 2303 Andarion 
(425. Watar/ tra«h paid. 
Singla car garaga. 
Waahar' dryar provid- 
ed. No pat*. 778-»04. 

TWO-BEDROOM AVAIL- 
ABLE now on Stagg 
HIM »3- BOG Alllaon. 
tsae Watar/ traah paid. 
Lautidry tadlltlaa. Diah- 
waahar. 776-3«)4 

TWO-BEDROOM AVAIL- 
ABLE now. Agglavllla 
Panthouaa Apartmanli 
817 N. 12th. 1550. Wa- 
tar/ traah paid. Olah- 
waahar, inier\>wiva. No 
pata, 77(^-380*. 

TWO-BEDROOMS, CLOSE 
to campua In ■ 12-plax. 
Pr*-I««*lng for faff, 
only ona-hiil dapoiil 
nawM S360- 1450. No 
.53B-2332. 



FEMALE NON-SMOKER 
wantadto lublaaM ona- 
badroom in thraabad- 
roorn apartmant Uid- 
May to July 31. Vary 
cloia to campua. Call 
Angia 537-61M. 

FEMALE NON SMOKER 
wantad to aubleaaa lar- 

gait badroom in thrsa- 
adroom apartmant. 
1196/ month nagoti- 
abla. 587-0621 

FOUR-BEDROOM. TWO 
bath. Cloaa to campua. 
Call 778-3445. S«00/ 
month. 

MIO-MAVTO Aug. 1. May 
paid. Own room, wall 
to campua Call 
537-2403, laava mai- 



NEW THREE BEDROOM, 

two bath. diBhwflihar, 
5730/ month, mcludai 
catila, witar/ triih. Mid- 
May 10 July 31. May 
paid. Option lo laau. 
587-B303. 

NICE, SPACIOUS ont-bod 
room avaiiabia May 10- 
July 31, across from 
campui, laundry ficili- 
tiaa, naw kitchan ap- 
pllar»caa, pata allowed. 
Can ranew laaia in 
Aug. dapotit rsquirad, 
call 587-9791 aftar 5. 

SUBLEASE ONE room In 
two-badroom apart- 
mant t192.50 par 
month. Available imma- 
diataly. March rant fraa. 
No patal NIca quiat 
aparimanta two and 
ona-half blocka from 
campua. April- through 
July 31 laaia. Call 
537-2043 or 775-1009. 

SUMMER SUBLEASE at 

Wareham Apartmanta. 
Graai aiudio avaiiabia 
May to July 3). Grtat 
location, low utilltlaa. 
S36G/ month. 53T-aei2 

SUMMER SUBLEASE two- 
badroom bl'laval apart- 
mant NIca. cloaa to 
campua. S760/ month. 
667-8702. 

TWO-BEDROOM FUR- 
NISHED Chaaa Manhat- 
tan Apartmant. Mid- 
May to Aug. SSSS/ 
month. May paid. Call 
Aaron or Ryan at 
587^8539. 




YOUNO GRANDMOTHER 
yylahaa to ahara quIat. 
elaan, thraa- bad room 
bom a. No dapoait. No 
bill*. On* tmall bad- 
roont. lies. iMva maa- 



2oe 



SERVICE 
DIRECTORY 



WANTED ARCHITECTUR- 
AL Oaiign tutor third 
yaar itudant naadi ai- 
■iitanca with lochnical 
drlwinga. praiantation 
ate 587-8141. 



^^'**'*" 



A PERFECT raauma and all 
your othar word pro- 
calling naada. Laaar 
printing. Call Branda 
776-3290 



NEED SOMETHING typad? 
I'll typa It for Sif par 
paga. Call 537-9460 
attar S:30p.m.. but 
plaaia. no calli aftar 
lOp.m, AakforJadda. 



Dasktop 
PublMilwg 

TYPED PAPERS, graphic*, 
chart* and graph* 900 
fbnli and nin* yaar* nt- 
parianca to maka your 
papar look graat Fann 
Graphic* 537-0446, 
fann@k*u.lc*u.adu 




lisiini: 



*1 ii.\ (Xirti.Mkv 



•\lllK(Ll\ ll-Mllh 



I 'l>.,llCll,ll|ll^N IH' 



.iiiifitN m 



I'lM'll MM.I'Ji 



Automoliv* 

Ir 



NISSAN- DATSUN Rapak 
Sarvica. 22 yaar* ax- 
parianoa. Maxdw, Horv 
da* and Toyotaa alio. 
Auto Craft. 2612 Dippar 
Lana. Manhattan, Kan- 
aa* 537-5049. 8a.m.- 
5pm. Mon- Fri. 

DONNIE'S AUTO Worka 
Foraign and Domaatic 
Car Rapair tForntar 
Nobia Auto Work*). 
Donnia l« tha nvlnnar 
of tha Sport! Car Club 
of America Baat M*- 
chwilo award 1809 a 
Riley Blvd S39-55tt. 
With Id S10 off tor 
labor over $100. 



OIlMr 
lamlg— 



CASH FOR coiiaga. 
900,000 gram* avail- 
able No rapaymanla 
avar. Oualify imm«> 
diataly. IB001243-243S. 

ELECTRONIC FILINO 
0tlLVi2BIII Gat your 
income tax rafund 
quick t Wa alao can pra- 
para your laxaa for 
you. Located in Manhat- 
tan. Call 1-800-333- 
4TAX. 

FREE FINANCIAL Aldl 
Over 16 billion In pri- 
vate lector granta and 
acholarihipa li now 
available. All itudanta 
are aligible ragerdlaaa 
of gradai. income, or 
parant'l income. Let uS 
halp. Cell Student Fi- 
nancial Sarvicar 
tSOO 1263-8496 axt. 
FS78e2. 






6t 






PROMPT CONTflACEPTIVE 
and abortion tervicea. 
Data L. Clinton. M.D.. 



(813)841-5716. 

RESUME PREPARATION, 
TAX PREPARATION, 
word procBisLng. UPS, 
ahipping. copies Ind 
morel The Mail Center 
ecroAs Irom Alco. 3110 
Anderson, 770-8246. 



NutrtttOMl 

W»HiM Low 

GET READY for Spring 

Break I Gat rid of thoae 
thighi and itomach 
with the only Body Ton 
ir>g Cream on tha mar- 
ket I've actually seen 
worki I loit four inchea 
off each of my Ihighi 
and three inchei off rr^y 
atomach. We are en In- 
ternational company 
with 15 yean of experi- 
ence helping people 
loae weight and tat arid 
keeping it off. Guar- 
entaed reautta. Call 
776-7869. or writei PO 
Box 1171. Manhattan. 
KS 66502. 

SPRING IS epproachlngi 
Loae weight, feet great. 
Immadiata reault*. Doc- 
tor recommended, all 
natural formula. lOO 
percent guarantee. CatI 
day or night 537.^82 

WANTED 100 itud«nti,- 
Loae 8- 100 poundl. 
New mataboliim break 
through. I loai IS 
pound* in three wvaka. 
RN aiiiated. Guar- 
anteed reaulta 135 
(800)679-1634. 



Youll never 
know unless you 
try...advertl8ing. 

cmmm 



3oe 



EMPLOYMENT/ 
CAREERS 



Th* Collegian esnnot 
verify ttia finenclal po- 
t*ntlBl of adwertlaa- 
manta In tha Employ- 
mant/Caraar elaeelfloo- 
tlon. Raedere are ad- 
vlaad to ■pproaeh etiy 
euch employment op- 
portunity with raaaon- 
ablo ABiitlon. Tha Cot- 
laaian urgae our raad- 
ere to oontact tha Set- 
ter Suelnoee Bureau, 
BQ1 SE Jotforaon. To- 

6 alt*. KB •««aT-11tO. 
ita ma- o w . 

S17SD weekly poailbl* 
mailing our circular*. 
No axparlanca re- 
quired. Begin now. For 
infor call I202)29fr-8B33. 

AA ALASKA EMPLOY- 
MENT. Earn to S3000- 
SeOOO/ month, fi thing 
indufttry. Great parte/ ra- 
lort joba toot Free 
room, board, tranipor' 
tation. Call Sei (919)490- 
ext A21. 



ACCEPTING APPLICA- 
TIONS/ Resume* for 
swimming pool manag- 
er. Must lie WSI certi- 
fied. Call (9131457-3381. 
City of Weitmoreland. 

ACCOUNTING MAJOR lo 
work In Finance Office 
Starting immadietely 
through aummer. 
Apply in 121 Umbarger 
with Karen by Mar 7, 
1986. 

BIOLOGICAL SCIENCE 

Technician (Intacti). 
Tha USD A Agricultural 
fteieerch Service* 
(ARS) aaaki Biological 
Sdanca Technician Itn- 
lecta) for tha U.S. Grain 
Marketing Raiaarch 
Lab, Manhattan. KS. 
There are aaven perma- 
nent poattlona to be 
filled. Dutlea Include 
maintaining and rear- 
ing intectt uiing var(- 
out type diet*, conduct- 
ing aMparimenli or 
analyses under super- 
vision, selecting iniecta 
for experimentation, 
gathering all nacaaaary 
iuppliai and equip- 
ment for eich exparl- 
mant. performing relat- 
ed taslia, such aa pre- 
paring and sterillting 
equipment, and other 
duties as BStigned. Ap- 
pllcanta mutt have ona 
year of spaciaDied ex- 
perience aquivaiant to 
tha GS'4 level or auc- 
ceiilul completion of 
four yaats of poathlgh 
aehool attidy leading to 
a bechelor'a degraa 
with major field of 
study or 24 aamaater 
hours in courtei luch 
ai biology, chemistry, 
etatlitlca, entomology, 
aitimal huabandry, bo- 
tany, phytic*, agrlcul- 
tuf« or mathematla. At 
least ail aemeiter 
hour* must be In the 
apeciatiiation of this 
poiilion (insects) A 
combination of educa- 
tion and experience it 
ecceptabla. Salary 
range: S19,407- $25,233 
per annum U.S. Citttan- 
ahip ia required, for ad- 
ditional informallon 
contact JImmie Nell 
Oliver (913)776-2737 
Application! muit be 
poitmartted by March 
14, 1995; submit appli- 
cations to Donna 
Schimming. USDA- 
ARS, Human Reaourc- 
a* Division, 6305 Ivy 
Lane. Room 318, Green- 
belt, MD 20770 143S: 
phona 13011344-3220. 
ARS is an Equal Oppor- 
tunity Empjoyer. 
Woman and minorllla* 
ere encouraged to ap- 
pfV 

AG BACKGROUND helpful 
to eem commiaaion lo 
16/ hour marketing 
unique egrlcultura pro- 
duct* (800 1 755-0032 

ALASKA SUMMEM EM- 
PLOYMENT- Fishing 
Induatry. Earn up to 
S3000- S6000 plus par 
month room and 



board! TranaportationI 

Male/ femele. No ex- 

f variance naceaaaryl 
206)545-4155 
ext.A576S4 

BUNNVSt PORTRAITS by 
LBJ and Manhattan 
Town Center are look- 
ing for Bunny/ Helper 
Oiy shift* 11a.m.- 
3:30p.m. 4p.m.- 6p.m. 
are ■vailable. Appjy at 
Portrait* by L8J 1714 
Fsirlana M- W from 3- 
8pm 539-7272 

CAMP TACONIC: Pres 
liglout coed Massachu- 
letts camp hiring moti- 
vated. leam-orTanted 
undergrads and grade 
who live with kids and 
inatruct In: Swimming. 
Waterekling. Sailing. 
Windiurflng. Tanni* 
Team/ Individual 

Sports. Rollertilsdlni|f 
Hockey. Archery. Golf. 
Fitness. Ropes/ Camp- 
ing, Arts/ Craht, Silver 
Jewelry, Photography, 
Vidao. Newt pa par, Mu 
Ileal Theeire, Dance. 
Science/ Rocketry. Re- 
warding, en|oyabte 
ll (800)762-2820. 



.' 



COMPLETE MUSIC, North 
America's largest OJ 
service, ia now hiring . 
bacauaa of our iremen- 
dou* growthi Do you 
want a fun weekend 
job7 Wa provide the 
equipment, compact 
disc library, and paid 

Professional training, 
ou provide your own 
transportation and time 
on weekends. Energetic 
and enthusiastic per- 
son* call 539-7111 or 
loll free (600)864-2887. 

CRUISE SHIP JOBS I Atten- 
tion: Studenlt. Earn 
S2000 plus monthly. 
Part-time/ full-time. 
World travel. Carib- 
bean. Hewaii All po«i- 
llon* available. No ax- 
perience. CALL: 

(602)453-4681. 

CRUISE SHIPS NOW 
HIRINO- Earn up to 
S2000 plus/ month 
working on Cruise 
Ship* or Land-Tour 
companie*. World trav- 
el (Hawaii. Mexico, the 
Caribbean, etc. I. Sea- 
sonal and tull-llme em- 
ployment availstjie. No 
experience necaaiary. 
For more information 
call (206)634-0468 
extCS7684. 

CUSTOM HARVESTER. 
need* hard working irv 
dividuala for summer 
harveet (Texia - N. Oo- 
kolal and poiaibly tall 
harvest Four JD 9600 t 
and truck drivers want- 
ad Need CDL or need 
to obtain. Preferred 
farm background or 
harvest experience. 
Strunk Harvesting 
(913)562-5358 or 
776-1321 

CUSTOM HARVESTER. 
Need ambitious mdrvid- 
uais tor wheat and row 
crop harvest. Truck driv- 
ers and combine opera- 
tors needed. For infor- 
mation phona 
(913)525-6328 or 8330. 
Naegele Combine Inc. 

EAJIM WHILE having funll 
Job openings part- 
time/ full-time. Flexible 
hours. Full Training. Up 
to S50/ hour posalbia. 
For interviews call 
537-0782. axt. 101. 

EMPLOYEES NEEDED to 
a**i*t in family oriented 
cuttom harvesting op- 
arallon Salary negoti- 
able and reflective of 
employees compatibili- 
ty with employer* fa mi 
ly, ctMtOmer* and other 
•mployee*. For more 
Infometlon reply to 
Gary at (318)225-0079 
after Sp.rrt. 

FAST FUNDRAISER- ralie 
•BOO in five day*- 
graak*, groups, clubs, 
motivated individuals 
Fatt easy- no financial 
oblisation 
1800)775-3851 EXT.33. 

HARVEST HELP needed. 
JD9600 and truck driv- 
ers wanted. Must ob- 
tain a CDl and will help 
obtain. Call lor very 
good salary options. 
May to Nov. Clydesdale 
Karveiting and Truck- 
ing. Call Randy 
5a»-523I. 

HELP WANTED for cuatom 
harvesting Combine 
operator* and truck 
drfvet*. Experience pre- 



ferred. Good summer 
wages. Cell 

l30J>4e3-7490 ewanlngs. 

HELP WANTED: Earn up to 
S500 per week aaeem- 
bllng product* at 
home, fio experlartce. 
Information 

(504)846^1700 DEPT. 
KS4438 

INTERNATIONAL SM- 
PLOYMCNT- Earn up 
to S2S- 545/ hour teach- 
Ir^ basic conversation- 
al English in Ja[ian, Twi- 
wan. or S. Korea. No 
teeching background or 
Alien Tanguagas re- 
quired For infonnstion 
call (30S|S3a-11«S 
e>t.JB7e83), 

KITCHEN HELP- Part- 
time flexible hour*, ex- 
?erler)ce preferred. In 
tte Blaachara. S23 S. 

t7th. 

NEEDED TRUCK driver* 
lot wheal harvest from 
Taxaa to NorUi Dakota, 
May through Aug. De- 
Ian* Raimer 
(405)267-3367 

NEW ENGLAND Brother- 
Sister Campi- Maa- 
sachuaett*. Mah-Kee- 
Nac for Boya/ Oanbee 
for Girts Counselor po- 
sitions lor projrem 
Speciallati: All Team 
Sports, especially Base- 
ball. Basketball. Golf, 
Field Hockey, Holler 
Hockey. Soccer. Volley- 
ball; 30 TennI* open- 
ing*; also Archery, Rl- 
flary, Pioneating/ Over- 
night Camping, 
Weights/ Fitness and 
Cycling; other openings 
include Performing 
Art*, Fine Arts, Pottery. 
Figure Skating, Gym- 
nastics, Newspaper 
Photography, Year- 
book. Radio Station. 
Rockatry, Rope* end 
Rock Climbing; All Wa- 
lerfront Acllwitlet 
(Swimming, Skiing, 
Sailing, Windsurfing, 
Canoeing/ Kayaking). 
Great lalery. room, 
board and travel. June 
16' Aug 16. Inquire: 
Mah-Kaa-Nac (6oy*| 
190 Linden Avenue, 
Glen Ridge, NJ 07028. 
Call (6001753-9116 Qut 
baft.(Glr«sl 17 Westmin- 
iler Drive. Montville, 
NJ 07045. Call 
(8001392-3762. 

STUDENT COMPUTER Op- 
erator (second shift) 
10- 30 hours par week. 
Must be willing to work 
hours Indicated and 
work every other wee- 
kend. Must be enrolled 
in at least six resident 
semester hours during 
spring semester and 
willing to work during 
student racestes end 
summer months. Appli- 
caboni will be accepted 
until 5p.m., Fri. March 
10, 1095 In Room 2S 
Farralt Library Under- 
graduates with employ- 
ment potential tor t^o 
years will be given pref- 
aranca. 

SUMMER HARVEST help 
needed. Run John 
Deere 9600'* at«d 9600 
and drive truck. CDL 
preferred. Parker Hat- 
vaating. Call 

(gi3l3»-2527 

SUMMER HARVEST help 
and run 2186 Caste t.H 
combines end three au- 
tomatic trucks. Wanted 
exparlenca: CDL for 
truck driver* arid com- 
bine operator*. Payroll 
11500/ montti for ex- 
perience. Will alao yrark 
with other to gat CDL 
Prefer non-imokari, 
non-drinker* and nan 
drug uaers. Cell 
l913>6m-«8«0. 

WAITERS/ WAITRESSES. 
Apply at 1213 Moro, 
Manhelten, KS. Saa 
Ruaty 

WANTED: WOMAN for 
photo sals for Gsnaai* 
Magaiina. Read tha 
magaiine before call- 
ing. (800)613-3933. 

YMCA SUMMER Day 
Camp Positions. Look- 
ing for malura. depend- 
able, committed people 
to implement quality 
YMCA Summer Day 
Camps in five Topeka 
locations. Must be abis 
10 work welt with and 
relate lo kids and par- 
ants. First Aid. CPH, 
water arKJ CDL cartlfka- 
Hon* a plus Elementa- 
ry School teac tiers and 
college students major- 



ing In Elementary Edu- 
cation, Child Develop- 
ment, Physical Educs 
tion, and Recreation are 
encouraged to apply. 
Camp Coordinator* 
need strong sdmlnittra- 
tive, supetvliory. com- 
municetlve, organiza- 
tional, and people skills. 

Minimum [«auil«: 

pUjCLtl: 12 collage 
hours In refevent cours- 
t* or one year experi- 
ence in state licensed 
child care program. 
Camp Counselors- 
Muat communicate and 
relate well to kids and 
parents. Mlnimurri re- 
qulramants: must be 
18. high school dipto- 
ma. and may require 
obsarvetion houri. 
Camp Counaalors Atsi s 
lants- (Volunteer posi- 
tion) ^<inimum requir*- 
njMUa; Must be 16 and 
appreciate working 
with youth. Apply now 
at the YMCA a of Tope- 
ka, Kuehne Branch at 
1936 N. Tylar, Topeka. 
80608 c/o Dennis fteedy 
or Jari Wilson. 

ZOO AMBASSADOR POSI 
TtONS SUNSET 200 
Looking lor a summer 
advanlure? Sunset Zoo 
i* seeking friendly, out- 
going and motivated 
aelf-ttaners to fill three 
pert-time/ seasonal 
200 AMBASSADOR 
positions. Zoo Ambas- 
aedor are guest servic- 
es representatives who 
greet loo quest*, sell 
memberships and an- 
swer general questions. 
Applicants should t>e el 
least 17 years of age or 
older. Applicants must 
be able to work wee- 
keiKJs and holidays. Ex- 
perience in tha field of 
public relations or sal as 
helpful. Application* 
taken until Friday. 
March 24. 1995 Apply 
at tha Department of 
Human Resources. City 
Hall. 1101 Poynti Ave 
Manhattan. KS EOE 
M/F/D. 



4^ 



OPEN 

MARKET 



FumKurw to 



FURNITURE CLEARANCE 
Canter at Faith Furni- 
ture. Repossessed 

queen aleepsr. lova- 
teil, cocktail table, two 
end tables, two lamps. 
reg. 51599. sale $798 
Glidder rocker reg. 
5199, sale $99. door 
cocktail table reg. 590. 
sale $45, drop-leaf oak 
dinette table reg. $70, 
sale $35. oak curio cabi 
net reg. $150, sale $75, 
oak finish student desk 
reg. two, sale 585. oak 
finish fourdrswsc cheat 
reg. t170. sale $85 See 
at Faith Furniture. East 
on Highway 24 next to 
Sirloin Stockade. 



4301 



AnMqttss 



TIME MACHINE Antique 
Maul and Gaeb Empori- 
um. GOOO square feel, 
antiques, collectibles. 
estate Jewelry, furni- 
ture, 4910 Skyway Dr 
four blocks ean of Man- 
hattan Airport. Open 
Tubs- Sat. II- 5p.m. 
539~«M«. 



Cotnpiitf 



MACINTOSH Computer. 
Complete syitem In- 
cluding printer only 
$599. Call Chria at 
(8001289-6685. 



Iitstrumsitta 



WELCOME TO THE MUSIC 
CO. In the Midlown Pla- 
ta. 523 S. 1 7th Street. 
New and used instru- 
ment sales and service; 
accessories for the mu- 
sician. 539-1958. 



in new tira*. $1000. 
639-2453. 

1964 FORD T-Bird. Runt 
better than good, nice 
interior, many new 
parti Pretty car $1200. 
negotlabte. 539- 1 582 

1892 DODGE Dakota LE 
extended cab, 4X4, V8, 

loaded, 56K. Asking 
$16,000 or bail offer. 
Call (913)494-2088. 

1993 EAGLE Talon Turbo, 
loaded. 33K Aaking 
SIS. 000 or best offer. 
Call (91 3)494^2088 



Motorcycl— 

1991 SUZUKI OF 500 E. Ex- 
cellent shape and run- 
ning great. Under 6500 
mile*. $2300. Call 
T76-08S1. Leave mes- 



600 



TIekats to 
Buy/Sail 



WANTED: MEN'S basket 
ball Tourney ticketa. 
Call 1913)364-6944 or 
1800)387-6944. 



SOD 



TRANS- 
PORTATION 



9101 



Autoinob(l«s 



1976 DATSUN truck, runa 
good. 1971 Dodge truck 
runs good, 1982 Audi, 
needs wodi. 539-8678. 

1978 FORD three-quarter 
ton. 390 V8 four-apead. 
Good solid truck. $500 



TRAVEL/ 
TRIPS 



•101 



Tour Pacteaoa 

SPRING BREAK- Two 
spots left for Cancun 
eight day/ seven nights 
beach front $499 in- 
cludes airfare from K.C. 
537-7546 three condo's 
ieH fior Keystone/ Breck- 
en ridge. Great location 
537-ffi46. 




What do you do if yoo see a fue? 

1. Call 911 

2. Then call us 



News Tips 

532-6556 



Kansas State Collegian 



I 




Worry about your baby 
while you're gone? The 
Collegian can help you. 

A classified ad in the Collegian 
can help you find the right 
babysitter for your baby. It's 
only $5 for 20 words — and a 
night out for you. Give us call 
or come see us In Kedzie 103. 



C KANSAS STATE 
OLLEGIAN 

iC«lil( 103 (iHt of th* Uninn) M2-iS5S 



CussiFiED Directory 




118 RoomsAv8M)i* 
Its ForRant-Hoimt 
lit FocSale-HotMS 
1» Forflert- 



AMNWnOMWIli 



UM and Pound 
Piraonali 



OM PwtaMvMoft 




1«t Ftorftant- 
MFtifiiitiBd 

119 Pw «•»*-_ 



ia» FbtSBto-. 



140 FtxfltM— GUBBI 

141 BcomnBteWarM 
tfO SMtm 

m SttfiWPMbm 
1M OffictSpats 
1M Ltrvd for Sill 



M 



iM Tutor 



tlO RaiuRN/TVplng . 
til Dwktop PiiMtng 
tao Sew«n^Ansralioni 
UB PrtgiwKy IMbig 
tlO UwnCWB 
SH OidCm 
M» lltNldanB^XJB 
an PetSecvtoM 

•H OttlBlS«mOBB 




EMPLOYMENT' 
CAREERS 



•19 Hl0WHMd 

am Vbknessrs NmM 

aao fluanact 

OppodunMn 




OPEN 
MARKET 



4M VtaMtoauy 
410 ItorraforSilt 
418 FumlintoBuy/Sel 
4a» teagi/YMSate 
4tl fwtaa 
4M Mqm 

4M COR^UlMI 

440 Foo(}Sp«cUl 

441 MalcfriMiuiwntt 
4I0 PMandSivpHM 
tm SipatlngEqMtmwfit 
4i0 SiMWEquJpfiiort 
4M IkMiloBuyi^ 




TRAKS- 
PORTATIOfJ 



810 AiiomoMBl 
sao BKfcm 
SJO Motofcydis 
140 CwPool 




TRAVEL' 
TRIPS 



•10 Tour PidogM 
no Mfplirie TUMi 
•ao Train T)(j«<i 
•40 fliaTkitM 



CATEGORIES 

To help yoo Hnd what you ara 
looking for, Xhe classified ads t^ve 
be«n arrartged by category arKi 
sub -category All categories are 
marked by one of the large 
images, and sub-categories are 
preceded by a number 
designation. 

TIPS FOR 
WRITING A 
CLASSIFIED AD 

Always put *irti«l item Of service 
you are advertising first. This helps 
poieniial bityers HrxJ twhal they are 
•00Mr>gt0f. 

Don't usa abbfevlatlons. Many 
buyers are confused by 
abbreviations. 

Cortaidar including the price 
This tails buyers n they are looking 
at sotnelhing in their prtee range 

WE 00 NOT USE PHONE 
NUMBERS OR LAST NAMES IN 
PERSONALS. 



I 



MonilaK March e, 1995 



KANSAS SIXTECOUIGIAN 



Ad prices effective 

March 1 thru 7,1995. 

Quantity rights reserved. 

In Manhattan; 401 E. Poyntz, 

222 N. 6th, 301 1 Anderson 

I OPEN 24 HRS. DAILY! 



Food^Less 






Oscar Mayer Lunchables 

FUN 
PACK 

Assorted, 
11.2 0Z. Pkg. 

Oscar Mayer 

LITTLE 
SMOKIES 

16 oz. Pkg. 



78 




^m CHICKEN 
FRY 
PATTIES 



88 



lb. 



Farmland 

SLICED 
BACON 

16 oz. Pkg. 



98 







Fresh, Ripe 

RED 

TOMATOES 



69 





lb. 



Medium 

YELLOW 

ONIONS 



39 







lb. 



rblgerdlrblaers fblaers 






^*^**^ *SS"»«^*v g^hdTbhaw s^'c«k 
Sweet coRpf k 




DUNCAN HINES 

CAKE MIX 



FOLGER'S 

COFFEE 




LIBBY'S 
VEGETABLES 

M5.5 to 17 oz. Cut Green Beans, Cream < 
Style or Whole Kernel Corn, Sweet Peas 



LIMIT 8 
PLEASE 




Our Special Touch 

GARLIC 

BREAD 

STICKS 



BAKERY 
DEPT. SPECIAL 



29 



Package 
of 8 





PARKAY SPREAD 

MARGARINE 



3 Pound 

Bowl 



99 




HJIand 
CHOCOLATE 

MILK 



1/2 Gallon 



99 



COCA-COLA 

AND 

RELATED BRAMDi 

. 24 Pack 

$g79 




TONY'S PIZZA 
D'PRIMO 




Assorted 
Varieties 



24 



BUDGET GOURMET 
ENTREES 




8.7 to 
10.5 oz. 
Pkg, 



ITIIPT Assorted 

UVlEi 1 ^Vari eties 

■ for%/ 





14 OZ, Bag 

Assorted 
Varieties 



Nabisco 

TOASTEHES 




Assorted 

Varieties 

13 02. Box 




FLORAL SPECIAL! 

"KACTUS 
PEOPLE 

GARDEN" 




99 



in 5" 
Red 
Clay Pot 



SAVE $1.00 

ON MIRACLE 

WHIP 48 oz. 



IN-AD COUPON 



VMJD; MARCH 1 THRU 7. 19&S 

nwnoo 



•1 \fwB{jiMa. 



SAVESIPO 

on OKI 48 oz. Jar of any 
MIRAOfWHIP^PriNliict 






111017 




eiODO"Ma07L' 



isi. 



MFUtOLTIUMm 

oiiiifMatKn 



CBS-27 



m Ki 



ftp. Date oom 

^« Stat, mstoruai 
^'"^ Section 



Societt 



Topetra 



ifS 



6M12 



Q2MM^_Cnvn 



^^LLEGIAN 




iHAN, 




AMWonil coplM tr* 23 ctnt*. 



► WOMIN'ft HIiTOHV 



p- INTERNATIONAL STUDENTS 



Equality is for both men, women ^^t^^ '11^™'. l™if 



Colkfun 

S^ttn'iM*: nil b iht flnHn M trtUi of 
attlckt aheat womtm Im Kamtas who hart 
protrt» tktmittm at ltad*n. 

To Sen. 
Nancy Landon 
Kasscbaum, R- 
Kan., the 
women's 
movement is 
not just about 
equal rights 
and opportuni- 
ties for 
women. It's 
about equality 
for all people. 

"[ don't think you set out to do 
something that just affects women," 




KasHbaum 



Kassebaum said. 

As a young woman, 
Kassebaum said she 
never thought she would 
hold public office. 

"1 never did any of the 
things I initially thought 
of." she said, "I never 
thought of being active in 
politics myself. 

"It was not a time when 
women's careers were burning 
issues," Kassebaum said. "And I 
don't necessarily think they should 
be today." 

Kassebaum said when her chil- 
dren were little, she wouldn't have 
even considered running for office. 
But in 1978, her children were 
older, and she happened to be in the 
right time and place for a career in 




politics. 

Although 
Kassebaum' s father, 
Alfred Landon, was 
politically active as gov- 
ernor of Kansas and ran 
for president in 1936 on 
the Republican ticket, he 
discouraged his daughter 
from entering the same career. 

"I tend to think he thought I was 
going to lose," she said. 

But she didn't lose. In 1 978, she 
was elected as Kansas delegate to 
the U.S. Senate and has been a sen- 
ator ever since. 

Kassebaum said she didn't set 
out in her career to help women 
advance their positions in society. 
What she did set out to do was be a 
good legislator who made good 



public policy. 

"In the course of doing that, you 
hope you've provided some inspira- 
tion for young men and women to 
become involved in public affairs." 
she said. 

Kassebaum said it is fun for her 
to see members of her staff go on 
and be involved in public affairs. 

"It makes me feel old," she said. 

But she said it is also very 
rewarding to know she has helped 
others get involved in their commu- 
nilies. 

"I would give anyone the 
encouragement to be involved in 
community affairs," she said. 

Kassebaum said a good way to 
become involved in community 

■ See SENATOR Page 8 



Colleiiui 

Beginning fall I99S, K-S(atc's 
international students may begin 
paying $15 more for tuition than 
tfte rest of the student body. 

The money would be used to 
hire an additional clerical-staff 
member for the International 
Students Center. About 35 students 
and administrators met Monday 
evening in the center to discuss the 
SIS fee and its implications. 

The request will be proposed to 
the Kansas Board of Regents in 
April. If pas.scd. about 1,100 inter- 
national students will pay SIS extra 
for fall 1995 tuition. 

Susan Scott, associate dean of 
student life, said this was not the 
solution originally intended, but for 
the time being, it is the only viable 
solution. 



"Finding a fiscal base where one 
does not already exist is difficult in 
these times," she said. 

From 1986 to 1993. the number 
of international students at K-State 
rose 41 percent, Scott said. Two 
other Big Twelve schools in Texas 
have a similar fee. 

William Richter, assistant 
provost for international programs, 
said even if the number of interna- 
tional students had not increased, 
the staff still would not be able to 
handle the workload because the 
Immigration and Naturalization 
Service requires more paperwork 
today than in the past. 

The center employs three staff 
members and a graduate assistant. 

Provost James Coffman said the 
center has three main needs. 

■ See STUDENTS Page 5 




Junior Opera 





TCollegian 

Cast membera ot th* "Fair winds" opart perform a song during rahearsal 
Monday afternoon at tha Manhattan Arta Cantar. Tha opara will bagln at 7:30 p.m. 
Wadneaday and Thqrsday at the Manhattan Aria Canter. 

Children learn from own production 






STEVE HE BERT. Collegian 

Nathan Oalhlgren watta behind the scenes for hia que to enter during the rehearsal of the "Fair Winds" opera. 
Fourth- and fifth-grade students at Theodoie Roosevelt Elementary School were In charge of forming a production 
company that would write, compose and design Its own opera. 



MMHLUNMV 

Colkfiui 

Differences in people 
don't always mean 
racial differences, 
said Helen Dorfmeier, 
a fifth-grade student at Theodore 
Roc^evelt Elementary School. 

Helen is an actress for the Broadway 
Opera Company that was formed by Roger 
Gibson's fourth- and fifihgrade class with 
the help of Susanna Parker, the school's 
music teacher. 

The students formed the production 
company as part of writing, composing 
and designing their own opera. 

The finished product is "Fair Winds," 
an opera that was produced with a theme 
of differences in mind. The production will 
be performed at 7:30 p.m. Wednesday and 
Thursday at the Manhattan Arts Center. 

Dorfmeier said that after rehearsing her 



lines and working on the production, she 
realized everyone has differences. 

"And those di^'erences are unique and 
can help everybody," she said. 

Young minds have profound thoughts, 
and these thoughts were put into action by 
all 24 students working on the opera. 

Each student played an important role 
in producing "Fair Winds." Shcena 
Nagaraja said the opera is largely self-pro- 
duced by the students. This includes stage 
managers, directors, make-up, costumes, 
electricians, public relations and other 
positions. 

Casey Dcvore, public relations, said the 
production has really big Jobs, but all the 
jobs are equal. 

Gibson said parts were chosen in an 
effort to challenge each child and were 
based on the individual's talent. 

Intended results of the production 
included a sense of community in the 
classroom and allowing each child to have 
a moment in the spotlight. Gibson said. 

■ See CHILDREN Page 8 



M 



n 



► STUDCNT OOVERNMENT 



SGA to sponsor forums 
to meter parking opinion 



•ARAH mNOAV 



CoUcglw 

Student Governing Association 
will sponsor two forums this week 
to inform and encourage students to 
voice an opinion about the pro- 
posed parking garage. 

An informal ^j 

forum will take \\ 

place SjudenjUKy 



Wednesday in 

the Union 

courtyard, and 

ft forma! forum will be 5 p.m. 

Thursday at Lucky BrewGrille. 

Michele Meier, business admin- 
istration senator, said all 12 mem- 
bers of the Parking Task Force and 
Gerald Carter, University architect; 
John Lambert, associate director of 
public safety: and Tom Rawson, 
vice president for administration 
and finance; will be available to 
talk to students Wednesday. 

Thursday's forum will be a 
question-answer session including 
Rawson; Dwain Archer, director of 
parking and fire safety; Darell Edie, 
chair of the University parking 



coiuKil; Jeff Peterson, student body 
president; and Meier. 

"A lot of people have been com- 
plaining about the parking garage, 
and hopefully they will come out 
and get their questions answered." 
Meier said. 

Meier said the main purpose of 
the forums is to inform the stu- 
dents. 

Edie said he would like to 
inform the students of the Parking 
Task Force's decision to take the 
parking garage proposed placement 
back to architects. 

The placement of the garage is 
now being considered, again, to 
possibly place it in the back portion 
of the Ramada parking lot, which is 
owned by K-State Foundation, 
north of St. Isidore's Catholic 
Student Center or Memorial 
Stadium, Edie said. 

Also, students will receive more 
information about the 1996 expan- 
sion of Anderson Avenue at the 
forums, Edie said. 

■ Sec DIFFERENT Page 8 



► cmr 



Race to boost tourism 



Event will bring 

7,500 competitors, 
fans to Manhattan 



Colkiiui 

The World Championship 
Equine Endurance Race will be 
coming to Manhattan in 1996 
and with it as many as 7,500 
people. 

"Estimating from recent 
World Championships, we 
expect l,SOO foreign visitors 
attached to teams, and we expect 
between 3,000 and 6.000 specta- 
tors to come to the event," said 
Christy Linders, organizing chair 
of the 1996 World Champion- 
ships Endurance. 

Dr. Eari Gaughan. assistant 
professor of equine surgery, said 
there will also be a number of 
dignitaries and political people 
at the championships. 

The event will be Sept. 21-22, 
1996, right after the 1996 
Summer Olympics. 



"The Summer Olympics are 
going to be in Atlanta," Gaughan 
said, "so there was great interest 
in having the World 
Championship Endurance in the 
United States. 

"Every two years we have the 
World Championships. Right 
now endurance is not an 
Olympic sport but it is likely to 
become one," he said. 

The sport consists of a 100- 
miie race across natural obsta- 
cles and dramatically changing 
terrain in a test of speed and 
endurance ability of both horse 
and rider. 

All of the horses have done a 
minimum of 800 to 1.000 miles 
and are experienced animals, 
Linders said. 

The headquarters for the 
event will be based at Rock 
Springs Ranch. 

Gaughan said they wanted to 
have the race in Fort Riley, but 
because to the transition and 
speculation about the future of 
the fort they were not able to. 

■ Sec RACE Page 8 



► CITY GOVERNMENT 



Candidate cancels campaign 



Lvwwuirr 



Colk|iu 

Mike Manning will no longer be 
campaigning for a seat on the city 
commission. 

As of Friday morning, he will be 
leaving Manhattan to take a job 
advancement 
within 
Household 
Finance 
Cocpofation. 

"It was out 
of the blue," 
Manning said. 
"1 was working 
on an advertise- 
ment for my 
can^gnal the 
time I received 
the call, and I 
just dispatched the ad." 

Even after months of campaign- 
ing. Manning said he couldn't pass up 
the oppcHtunity. 

"I have an oppoftunity for promo- 
tion within my corporation, and it's 
one I can't reluse," Manning said. "I 
have to look at the quality of life for 
my children and my family in gener- 
al. I have to go wtioc (he bread and 
butter is." 

Manning, who has lived in 




Manning 



Manhattan five years, said the quality 
of life here is great. 

"1 really appreciate the opportunity 
to live here in Manhattan and to 
became friends with the people in the 
community," he said. "1 hope 
Manhattan continues its success and 
prosperity. I reaUy think that nwds to 
be said." 

Before living in Manhattan. 
Manning said he moved around a lot 
his entire life. He anended 17 grade 
schools and seven universities. 

"There is no place thai parallels 
Manhattan. It's a gneat place to raise a 
family," he said. "I've even lived in 
Hawaii, Vermont and other placet 
that have a lot of notoriety." 

Although Manning is not cam- 
paigning for the ofRce, his name will 
remain on the ballot. 

"He can't actually remove his 
name from the ballot for April, but 
he'd be unable to serve because he 
will not be a resident" Jim Pearson, 
city manner, said. 

In the event that Manning would 
be elected, the city commission would 
elect a citizen to fill the vacancy, 
Pearson said. 

"I encourage my supporters to 
give their support to Steve Hall at this 
time," Manning said. 



g T^i— d«y^ March 7, 1MB 



KANSAS STATE COLLEGIAN 




News briefs 



► BOARD CONSIDERS LOCATIONS FOR BMX TRACK, BASKETBALL COURTS 



A BMX track and baskttball 
court* rscAlved luppori Irorn the 
Manhattan Parks and R»creatlan 
Advisory Board Monday r>ighl. 

Motions on both Issuss passed 
unanimously. 

Wade Davis and Ray Cat*, 
mambars of a cillzans group 
Involved In plannlr>g tof a BMX track, 
requested tfw Partes artd Recieation 
Oepartmeni'a ttelp In creating a 
track Case told ttte board thare 
would be no morvetary cost to ttie 
city (or the pro^. 

*We did not coma hero to 
request funds,* Case sakl. 'We are 
looking (or fietp locaUrig a site.* 

Itw No. 1 site at Itiis tinw is on 
land in CiCo park owned by USD 
303. said Terry DeWeeae, director 
01 Manhattan Parks and Recreation. 

Davis said three busirvessas 
have said they will make contribu- 
liorvs when itie time corrtes. 

The buslnesaes are Aggie Bike 
Station, which Davis owns. Game 
Quy and Henion Plumbing Heating 
and Air CorxltUonlng, Davis sakl 

The citizens group wants to 
obtain a site before any (unds are 
sol Kited, Case sakl. 

DeWeese aakt he has received 



only one letter Irt opposition to the 
CiCo Park site. 

Existing facilities In CICo Park 
such as reatrooms and water give It 
ttM advantage, DeWeeM Mid. 

TH aJI the sites we kMkedat, Ihit 
seemed to be ttie most appropriate 
for what we are looking at,* 
DeWeese said. 

Because CICo Park's master 
plan Inckides terwla courts, lf>e BMX 
track would have to move l( the 
need or desire for courts were to 
arise, DeWeese said. 

Davis and Case sakl they accept 
tl4s possibility. 

-That's tine,' Davis said. 'We 
hope H woiiUn't happen in a year.* 

Davis said if it happened In three 
or four years, (he track might have a 
targe erwugh base o( riders that the 
track coukl succeed even If moved. 

T?ie consensus ol the board was 
that a BMX track would provide a 
wholesome activity (or children. 

*T>ie raaion I got Involved at ftrst 
was Itfat there were comments 
acrost the community that not 
enough Is done for children," 
DeWeese said. 'I'm not a BMXer 
My kkfe sren1 BMXers. But I think It 
has some t>eneftt to tt>e convmmHy.' 



The advisory board look slepa 
loward addlr>g baskelt>all courts lo 
Itte Manhattan parks system. 

A lull axjd was proposed (or CNy 
Park and a half court lor Goodnow 
Park. These silea were preferable lo 
others because of the large amount 
ol Irafnc they get. Including (rom K- 
State, DeWeess saU. 

Nancy Bolsen, an advisory board 
member, said she was concerned 
that the neighborhood around 
Good now Park might not want a 
court In the park. 

As a result, Jim Llndquial, an 
advisory Iward member, changed 
his ntotion to irtclude an investiga- 
Uon of a haM court in Goodnow Park. 

The money could not be trans- 
ferred to another project without 
approval of the city commission, 
DeWeese sakl. 

The money was designated (or 
basketball courts in the 1095 Capital 
Improvements Plan, he said. 

If the neighborhood around 
Goodnow Park aaya y*i to the 
court. It will be built. If the court Is 
rejected. Parks and Flecrealion wHI 
tmmedialeiy begin boking at placing 
a half court in CICo park 



► BILL THAT WOULD INCREASE SCHOOL BUDGETS SENT TO COMMITTEE 



TOPEKA (AP) — The House 
rejected Senate amendments to a 
bill making changes in the 1992 
Sctiool Oistnct Finance and Quality 
Performance Act, sending It to a 
conference committee to resolve dif- 
ferences on Monday. 

Named as House members o( 



the conference committee were 
Reps Rochelle Chronister. R- 
Neodesha: Ger>e Shore. R -Johnson; 
and Bill Reardon. O-Kansas City. 
Chronister will serve as chairwoman 
of the conference committee 
because it is a House biH. 

TTie Senate did rK>t name its corv- 



ference members Monday. 

The t»ll woukl increase tt»a per- 
pupil budgets ol sdwoi distrKts from 
S3,600 to S3.621 lor all school dis- 
tricts and give larger school distrk:ts 
an additional S43.15 per student 
under a 'high-enrollment' weighting 
proivMon. 



► COMMIHEE DEBATES VALUE OF FARM PROGRAM, VOTES TO KEEP IT 



TOPEKA {AP) — The Senate 
Ways and Means Committee voted 
Monday to save a program that pro- 
vkles financial and legal assistar>ce 
lo troubled farmers and small tHJsi- 
rwsses. 

Some senators wanted lo elimi- 
nate the Farmers Assistance 
Counseling and Training Servk:e. or 
FACTS, from the proposed tiudgets 



lor government agrk:ullure programs 
for fiscal year t996, which begins 
July 1. 

FACTS was established during 
ttw mid-ldBOs as a response to the 
trouMed rural economy Critics con- 
lend Ihe program has outlived its 
usefulness. 

Bui a Ways and Means subcom- 
mittee concluded that the program 



still has vaJue and had saved more 
than 6S0 farms since 1986 

The committee had made the 
same rei»>mmandation before, but 
ttw Senate returned ttw bll to com- 
mittee two weeks ago, after financ- 
ing the FACTS program became 
e»ntroversiaJ. 

The committee's vote Monday 
was 8-2. 



<^ Police reports ^Bulletin board.;' 



li|ia(iwM 




K-OTAHPoua 



SUNDAY, lUJieH • 

At l:OT >.m., Siri Black* 
•rivind flf tm uoeii ol tn llbt>> "b^ 
MMO* la Mom tlill itma Firmer 
WH taatd ID be in poucuion of druj 
puiphemftlJA and hAlliicinD|ciiJc 
(ki)|i. ftnmr wb ■noted ud UkM 
isMlcyCaaMyldL 

At 3:10 i.ni., Bridfcii Poner, 
Moore H«ll ittll memter. iilviied of 
( (titiject yelllnf olitcCDiliei init 
pundiini the etetta dp«. Ttw ume 
Mibject tuj been involved in ia ewli- 
tt incident the day txtorE. The 
ropondini olTlcer wu uiuMe to fbid 

RILEY COUNTY POUa 



Al i-lt p. a.. Brl*a Turtle. 
Haynuket Til. adviiad a( crimliul 
dunafc lo pcopcfty on his llfht-bltie 
1991 Acuta liuetn. 

Al 8 3S p.m.. the Riley Coynly 
Police rtqnctKd uiitunct with ■ 
ftfht (I North Manhattan and 
Bluenont avenuei. Rilty Coanty 
called back aiiij requctted oflken Id 
monitor five male subjecti tn that 
area walkiiif tovaid ThwMMi Stniel. 
AU five wcte appaftntty diuttk. 



ANNOUHCIMINTS IHH^B^i^HHMi 

AppHottsM tor ana and tdtnta ambnudort an available in Ihe 
dtwi't (ifTtce. Ap(Micalion« art due at 3 p m. Mafcli 16 ' 

Appllcalioqa for human ecolofj aiDbaaaadoi^ art available al tlw (rool 
deak in luuin Hall. They arr dix March 17 al the lante location. 

Hdp M laiarwUoaal Kiadmt wHh <polten Eoflith and Icain liruhand 
ihout iitltttM oilurei Be i volunteei lulor Tor the Conwrulional En|li>h 
Profrun. Qhiijci Jim Endriui ar the laumatJonaJ Stttdent Center. J12'6MS« 

Caruar aad EnplajDwiit Serr ka a will cortduct a leaume twildinl wort^ 
dwp at J 30 tofliftH in Union 206 



BULLKTINS 



SUNDAY, MARCH S I 

At 12:16 pm., Annttle 
Chritijanion. 24 IS Charloii Lane. 
re<)uc»ied tp meet with tomeone 
tcfaidint a dO| in ttet irath. The offl- 
oer couhl not locate the dof . 

Al 7:21 p.m.. a vehicle injury 
iccideM wti npoiMd al Sedi Chikk 
•nd Farm Bureau roadt between 
Chad Pmcolt. S30 Dondee l>tiva, 

MONDAY, MARCH • I 

A( 11:42 a.m.. criminal dam^ie 
u propeity w»» nponed. The victim* 
weit Equine CkKhicrv 1 13 5 Fouiih 
St., and Dollar General Sun. J2I S 
Founli St. Ctamaft wai dime to the 
walli and dixin of both location! 
Total kxi wat tlOQ. 



and Shelly Aleiinder. 109 Redbud 
EfXalcs. A major .darrufe. injitfy acci^ 
dem report wat filed- 

Ai 9:1] p m., Jondihon Butlen. 
Die N. Manhattan Ave., wat itaued 
a notice to appear for untawful uae of 
a Kaaiaa driver^i liccnaa at Fatt 
Eddy'a. 



At 3:21 am.. Jerri Gillian. 1021 
LcavenwortK St.. reported a pait tmr- 
glary. Taken from hit 1994 Ford 
pickup wai a Mainavoi portable 
coRipael diic player and t CD. Lou 
wutll6 



■ HablUI ror HuBianlly will 
meet al 9 lonifhl in the Union Bit S 
Room. 

■ The Society ror Ike 
AdTBncemeiit of Ma ms im eu t will 
meet ii ^ tonight in Union 2 II 

■ Ediieatl«a Cauacll »ftm 
baaae commitlcca will meet at 1 
t(ini|hi in Bluemint 106 

■ Newly Initiated itvcmlMfi a( 
Merlar Board will meet al 6 
toniibi in tJninn 213. 

■ Swdal Work Orianlaaltan 
will meet at 7 tonight in Union 205 



■ Alpha Phi OoMfli will riMd 
m R:30 toniitii in Ihe Unkm council 
chamben. 

■ HIapaalc Amrrtcin 
Leadcr^ilp OrtaaluUH will meet 
al 6 30 ion I ght in (he Ecumenical 
Camput Miniury buiidin|, 

■ CIrck K lulcmatloaal will 
meet ai 9 lonigN in Union 204 

■ PM Alpha TImM will meet at 
7 lonifhl in Eitenhower 015 for a 
lecture and diicuuian with Scr^i 
Khruthchev about the rulure of tfle 
RuMian foundation. 



The Kansas Slate Collegtan 
(USPS291020), asludeni 
newspaper at Kansas State 
Univarsity, is pubilshed by 
Sludint Pubications Inc.. 
KMzil Ml 103, Manhattan. 
Kan., 6^06 The CoHegian is 
puUtehed weekdays during the 
sdvMl year and once a wMk 
Birough tt>e summer Second- 



class postage is p^ al 
Manhattar. Kan . 66502. 
POSTMASTER Send 
address ctianges to Kansas 
State Collegian, circulation 
dssit, Kedzie 103, Manh^tan, 
Kan. 66506-7167. 



OKmsu Stale Colegivi. 1996 



Weather 



YESTERDAY'S HICHS AND LOWS 



State Outlook 

Light snow in the east early. Otherwise 
sunny west, clearing east. Highs in 
the mid-20& to the lower 30s. 



nUSSELL 

mi 



IMNUrTMl 
3404 



SAUNA 



TOPEKA 
3S/32 



KANSAS 

CrTY 
V3S/32 




• DENVER 

29a> 



• msA 

6IM1 



» OMAHA 
2402 



COfFEmiE 
SVtl • 



•St LOUIS 
41137 



Manhattan Outlook 
TODAY I^HHHI^H^ 

A 20-percent chance 

for light snow early 
then becoming mostly 
sunny. High anxjnd 25. 



Mostly sunny and not 
as cotd. Highs Irom 35 
to 40. 






?5Bfci"^ 




E 




ix'^ 


"Bui he doers of the Ubrd, and not hearen 
onlv. deceiving yovnelves. 

.Jame«l:22 



I Earn up to $90 





UI^ITI 




KIS 



klZZ] 



Auditions tor four parts tn this year's K-State Recailtment Video. 

Need four students, college or high school students, 

who could pass for high school seniors. Each part will pay $100 

and probably require only one day of shooting. Auditions are open 

and will run from 1 p.m. to 6 p.m., Mar. 8, at Bob Dole hall. 

Call Jim Kinser at 532-7041 , for more details. 

■ ■■■■■■■■■MMMMMMMllllir 



rake Service 
e'JS traighte ning 




Bob WestgaUAuto Repair 

$10 Hayes Dr.-Behind Wabnart 

m 



776-4239 



7^(7^MUFFLER HOUSE 

I V "Our business is exhausting" 

MUFFLERS & TAILPIPES 

DUAL SYSTEIVIS 

AUTOS (American & Foreign) 

RV$ LIGHT & HEAVY DUTY TRUCKS 

CUSTOM PIPE BENDING 

COMPLETE BRAKE SERVICE FOR 

AMERICAN, FOREIGN, & LIGHT TRUCKS 

SHOCK ABSORBERS & STRUTS 

ROSE HOUSE OF TINT 

"If it's glass, we can tint it" 

GLASS TINTING SERVICES AVAILABLE 

FOR YOUR AUTO, HOME OR BUSINESS 

FREE ESTIMATES 

Mon.-Fri. 7:30 a.nn.-5:30 p.m. Sat. 8 a.m.-Noon; 

2049 Ft. Riley Blvd. 
776-8055 or 1-800-439-8956 



Mo?;ferCard 




U-HAUL TRUCK & TRAILER RENTALS 

DAILY, LOCAL & ONE-WAY RATES 

776-5037 — Same Location 



PHILLIPS 



Helget's 66 & Auto Service 



Ron i Trtcy H»lg§t, Owntrm 
Dav» Cavmw*, Shop Ugr. 



1629 PoyntzAve. 

Manhattan, KS 66502 

(913) 537-2480 



ML CHANGE 

tnctudes lubricating of irtovlng 
parts. Oil and fitter additional 
charge. Must be purchased 
through Halget's 66. (Most cars 
and light trucks.) 



BRAKE CHECKS 



*8 



I 



I 
I 

! fMUTECMUiE 

lAnuFmiimcnoN 
I 



We'll pull all four wheels 

and inspect your brake 

pads and shoes. 



J 



15.95 



>25 



IWa'll chack your brahas, under 
carriage, betls. hoeea, tirM, thodrs, 
I front and, flulda, wiper bladet, 
exhaust and electrical eyttemel I and riuMt axtra. Mutl b% puVchasM 
I (Moet cars and tructc.) 



LM <M (train and r«WI your tranamistlon ■ 

to k««p youi cat In lop perlofmlng I 

condltton and (hitting smoothly. |Pai1i ■ 

ttroughHaiaaraee.) 



J^ 



•KANSAS STOT COLLEGIAN 



Tfa««d«K March 7, IMg ^ 



► RILEY COUNTY 



News of oil spill slow to filter 



CaUcfiM 

, Poor communication kept Riley 
County officials from hearing about 
an oil spill near Leonardville until 
almost a month after the accident 
happened. 

On Jan. 5. 350 barrels of No. 2 
ttie\ oil, the type of fuel used to heat 
boilers, was spilled southwest of 
H^onardvillc. 

In late January, Riley County 
officials first found out about the 
spill through gossip, Pat Collins. 
Riley County emergency manage- 
ment coordinator, said. 

On Feb. 10, the Riley County 
public works department received 
an accident report from the National 
Cooperative Rcfmery Association, 
Collins said. 

According to the NCRA accident 
report, at 10:30 a.m., the NCRA 
products pipeline pump station at 
Blue Rapids went down on a low- 
suction alarm. 

At 10:50 a.m., William Peterson 

■ called the NCRA products pipeline 

: office at Blue Rapids. One of 

: Peterson's bulldozers had hit the 

pipeline, according to the report. 



Peterson had been building a 
pond in a pasture for the landowner. 
Wesley Llewelyn. Several pump 
stations were then shut down to pre- 
vent any nK>re pnxluct spillage, the 
report said. 

At 10:52, products pipeline per- 
sonnel left the Blue Rapids station 
to close down the pipeline on both 
sides of the accident. They were on 
the scene less than an hour later. 

The oil was contained in the 
pond, Greg Crawford, director of 
public information for the Kansas 
Department of Health and 
Environment, said. 

Two NCRA tanker trucks came 
to the accident site and vacuumed 
340 barrels of oil from the pond, 
Crawford said. 

Nineteen 4 -cubic -foot bags of 
sphag sorb were placed in the pond 
area to soak up the rest of the oil, 
according to the report. The NCRA 
repaired the pipeline on Jan. 6. 

On Jan. 10, 280 cubic yards of 
saturated soil was moved and 
spread about 2 inches thick over a 
lOO-foot-by-450-fooi section of 
field to bake in the sun. 

The pond bottom and the saturat- 



ed soil will be sprayed with organ- 
isms that eat hydrocarbons, accord- 
ing to the report. Peterson had not 
attempted to call the Kansas One- 
Call System Inc. at 1-800-DIG- 
SAFE or the NCRA before the dig- 
ging started, the repon said. 

Llewelyn told Peterson that the 
pipeline was 200 yards farther north 
of the pond where the accident hap- 
pened, the report said. 

The NCRA reported the accident 
to the Kansas Department of Health 
and Environment, Collins said 

By KDHE guidelines, if the 
KDHE had not been notified, there 
would have been fines to pay, 
Crawford said. 

"If it had not been cleaned up, 
enforcement would have been 
undertaken," Crawford said. 

The news of the accident was not 
disseminated to the county though, 
Collins said. 

"It's a public education prob- 
lem," Collins said. 

If the 911 emergency number 
had been called, the people at 91 1 
would have informed the county 
emergency staff and the KDHE. 
Collins said. 



Students say fee singles them out 



CONTINUED FROM PAGE I 

The first is the need for com- 
puter e(]uipmcnt, which is being 
taken care of through re-allocation 
of other funding, he said. 

The second is the need for an 
expansion in facilities, which is 
being taken care of through a task 
force led by Richter. Coffman 
said. 

"These needs are attended to 
effectively or in the process of 
being attended to," Coffman said. 

Coffman said the problems 
arose when fmding a solution to 
the problem of funding an addi- 
tional clerical staff for the center. 

"We looked at .several alterna- 
tives," he said. "The fee started at 



S20 a semester, but then we decid- 
ed it might create more money 
than needed." 

Many students said they 
believed they were being singled 
out to pay this fee because they 
arc foreigners. 

Coffman said this was not true. 

"The rationale for the fee for 
international students is related to 
the fact that additional services 
were rendered in support for inter- 
national students that don't affect 
everyone else," he said, 

Navin Nagiah, graduate student 
in cleclncal engineering, said he 
was worried about the symbolism 
of the $15 fee but also about the 
bad public relations associated 



with it. 

"It's almost as if now there's 
going to be an in-state, out-of- 
state and out-of-country fee." 
Nagiah said. 

Coffman said those types of 
problems had been addressed. 

"There's been a mark increase 
in international students, but 
there's also been a marked 
increase in costs as well," he said 

"We're not singling out a pop- 
ulation but addressing a need," 
Coffman said. 

Scott said there is some possi- 
bility that many departments on 
campus will chose to pay the $15 
for the students in their depart- 
ments. 




Snowbound 



MARK t^lFnnOWIU/Oitogian 



Indllring Mondiy nlghft tnow storm, a student wltli «n umbrella Iraka scroas camptJt naar 
Andcraon Hall. Tha snow la axpactad to taper off aarly today. The forecast calls for mostly surtny 
skies with a high of 25 degrees. 



► CITY 



Target not building store in Manliattan 



•ramiivouiM 

Collttilll 

Target, a nationwide discount 
retailer, will not be coming to 
Manhattan anytime soon. 

Daiyle Frank, manager of Frank's 
Mobile Home Sales, decided not to 
sell any of his property for the projccL 

For Target to have enough land to 
build, purchasing private property in 
the mobile home park would have 
been necessary, said Jerry Petty, 
Manhattan's director of community 
development. 

Frank said he would have had to 
sell two or three acres, 

Russell Johnson, the real-estate 
developer who had been looking for 
land suitable for Target, said Frank's 
decision was based on the uncertainty 
and length of the dealings between the 
city and himself 

Frank said the developers of the 
Target project first approached him in 



mid-October 

The subject was on the city com- 
mission's agenda in early December 
but was called off at 4 p.m. the day of 
the meeting, Frank said. 

A new offer was made Jan. 3, he 
said. Eventually, the city and Johnson 
ran into their problems, 

"Mr. Petty agreed that it would be 
three or four months before they hail a 
decision." Frwik said. 

He said he is not opposed to Target 
coming in. However, he did not want 
to make residenLs of his park wait on 
an outcome any longer, Frank said. 

Anywhere from 32 to 45 homes 
would have been displaced, Frank 
said. 

The price of the city's land kept the 
city and Johnson from closing the 
deal, Johnson said. 

"Basically, the property owned by 
the city was not immediately available 
at a good price," Johason said "It was 



my understanding that the property 
could be sold for industrial purposes 
at $8,000 an acre." 

Johnson wanted to buy the land 
contingent upon it being re-zoned for 
commercial retail use. Petty said. 

The city instead decided to sell the 
property at a nnarket value appropriate 
for commercial use, Petiy said. 

The fair value of the land was 
determined to be about $42,000 per 
acre. Petty said. 

"Commercially zoned land is 
worth a lot more than industrially 
zoned land." Petty said 

Target is not interested in any other 
sites in Manhattan, Johnson said, 
because Target is requiring that their 
land be near the mall. 

A 100.000-square-foot store would 
take about eight acres of land, he said. 
The industrial-park site is the only one 
near the mall (hat is the right size, 
Johnson said. 



\\ \ 




LA-FEME 

WOMEN'S CLINIC 

Women's Health Care Services 

—Birth Control Information/Prescriptions 

— Pregnancy Testin^Counseling/Referrals 
—Routine Gynecological Exams 
—Sexually Transmitted Disease 
Testing/Information 

532-6554 

Lafene Health Center 
Kansas State University 



IB^ 



SOFTBALL AND INDIVIDUAL SPORTS 

INTRAMURAL ENTRY DEADLINE 

Thursday, March 9, 5 p.m. 
at the Rec Complex- Rec Services Office 



leetlng ^*S^*^ 



MANDATORY 

SOFTBALL 

Captain's/ Manager's Meeting ^ 

Wednesday, March 15, 5 p.m. .. j*'**^^Ski^ 
Union Forum Hall ** ^* 




SOFTBALL UMPIRES WANTED 

Must attend both clinics: 

Monday, March 13, 6:30 p.m. 
K-State Union, Room 212 

Tuesday, March 14, 5 p.m. 

Rec Complex 
MAKE EXTRA CASHfll 



y^ 



In the Staterooin 

March 6-10 ' 
10:30a~1:30p 

chi c keN 
/hAck 



MENU 

Fried Chicken 

2pa»rte ».... 

2 pa dark 

SawtyCliJiai 

2paclark {lB9 

GiUeis 
l^ffQEsrds} $139 

and Graw $0.75 

VfldFfceaend.„ $0.75 

Bread Dressiig $0.75 

Seasoned ^een Beans $0.75 



K-Stato Union 



FoodServIc* 



MEAL DEAL $3.29 
Choice of Ofw Entree 

2 Pieces of Chichen 

Fried Of Savofy 

•or- 

Gi)let$ 
Choice of Two Skies 

Mashed Potatoes 

Wild Rice Biend 

Bread Dressing 

Seasoned Green Beans 




congratulations! 

to the members of 

Mortar Board National Senior Honor Society 

1995-1996 



Sherry Ahtgrim 
Ann Arnold 
Chad Asmus 
Crysul Bailey 
Jetl Ann Blain 
Megan Bolinder 
Jennifer Bradley 
Hayley Sriel 
Brian BuCord 



Kyle Campbell 
Carrie Cox 
JodI Dawson 
Mdanie Ebert 
Amy Gates 
Gregory Cehrt 
Martth Cilmore 
Terri rfarris 
Brian Hesse 
Itsa Hofer 



Colby lonev 

Elizabeth King 

Natalie Lefiman 

Ctint Leonard 

I 
Kfisten ^|lcCrath 

Shantfe' l^toerfe 

^jnnberly Mo^er 



Greg Roth 



Raymond Schiererecke 
Marvin Schlatter 
Sarah Schroeder 
Michael Seyfert 
fttricia Stamm 
loe Stein 
KeHy Strain 
Katie Thomas 
Kimberly Thompson 
Catherine Williams 



GRADUATION FAIR 



Get the tassel with less hassle 

March7,8&9 ^ 

Bachelor Apparel Special 

Includes cap, gown & tassel 

$14.95 



Baifoui: 



Personalized Announcements 

$29.95 

K-State Union Bookstore 

10 a.m. -4g.m. 

Shop at the store that gives back to yout 






I K-State Union 
! Bookstore 532-6583 



ItiKluinr :t|ipiiri'l. <>riulii;i1ion niHtoiiiKi-tiHiKs. ilavs rinuv mimkI t>iii>rsiii'fl Ht|>lottt;iv. ;iiul imtrc \\\\\ Ih< 

lie lor fMHiliiiX'. (■rucliiiilr sliidiitto Jtiil hitiiltv tiuttihti s iiuiv itrilri ui*:iilii:ilii)ii ;i|)|>ai tl. Rt-|)rr<si'iil^uit i'>> 

lit ill Imn -. It.tlliMif . Vri( .irvtil, I raiiuct Mi iiiiiri< <., * iilliui:it(' < ill) tJi l.imn \^ill Ik im tiiitiil l»> Ms-isi mhi. 




^ Ifiltf Itl Stal* 



PINION 



N. Stewm Aodentm 

UMfOR Crittioa lanBcy 

..»,.•. t • . Robin Kidcha^tr 

Mut UAinewdl 

Ude 




OiriMy 

SifftllBif ftlffll 
■^eOUIOUUI nnwi Mike BuKh 



.•...SenUTU 
AU/rUTUMt IMTML . . Am Zieglff 

■MMin niTM ..,....., mil Sni 

MtfNKt IWTM , . . . . TlriJhl Bciilai* 

COPY CMV DiwObM 

CITY'«OV. IMTM Mike Mtrlett 

uKt. worn WBmm ..... iemti Cohan 
...Mib 




. Ryadell Uttk 
. . . JiD DoBois 
.AarooGniwa 
Katiuyo Kenw 
. Roo Jotui^i 
Glofu FrMtud 



In Our Opinion 



by the CoUegian Editorial Board 



Group's views, content shouldn't affect funding 



l««lHd»iit 



Nudity and sexual content was enough 
to cause some student senators to balk at 
ftindiog Metazine, a campus ma